Daemen College Academic Festival

A Celebration of Academic Achievement, April 20, 2011.

Chris Matthews

Chris Matthews is the host of "Hardball with Chris Matthews," Monday through Friday on MSNBC (5 and 7 PM EST). Matthews is also the host of The Chris Matthews Show, a syndicated weekly news program produced by NBC News and distributed by NBC Universal Television Distribution. Mr. Matthews is a regular commentator on NBC's "Today" show.

A television news anchor with remarkable depth of experience, Matthews has distinguished himself as a broadcast journalist, newspaper bureau chief, Presidential speechwriter, and best-selling author. Matthews covered the fall of the Berlin Wall, the first all-races election in South Africa and the Good Friday Peace Talks in Northern Ireland. In 1997 and 1998, his digging in the National Archives produced a series of San Francisco Examiner scoops on the Nixon presidential tapes. Matthews has covered American presidential election campaigns since 1988, including the five-week recount of 2000. In 2005 Matthews covered the funeral of Pope John Paul II.

In March 2004, he received the David Brinkley Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism. He has also been awarded The Abraham Lincoln Award from the Union League of Philadelphia and in 2005 he received the Gold Medal Award from the Pennsylvania Society.

Matthews worked for 15 years as a print journalist, 13 of them as Washington Bureau Chief for The San Francisco Examiner (1987 - 2000), and two years as a national columnist for The San Francisco Chronicle, which was syndicated to 200 newspapers by United Media.

Prior to that, Matthews spent 15 years in politics and government, working in the White House for four years under President Jimmy Carter as a Presidential speechwriter and on The Presidents Reorganization Project; in the U.S. Senate for five years on the staffs of Senator Frank Moss (Utah) and Senator Edmund Muskie (Maine); and as the top aide to Speaker of the House Thomas P. Tip ONeill, Jr. for six years.

Matthews is the author of four best-selling books, including American: Beyond Our Grandest Notions (2002), a New York Times best seller. His first book, Hardball (1988) is required reading in many college-level political science courses. Kennedy & Nixon (1996) was named by The Readers Digest Today's Best Non-fiction and served as the basis of a documentary on the History Channel. Now, Let me Tell What I Really Think (2001) was another New York Times best-seller.

A graduate of Holy Cross College, Matthews did graduate work in economics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Matthews also worked for two years as a trade development advisor with the U.S. Peace Corps in the southern African nation of Swaziland.

Matthews was a visiting fellow at Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government, Institute of Politics. He holds 16 honorary Ph.D.s.

Jeffrey Stott

Jeffrey Stott, Executive Vice President of Production Management at Castle Rock Entertainment, 1988-2002, will speak at the 2011 Daemen College Academic Festival. Stott's talk, "Entrepreneurship: From a History Degree to Making Movies," will be the second presentation in the Nancy Haberman Gacioch Entrepreneurship Lecture Series,which seeks to highlight success stories, and provide incentives, for individuals in the area of business entrepreneurship.

Jeffrey Stott (Executive Producer) has collaborated with Rob Reiner since Reiner's directorial debut, "This is Spinal Tap." The film went on to capture the hearts of critics and audiences alike and was followed up with the equally successful films "The Sure Thing," "Stand by Me" and "The Princess Bride," on which Stott was associate producer.

His long association with Reiner continued through the formation of Reiner's company, Castle Rock Entertainment. During his tenure there as Executive Vice President of Production Management, Stott oversaw the production of more than 80 films and served as executive producer on "The American President," "Ghosts of Mississippi," "The Story of Us" and "Alex & Emma," and Reiner's "The Bucket List," starring Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman.

Stott's credits as a co-producer include the classic "When Harry Met Sally"; "Misery," for which Kathy Bates won an Academy Award for Best Actress; and "A Few Good Men," which earned Jack Nicholson an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor. His additional credits include "Murder By Numbers" and "Dolores Claiborne."

While at Castle Rock, Stott also served as the executive in charge of production on the hit TV series "Seinfeld."

Stott's recent productions include the comedy "Fat Albert," for director Joel Zwick, and the remake of "The Omen," directed by John Moore, "Marmaduke" for 20th Century Fox, and most recently "Drive" scheduled for release in September 2011 and starring Ryan Gosling and Cary Mulligan.

He holds an M.A. in history from Brigham Young University and a Ph.D. in history from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Presenations

"Il était une fois..."

Terri Bierasinski
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
RIC 120

Fairy tales have existed across cultures and across history, first as oral tales and then as a written literary genre. This began in Italy with Giovanni Francesco Straparola’s Le piacevoli notti  and then Giambattista Basile’s Il Pentamerone. The literary fairy tale gained popularity in 17th century France, having roots in these works and in tales included in Asinus aureus by Apuleius and Decameron by Boccacio. The modern versions of Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast have evolved through the centuries from these tales. By examining the different literary and film adaptations of fairy tales that were once considered entertainment for adults, one can better understand how society has evolved, particularly in France, from the Middle Ages to the 1900’s.

2011 Responses and Reflections on the Cigarette Butt Awareness Installation of 2010

Cailey Enright, Alyssa Crane, Jason Tower, C.J. Szatkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Wolf
11:15 am - 4:00 pm
Art Gallery Lobby

Last year students in EDU 311 – Art Materials and Methods: Middle School, created a Cigarette Butt Awareness Installation for Academic Festival. Students gathered thousands of cigarette butts on campus and designed a sculptural work of art that implied the cigarette butts were climbing and entering the cigarette butt receptacle. The goal was to bridge art and education in a way that engaged viewers with a local and global problem—the littering of cigarette butts.

This year, the new students in EDU 311 have analyzed the responses to identify themes and patterns that emerged as part of the artwork. Feedback was individually categorized by the visual and verbal comments. Titles were given to the groups that emerged, and similar items were placed together under each given category. Differing items called for deeper analysis that allowed them to be placed accordingly. The categories that emerged and the conclusions from this analysis will be shared in this poster session/presentation. 

Next year, students will enter Phase III of this project, which will involve an implementation of this installation into local middle schools. Students in EDU 311 will collaborate with a local community and school to reach out and educate them on Cigarette Butt Awareness.

A "Greener" Duns Scotus

Andrew Engelbach-Schafer, Renee M. Retton, Alicia J. Palmatier
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
DS 227

Duns Scotus is a building that was designed in a time when window space was maximized to provide natural light, but generally to the detriment of climate control. Properly designed windows play a key role in achieving energy efficiency in any building; and are also important in the comfort and productivity of building occupants. As we strive to be a “green” college, we should consider whether the windows in Duns Scotus can do more than provide natural light and ventilation, by adding to its energy efficiency. Our group will present possible alternatives on window designs or modifications that may meet this challenge.

A Community of History: The Preservation of Historic Hamlin Park

Jessica Doyle, Meghan Allen
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
DS 11

This presentation explores the field of Public History through the lens of Historic Preservation. It will discuss the attempts of residents and specialists to list Buffalo’s Hamlin Park district on the National Register of Historic Places. The Hamlin Park district is currently going through the application process to be included in the National Registry. This presentation will discuss the process of documenting the features of historically significant sites, with emphasis on the link between buildings and the past. We will also discuss the documents that Preservationists work with and will explain the way these documents are used in Historic Preservation, with special attention on the case study of Hamlin Park.

A Piece of Paper and a Pair of Scissors

Christine Rakowski
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
DS 11

Let us assume that someone wishes to split a piece of land in two equal pieces. However, there exists a point somewhere in the region that is the water source and we wish that point to be on both pieces of land. This kind of problem is exactly what we will be discussing. Given an arbitrary region in the plane and a point in the interior of the region, is it possible for a line to split the region in two sections of equal area? Or in two regions with areas p% and (100 − p)%?

The problem is simple in the case of a symmetrical region. For instance, given any point inside a circle there is always a diameter through this point which will split the circle in two equal sections. If the areas are not to be equal one could find, using methods of Calculus or Geometry, the line with the desired property. The problem complicates multiple-fold just by taking the case of an equilateral triangle and it becomes even more complicated in the case of a scalene triangle.

Alzheimer’s Disease: What is Known and Unknown, a Review of the Current Research

Bianca Gjorgievski
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
RIC 120

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a non-reversible neurological disorder that causes the debilitating loss of mental capacity and cognitive function. Approximately 5.3 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with AD, of which, 5.1 million are aged 65 years or older. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, there are ten signs of the disease; the top two are memory loss that disrupts daily life and challenges in planning or problem solving. Currently, there is no cure for the disease; however, there are a few medications to treat the symptoms. This presentation will discuss the etiology of AD and prevalence rates by demographics, such as age, gender, race, and socioeconomic status, as well as the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this disease. There are two main risk factors directly correlated to AD; family genetics and age. This presentation will discuss all of the risk factors, both modifiable and non-modifiable, associated with development of AD. The latest research on AD, including treatment and interventions, will be reviewed, and existing programs and efforts currently underway will be discussed.

Concentrations of MTBE in Egg Contents of Scyliorhinus Canicula and the Possible Effects on Embryonic Development

Abby Cryan
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
DS 11

Scyliorhinus canicula, the lesser spotted dogfish, is a commercially exploited marine shark found in coastal European waters. As an oviparous species, the dogfish performs internal fertilization and then releases a resilient egg case, composed of varying collagen fibers, into the seawater. Through the stages of development, the embryo may be exposed to a variety of chemicals, including heavy metal ions and toxic molecules found in runoff from everyday human activities. As the global economy continues to develop, petroleum continues to be a cornerstone for several economies. Petroleum, or crude oil, contains different portions of hydrocarbons with varying boiling points. Some of these elements including benzene and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) are particularly toxic to the environment. Drinking water can be contaminated with only twenty micrograms per liter of MTBE. Its ability to readily dissolve in water makes it a large concern during an oil spill to humans and marine organisms. This experiment will analyze the concentration of MTBE in egg contents of S. canicula and determine the possible effects on embryonic development.

DC Service Learning 2011: República Dominicana

Abby Cryan, Sarah Velarde, Molly Tyrrell, Stephanie Czaja, Rachel Hezel, Carly Sno, April Furman, Lisa Truscott, Chris Race, Kane Eaton, Kristen Busch, Amanda Karwick, Megan Hendel
Faculty Sponsor:
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Wick 113-115

Over the intersemester break, fourteen students traveled to the Dominican Republic to partake in a prodigious service learning experience. During the two week undertaking, the students developed a greater understanding of the Dominican culture, history, and people. Another significant, yet less expected, outcome of the experience was that the students simultaneously learned a great deal about themselves. These students underwent a change in their world view and in their concept of who they are as American citizens. In their work with the people of Hato Mayor, the students felt tremendous pride and accomplishment through serving and getting to know a community in need. Working side-by-side with community members, the students assisted in the construction of a long-awaited community center for Hato Mayor's women's group. They also presented educational workshops on health and business-related topics.

This service learning trip had a positive effect on all who were involved, and will leave a lasting impact on their hearts and minds. Several participants have voiced a newly-developed interest in continuing a pursuit of both service learning and study abroad experiences. Please join us as we take you through our experience in the communities of Santo Domingo and Hato Mayor in the Dominican Republic. We believe we left a true impact on the community we served, but more profoundly, we know we were left permanently changed through our experience.

Entrepreneurship: From a History Degree to Making Movies

Jeffrey Stott
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Rosen
1:00 pm - 1:50 pm
Alumni Lounge

Jeffrey Stott, Executive Vice President of Production Management at Castle Rock Entertainment, 1988-2002, will speak at the 2011 Daemen College Academic Festival.  Stott’s talk, "Entrepreneurship: From a History Degree to Making Movies," will be the second presentation in the Nancy Haberman Gacioch Entrepreneurship Lecture Series, which seeks to highlight success stories, and provide incentives for individuals in the area of business entrepreneurship. 

Future of Transportation: Hybrid Technology

Nathan Costello, Shaniqua Wiggins, Renee Austin
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 227

The current demand for traditional energy sources needed to supply the power for transportation is on the rise. With the world developing at a rapid rate, the finite resources we currently depend on will soon be either depleted or scarce to the point  where prices become unaffordable. China and India, the two most populous nations, are increasing their Gross Domestic Product (GDP) every day as  their citizens demand the American lifestyle. A rise in the demand for fuel to supply the energy required is becoming more difficult to acquire. Since most of the energy devoted to transportation needs are fossil fuels, different avenues need to be explored to assure our lifestyles will remain intact with a probable shortage of oil in the future. Developing and implementing the hybrid technologies is the best way to bridge the gap until the best renewable energy source for transportation can be developed. Hybrid vehicles will help decrease the global community’s consumption of the dwindling oil supply and bide more time to develop other technologies, such as fuel cells, bio-fuels, and hydrogen.

Greek Speak

Kirsten Sharp, Emily Grabowski, Heather Prinsen, Jill Spytman, Alyssa Serba, Elaine Mills, Fiona Burzynski, Maria Corio, Hector Castillo, Brendan Altman-Cosgrove, Mitchell Altman-Cosgrove, Lonijae Simonton, Troy Anderson, Theresa Tripi
Faculty Sponsor:
10:45 am - 11:45 am
Schenck 202

This presentation will portray the relationship among all Greeks on campus. As a team, we will demonstrate what each organization stands for and what we all represent together. In an effort to try and eliminate negative images created by media, each sorority and fraternity will show how we are different from the stereotypical image. We will address the most important aspects that we, as Greeks, feel need to be addressed. The topics that will be addressed are as follows:

  • Anti-Hazing/ The Gordy Foundation. By Sigma Omega Chi - A presentation on how Greek organizations do not participate and also try to prevent any illegal hazing activities that may affect the Daemen community at large.
  • Community Service. By Lambda Chi Iota - A presentation on the different ways Greeks not only interact with, but give back to their surrounding community (Daemen College, Buffalo, Amherst etc) and rally to gain support for charities.
  • Underage Drinking. By Delta Phi Mu - A presentation on underage drinking and what Greeks can do to prevent the activity and any disasters resulting from alcohol abuse.
  • Diversity. By Psi Xi Omicron - A presentation on how Greeks accept all types of people without discrimination and implementing Daemen’s Diversity Plan.
  • Networking. By Omega Epsilon Zeta - A presentation highlighting where Greeks are found on campus in various other clubs, organizations and leadership roles. Also showing connections between alumni and students can create opportunities.

Learning Chinese - My Experience

Carrie Skellen, Jen Williams, Ian Daniels
Faculty Sponsor: Yi-Tung Wu
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
RIC 120

With over 1.3 billion speakers world wide, Chinese is the world’s most commonly spoken language. Mandarin Chinese is one of the official languages of the United Nations as well as a major language of business. Having the ability to speak and understand basic Chinese is an advantage that students should take into consideration. In my presentation, I will share my own experience from the classroom and reasons why I chose to study the Chinese language. This presentation will also reveal why this language is becoming increasingly important to study. A video of our learning process will be shown, with topics that include: meeting new people, providing personal information, making appointments, ordering food, asking for directions, and making travel plans. The purpose of this presentation is to encourage others to learn the language that is quickly sweeping the globe.

Marketing on YouTube

Katherine Kapanek, Prince Akyeampong, Shaunette Archer, Gregory Cobb, Joshua Ector, Anthony Gabel, Lynn Kane, Alanna Laguerre, Marc Lambert, John Nurse, Chris Race, Kevin Sealey, Anthony Sieber, Nathan Tovornick, John Vecchio , Isaac Villa, Crystal Woody ,
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wick Lobby

The MKT 420, Strategic Marketing, class will be presenting a collaborative YouTube project that addresses three main topics: The Waterfront (New Creative Class), Green Initiative (Vision and Economics) and International Business (Globalization and Culture). Four YouTube videos have been created under each topic, comprising images, interviews, and statistics relevant to each. The idea is to raise awareness of these issues and relate them to the future of not only Daemen College, but the WNY community as a whole. Students have conducted interviews of local business leaders, government leaders, and school faculty to gain insight on these topics, which were then uploaded to YouTube in order to gain attention and awareness via Internet.

Possible Ways to Make Duns Scotus More Energy Efficient

Danielle Budzinski, Morgan Devitt, Jackie Ralph, Jaime Mund
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
DS 227

Our presentation will investigate the possibility of using thermal insulation and other alternatives as means to transforming Duns Scotus into a more energy efficient building. We hope to identify key inefficiencies using data and student observations of the current thermal conductivities of various parts of the building’s outer structure. Once the prime areas are identified, we plan to discuss simple, cost-effective alternatives that may exist to mitigate the energy losses. Efficient use of energy is important and can reduce operating costs and make Daemen College more sustainable.

The Danger of Soft Drinks to America's Health

Sara Wells
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
RIC 120

Food is a huge part of peoples’ lives; are their gulping of beverages just as huge? People don’t always pay attention to the drinks they consume or the adverse affects of consuming them. Most beverages aren’t healthy, even if they boast about containing vitamins and antioxidants. This is a huge problem because not many people think about the calories, sugar, and fat they consume in their beverages. America is obese and many consumers are not properly educated about the drinks they consume as a contributor to obesity. This presentation will discuss how these unhealthy beverages are contributing to America's obesity epidemic. I will reveal comparisons of local grocery and convenient store drink choices, including options, prices, nutritional values, and variety. This presentation will reveal the true nutritional value, or lack-there-of, of society's most notorious beverage choices and what effects they have on the body. Upon revealing these statistics, I will also discuss what kind of moral and ethical responsibility the food and beverage industry holds toward its consumers.

The Design Garage

Jonathan Milligan, Miranda Roth, Kyle Pelczynski, Bo Jiang
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Kegler
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
DS 136

Daemen College has given selected graphic design students an opportunity to work on a Think Tank project, designing promotional materials for the campus. In this collaboration between students and faculty, we have discovered many aspects of the professional design world. Some of the key skills we’ve developed include time management, problem solving, communication, and working with strict deadlines in order to produce quality end products. In the fall semester, we were successful in completing promotional material for the Visual and Performing Arts Department and an exhibition card for the Fanette Goldman Carolyn Greenfield Gallery. This semester, we have been working on RIC signage as well as an identity for the Daemen College Sustainability Program. Throughout our presentation, we will display physical and digital examples of the progression of each assigned project and what we have learned along the way.

The Magic Number e

Anthony Mussari, Anthony Tonsoline
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
DS 11

Developed in the Eighteenth Century by Leonahard Euler, a Swiss mathematician, e is a unique number with many applications. One of these applications is the derivation of a model which can be used for calculating natural growth and decay cycles with remarkable accuracy. A demonstration of how this model can be exploited will be offered in this presentation. This demonstration will consist of a brief formulation of the exponential model, after which, some applications of this model will be addressed with reference to Population Growth, Continuously Compounded Interest, Drug Elimination, and Radioactive Decay given an initial condition or constraint.

Transportation 2050: Diesel Fueled Engines

Gabhriel Kohlbrenner, Alyssa Shone Megan Hovey
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 227

This presentation will focus on the transportation of the future. Because of increasing gas prices, modifications of old fuels and alternative fuels for  transportation are being scrutinized. We will be evaluating and comparing the viability of diesel, clean diesel, and biodiesel fuels to power cars. Diesel is a petroleum based fuel oil that has a higher energy density than traditional gasoline and clean diesel has a lower emission specification, meaning it emits fewer pollutants when burned. Biodiesel is a non-petroleum based fuel, making it a cleaner-burning alternative. Our evaluation will compare the composition, emissions and environmental impact, efficiency, renewability, practicality, as well as the overall benefits for each alternative fuel use.

Transportation 2050: Electric Cars

Andrew Stapleton, Lindsay Peterson, Kearsten Renzi
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 227

The possibility of driving a fully electric car is fast becoming a reality in the United States. Essentially, electric cars use only energy stored in batteries, currently Lithium ion or NiCad batteries, to power the motor instead of petroleum based fuels.  The presentation will include the history of electric cars, as well as the benefits and disadvantages of the cars from both an environmental and economic standpoint. These factors will be compared to those of hybrid cars which also depend on batteries for energy storage and power. The cost and performance of electric cars compared to hybrid cars is a key factor that would need to be considered by the consumer and will also be discussed in this presentation.

Transportation 2050: Fuel Cell Cars

Gretchen Morelli, Carly McNeil, Emily Hart
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 227

The purpose of this presentation is to raise awareness about possible alternative-fuel vehicles. Specifically, this presentation will discuss fuel-cell cars. It will describe how fuel-cell cars function and their impact on both the environment and the economy. The advantages, as well as the disadvantages, of this particular alternative-fuel vehicle will also be discussed. This discussion will then detail the improvements to the fuel-cell vehicle, as well as future projections. Fuel-cell cars will then be compared and contrasted with both hybrid and electric cars. The knowledge gained in this presentation will supplement the information learned from the other three exhibitions on the topic of projected transportation in 2050.

What Are Some of the Social Determinants for Students who Procrastinate?

Dania Cristobal, Jim Jean-Joseph, Brittany McGrady
Faculty Sponsor: George Siefert Jr
2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
DS 11

As we begin to better understand the phenomenon of student procrastination, it was found that there may be many contributors, some psychological, and some social (Tuchman, 1999; Solomon & Rothblum, 1984). Our interest is in examining some of the possible social forces that may affect whether or not students choose to procrastinate with respect to their class work.  Such things as class status, the level of personal responsibility, and gender are factors that will be evaluated in relation to procrastination. Findings from this study may help faculty, advisors, and staff be able to identify students who may have a problem with procrastination and be able to intervene in a more timely fashion.

Nursing Assessments

College Students' Knowledge of Sexually Transmitted Diseases (DC Office of Student Affairs)

Kim Ham, Terese Schmidle, Jennifer Nesterenko, Kathryn Murphy
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
1:30 pm - 1:50 pm
Business 107/109

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are infections that spread from person to person through sexual contact. STDs are among the most common infectious diseases in the United States. More than 15 million Americans are diagnosed with an STD every year. Despite the education that has occurred regarding this subject, STDs continue to be prevalent. This project focuses on determining the knowledge level of Daemen College students regarding STDs. This presentation will reveal the findings from this investigation and recommend strategies to increase awareness of STDs in the student population.

College Students' Knowledge of the Family Justice Center (DC Office of Student Affairs)

Donna Aliotta, Karen Koster, Michelle Monte, Denise Vitale
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
1:10 pm - 1:30 pm
Business 107/109

The Family Justice Center (FJC) of Erie County in Buffalo, NY provides one-stop, wrap-around services for victims of domestic violence and their children. The mission of FJC is to develop and sustain a collaboration of people that help in the delivery of services that enable people to live safely, free from domestic violence, and that advocate offender accountability. One way FJC can be successful is to “get the word out” that they are there to help. In light of this, a community assessment was conducted to ascertain Daemen College students’ awareness of FJC. This presentation will reveal findings from this work and offer recommendations to increase student and community knowledge of this valuable service.

College Students' Knowledge Regarding Cervical Cancer

Allison Jacklin, Karen Stevenson, Stacy Parker, Lisa Beckwith
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
3:10 pm - 3:30 pm
Business 107/109

Cervical cancer screening tests can find the cells that lead to cervical cancer before it starts, or find cervical cancer early when it is most easily treated. Women who are not screened or have not been screened in a long time could have cervical cancer and not know it. A project was conducted to determine the knowledge level of Daemen College female students, ages 18 and over, regarding cervical cancer. Findings from the project will be presented and recommendations for further education regarding cervical cancer will be made.

Cyber Bullying and the College Student

Michelle Colello, Getty Belance, Mary Ormond, Shamale Grant,
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
Business 107/109

Cyber-bullying is "the use of information and communication technologies to support deliberate, repeated, and hostile behavior by an individual or group that is intended to harm others." The Daemen College RN students questioned students in the Wick Center regarding this issue. Using the results of the survey, combined with a community assessment, the RNs developed an informational program designed to present the risks of cyber bullying and offer resources to combat this threat.

Exercise in the Senior Adult

Nicole Czumaj, Michelle Bogumil, Mary Folaron, Kelly Lawrence
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
10:00 am - 10:20 am
Business 107/109

Members of the Clarence Senior Center assisted the Daemen College RN students by completing a survey designed to assess knowledge of the importance of exercise for healthy living and the patterns of exercise in the senior adult. Statistics show that exercise improves health and increases longevity. Regular exercise is of vital importance in the senior adult to prevent or delay many diseases and disabilities, including dementias. Using the nursing process, a community assessment was conducted and the results were used to present an educational program for the senior adult about the benefits of exercise and how exercise may be adapted to every age and lifestyle.

Health Care Services for Cancer Screening by Erie County Residents who Access St. Luke's Mission

David Marciniak, Mandy Irrgang, Rebecca Tonner, MaryBeth Moore
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
11:40 am - 12:00 pm
Business 107/109

St. Luke's Mission of Mercy is an independent mission with a Roman Catholic tradition in the inner city of Buffalo, New York. St. Luke's missionaries feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, shelter the homeless, and clothe the naked. Guests of St. Luke’s Mission are often underinsured or uninsured and in need of health services. Therefore, this project was undertaken to determine the health care needs of the guests of St Luke’s Mission and to determine services in Erie County, with a special emphasis on how the American Cancer Society could meet these needs.

Health Needs of Persons Traveling out of Country

Sarah Catanese, Emily Christopherson, Laurie Flury, Margaret Johnson
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
9:00 am - 9:20 am
Business 107/109

Individuals traveling out of the country often need a variety of immunizations and education on environmental, physical and emotional risks of out of country travel. Previous participants of Passport Health were surveyed regarding this issue and a nursing assessment of the issue was developed. Education on the required immunizations, including information regarding physical health and safety, was presented to the general population.

Horizontal Violence Among Families and Nurses (DC Nursing Department)

Kathleen Winiecki, Karen Potempa, Daneal Bulls
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
9:40 am - 10:00 am
Business 107/109

Verbal and physical violence against nurses occurs in the workplace. In addition to assessing the risk and making changes in policies, procedures, and physical environment to protect against violence, health care administrators need to develop procedures for responding to incidents of violence that both support the victim and lead to improvements in the workplace. This project was conducted to determine the Daemen College RN-BS nurses’ awareness and experience with workplace verbal and physical violence. Findings from this project were analyzed to formulate recommendations.

Knowledge and Usage of Community Resources by Guests of Genesis House in Cattaraugus, New York

Katherine Gleason, Patrick McCue, Melissa McLeod, Erin Spengler
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
11:20 am - 11:40 am
Business 107/109

Homelessness is a major health issue for individuals as well as families. This vulnerable population has many needs and very often must rely on community resources. An assessment was done in collaboration with the Genesis House, a faith based organization in Olean, New York , which provides shelter to homeless families. The purpose of this assessment was to determine the knowledge and usage of community resources by guests of the Genesis House. This presentation will focus on findings from a survey and an assessment of the community.

Lateral Violence in a Subacute Facility

Afran Malik, Christopher Nichols, Regina Williams, Keishonta Lawrence
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
10:20 am - 10:40 am
Business 107/109

Degraff Memorial Skilled Nursing Facility was the site for a survey and educational program designed for professional caregivers concerning lateral violence. In healthcare today, violence is a growing problem among nurses and other professional caregivers. This issue can contribute to strained staff relationships and, in the extreme, compromise patient care. This assessment explored the issue and results were used to prepare an educational program offering practical solutions to curb lateral violence.

Parents Knowledge of Nonprescription Medications in the Elementary School Aged Child

Jenn Hrycik, Kara Lester, Amanda Knight, Shawna Rank
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
2:10 pm - 2:30 pm
Business 107/109

School-aged children are abusing non-prescription medications, such as cough and cold remedies, laxatives, diuretics, emetics, and diet pills. Self dosing in the absence of a parent, using inappropriate and inaccurate measuring devices, not reading caution labels and not consulting with a professional care provider can all contribute to the abuse of non-prescription medications commonly found in the home. Daemen College RN students explored this issue through a survey of parents with school-aged children and a community assessment. Results of the investigation culminated in the preparation and presentation of an educational program, designed to alert parents to this potential danger. Interventions that could be used to decrease this danger were included.

Registered Nurses' Knowledge of Childhood Autism (The Parent Network of Western New York)

Jodi-Lynn George, Linda Hubbard, Debby Jankowiak, Jessica Lawson
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
9:20 am - 9:40 am
Business 107/109

The Parent Network (PN) of Western NY involves parents helping parents and professionals who assist individuals with disabilities to reach their own potential. In keeping with its mission to empower parents of children with special needs and professionals who work with these families, PN offers workshops to help parents and the professionals better understand their children's disabilities and increase knowledge on special education topics and concerns. This project focuses on the Daemen College RN-BS nurses’ knowledge of Childhood Autism.

S/S of Diabetes in Erie County Residents, Ages 35-50 (Fitness 19)

Maureen Lynch, Alexis DiPalma, Theresa DiSalvo, Shannon O'Brien
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
10:40 am - 11:00 am
Business 107/109

Diabetes is the most rapidly growing chronic disease of our time. It has become an epidemic that affects one out of every 12 adult New Yorkers. Since 1994, the number of people in the state who have diabetes has more than doubled, and it is likely that number will double again by the year 2050. Students partnered with Fitness 19 (a local health club facility) to measure the knowledge level of adults, ages 30-50 years, regarding diabetes. This project focuses on the needs of this population and information was analyzed to formulate recommendations for future diabetes education.

Sexually Transmitted Disease in the Senior Adult

Alison Ferraro, Brett Kelly, Amy Hull, Seema George
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
1:50 pm - 2:10 pm
Business 107/109

The purpose of this community assessment was to investigate the knowledge of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in the senior adult. St John’s Tower in Buffalo, NY was the setting for a survey exploring this issue. The survey and assessment results were used to develop and present an educational program focusing on the incidence of STDs in the senior adult, means of prevention, and knowledge of when and where to seek assistance for an STD.

The Use of the Hospital Emergency Room by the Senior Adult

Dana Tague, Helene Coignet, Raymond Manning, Jamie Miller
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
2:30 pm - 2:50 pm
Business 107/109

The overuse of the ER is a common problem within our current healthcare system. This community assessment investigates the use and abuse of the hospital ER in the urban population, including reasons for visits and lifestyle patterns that may precipitate an ER visit for a non-emergency situation. An informational program designed to educate the population regarding the appropriate use of the hospital ER was given to participants of the Moot Community Center. Practical suggestions and solutions to the issue were designed to help alleviate this growing problem of health care delivery.

Usage of Healthcare in Chautauqua County by Residents of Lutheran Senior Housing

Danielle Kennelley, Amy Hoch, Julianne Olson
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
11:00 am - 11:20 am
Business 107/109

This presentation will focus on the use of healthcare by the elderly residents of Lutheran Senior Housing, located in Chautauqua.  A survey was created to ascertain the knowledge of the Lutheran Senior Housing residents regarding the consumption of health care services. Results of this survey and an assessment of various aspects of the community will be presented. Development and implementation of a community education program based on conclusions from the study will be discussed.

Posters

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

"C is for Culture"...Incorporating Culture into a Language Classroom

Shannon Wilson
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Incorporating Culture into the L2 classroom has been shown to increase student involvement and stimulate a constructivist approach to language acquisition. Studies prove that having a Culture factor in a L2 classroom augments the motivation of students to learn in the class. Most students live in a mono-cultural society and, as a result, form false stereotypes about other cultures which, in turn, plays a demotivating role in the classroom. This presentation will reveal the research that supports this theory and how it can be applied to the constructivist approach in a classroom. By reflecting on our own experiences, we create meaning for the world we live in. That is, the teacher's job is to provide students with information and ideas about other cultures and how they work, and it is the students' job to develop meaning for themselves personally.

A Prospective Look At Daemen's Recycling Efforts

Renee Retton, Matthew Vandermeulen, Sarah Lang, Amanda Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Daemen Environmental Club has been working to promote environmentally-friendly activities  on our campus.  One area of focus has been to increase recycling efforts by students, faculty and staff.  This poster will showcase the results of a recycling event planned by the club as well as provide information on the benefits of reusing and recycling materials.

Accounting Estimates

Patrick Beisiegel
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will address the topic of using accounting estimates in financial statements. It will review the rules currently in place with the Financial Accounting Standards Board regarding the use of estimates and will also outline the history of these rules. This presentation will also analyze the differences that will be established  when the U.S. adopts International Standards.

Accounting for Goodwill

Amanda Buckley
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In today's economy, an increasing number of businesses are now competing at the global level. Because of this, financial statement users should become familiar with the similarities and differences in accounting policies across countries in order to understand what information is being presented in the financial statements. This poster discusses and compares accounting for goodwill under international standards, Australian standards, and United States standards. The importance of intangible assets in general and the specific importance of goodwill will be discussed as well as the impact of these policies on financial statements. The difficulties found in measuring and valuing goodwill will be explained along with why these measurement difficulties and impacts on financial statements affect management's disclosure about goodwill and goodwill impairment.

Accounting for Goodwill: Consideration of Impairment Issues

Christopher Lemay
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Goodwill is defined as an intangible asset that is created when the purchase price of an acquisition exceeds the fair value of the company being acquired. Once goodwill is recognized, the issue of accounting for goodwill, particularly impairment, becomes relevant. Since accounting for goodwill has changed significantly within the past decade, it is necessary to examine the effect those changes have had on financial reporting. This issue is particularly relevant as the recent global recession resulted in massive amounts of goodwill impairment charges. Currently there is a push for the US to adopt the International Financial Accounting Standards and convergence of goodwill is still a debated issue. The focus of this research is to compare the treatment of goodwill impairment in the US with international practices for goodwill impairment and to determine how any change in US standards could impact financial statements. This research will consider the historic and current accounting practices for goodwill and an examination of how proposed changes might impact the treatment of impairment going forward.

Accounting for Impairment of Value

Mujeeb Oridami
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation will discuss issues related to accounting for the impairment of value with regard to property, plant and equipment, and intangible assets.  A comparison of US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) is presented, as well as the importance of accounting for impairment of value of assets and the accounting impact of the different accounting standards. This topic is significant to accounting because it illustrates how changes in reporting guidelines may impact financial reporting and the impairment of value.

Accounting for Research and Development

Rebecca Stanley
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Research and Development can provide growth for a company through the development of a new service, product, design, or process. The accounting area of Research and Development is important because certain companies, like pharmaceutical and technological, need this type of accounting to function. Main areas of discussion will include applicable U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) regulations and Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) statements explaining how to properly disclose and classify Research and Development expenses. In-process Research and Development will be included to discuss what is done when a company is acquired. Alternative methods that are debated regarding Research and Development will also be presented.

An Exploration of Latina Suicide and Progress in Prevention

Brittany Calandra
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Large numbers of suicide attempts by Latina girls have attracted the attention of the media and the mental health community. Despite theory on why so many young Latinas have attempted suicide, there is very little quantitative research to show what prevention programs would be beneficial to the Hispanic Community. My senior thesis called attention to the gap between theory and research on Latina suicide. The project will present key points from my thesis, such as: expert theory on Latina suicide, what has prevented progress in suicide prevention research for the Latina population, and what more is needed to further prevention efforts. I hope to include feedback from agencies in the Buffalo area to show the resources available to the Hispanic community. This feedback will show whether or not social agencies in Buffalo provide services for suicide prevention, and how they tailor services to the Latina population. This section will also demonstrate the strengths and needs of the organizations working with Hispanics.

Analysis of Foreign Currency Translation Under GAAP and IFRS

Christopher Pallarino
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Foreign currency translation is the process by which a company that operates under different currencies consolidates to a single currency for reporting standards. In recent years, increased globalization has made foreign currency translation an important topic. A company that follows generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) is afforded multiple methods of translation. This allows for variations between different companies’ reports. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages that companies must address. Currently, Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) No. 52 governs foreign currency translation under GAAP, but with the United States transitioning to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), IAS 21 will take governance over foreign currency translation. This presentation will focus on the differences between FASB 52 and IAS 21 and how it will affect the financial statements of international companies.

Bonding in Context: A Historical Perspective of Bonds in Molecules from Lewis Dot to Molecular Orbital Theory

Jacqueline Slack, Abby Cryan
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This current study will investigate the history of chemical bonding theories, from the simplistic Lewis Dot Theory to today’s accepted Molecular Orbital Theory. Lewis Dot Theory, first introduced in the early 1900’s, presents a basic understanding of how electrons are shared or transferred in molecular or ionic compounds, respectively. Advancements in molecular bonding resulted in the Valence Bond Theory, an approach where atoms generate hybrid orbitals that are simple additions of the wave function. These additions represent the orbitals of the atom to general shape and overlap which forms a bond. Although early models work for many simple examples, several failures exist. Today’s most accepted theory, the molecular orbital theory, looks at linear combinations of the wave functions of atomic orbitals to generate bonding and anti-bonding orbitals incorporating all atoms within the molecule. Examples including homonuclear diatomics, heteronuclear diatomics, and some other small molecules will be illustrated with the help of a computer software simulation.

Calculus and Distribution of Wealth

Fiona Burzynski, Melinda Montaperto, Erin Hoeflich, Sean Hellingman, Sean Pickering
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Lorenz Curve was invented by Max Otto Lorenz, an American Economist, in 1905. This curve is a great tool to illustrate how wealth is distributed across society. Wealth, in this case, means the income or personal assets of individual households. The Lorenz Curve is calculated by the equation y=L(x) with 0≤x≤1 where x represents the fraction of all households in the society and y=L(x) represents the fraction of the total wealth that is owned by the fraction x of society. This project will explore the Lorenz Curve and provide additional information and recommendations.

Category Cues Contribute to Retrieval Induced Forgetting

Erin McKissick
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Items that are associated to the same cue or cues guiding retrieval of other items are more likely to be forgotten. The retrieval practice paradigm (Anderson, Bjork & Bjork, 1994) is commonly used to reliably demonstrate this form of memory failure using word stems to trigger recall. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of the cue in the experimentally induced retrieval induced forgetting. Undergraduate students completed an expanded version of the paradigm that included an additional no-cue recall condition. Memory for items was compared across retrieval conditions. The results replicated Retrieval Induced Forgetting using a visual form of the retrieval practice paradigm of Anderson et al. (1994). The cued-recall condition resulted in poorer memory for non-practiced words from the practiced category over those of the non-practiced category. However, this was not the case for the free-recall condition. In the absence of the cue, memory for words was the same across non-practiced words. These results indicate that retrieval cues enhance memories for words and that the cue appears to be necessary for inducing retrieval induced forgetting.

CEC and NAEYC in Daycare Settings: Which is Better for the Child?

Miranda Kinney, Melissa Goodspeed
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) recommends that learning should be teacher-directed by a competent and qualified professional. This means that the instruction in the classroom is delivered to the students based on their individual goals and objectives. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) recommends that learning should be more child-centered and child-directed.  We will be looking at children in the infant and toddler years - birth to 36 months. It is our contention that a young child learns best through movement, exploration and play, involving indoor and outdoor environments, supporting child-initiated play whenever possible. It is critical in the child’s learning for them to trust and feel safe with their caregivers. Our poster compares and contrasts these two methods, CECs and NAEYCs, in daycare settings.

Chemiluminescence of the Luminol-Hemoglobin Interaction

Brittany Boyce
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Blood is one of the most commonly found pieces of evidence at violent crime scenes. Investigators use Luminol (C8H7N3O2) to detect blood, which reacts with the iron in hemoglobin to produce chemiluminescence. Once it has reacted, blood can be visually observed and measured on a Cary Eclipse Flourescence Spectrophotometer. The luminol blood test is a presumptive blood test, which is open to interference from substances such as hypochlorite bleach, especially when attempted cleaning of the crime scene has occurred. This poster will examine the current scientific literature concerning the luminol-hemoglobin interaction and false positives, as well as introduce thesis research work. We will also examine the unfolding of the hemoglobin protein, and the chemiluminescence corresponding to each step of the unfolding. With this knowledge, we can synthesize a substance capable of reversing interference of the luminol-hemoglobin reaction, facilitating forensic investigators’ ability to detect blood at a crime scene.

Cisplatin Mechanisms and Interactions with DNA

Jacqueline Slack
Faculty Sponsor: Kristin Fries
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

DNA interactions occurring in chemotherapy treatments follow several mechanistic pathways including intercalation, major and/or minor groove binding, and DNA interactions. The mechanism by which a drug works within the body is important in understanding how a cancer cell dies and how to improve current cancer treatments. This presentation takes a critical look at the mechanism of a popular chemotherapy compound, cisplatin, used today to treat a number of cancers.

College Students and Technological Distractions

Sascha Baxter, Kimisha Baliey, Nyisha Thompson
Faculty Sponsor: George Siefert Jr
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In this study, we will examine the effect of personal electronics (laptops, smart phones, etc.) on college students. We will explore the amount of time students spend on electronics in and outside of the classroom. We will also explore the content of the curriculum, as well as the delivery of the curriculum, in order to determine if the content and/or delivery of the curriculum are identified as reasons why students use technology (smart phones, laptops, etc) for personal reasons during class periods. We are also interested in determining if there is an association between time spent on personal electronics and G.P.As.  In order to collect our data, we will administer a survey to a sample of students. We will then analyze our data to determine if the information we gather from our sample explains whether or not the content and /or delivery of the curriculum content is related to increased likelihoods of students using personal electronics in the classroom. Learning more about why students use electronic devices in the classroom as a form of distraction may help Daemen College know more about what is actually going on in the classroom and use more effective teaching techniques for students that might reduce the inclination to be distracted. 

Conservation of the Indiana Bat

Mikhail Boutsko
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis) is a small bat found in the Eastern United States and is one of nine bat species that inhabit New York State. Due to disease, human destruction of habitat, and other factors,  this species has been declining in numbers. Recent estimates by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service suggest that only 387,835 Indiana bats remain in the U.S., 32,734 of which live in New York State. This species has been listed as endangered since 1967. Current conservation efforts have focused on protecting the hibernacula and roosting locations in forests and wetlands. Organizations currently try to eliminate disturbances by establishing gated hibernacula locations and working with land owners to maintain intact habitats. This poster will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the existing conservation plan and consider alternative solutions.

Daemen Campus Sustainability Internships: Helping to Green our Campus

Morgan Devitt, Nicole Earl
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Daemen College signed the Talloires Declaration in 2004, publicly committing itself to environmentally-friendly campus operations and enhancing sustainability education in its curriculum. In recent years, Daemen has introduced campus-wide recycling initiatives and witnessed the addition of a new LEED Gold (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Research and Information Commons. To help further our efforts to “green” our campus and better prepare our students for their future positions, Daemen has introduced the Campus Sustainability Stewards program. Paid student interns in this program will work with the campus community on efforts to promote efficiency in water and energy use as well as waste reduction and recycling. This poster will discuss the new internship program and describe ways that the campus community can help make Daemen shine as an example of sustainable practices and awareness.

Daemen's Environment as Perceived by Students Who Are Also Parents and/or Spouses: A Qualitative Study

Tia Stanley
Faculty Sponsor: George Siefert Jr
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This qualitative research project examines the question of whether Daemen College provides a supportive learning environment for students who are responsible for performing additional roles outside of school, such as parenting and/or spousal roles, as compared to traditional students. What this study is intended to discover is whether Daemen College provides a supportive campus based environment for commuter students who are also raising children or carrying out spousal responsibilities. A small number of research participants will be interviewed regarding their experiences and the extent to which Daemen is perceived as supportive of their unique needs. Results of this study may be useful to faculty and administrators to further identify the needs of this cohort of
non-traditional students.

Deferred Tax Assets and Liabilities

Christie LeDonne
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The role of deferred tax assets and liabilities is to account for current and deferred income that can later be recognized as revenues or expenses. Temporary differences from revenues and expenses that relate to tax issues are tax liabilities and assets. The timing of each situation can determine the assets or liabilities that are able to be deductible in future years. When and how you report these assets and liabilities can affect value of companies and cash flows. This poster reveals temporary differences that cause deferred tax assets and liabilities. It looks at the differences in book and tax depreciation methods along with differences in book and market value. This poster also presents how to isolate and manage earnings using the deferred tax assets and liabilities and the effects on the firm value. This is a complex topic with many rules and regulations making it essential to report these differences properly on all financial statements.

Defined Benefit Pension Plans

Eileen Mayfield
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Current accounting practices relative to defined benefit pension plans may distort the extent of a company's pension obligation and result in an incomplete view of the company's financial position. The accounting practices used for defined benefit pension plans have been a controversial topic in financial accounting for over thirty years due to questions regarding the adequacy of financial disclosures. Because of this controversy, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) has gradually implemented various changes for the accounting of defined benefit pension plans since 1980. The purpose of this study is to identify whether the disclosures required by FASB are sufficient to provide reasonable information to users, including: investors, employees, creditors, and other third parties.

Developing A DNP Project: Health Screening for Prostate Cancer in the Amish Population of Chautauqua County

Patricia Brown
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea for the DNP scholarly project related to organizing, implementing, and evaluating a free health screening program for prostate cancer in the Amish population of Chautauqua County in New York. For men in the United States, prostate cancer is the leading incidence of cancer as well as the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths (American Cancer Society, 2010). Accurate screening is vital in early detection and treatment of the disease, leading to improved prognosis and cure rates. The target population is the Amish community in Chautauqua County because it is perceived as underserved, having barriers to healthcare, including transportation, insurance/cost, and education barriers. The project aims to find solutions to overcome these barriers; it will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing a Doctor of Nursing Practice Project Idea: Establishing a College Based Wellness Center

Susan Nierenberg
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is a terminal doctorate degree for a nurse practitioner established to enhance clinical practice, requiring the completion of a scholarly project addressing an identified healthcare issue. This poster will present ideas for establishing a college wellness center  where students would be able to access health education, stress reduction opportunities and wellness - based on classes such as yoga, Pilates and mindfulness meditation.  The project planning will follow Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing an Idea for a DNP Scholarly Project Related to Alternative Therapies for Chronic Pain Patients

Veronica Mason
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea related to developing a series of educational programs at a local pain practice. The educational program will focus on nutrition and alternative therapies which will help decrease chronic pain in patients on chronic opiate therapy. This idea will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing an Idea For a DNP Scholarly Project Related to Better Undertstanding Treatment Indices of Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy

Melissa Mele-Delgado, ANP
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a project related to understanding the treatment options regarding immunoglobulin A nephropathy, or IgAN. IgAN was once considered a rare, mysterious renal disorder that has since become known as the most common form of glomerulonephritis throughout the world. While there is no cure for IgAN, recent research has shown progress in identifying treatments to slow disease progression. Reviewing such research will facilitate data compilation that will be useful in advancing the overall understanding of IgAN treatment. The proposed idea will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White's (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing an Idea for a DNP Scholarly Project Related to Implementating Shared Medical Appointments for Patients Experiencing Chronic Pain

Tina Reynolds
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea related to implementing shared medical appointments for chronic pain patients. Shared medical appointments have been shown to increase greater self-efficacy, improve patient satisfaction, reduce healthcare costs, and decrease emergency visits and hospitalizations (Bodenheimer & Grumbach, 2007). The proposed idea will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing an Idea for a DNP Scholarly Project Related to Injecting Botulinum Toxin At The Time of Tissue Expander Breast Reconstruction

Ann Marie Bauer
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea for the DNP scholarly project related to the injection of botulinum toxin into the pectoral and seratus muscles at the time of tissue expander breast reconstruction. This injection should decrease post-operative pain and pain associated with expansion, allowing for faster expansion and a decreased risk of expanders riding high. The proposed idea will be developed throughout the course this semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Developing an Idea For a DNP Scholarly Project Related to the Path to Intimacy, Connection, Sexual Satisfaction, and Love (PICSSL) Model

Maureen Ryan
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal degree culminating in a final scholarly project. The purpose of this poster is to develop an idea related to implementing a model to assist health care providers with offering guidance and interventions for their patients dealing with intimacy and sexual concerns. Issues related to sexuality are prevalent and educational programs for providers are essential to improving quality of care. Health care providers are often challenged with their patients’ concerns related to intimacy and sexual dysfunctions. Given time restraints and lack of perceived ability to adequately address these issues, the vast majority of patients never receive the help needed. The Path to Intimacy, Connection, Sexual Satisfaction, and Love (PICSSL) model presents the provider with a wide variety of interventions, many of which can be incorporated into a brief office visit. This model is offered to increase the practitioner’s confidence in assisting patients toward enhanced intimacy, connection, and sexual satisfaction. This idea will be developed and refined based on Zaccagnini and White's (2011) nine-step template for the DNP scholarly project.

Developing an Idea for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Scholarly Project Related to Diabetes Education for At-Risk Populations

Mary Cerrillo
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctorate of Nursing Practice (DNP) degree is a terminal clinical degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea related to implementation of a program related to diabetes education for at-risk populations. Diabetes is a metabolic (endocrine) disease that affects people of all ages and ethnicities at any stage of their lives. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, with some 1.6 million new cases in the U.S. each year. Although there is no cure, it is possible for persons living with diabetes to maintain a normal blood sugar through lifestyle changes and collaboration among patients, families, and healthcare providers. Educating diabetics on maintaining their blood sugar can prevent/decrease the complications of diabetes. This project will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White’s (2011) systemic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Development and Implementation of a Standard Congestive Heart Failure Education Guide and Evaluation of the Impact on Medical Therapy, Hospital Readmission Rates and Patient Outcomes

Patricia Geiger
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recent literature supports the positive impact of education on improving congestive heart failure patient outcomes. The goal of this pilot project is to implement a formal education process in order to improve congestive heart failure patient outcomes in the Kaleida Health System. A pilot sample of 100 patients ages ≥ 65 years old admitted with a principle diagnosis of congestive heart failure will be instructed in the hospital with a congestive heart failure education guide developed for the purpose of this study. Outpatient medication compliance data will be accessed through 3rd party claims data for prescription refills. The measurement variables used throughout this study will include: hospital length of stay, in-patient and out-patient use of evidence based medications of beta blocker, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, and diuretics, mortality, outpatient medication compliance and 30, 60 and 90 day readmission rates. Data will be obtained by chart review and analysis will consist of multivariate regression.

Development of Static Standing Balance in Children

Chelsea Kibler, Daniel Lopez, Kelly Jeanne Freatman, Aimee Jagord
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The development of balance in children represents an essential prerequisite skill in the acquisition of functional activities. The ability to maintain balance allows children to perform self-care activities, such as bathing and dressing, and affords children the ability to run, jump, and play with peers. Although balance is historically believed to increase linearly through adolescence, limited data exist to document the progression of static standing balance in children. An enhanced understanding of the balance acquisition and refinement process would provide insight into typical and atypical development in children. It appears that clinicians choose to employ non-standardized balance assessments when presented with several options to measure balance abilities. Researchers modified the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) by creating a more child appropriate assessment tool while maintaining the original balance constructs to form the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS). Current research on the PBS examines the performance of children on select static items: standing, standing with eyes closed, standing with feet together, standing with one foot in front, and standing on one foot. Also, researchers analyze the influence of age, gender, height, and body mass on a child’s performance on the PBS. Our research, to be completed by the end of 2011, will continue to investigate performance profiles for static standing balance in the pediatric population using the PBS. The purpose of this poster is to review the existing literature on the development of static standing balance in children two to fourteen years of age.

DNP Capstone Project

Jacqueline Gallagher
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recent literature supports the positive impact of education on improving outcomes in the ICU. VAP is preventable and nursing compliance can have a positive impact on ventilator dependent patients. The goal of this pilot study is to implement an educational process to improve outcomes on ventilator dependent COPD patients in the ICU. The major endpoints are reducing hospital length of stay, fewer ventilator days, and prevention of VAP.

This presentation will report on a pilot study of 20 critical care nurses caring for COPD patients on a ventilator who will have an educational inservice reviewing best practices for VAP prevention. A pre and post test will be given to assess his/her learning capabilities. A booklet will be provided to enhance the educational component regarding COPD and best practices. The DNP student will also provide patients with an educational booklet on the prevention of COPD. An observational longitudinal study will be utilized to compare LOS, VAP, and ventilator days observing the nursing staff. Data will be obtained from chart review and observation. Data will also be collected from chart review and analysis will consist of multivariate regression.

DNP Project - Development of a Primary Care Clinic

Karen Kieliszek
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is a terminal clinical doctorate degree culminating in a final scholarly project that addresses an existing healthcare issue of significant magnitude and complexity. The purpose of this poster is to share a developing idea for a DNP scholarly project related to the lack of primary care services available to the uninsured and underinsured in the City of Buffalo. The goal of this project is to develop a Primary Care Clinic within an existing Family Planning Clinic to service this group. In 2010, approximately 30% of women and 90% of men who attended our Family Planning Clinic were uninsured. Seventy-five percent of women and 90% of men had no access to primary care at all. The establishment of coordinated primary care services would provide these patients with dedicated care. The groundwork to design this program and clinic will be laid while investigating the needs of the surrounding community and providing options for improved health to our community. The idea will be developed throughout the course of the semester and refined based on Zaccagnini and White's (2011) systematic, nine-step template modeling the DNP project process.

Early Intervention Programs: How Effective Are They?

Ashley Pfentner, Sara Pascell, Samantha Lemke
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Early Intervention (EI) programs are directed towards children who have a documented disability or who are at risk for developing a cognitive, social, or physical condition that may affect them drastically in the future if not given the appropriate services early in their lives. To qualify for intervention services, the child must have a 25% delay in two or more domains of development or have a 33% delay in one domain. Many parents of children with disabilities and professionals have labeled early intervention programs as successful, while others believe EI programs are a waste of taxpayers' money. This poster will document the success of EI through the use of statistics made available in the literature and documentation of experiences of those who have already undergone Early Intervention. The progress of the children who participate in EI depends upon the number of services being received and the amount of time that is devoted to the child. Our study will focus on a review of literature regarding the effectiveness of the Early Intervention programs.

Effect of Plyometric Training on Lower Extremity Biomechanics

Danielle Kelley, Lauren Angelucci, Pamela Eichas
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Plyometrics, or jump training, is high velocity resistance training in which a concentric contraction of a muscle immediately follows an eccentric contraction of the targeted muscle. Research has shown the effects of neuromuscular recruitment during plyometrics and its impact on sports performance. Studies have now begun to focus on using plyometrics as a preventative training program for sports injuries, such as Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) sprains and tears. Proper lower extremity biomechanics has been shown to be an important factor in preventing injuries. The literature supports the conclusion that plyometric training programs have a positive effect on lower extremity biomechanics. Specifically, these studies have found that plyometrics increases knee flexion angles at initial contact of jumping activities and decreases knee valgus angles, thus preserving the integrity of the ACL.

Effects of Anterior-Posterior Pelvic Tilt on Normal Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Spine Range of Motion in Standing

Jessica Fortman, Jessica Beszczynski, Lauren Bilski, Jennifer Cerra
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of the study is to determine the relationship between anterior or posterior pelvic tilt and lumbar lordosis, affecting lumbar spine range of motion. Overall, alignment of the pelvis affects the normal lumbar lordosis. When the pelvis tilts anteriorly, the lordosis increases. In contrast, when the pelvis tilts posteriorly, the lordosis decreases. With a neutral pelvis, the lordosis will change as opposed to measuring with a pelvic tilt. When a patient presents with abnormal alignment of the pelvis, he or she may present with back pain. Physical therapists treat low back pain frequently because of its high prevalence, especially in the working population. The direct effects of anterior or posterior pelvic tilting on lumbar spine flexion and extension ROM have not been researched extensively. Measuring lumbar spine flexion and extension ROM with a double inclinometer is a valid and reliable method of measurement. With research on normative data determined by reliable measuring tools, clinicians have baseline values for lumbar spine ROM and lumbar lordosis measurements. By establishing normative values, clinicians have the ability to compare their patient’s range of motion and lordosis measurements with accepted values. However, the starting points for measurements are different for every patient due to differences in body morphology and alignment. If the patient’s abnormal alignment causes the back pain, then the alignment can be corrected for treatment to alleviate the pain.

Effects of Speed on Walking Performance in Children with Cerebral Palsy as Assessed by the Standardized Walking Obstacle Course

Melissa Czajka, Amanda Altieri, Jillian Keller, Ashley Needham
Faculty Sponsor: Sharon Held
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Physical therapists in the pediatric setting utilize standardized outcome measurements and task analysis to aid in their clinical decision making related to activities of daily living (ADLs) for children with a variety of diagnoses including Cerebral Palsy (CP). Children with CP demonstrate difficulty with high activity levels during the functional tasks for ADLs including walking secondary to physical impairments such as spasticity, decreases in range of motion, strength, and endurance. This poster presentation contains a preliminary review/analysis of current literature that relates to the effects of one aspect of high activity level, walking speed, during functional activities. The Standardized Walking Outcome Course (SWOC) provides a standardized assessment of functional mobility by examining a child’s walking skills in various task conditions related to physical features and environmental dimensions; but this tool has yet to be used to investigate the effects of speed on the quality of performance for children with CP. The literature analysis, including information about the SWOC, provides the theoretical foundation for a study that will examine SWOC testing at increased speeds in order to determine functional mobility levels of children with CP, including comparisons to their peers. The results of assessment with this standardized outcome measure could provide a stronger objective tool for patient examination and influence pediatric physical therapy outcome and intervention planning.

Effects of Vitamin D Supplements and Cannabis on Patients Suffering from the Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

Rose Mimy, Angela Carroll, Tara Downey
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an auto-immune disease that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing painful muscle spasms, problems with coordination, and fatigue. Multiple Sclerosis has no known cure and is an unpredictable disease that can strike anytime. According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, approximately 400,000 Americans have been diagnosed with MS, while affecting nearly 2.5 million people worldwide. These cases are more prevalent in adults between the ages of 18-50. While there is no cure, there are several complementary/alternative therapies that are used to alleviate symptoms and may prevent common relapses with current drug therapies. According to recent studies, Vitamin D supplements and Cannabis (medical marijuana) are alternative therapies used to help reduce spasticity, improve mobility and decrease fatigue. This poster will investigate current literature on the use of Vitamin D supplements and Cannabis, and their effects on reducing spasticity, fatigue, and other symptoms of MS.

Environmental Education in the Community

Kristen Melohusky, Marlana Rosenow , Teresa Peeples Polk
Faculty Sponsor:
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Environmental education can be described as educating others in the wonders of the natural world. Through IND 214, Environmental Education in the Community, a group of students from Daemen College provided assistance to local communities and organizations that directly benefit the environment. Our class worked closely with teachers and students from the Dulski Center and Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary, taking field trips to Reinstein Woods and Tiftt Nature Preserve, which included education of the human impact on the environment. This presentation will explore this rewarding experience that allowed us to teach and help children in the community.

Fair Market Value and Changes Resulted From Economic Crisis

Brandy Dudek
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In recent years, many companies in the US have begun recording assets at fair market value because it was thought to be a more accurate reflection of the true value of the assets. However, due to the recent economic turmoil in the US, the limitations of market-based accounting have become apparent. As a result, the recession has led to a re-appraisal of the current methods of fair value accounting. Many people argue that the write-down of assets resulted in a significant impact on company’s financial statements, and financial institutions in particular. Some suggest that fair value accounting exacerbated the financial crisis in the U.S. This poster will present the history of fair value accounting, current practices, methods of recording and disclosing of the assets, and the potential impact on the financial markets.

Foods That Prevent Cancer

Lisa Truscott, Amy Demonte, Kane Eaton
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There has been an explosion of consumer interest in the health-enhancing role of functional foods and their ability to prevent cancer. Nutritional support is a recent advancement in diet therapy, however, this idea dates back to ancient history. Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, wrote nearly 2,500 years ago “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.” The National Cancer Institute estimates that roughly one-third of all cancer deaths may be diet related. Many of the common foods found in grocery stores such as green tea, nuts, and berries are said to contain cancer-fighting properties. This poster, based on current literature, will address the hypothesis that these functional foods do have potential in preventing disease.

Forest Box

Christen Lawicki, Lauren Schroder
Faculty Sponsor:
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Daemen College students are collaborating a Forest Box, representing New York state forests, to be sent to the United Nations as part of the Year of the Forest. Daemen College is one of only three schools in the state to be taking part in this project, and the only college being represented.

This project is being completed through a math and science methods course that involves a thirty-hour practicum, in which we will be teaching four lessons in a second grade classroom. In addition, we will be working with middle school students partaking in this project. We will work together to present various lessons to the students about forests, helping the students to assemble their own Box, and accompanying the students on a field trip where they will learn about forests.

This presentation will display a visual representation of the Forest Box we created and the Forest Box we assisted students at Martin Luther King Jr. Multicultural Institute Buffalo Public School #39 create. We will also show pictures of the process and lessons we created along the way.

Globalization in Business Today

Brian McCloe
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A goal of many companies is to reach new markets, especially those in foreign countries. However, the road to success in one country differs from that of another. The focal point of my research is: Companies that develop distinct capabilities can realize success in globalization efforts. I will demonstrate the methods and applications companies practice when entering global markets, including whether knowledge, training, previous experience or a combination of these or other factors make or break the success of companies in the global marketplace.

Hiring Ethical Employees Leads to Organizational Success

Alexis Ruffino
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Organizations are in business to achieve success on a variety of levels. Success may be measured by product development or improvement, profits, creating jobs, gaining and maintaining a good reputation, expansion throughout the nation or an international presence. This project will focus on the idea that success is only possible with true ethical behavior on the part of everyone involved. Ethics are moral principles —knowing the difference between right and wrong. There are examples in corporate America including Enron, Martha Stewart, Kmart, and many more, demonstrating how ethical, or unethical, practices can affect the success of an organization. The primary focus of my research will involve how hiring ethical employees leads to organizational success. I will describe ethical behavior of employees in the business world, demonstrating that ethical behavior begins at the top and can be transferred to each level of an organization; i.e. management to employees to co-workers. I will include professional opinion to explain the reasons why ethical behavior outweighs unethical behavior and while short term success can certainly be achieved with unethical practices, only those acting ethically will achieve long term survival.

How Bullying Effects Student Learning

Ellie Allen
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Bullying in schools can have a negative effect on student learning. Unfortunately, students who already have a Learning Disability (LD) are often an easy target for bullying. This can lead to self esteem and social issues for the child, having a negative effect on their academic success. If a student is not comfortable and confident in his or her learning environment, it can lead to stress that does not allow the child to reach his or her full learning potential in the classroom. In order to create an environment that allows for the maximum achievement of all students, teachers must to be aware of how they can provide a classroom for all students that is free of bullying.

Implementation of a Defibrillator Education Program

Tami Buzzard
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sudden Cardiac Death claims more than 450,000 lives each year in the United States. Some risk factors for sudden cardiac death include left ventricular systolic dysfunction and/or ventricular arrhythmias. Congestive Heart Failure affects approximately 5 million patients today, with 500,000 new cases being diagnosed annually. Randomized clinical trials have supported prophylactic Automatic Implantable Defibrillator placement in patients with Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction and/or Ventricular arrhythmias. Patients qualifying for defibrillators will continue to rise at an annual rate of 100,000 and therefore affect a large population of survivors. Patients experience a variety of physical and psychological adaptation issues "post defibrillator implantation" that lead to poor health habits and maladaptive behaviors. This project will include the implementation of a Defibrillator Education Program to help patients increase knowledge and make informed decisions about living a healthy lifestyle. The Defibrillator Education Program Outcome measurements will focus on increased office follow-up, compliance / reduction in Emergency/Hospitalization for defibrillator firings, decrease in office calls and improved quality of life.

In-Vitro Abrasivity of Fluoridated and Non-Fluoridated Toothpastes

April Skierczynski
Faculty Sponsor: Kristin Fries
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The abrasivity of toothpaste varies with each brand and - in conjunction with the force of brushing - plays a major role in enamel erosion. The purpose of this study is to compare the effect of abrasivity in fluoridated and non-fluoridated dentifrices. A total of forty eight bovine teeth were divided into six groups. Three groups were assigned to non-fluoridated toothpastes (Nature’s Answer PerioCleanse, Tom’s of Maine Antiplaque & Whitening, Vademecum the Swedish Whitener) and two groups were assigned to fluoridated toothpastes (Arm & Hammer Complete Care Extra Whitening and Ultrabrite Advanced Whitening). The sixth group served as a control. 

Inclusive Classrooms

Te'Anna Coplin, Naytira Baker
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Inclusion refers to the practice of having children with disabilities participate as equals in schools, churches, workplaces, playgrounds and other public places. . Including children with disabilities in a regular classroom with typically developing children helps all students become better learners. When students are put in an inclusive classroom, they learn how to interact with students who differ from them, and are put in a position to learn skills from each other. Moreover, students with disabilities and typically developing students are exposed to the idea that they have many similarities as well as differences. Educators are able to teach and enhance students with disabilities in a regular classroom by scaffolding different learning techniques to help with the student's comprehension. Inclusion provides the services needed for children with disabilities in a regular classroom.

Income Statement Format: A Comparison of the US and UK Income Statement Formats

Brandon Seiferth
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster presentation is a comparison of the US and UK Income Statement formats. The Income Statement reports a company’s income, expenses, and profits over a period of time. The accelerated growth of economic globalization has increased the need for financial statement users to examine foreign company income statements. Recognizing similarities and understanding differences in Income Statement elements can eliminate confusion when determining a company’s financial position. Comparing Income Statement formats can help lead to improvements in the accuracy with which users extract financial information. Research examining the similarities and differences between US and UK Income Statement formats can help better inform accountants by identifying difficulties that may be faced by financial statement users.

Influence of the Iliopsoas Muscle on Lumbar Lordosis: Implications for Patients with Low Back Pain

Jenna Jeswald, Daniel Clauss, Michael LiVoti, Justin McEvoy
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Low back pain is a prevalent condition in today’s society. Various therapeutic and surgical measures are commonly taken in order to combat this ailment. A relatively new idea in the treatment spectrum of low back pain is its relationship to the iliopsoas muscle. The iliopsoas muscle is truly a combination of three different muscles: iliacus, psoas major, and psoas minor. Proximally, the iliopsoas muscle originates from the transverse processes and vertebral bodies of T12-L5, the iliac wing, and lateral aspects of the superior sacrum. The three muscles then combine and traverse distally to the lower extremity to insert on the lesser trochanter of the femur. The iliopsoas muscle may be indicated in cases of low back pain because of its attachment to the lumbar spine. Iliopsoas dysfunction may be a result of adaptive shortening due to various sustained postures, trauma, or simply a flexion dominated lifestyle that most individuals endure. Other studies have looked at the integrity of the lumbar spine following an iliopsoas release technique from a quantitative range of motion perspective (amount of curvature in the lumbar spine). Results of such research have varied and warrant further examination in the area. This study aims to identify changes in the lumbar spinal curve following iliopsoas release in typical, healthy individuals.

International Service Learning

Evanthia Apostolaki
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation will include information about what orphanages are like in Latin America. Throughout the course of my study abroad, I realized that there are many places in Latin America that offer orphans the opportunity to have a home and receive some level of education. The Summer of 2010 I did volunteer work in an orphanage in a small village called Turrialba in Costa Rica. I engaged the kids with activities, taught them Greek and English, showed them how to wash their hands properly and how to hold and eat food with silverware. In the Fall of 2010, I went to Mexico City to spend a semester at a Mexican University. I performed volunteer work there as well, and compared the two orphanages which revealed the many similarities and differences. I taught the kids English and traditional Greek dances. In this presentation, I will discuss many factors of differentiation between my experiences, while emphasizing the many benefits of studying abroad.

Intrasexual Competition Between Females: For Mates or Status?

Liz Tierney
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The current study examined whether intrasexual competition between females exists, and if so, whether the competition is driven by the desire for status within female social groups or for the attraction of potential mates.  Prior research has suggested a connection between intrasexual competition in females and eating disorders, generally anorexia nervosa; however, it is unclear what the various reasons are that cause women to compete with one another in maintaining levels of attractiveness.  Evolutionary psychology predicts that females compete in attractiveness to acquire mates. However, newer research suggests that females seek attainment of high status within female peer groups. The current study explores whether or not certain factors (self esteem, depression, self-monitoring orientation, and tendencies to compare oneself socially to others) correlate with the experience of intrasexual competition.

Is Salvation Possible for the Tasmanian Devil?

Jacqueline Ralph
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Commonly portrayed as a ferocious Australian predator, the Tasmanian Devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is now an endangered species. This marsupial resides on the island of Tasmania, south of Australia, and cannot be found anywhere else in the world aside from captivity in zoos and labs. A devastating cancer called Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD) is spreading throughout the devil population; since the emergence of DFTD, the devil population has drastically declined by more than 60%. Because Tasmanian Devils are an endemic species, conservation efforts must be established to help prevent their extinction. Conservation strategies currently include ways to prevent more devils from contracting the disease. My poster will analyze current conservation plans and propose any possible alternative conservation approaches.

Montessori Schools vs. Traditional Preschools

Emily Litwin, Megan Brown , Natalie Banach
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The information presented in this poster will cover the history, concepts, philosophy, materials and curriculum, and interaction of environment in both the traditional preschool room and Montessori classrooms. In most preschools, a teacher educates the children using a curriculum guided for the entire class. In Montessori preschools, the children learn concepts spontaneously as they work independently from self-teaching materials.  Self directed learning for children provides opportunities for students to find their “true, normal nature.” In today’s society with such rigid standards, it can be hard to practice Montessori learning.  However, all children have a different learning style and learn at a different pace.  By implementing Montessori teaching, this enables all children, even children with disabilities, to learn at their own pace and not feel excluded from others.  The information presented in the poster will cover the history, concepts, philosophy, materials and curriculum, and interaction of environment in both the traditional preschool room vs. the Montessori classrooms.

Mountain Gorilla Conservation

Francesca Cirulli
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) are found in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda. The major threats affecting this critically endangered species are habitat loss or modification, disease and disease transmission from humans, and war/political unrest. Gorillas feed on the vegetation and fruits available in their rainforest habitat. Due to the gorilla's size, it must spend long hours feeding every day to maintain its body weight. This poster will present the biology of this species and propose conservation strategies to complement the existing conservation plan.   

Parental Conflict and Offspring’s Personal Relationships in Adulthood

Kevin McLean
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of this research study is to compare the effects of growing up with parents in intact discordant relationships and growing up with divorced parents on adulthood romantic relationships. The study also examined levels of individual resilience as a potential moderator in the effects of discordant parental relationships and divorce on children’s adulthood relationships. Previous research demonstrates that intermarital conflict in intact marriages has the most negative effect on offspring. Divorce, resulting in a healthy post divorce relationship of parents, has been shown to be positively correlated with emotional security and the development of functional personal relationships in young adulthood. Adverse family experiences do not guarantee all children will develop lasting developmental problems. It was hypothesized that levels of individual resilience would moderate the relationship between parental conflict and child adjustment. Results from the research may provide participants with better knowledge of the effects of their marital relationships on their offspring and help them to make informed decisions regarding their relationships.

Personality, Goal Orientation and College Achievement

Michelle Mestre
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

High school QPA and SAT scores are commonly used by colleges to predict academic achievement. However, evidence suggests that the SAT is culturally biased, and that QPA and SAT alone only moderately account for QPA differences in college students (see Lawlor, Richman, & Richman, 1997; Wagerman & Funder, 2006). Another attribute that is known to directly vary with academic outcome is goal orientation. In addition, conscientiousness, a culturally unbiased measure of personality, has been shown to predict QPA better than SAT alone (Noftle & Robins, 2007; Trapmann, Hell, Hirn, & Schuler, 2007). The present study was designed to determine whether goal orientation improved this predictability. Undergraduate students (N=92) completed the Patterns of Adaptive Learning Survey and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. These measures, along with SAT scores, were entered into an analysis to determine the regression constant for predicting QPA. The results indicate that SAT predicts QPA, but conscientiousness and goal orientation do not add to this predictability. Examination of distribution suggests that extended analysis using non-linear regression techniques may offer further understanding.

Phytoremediation of Estradiol using Duckweed

Mikhail Boutsko
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Estradiol and similar estrogen-like compounds have been found at increasing levels in waterways that supply our drinking water. Exposure to these compounds has been shown to adversely affect aquatic wildlife, specifically fish and amphibians, who then display abnormal reproductive development. Contamination of our drinking water could lead to similar reproductive issues in humans. Currently, estradiol levels are not monitored in drinking water and the removal process for this compound would be difficult and costly. Plants have been used previously to remove some toxic metals and other compounds from soil and water. This study investigated whether duckweed could be used to remove estradiol from water.  Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to measure estradiol levels in water and plant samples taken from experimental treatments of differing estradiol concentrations.

If duckweed is as effective as a phytoremediation species for estradiol in water, this could be a cost-effective method for cleaning our water supply. This plant grows on the water's surface,  making it possible to remove it from large bodies of water by skimming and then disposing of the plants.

Polar Bears - A Threatened Species

Ann Montaperto
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus), a marine mammal, is the world’s largest land carnivore. Polar bears thrive in the cold Arctic and use their sea ice habitat to hunt for seal, their main prey. Over the years, the Arctic sea ice has been melting at an alarming rate, threatening the polar bears’ existence. In 2008, polar bears were listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. If sea ice continues to disappear, polar bears may become extinct. This poster will explore the reasons for polar bear endangerment as well as possible conservation plans to save the species from disappearing in the Arctic.

Preparation for the NYS Math Assessment Grades 3-5: A Twelve Week Intervention

Christina Newton, Crystal Alley, Melissa Barberic, Courtney Dagostino, Megan Day, Evelyn Kosek, Caitlin LaLonde, Amanda Losi, Tia Phelps
Faculty Sponsor: Elizabeth Wright
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Thomas Reynolds Center is currently teaching all after-school program participants key mathematics topics embedded within a developmental teaching and learning trajectory in preparation for the NYS Math Assessment Grades 3-5. The program began January 24, 2011 and continues for 12 instructional weeks. Prior to each topic, students were pre-tested using curriculum-based measures. Multiple curriculum-based measures are also being taken throughout instruction on each math topic. Participants will be post-tested upon completion of each math topic within the intervention study. The research question is: What impact does a twelve week teaching experiment in key mathematics topics utilizing a developmental teaching and learning trajectory have on participants' mathematics acheivement in those topics? The Thomas Reynolds Center's instructional sites are established educational settings, and the project utilizes normal educational practices with all participants.

Procrastination with College Students

Kelsey Jones, Amber Lane, Dominique Rodriguez
Faculty Sponsor: George Siefert Jr
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This study will examine the issue of procrastination among college students by exploring the outcomes of students who demonstrate this practice. Outcome variables will include students’ involvement in extra/co-curricular activities, the extent to which they meet with their advisors and instructors, and GPA. We hypothesize that the more students procrastinate, the lower their grades are, the less likely they are to meet with instructors and advisors outside of the classroom, and the less likely they are to be involved in co-curricular activities. In order to collect our information, we will administer a survey to a sample of Daemen students to obtain relevant data. We will then analyze our data to determine whether or not our hypothesis is supported by our research.

Promoting Physical Development in Pre-School

Andre Wilson
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The National Association for Sport and Physical Education recommends that preschoolers accumulate at least 60 minutes of structured physical activity, and between 60 minutes to several hours of unstructured physical activity on a daily basis. Preschoolers should not be sedentary for more than 60 minutes at any time except when sleeping. Preschoolers learn through moving, exploring, and acting on objects. Early childhood educators should plan active play indoors and outdoors, while paying attention to the children’s capabilities and interests as they run, jump, climb, balance, throw, catch, and explore their fine motor skills. Throughout the preschool years, children benefit from materials, experiences and teaching strategies that help them learn the distinctive features of objects, graphical symbols and other stimuli. Daily activities should include many opportunities for young children to develop confidence and competence in their gross motor skills. This poster will examine the importance of physical development in preschool, and show activities and strategies that can be used to promote physical development in preschool.

Pros and Cons of Looping

Mary Cronmiller, Karissa Revell, Alyssa Reynolds
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Looping is an educational practice in which a single class of children stays with the same teacher for two or more years or grade levels. The children and the teacher remain together as the class is promoted. At the end of the second (or third) year, the children move on to a new teacher while the looping teacher returns to the lower grade level to receive a new group of students. There are several advantages of looping, such as the children developing an in-depth relationship with their teacher, as well as their peers. However, there are also disadvantages to this process, such as the possibility of the children having an ineffective teacher that they have to be with for the next couple years. This practice is controversial in the area of Early Childhood education, leading to a discussion of pros and cons related to this issue.

Quality of Life in Patients Presenting with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Matthew Vargason, Elise Carr, Hayley Drews, John Rusin
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Edsberg
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Patients with diabetes demonstrate an increased risk for the development of chronic foot ulcers due to decreased healing ability, sensory perception, and distal circulation.  Once an ulcer develops, the patient becomes susceptible to multiple complications including infection and amputation.  Most studies measure wound size, rate of healing, efficacy of treatments, and prevention of infection; however, few studies investigate how ulcers impact a patient's health related quality of life (HRQoL).  This poster highlights key articles depicting the impact of chronic foot ulcers on a patient's HRQoL.  Researchers addressed how the presence of a chronic foot ulcer negatively impacts a patient physically, emotionally, socially, psychologically, and financially when compared to an individual without the presence of a foot ulcer.  With the increase in diabetes diagnoses worldwide, the significance for research within this field becomes important.  By understanding and measuring a patient's HRQoL, physical therapists can obtain the data required to optimize all aspects of a patient's quality of care.  Based on the information discussed in this poster, further research to investigate how specific clinical interventions, such as topical wound oxygen (TWO2) therapy, affect a patient's HRQoL is warranted. This further research could potentially lead to an increased quality of patient care as well fewer amputations and increased healing for patients with diabetic foot ulcers.

Reliability and Validity of Cervical Spine Examination Tools Used by Clinicians

Jordan Bergmann, Robert Corcoran, Maggie Mandic, Kellen Rotach
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cervical spine pain is a condition often managed by Physical Therapists (PTs). Management strategies for these patients is often based on examination findings. Currently, there is not one specific examination system used to identify cervical spine pathologies; however, clinicians using examination tools that have high reliability and validity may achieve better patient outcomes. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the reliability and validity of examination procedures used by clinicians for people with neck pain. Our preliminary research indicates that the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Bournemouth Questionnaire (BQ), McKenzie Method, and certain Manual Examination Procedures (MEPs) showed acceptable reliability and should be used by clinicians when examining people with cervical spine pathologies. Further research is warranted to better support the findings of this research.

Reliability of Classification Systems for Patients with Low Back Pain

Christy Edler, Munish Sharma, Amanda Ryan, Caitlin Sternberg
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Low back pain (LBP) is a common pathology affecting 80% of all Americans at some point in their life. Several examination techniques and classification systems exist to assist physical therapists in treating patients with LBP; however more research is warranted to determine the most efficacious and reliable methods. Selection of the tests and measures exhibiting the greatest reliability remain critical to efficacious management. A review of literature was conducted to determine the most reliable and valid tests and measures that can be used to examine the lumbar spine and sacroiliac joint. Our research will prompt further investigation of preferred interventions used by the Catholic Health System Physical Therapists of WNY, and eventually, a model of assessment that will impact clinical decision-making and ultimately outcomes.

Reporting of Hedging Activities-FAS 133 and IFRS 9

Lauralee Zientek
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In corporate America, companies must protect themselves from price fluctuations within the market when dealing with international companies. Some ways companies protect themselves is through the use of financial instruments such as derivatives and other types of hedging. Confusion occurs when accounting for these financial instruments, but through International Financial Reporting Standars (IFRS) 9 and Financial Accounting Standars (FAS) 133, a more concise and specific guideline for recognizing, measuring and reporting hedging is possible. The use of fair value of hedges on the balance sheet is now required, allowing shareholders to easily recognize hedging activity within the company. With the growth of international business, companies will continue to use these types of financial instruments to protect themselves and shareholders.

Response to Intervention in Urban Schools

Brian Dibb, Matt Haynes
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of this project is to examine the response to intervention (RTI) in urban schools. After an early examination of the research, we found that response to intervention in urban schools was not being properly implemented. It is common knowledge that RTI is vital to the student's progress. In education, RTI is a method of academic intervention used in the United States which is designed to provide early, effective assistance to children who are having difficulty learning. RTI is also designed to function as one part of a data-base process of identifying learning disabilities. This method can be used at both the group and individual level. Our research will show the impact of the introduction of RTI in urban schools in relation to the teacher's ability to raise the success rate of the students.

Revenue Recognition of Long-Term Contracts

Khorri Silcott
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This thesis will analyze the effects of the proposed joint project of the FASB and IASB on revenue recognition of long-term contracts. The purpose of this project is to explore differences in the revenue recognition approach when comparing US GAAP and IFRS. The issue of revenue recognition on long-term contracts has been highlighted by investors and other financial statement users who have concerns about ineffective information on financial statements.

The specific area of this study is revenue recognition of construction contracts and methods for reporting revenue on construction projects such as percentage-of-completion. This method has been used to recognize revenue based on the stage that the project is in. However, one common issue for long-term projects is that sometimes revenue is recognized before the asset title has been transferred. Also, changes in projected price can arise, complicating the recognition of profit. The goals, methods and risks of accounting for long-term contracts will be analyzed to find whether proposed changes are beneficial or detrimental.

Revenue Recognition Relating to GAAP and IFRS

Jessica Pankok
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This research shows revenue recognition relating to GAAP and IFRS. The topic will discuss what revenue recognition is, what revenue recognition involves, how technology can help revenue recognition, what improvements need to be made regarding revenue recognition, and how revenue is recognized regarding both GAAP and IFRS. Revenue recognition has problems that need to be fixed for companies to successfully continue in the ever-changing economy. This research shows how technology is helpful in solving problems and can help with improving revenue recognition issues in companies trying to succeed. Improvements in revenue recognition need to be viewed thoroughly to make sure current and future problems do not reappear. Revenue recognition can be critical if it is not recognized in the appropriate manner. The relationship between revenue recognition, GAAP, and IFRS is important in the future of accounting and needs to be taken seriously for success of companies.

S.M.A.R.T. Squad - A Pilot Program

Kenneth Ostroff, Josh Kibler, Talia Calabro, Allison Hernandez, Louis Rios, John Michael Bianco, Cassy Edwards
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

While technology is a fast-growing and ever-changing field, many people are unable to keep pace with new developments. The Daemen College S.M.A.R.T. Squad was designed with this fact in mind. "S.M.A.R.T." stands for "Student Mentored Assistants for Resources in Technology." It is an organization composed of students, for the students, and are located on campus to help others with their computer technology problems. These students have the technological experience to fix and help maintain both lab computers as well as individual PCs. Our students are able to increase their knowledge of computers, while teaching others who have less experience in the field of technology. This pilot program is a learning experience in computer maintenance and repair, and also assists in the development of leadership and ethical skills in the context of a "help desk" environment.

Siblings, Only Children, and Relationship Quality

Yolanda Shaw
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Friendships and sibling bonds are among the most enduring relationships in a person’s life. Studies of relationship types find that similarity of interest is an important factor in friendships, which are voluntary relationships, while for siblings, who do not choose one another, dependability is most highly valued (Floyd, 1995). Research has shown that adult siblings who frequently interact with one another and get along with their siblings, feel as if they have a close bond (Spitze and Trent, 2006). The purpose of the current study is to (1) determine whether siblings who are close in age will have a better quality of friendship with others than participants who have siblings that are significantly older or younger in age, (2) determine if participants who have siblings with whom they have a strong bond, regardless of the age difference between them, will have a better quality friendship with others than participants who have siblings with whom they have a weak bond, and (3) determine if participants who have siblings, regardless of age differences and feelings of closeness, will have better quality friendships with others than people who do not have siblings.

Sport Tourism Can Benefit a Destination With Increased Social, Environmental, and Economic Impacts

Jorge Ebanks
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sports fan or not, your city or state can be positively affected by major and minor league home teams, tournaments and themed events. Sponsoring cities position themselves to gain the most from supporting fans while creating a positive economic impact on local businesses. Benefits to society come in the form of infrastructure, environment, and economics, including job creation and increased consumer spending. Reputations of cities and areas are formed and changed as a result of specific types of events held in their area.   

Sports Stadiums Have Changed to Adapt to the Marketplace and Financial Needs of Team Owners

James Cardona
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Big sports cities understand the value of having a great sports venue to attract quality players, coaches and administrators for the franchise intended. They also realize the value of flexibility for hosting additional venue events. Having flexibility ultimately results in a wider profit margin and other financial rewards. Sports stadiums have increasingly become more recognizable and can be a centerpiece for tourism. Stadiums can capitalize on sporting events, concerts, tournaments, themed events, and more. Being versatile is key to being able to adapt.  This presentation will demonstrate the level to which specific stadiums, teams, team owners, city demographics, architecture, profit margins, utility cost, seating, construction cost, and TV contracts are related to certain sports and how ever-increasing costs for erecting sports stadiums and the inclusion of desirable amenities; as well as the cost to tax payers and how it directly benefits the city and profitability of the region. The strategies stadiums have successfully used to adapt to the marketplace and financial needs of team owners will also be highlighted. 

Stress and Aromatherapy

Julia Carroll, Alexandria Hillery, Kim Mulvey
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

 Stress is a major part of everyday life for millions of Americans. Fifty percent of Americans say that they are increasingly stressed about their ability to provide for their family’s basic needs, while 80% of Americans state that the economy is a significant cause of stress. As stress affects everyone differently, so does the way we handle it. Aromatherapy is an alternative approach that uses different essential oils and aromas from herbs and plants to reduce both psychological and physiological symptoms of stress. In reviewing the current literature, we believe there is a positive relationship between the use of aromatherapy and a reduction in stress symptoms. 

Stress Levels Between Resident and Commuter Students at Daemen College

Samantha Kowalski, Kristy Schneider, Alexa DeJesus
Faculty Sponsor: George Siefert Jr
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The National Center for Education Statistics states that 80% of undergraduate students are commuters (Jacoby & Garland, 2004). Forty eight percent of those students are working while going to school, while forty six percent work twenty-five hours or more to make ends meet (Jacoby & Garland, 2004). Due to work requirements, commuter student time is a critical and limited resource which directly impacts their ability to engage in academic and co-curricular activities (Jacoby & Garland, 2004). We want to know if commuter students are less likely to seek out academic or professional advisement because of the time constraints that they face.  Access to advisement may lower stress.  We will also examine whether commuter students have the same opportunity to develop close relationships with faculty, making the educational experience much less stressful. 


Synthesis and Characterization of Ruthenium Nitrosyls

Jacqueline Slack
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A series of ruthenium nitrosyls was synthesized from the ruthenium (III) chloride and sodium nitrite with polyaminocarboxylate ligands. Infrared spectroscopy and UV-Visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the ruthenium nitrosyl complexes. A pH-dependency study was conducted to determine the stability of the complexes and a photo-irradiation study was performed to determine the lability of the coordinated nitrosyl. Ruthenium nitrosyls have potential as a chemotherapy agent, as well as a photodynamic chemotherapy agent, in treating various forms of cancer.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning

Fiona Burzynski
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning (CIEL) was established by a group of like-minded campuses that share the idea of progressive education. These schools are committed to student-centered learning, with particular emphasis on the interconnectedness between teaching and learning. The CIEL exchange allows students to "study abroad" while remaining in the United States. There are currently thirteen institutions in this collaboration, ranging from as far west as California and Washington, to sunny Florida, and up to New Hampshire. Each school has its specialized fields of study, and students from any of the schools in CIEL can attend any of the other CIEL schools. If the CIEL school the student is attending doesn't have the student's program, then the student can apply to attend the CIEL schools with the desired program for a fall or spring semester. This can be incorporated for up to two semesters, at the tuition rate of the home institution. CIEL opens the boundaries for students to see more of the United States and provides opportunities for students to see what other schools with these progressive ideas have to offer.

The Differences Between US GAAP and IFRS Balance Sheet Reporting with Respect to Contingent Liabilities

Kristen Comerford
Faculty Sponsor: Michele Flint
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) is a method of accounting that has been utilized in Europe for the last five years and will become the method of US financial reporting standards in the near future. Over the last three decades, there has been a discussion of adopting a uniform set of accounting standards to conglomerate the global financial infrastructure. This has become a necessity due to increased globalization. Currently, companies who operate in multiple countries are required to report their financial statements differently for each country in which they do business. Companies within the United States follow the rules set forth with US GAAP, while other countries have their own rules that are followed. As the US moves toward the adoption of international standards, financial statements will be significantly affected. Of these financial statement changes, this study will focus on how contingent liabilities will be reported on the balance sheet due to the proposed change and international standards.

The Effect of Quadriceps and Hamstrings Recruitment Between Genders During a Drop Jump on ACL Integrity

Kaylee Peluso, Melanie Haier Mary Kate Wilson Ariel Trzewieczynski
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Inferences have been made as to why female athletes have a higher incidence of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries than male athletes. One theory suggests joint angles during jump landings put excess torque on the knee joint, secondary to women’s increased degree of genu valgus (knock kneed position). Researchers have also investigated the timing or sequencing of muscle recruitment in the legs during a jump landing and the amount of force each muscle is producing, specifically comparing the hamstrings and quadriceps. Greater quadriceps contraction than hamstrings, as well as quadriceps contraction occurring before the hamstrings, upon landing from a jump, could produce a greater tensile force (sprain) on the ACL. This results in an increased likelihood of an ACL tear. The research presented investigated electromyography (EMG) analyses of the hamstrings and quadriceps muscles in both women and men during non-contact activities, and furthermore, the effect these muscles pose on the strength of the ACL. EMG can provide an objective method in which to measure temporal sequencing and magnitude of muscle recruitment. Through this research, we seek to investigate factors predisposing male and female athletes to ACL sprains, and how we as physical therapists can impact these factors in an attempt to prevent injury.

The Effect of Stander Device Use on Range of Motion in Children

Lindsay Schroder, Eric Truesdell, Meg Weber
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Stander devices provide the support necessary to maintain a standing position for individuals who are unable to independently achieve or maintain an upright posture. Children who cannot walk or stand have the potential to develop adaptive tissue shortening in their lower extremities. Adaptive tissue shortening may lead to loss in joint range of motion and development of joint contractures. Joint contractures, in turn, can result in further limitations in functional abilities.

It has been suggested, clinically, that stander device use can promote elongation of tissues and prevent or reduce joint contractures in children. Some current research suggests beneficial results from the use of a stander device in increasing range of motion or preventing loss of motion in the lower extremities. However, there is no clear evidence indicating the appropriate parameters to follow when using a stander device to promote elongation of tissues. Furthermore, minimal evidence exists in the pediatric literature to support or refute the regular use of a stander device to improve an individual’s range of motion.

This poster presentation will provide a review of the recent evidence regarding the use of stander devices to promote range of motion and prevention of further development of joint contractures in individuals unable to independently stand and complete daily tasks.

The Effects of Bribery on Organizational Success

Chelsea Nicometi
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cultural differences have made the world what it is today, especially when it pertains to business ethics. For instance, bribery in Western cultures is not only viewed as unethical, but is also illegal. In many other cultures, however, it is not illegal; instead, it is normal practice to offer monetary or material gifts to business affiliates. I will present how organizational success results because of bribery, including a description of the legality and acceptability of bribery among different
countries. This will involve explanations of ethical standards, which includes
guidelines and laws to which businesses must adhere. Also, the varying degrees
to which bribery is acceptable in other countries in comparison to Western
culture will be discussed. I will also discuss the effects bribery has, not just
on a corporation, but how it affects individuals and communities.

The Effects of Human Growth Hormone on Athletic Performance

Emily Werner, Marybeth Nugent, Amber Levy, Melissa Nephew
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Human growth hormone also known as hGH, is a chemical naturally produced by the pituitary gland in the human body. Human growth hormone is important for growth and metabolism, especially in adolescents. In recent years, this drug has been administered to athletes in order to improve performance. Currently, the National Collegiate Athletic Association and International Olympic Committee have banned this peptide hormone from athletic competitions. According to recent studies, hGH has been linked to many health related complications. Analysis of current research leads to the hypothesis that although hGH is preferred by athletes to quickly and easily improve their performance capabilities, it is not as effective as proper diet and strength and conditioning training.

The Image of Women in the Media

Alyssa Crane, Cristina Paternostro
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As an extension of the ideas and concepts we studied in our class, The Image of Women in Art and the Media, this project sets out to explore the role that the media plays in controlling our thoughts and attitudes about women. In the media, images of women are used to sell products and stereotypes through advertisements and commercials. These images of women are used as objects to be looked at, to be objectified. Images gathered from the Fall semester and over the last few months will be displayed on a computer monitor while conclusions we've drawn from these images will be listed on an accompanying poster display.

The objective of this presentation is to present visual information to spark discussion within the group and viewers at the poster session. By utilizing a website called Ning.com, our group has set out to collect these images and expose the issues associated with them.

The Incorporation of culture/Culture in the Spanish Regents Exams

Michelle Collier
Faculty Sponsor: Melissa Fiori
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This project is a study on the inclusion of culture and Culture in the New York State-mandated Spanish Regents exams. Little c culture examines the understood parts of the culture, including acceptable mannerisms and greetings, while big C culture represents what is evident in society, such as music, literature, and billboards. These Regents exams are taken by high school students upon completion of proficiency-level Spanish and include four sections: speaking, listening, reading comprehension, and writing. For the purposes of this study, I sampled 8 exams, looking at only the listening and reading comprehension sections (both questions and answers). Little c culture was harder to find in the exams, while big C culture was often present in the readings, but not in the questions. In the end, it was evident that the Regents made an attempt to include culture in the exams, but it is not assessed. Rather, the exam focuses on comprehension of vocabulary.

The Prediction of Romantic Relationship Satisfaction Across Time: Physical Attractiveness and Perceived Similarity

Christina Paternostro
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Prior research has demonstrated that physical attractiveness plays a pivotal role in relationship satisfaction during the mate selection process, but becomes less important over time in determining whether or not an individual is satisfied with an on-going relationship. However, no studies to date have identified the time frame in which relationship satisfaction shifts from being driven primarily by physical qualities of a partner, to non-physical characteristics of a partner. The current study seeks to determine the time frame with which physical attractiveness continues to be a good predictor of relationship satisfaction, and seeks to specify other criteria (perceptions of social support and perceived similarity of one's own and one's partner's personality), that may play a stronger predictive role in regard to relationship satisfaction over time.

The Role of Massage Therapy in Chronic Pain and Depression

Christine Bakeman
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In the past decade, the use of complementary medicine has been on the rise by individuals who are looking for alternative ways to increase health and well-being. One of the largest areas of growth within the domain of complementary medicine has been the use of techniques to reduce pain in those who suffer from chronic pain conditions. The current study investigates the role massage therapy plays in reducing pain and depression in individuals suffering from chronic pain. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three massage conditions (therapeutic massage, aromatherapy massage, or no massage). Participants’ levels of state pain and state depression both prior to, and following, the condition to which they were randomly assigned were measured using the Visual Analogue Scale for Pain (Bieri, Reeve, Champion, Addicoat, & Ziegler, 1990), and the Beck Depression Inventory (Beck, 1961). It was hypothesized that therapeutic massage would result in significantly greater decreases in state pain and state depression than aromatherapy massage, and that both therapeutic and aromatherapy massage would result in significantly greater decreases in pain and depression compared to the control condition.

The Role of Norm Perception and Personality in Students' Perceptions of Cheating Behavior

Charanna Wise
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Academic dishonesty is a pervasive problem in colleges and universities. Perception of cheating norms plays an important role in students’ evaluations of the acceptability of academic dishonesty. Engler, Landeu, and Epstein (2008) found that students overestimate the amount of cheating that their peers engage in. Studies conducted on issues outside of the realm of academic dishonesty, such as perceptions of peer alcohol use, drug use, and sexual activity have achieved similar findings in that students overestimate how often their peers are engaging in these negative health behaviors. Williams, Nathanson, and Paulhus (2010) examined the relationship between personality traits and academic dishonesty. Conscientiousness was found to be an important factor; students who are conscientious prepare for exams and assignments, and may therefore be less prone to academic dishonesty as a means of compensating for lack of preparation (Williams et al., 2010). The current research brings together the two lines of research discussed above. Specifically, the present design explores the possibility that students’ conscientiousness levels moderate the effect of students’ perception of the cheating norm on beliefs about the seriousness of academic dishonesty.

The Unmet Needs of Minorities Living With Multiple Sclerosis

Mandy Fitzgerald, Taylor Meyers, Kathryn Miastkowski, Katelyn Pellegrino
Faculty Sponsor: Theresa Kolodziej
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic, progressive neurological condition, affecting 2.5 million individuals worldwide. Minorities with Multiple Sclerosis face language barriers, socioeconomic challenges, and an overall inaccessibility to community health care support creating further difficulty in management of this degenerative disease. Several questionnaires and surveys have revealed deficiencies in the care of the minority population of individuals diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. Research has identified factors that correlate to the patients’ ethnic identity, especially if their primary language is not English, which may compromise quality of life. These studies suggest that both patients and health care practitioners recognize a perceived decrease in quality of care for patients diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. Interventions to enhance patient care need to include patient education, support systems in the community to assist health care practitioners in monitoring their patients’ disease progression, and assistance with medication and treatment plan compliance. Ultimately, further research should enhance health care professionals’ understanding of their patients’ needs to improve quality of life for minorities diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis.

Tools For The Assessment Of Return To Function

Nicole Langworthy, Nicole Hobbs, Rob Koshinski, Eric Fattey
Faculty Sponsor: Raymond Hammel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Physical therapists are continually seeking an effective way to measure a patient’s quality of functional movement. In order to design a relevant treatment protocol and track progress over time, therapists must be able to reliably determine a patient’s ability to coordinate movements of all extremities and move in a multitude of directions. The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is an additional tool used in determining quality of multi-segmental movement. The inter-rater reliability of the FMS was established by Minick et al. in 2010. A significant variance in agreement was reported, with values ranging from 0.400-1.000. The discrepancy in FMS rating could be attributed to many factors, such as the level of experience or training of the raters and unclear scoring criteria. The use of a functional measurement tool, such as the ScapStick, may better allow physical therapists to determine where a patient’s movements are functionally inadequate. Huspen and Baco (2005) determined the ScapStick’s inter-tester reliability to be 0.863 to 0.998 when testing across 10 different upper extremity reach tasks. Due to the reported reliability of the ScapStick, further research intends to use this tool to assess improvement in functional movement strategies of patients with shoulder pathologies. By doing so, Physical Therapy interventions may be developed or altered to fulfill individual patient needs and improve patient care during services.

Treating ADHD: Biofeedback versus Medication

Laura Burns, Lynn DeJonge, Emily Strub, Anastasia Urbanski
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavorial disorder that is most often diagnosed during childhood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as of 2007 there were 5.4 million children between the ages of 4-17 that have been diagnosed with ADHD, and approximately 2.7 million of which receive medication to treat ADHD. Biofeedback is an alternative treatment that allows a person to learn how to change physiological activity, such as thinking and behavior, in order to improve their health without taking medication. Specific instruments measure physiological activity, which help the patient become more in tune with their body. After an extended period of time, the patient is able to control their thinking and behavior without using the instruments. A review of current literature and clinical research was conducted to determine the effectiveness of biofeedback as a treatment for ADHD compared to medication.

Use of Kangaroo Care for Preterm Infants

Amberlee Meulendyk, Laura Antoine, Jessica Czamara
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Premature infancy is the most frequent cause of infant death in the United States. About one in ten newborns are born premature and over 1 million die within the first 37 weeks of gestation. Kangaroo Care is an alternative form of treatment for preterm infants that involves skin to skin contact between the parents and the premature newborn. Used with and without an incubator support, Kangaroo Care has been known to increase weight, neurological responses, oxygenation and further improve the success of breast feeding for a preterm infant. Unlike the incubator support, parents and babies are able to bond through constant touch and smell which encourages growth and development. Kangaroo care is a proven alternative to incubator support, especially globally, where intensive medical care is not found and cannot be afforded. This alternative care for preemies can be used globally to increase chances of survival where these chances are usually very slim. This research will explore the current literature on the effective use of Kangaroo Care, or skin to skin contact, between parents and their preterm infants.

Use of Pedagogies by Full-time Nursing Faculty

Donna Sandretto
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Lou Rusin
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The National League for Nursing (NLN, 2003) has called for reform in nursing education. Innovative pedagogy usage is one technique that may lead to reform in nursing education. The purpose of this research was to examine the use of innovative pedagogy by full-time pre-licensure associate degree program faculty members and full-time pre-licensure baccalaureate degree program faculty members in order to better understand faculty comfort and efficiency of use with pedagogies. Comparing the results of the two educational levels provides a better understanding for student preparation and nursing program philosophy. The Community of Inquiry serves as a conceptual model illustrating the importance of collaborative and student centered education. This research, along with the literature review, emphasizes the continued need for research regarding innovative pedagogy usage and the evolving health care system.

What is the Effect of Stander Devices on Bone Density in Non-Ambulatory Children?

Megan Tomassini, Erin Gustason, Erin Tobin
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Stander devices are assistive technology that assist individuals with a variety of disabilities to achieve and maintain a standing position. Children who are non-ambulatory have an increased risk of fractures, weakness, and decreased bone density due to significant decrease in typical stresses on weight bearing bones. Wolff’s Law states that bones adapt depending on the mechanical stresses that are imparted to them. Applying this theory to weight bearing in stander devices for children who are non-ambulatory may cause increased stress to bone, and in turn, an increase in bone mineral density. Little research has been conducted to determine the validity of stander devices used to increase bone density. Further research is warranted to determine potential benefits of static versus dynamic stander devices, as well as the parameters for their use. Once the impact of stander device use on bone density has been established along with the appropriate parameters of use, then research can explore long term outcomes of stander use on bone density as well as impact on risk of fractures, weakness, poor alignment, and poor posture. This poster presentation will provide an analysis of the existing research evidence on the effects of stander device use on bone mineral density in children.

Women Overcoming the Glass Ceiling

Tiffany Brignone
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Traditionally, there has been a wide variety of stereotypes that vary within different sectors of the population. While many of these stereotypes still exist today, some  no longer exist because people tend to change their opinions as trends change and time evolves. I will demonstrate the stereotypes of women and men as they attempt advancement into upper management positions and the reasons why, even though women have been able to achieve higher corporate levels than in previous decades, they have not been able to break the glass ceiling as often as males. The primary focus of my research will be: By removing stereotypes that correspond to women lacking capabilities to effectively lead an organization, women can stride equally with men climbing the corporate ladder. I will reveal different opinions and perceptions that men and women have on the topic of women breaking through the glass ceiling for more advanced positions, including Fortune 500 statistical information on how many women CEOs there are compared to men and how many women hold a lower entry level job compared to upper management positions. I will also show trends across specific industries and explain how the level of education one has plays a role in this topic.

Exhibits

Dimensional Transitions

Art Club, Alyssa Crane, Alicia Malik, Miranda Roth, Danielle Werynsk, Nicole Earl, Liz Kenison, Jason Tower, Clinton Szatkowski, Dave Mawer
Faculty Sponsor: Felice Koenig
10:45 am - 4:00 pm
Art Gallery Lobby

 After experiencing the Paterson Ewen "Inspiration and Influence" show at the Toronto Art Gallery, members of the Art Club will create artwork in response to this exhibition. Ewen is a Canadian artist who bridged the divide between painting and sculpture and explored the relationship and differences between them. Ewen captures his environment through his depiction of landscapes. During our trip we explored the cultural differences between Canadian and American art, and based on what we discover in Toronto we will develop an exhibit that creates a positive aesthetic experience through painting and sculpture. The project will help reveal Art Club’s community voice, which refers back to Ewen’s strive to find his own unique artistic voice.

Visual and Performing Arts Senior Exhibit

Laura Sommer, Brianna Bartus, Julie Berger, Alison Rebman, Christina Slomczewski, Gina Territo
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Art Gallery

Student artwork will be on display in the gallery throughout the Academic Festival.

Alison Rebman, Brianna Bartus, and Julie Berger will receive a B.S. in Visual Arts Education.

Christina Slomczewski and Gina Territo will receive a B.S. in Art.

Performances

9th Annual Moot Court

Sabrina Rodriguez, Mitchell Altman- Cosgrove, Yen Bui, Jeffrey Chavez, Kevin Gill, Amy Grimes, Galen Lowell, Wade Peitrocarlo, Saladi Shebule, Samantha Spicer, Ally Szafarski, Louis Rios
Faculty Sponsor: Laurie Walsh
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Schenck 202

The Pre-Law Association is proud to present, in conjunction with the History and Government Department, the 9th Annual Moot Court Experience. Students will stage a trial - complete with opening statements, testimony from witnesses, closing statements, and a jury deliberation to determine the outcome. Students participating in Moot Court have studied the “art” of law, perfecting questioning, presentation of evidence, and, most importantly, framing their legal arguments. This year's case involves a drive by shooting. The trial will conduct in-depth analysis consisting of questioning and witness testimony to determine whether the defendant is guilty or innocent. Moot Court is a mock trial situation where facts and information will be examined in a trial-like manner.

Drama Performance: Something That I'm Supposed to Be

Cameron Garrity, Kyle Gordon as Jim Henson, Cameron Garrity as Kermit and Ernie, Shakeel Alexander as Michael Eisner, Rachel Gau as Mickey Mouse, and, Puppet Ensemble Featuring, Elizabeth Kenison, Danielle Peres, and Emily Styn , , Stage Manager, Yen Bui, , Puppet Wrangler , Sara O'Brien, , Directed by, Professor Christian Brandjes and Cameron Garrity, , Scenic Design Team, Katie Chesna, Katlin Daigler, Nikki Dzimira, and Erin Hutchinson, , Graphics, Nicholas Kaczmarek
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Alumni Lounge

Something That I'm Supposed to Be is the fantasized re-telling of Jim Henson, American filmmaker and creator of The Muppets. Dr. Robert Waterhouse directs sophomore Cameron Garrity's script.

Quintus Island is home to Jim Henson and his Muppet creations. It is a magical place where singing and dancing is the only prerogative of the day. When that home is threatened by the arrival of Michael Eisner, heir to the Disney magic, Jim and Kermit are forced to decide what is truly important as they face impending doom and their own mortality.

Festival Musicale!

Chris Malik, multiple
Faculty Sponsor: Christopher Malik
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

Music is a language that crosses all borders and unites humankind in a communication that is aesthetic and universal. The experience of music is so pervasive in our lives that we can be unconscious to its presence. Take the time to listen and watch it be created and music can become an intimate connection to a spiritual plane and another world. Whether you are aroused by the rhythm of drumming, chill to the strum of an acoustic guitar, or dream to the colorful chord of a Steinway, you do not need to be a professional musician to participate in the joy of music. Come hear Daemen students, faculty, and staff as they share some of their personal art of music making.

Musical Jam

Denise Emer, Jeremy Hall , Chris Malik, Bob Gunther, John Mayer
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

This performance is a musical session that will include music from the past and present in various genres, including classic rock, R & B/blues, and pop music.

Step Team Performance

Tamika Crawford, Tahja Ferguson, Lacresha Pierre, Kenya McKinnis, Danice Williams, Casey Harris, Laura Antoine, Bonnie Humphrey, Taneesha White, Quanisha Ransom, Alphonso Walker, Patrick McGowan, Ayana Williams, Danaya Bolden , Jillian Wilson, Tamika Crawford, Sarah Lang
Faculty Sponsor:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Wick Dining Room

The award winning Daemen College Step Team will thrill and excite all with their creative choreography, their razor-sharp execution, and their indomitable spirit. Stunning to both see and hear, come see why this powerhouse of a team is the pride of Daemen College.

 

Core Compencies

The Daemen College core curriculum is an innovative competency-based curriculum in learning community format. In today’s rapidly changing world, the competencies developed in the core curriculum will have lasting value and will provide a strong basis for lifelong learning. Certain courses are thematically linked as learning communities of two courses, enabling students from different majors to view course material through the perspective of different disciplines and to develop friendships with students outside their own specific field of study.

The specific competencies identified by our faculty as foundational for a knowledgeable and creative individual are:

I. Critical Thinking and Creative Problem Solving
Critical thinking employs intellectual skills such as observation, classification, analysis and synthesis in a reasonable and reflective manner to arrive at meaningful decisions.

II. Literacy in Information and Multi-Media Technology
This competency is defined as the capacity to effectively utilize technologies, including computers, software, the internet, and databases for research, communication, and presentation.

III. Communication Skills
Effective communication includes grammatical and technical competency as well as the ability to communicate across cultural boundaries with an awareness of the rhetorical effects of language in a variety of situational contexts (including non-verbal).

IV. Affective Judgment
Affective judgment emanates from the relationship between sensory experience and emotional response. Unmediated sensory experience can move people to great emotional depths and can provoke powerful sensations of certainty, wholeness, ambiguity, and vulnerability, to name just a few, all in the absence of discourse or reasoned contemplation.

V. Moral and Ethical Discernment
Moral and ethical discernment is defined as a non-judgmental understanding of how moral and ethical standards are formed, how they influence aspects of our lives, and how they shape public discourse and policy.

VI. Contextual Competency
Contextual competency is the ability to understand past and present issues affecting individuals, organizations, local societies, and global communities.

VII. Civic Responsibility
Civic responsibility is grounded in an appreciation that the health of local, national, and global communities is dependent on the direct and active participation of all members in the well being of the community as a whole.

Committee

Edwin Clausen - Vice President, Academic Affairs
Michael Brogan - Dean, Health & Human Services Division
Kevin Telford - Dean, Arts and Sciences Division
Margene Weiss - Conferences & Events
Jim Bachraty - Instructional Technology Services
Greg Ford - Physical Therapy
Mary Fox - Off-Campus Programs in Education and CIEL
John Frederick - Executive Leadership & Change Program
Sherrie Gustas - President’s Office
Felice Koenig - Art Department
Chris Malik - Student Activities
Tom Wojciechowski - Web Communications
Doris Murphy - Academic Affairs
Kim Pagano - Orientation and Student Leadership Development
Sabrina Fennell - Higher Education Opportunity Program
Peter Siedlecki - English Department/Director Honors Program
Brenda Young - Natural Sciences Department
John Zaepfel - Academic Computing Services

Student Editor Program Book

Katherine Kapanek, B.S., Business Administration, 2011 and Sigma Beta Delta

Student Proposal Logistics Review

Christine Rakowski, B.A., Mathematics, 2011

Poster Session Coordinator

Jessica Looney, Graduate Intern

Academic Festival T-Shirt Design

Jason Tower, BS Visual Arts Education, 2012

Special Thanks To

Brenda Rosen, Conference & Events Office; Academic Affairs; Daemen Dining staff; Diana Alvarado and Printing Office staff; Classroom Technology Services and Maintenance.

Design for Program Book & Poster

Mike Morgan, Joyce Strobel, Publications

Program Book Managing Editor

Margene Weiss

World of Opportunity Wizard

Wow! Did you know business students have endless opportunities for internships?

Our Business students interned at all sorts of companies, from M & T Bank and Fisher Price to New Era Caps and the Buffalo Sabres.

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