Daemen College Academic Festival

Download a printable version of the program.

A Celebration of Academic Achievement, April 18, 2012.

The Daemen College Academic Festival 2012 brings us together on campus to celebrate the academic and creative achievements of Daemen students.

The Daemen College Academic Festival centers on student presentations to campus and community, providing a showcase for academic excellence and achievement through student and faculty presentations, exhibitions and performances. These presentations may reflect work done in a single discipline or be interdisciplinary in nature, and they may include posters, papers, panel discussions, exhibits, videos and artistic, musical or theatrical performances. In some disciplines, you will be viewing final capstone projects and/or research.

We are deeply appreciative of the level of student involvement in Academic Festival 2012 and of faculty support for this endeavor. Faculty sponsors have worked with students through teaching, research projects, Think Tank projects and study abroad experiences, and they have provided encouragement in the development of proposals. We hope you will enjoy the insightful and exciting ideas generated through student and faculty scholarship.

Celebrating our 12th year, we thank President Edwin G. Clausen for his leadership and support of the annual Academic Festival. We also want to thank members of the Festival Planning Committee who have worked over the past year. Committee members are listed inside the back cover of this Program Book.

Dramatic stage production by University of Botswana Visual & Performing Arts students and faculty will highlight 2012 Daemen College Academic Festival

A dramatic stage production by students and faculty from the University of Botswana Department of Visual Arts and Performing Arts highlights the 2012 Daemen College Academic Festival. Entitled “Gifts From Daddy,” the performance includes a series of vignettes focusing on the AIDS crisis in Africa. The University of Botswana production will take place 7 p.m., April 17, in Wick Center

During their week here at Daemen, the students from the University of Botswana will also perform for Buffalo Public Schools students. Performances will take place at South Park High School on Thursday, April 19, and at Frederick Law Olmstead and Lafayette High Schools on Friday, April 20.

Students and faculty from the University of Botswana will also participate in Academic Festival activities and opportunities on April 18. Thursday, April 19, will feature a special workshop for theatre practitioners, presented by Dr. David Kerr of the University of Botswana Department of Visual Arts and Performing Arts, on “The Social Space of Indigenous African Performance and its Transformation for Applied Theater: Contemporary African Theater.”

Twice the size of Arizona, Botswana is a parliamentary republic of 1.6 million people in south-central Africa, bounded by Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and South Africa. Botswana has a strong economic outlook. However, the AIDS epidemic remains the biggest challenge threatening the country’s future, with 37.5% of the population infected.

A recent seminar organized by the University of Botswana Center for the Study of HIV and AIDS noted the devastating consequences of the epidemic for countries on the African continent and worldwide. The noted effects included erasing decades of progress made in extending life expectancy; loss of income for households, where caring for sick relatives reduces the capacity to earn money; extreme strain on the health sector; and negative impact on Africa’s economic development, in turn, affecting Africa’s overall ability to cope with the epidemic.

Presentations

Building Honors at Daemen

Thomas Wilkie, Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

This past October the Annual Conference of the National Collegiate Honors Council was held in Phoenix, Arizona. The Daemen College Honors Program was represented by its Director and two members of its Governing Board. They attended numerous meetings and lectures regarding the work and development of honors programs around the country. The trio learned about how different schools approached their programs, as well as the different work done by their honors students. This presentation will explain the Governing Board’s plans to utilize what they learned at the conference in order to build a program that benefits the larger Daemen Community. Presenters will also take a look back at how far the program has come due to the efforts of its graduating seniors.

Bunraku: Japanese Puppetry

Robert Waterhouse, Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

A Faculty Development Award allowed me to travel over the summer to the home of Japanese puppetry, The National Bunraku Theatre in Osaka, Japan. Here, I present my impressions of a tradition scrupulously maintained since the 17th century. Buffalo's most prominent puppeteer Michele Costa and Daemen College puppeteer Cameron Garrity will give a brief presentation inspired by Japanese techniques.

Causes and Effects of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in the Academic Success of Children with FAS

Lauren Leidolph
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Wick 113-115

Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) affects many children in both our country and others. It is caused by excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy, and potential effects include mental retardation and physical anomalies of the child's skull and face, which are visible in the classroom. Many educators in previous years were not equipped to provide adequate resources and interventions for students with FAS who were not adapting well in the general learning environment. Although this had proven a problem in the past, educators in recent years have been equipped with better knowledge in how to adapt the environment and the curriculum to better meet the student’s behavioral and physical needs. This presentation will highlight this syndrome's causes and effects and highlight the academic success of children with FAS.

Costa Rica in January - Pura Vida

Ann Montaperto, Abby Cryan, Alyssa Hanlon, Brittany Boyce, Darcie Neaverth, Gretchen Morelli, Molly Tyrrell, Monica Metzger, Morgan Devitt, Sarah Velarde, Stephanie Czaja, Tiffany Petranek
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenck 107

The best way to learn about animals and plants is to observe them in their natural setting. To experience this firsthand, students enrolled in "Costa Rican Natural History" traveled to Costa Rica in January to explore its rich biodiversity. Each day was filled with exploring unique ecosystems, from lowland tropical rainforests to the higher elevation cloud forest, which they viewed from zip lines suspended in trees. Monkeys, sloths and iguanas lined the riverbanks during boat trips. In addition to learning about biology, the students also gained an understanding of Costa Rican culture and economy. They observed how Costa Rica has been able to promote their biodiversity and establish a solid ecotourism industry. Students also enjoyed fresh fruit, friendly people and the opportunity to learn and practice Spanish. This group presentation will discuss the unique features and creatures of Costa Rica.

DC Book: Creating a Well-Rounded Experience

Megan Conley, Rebecca Hess, Helen Lawrence
Faculty Sponsor: Kathryn Graf
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

The DC Book: 50 Traditions to Do Before you Graduate is a way to display the various traditions students accomplish while attending Daemen College. From career building activities to social events, the DC book incorporates all that Daemen has to offer. For many students this book is a way to remember their college experiences and share them with others. Senior Helen Lawrence has used the DC Book in her Resident Assistant (RA) position as a source of encouragement for her freshman residents. To date she has completed 45 of the 50 traditions and only started in the past year. Sophomore Rebecca Hess was influenced by Helen, who is her RA, to start her own DC Book traditions, and the book has allowed her to keep a scrapbook of her experiences with her friends. The DC Book is more than just a list of traditions; it's a list of experiences that alumni will remember forever.

Development and Implementation of a Standard Education Guide for the Congestive Heart Failure Patient and Evaluation of Impact on Medical Therapy, Hospital Readmission Rates and Patient Outcomes

Patricia Geiger
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 120

This project's goal was to implement a formal education process to improve congestive heart failure patient outcomes in the Kalieda Health system during hospitalization and following discharge. Since recent literature supports the positive impact of education on improving congestive heart failure patient outcomes, this was attempted through use of a congestive heart failure education guide developed for this study. To facilitate this, designated staff representatives provided education for a pilot sample of a maximum of 100 inpatients age 50 or older, who were admitted at most six months prior to initiation of the study with diagnoses of congestive heart failure or development of heart failure during hospitalization. This project compares the evidence, obtained by chart review, through an observational pilot longitudinal design, based on medications usage and outcomes from before and after using the guide. Outpatient medication compliance data was accessed through home care follow up with the Visiting Nurses Association.

Dominican Republic Service Learning

Maegan Olson, Kaitlin Arida, Kristina Lord, Brittany Anthon, Nicole D'Agostino, Gina Gaca, Jennifer Sullivan, Rachael Masser, Jessica Utech
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Schenck 107

Over inter-semester 2012, nine students traveled abroad to the Dominican Republic for a service learning project. During their two week stay they experienced many cultural and social differences. In the capital, Santo Domingo, students stayed with Dominican families and were fully immersed in the culture. They participated in classes and tours of Dominican society, culture and history. These hands on experiences changed the way these students saw their lives in the US. The second week was spent with the rural community of Hato Mayor, teaching health related topics to women and building the community center that another Daemen group had started three years earlier. Although challenging, this became a community project, involving anyone from children to older women. Please join these students as they share their experience of impacting lives and the profound meaning it left on each student.

Effective Teaching Strategies: Engaging Students in Their Own Learning

Allison McAdoo, Katie Lutz, Amy Grimes, Sarah Brody, Chelsey Kump
Faculty Sponsor:
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Wick 113-115

For this presentation, we will be demonstrating three models of instruction through lesson plans: Direct Instruction, Presentation and Cooperative Learning. Each person/group will demonstrate part of their lesson using one of these three models, while also incorporating teaching techniques and stategies to engage students in the learning process.

Entrepreneurship in Action

Lia Zahn, Aaron Davis, Mario Bermudez, Holly Hogg, Rebecca Howell, Alvaro Orozco
Faculty Sponsor: Pauline Soeffing
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Schenck 202

Students from Entrepreneurship in Action (ENTR 401) will give a 5-7 minute summary presentation of their individual business feasibility plans that were developed for this capstone course in the interdisciplinary entrepreneurship minor. Building upon techniques honed in ENTR 201 and 301 - such as creativity and innovation, creative problem solving, brainstorming, opportunity recognition, business planning and financing - students will present their ideas for new business ventures based upon individual skills, interests and aspirations. Some presenters hope to use their business plans to launch their businesses after graduation.

Exploring High Quality Literature: Nursery Through Grade 2

Natalie Banach, Crystallynn McNutt, Emily Wilwol, Melissa Fabrizio, La'Quisha Pompey, Mei Zhan
Faculty Sponsor:
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Wick 113-115

This presentation will enlighten our audience on how to engage students from nursery through second grade in high quality literature education. Through both our classroom and practicum experience, we will demonstrate the power of literature in student learning, define the goals of a response-centered curriculum, plan ways to explore literature in the classroom, and recognize student response to literature. We will also display examples of high quality literature through multiple author studies, which will provide an in-depth knowledge of authors’ books.

Factors Associated With Emergency Room Presentation, Time of Diagnosis, and Treatment of Stroke

Claudia Moulden
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 120

This study's goal was to gain insight into factors which cause patients to delay seeking emergency treatment for strokes, the third leading cause of death and number one cause of adult disability. This quantitative retrospective research study of 40 participants occurred in a non-profit hospital in New York State and successfully explored possible factors that cause delays in the administration of intravenous recombinant tissue-Plasminogen Activator to stroke patients. I ascertained the predominant signs and symptoms, risk factors, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores, documented reason for delay, insurance type, and mode of transportation. Data collected by the researcher from the study's setting was analyzed with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 18.0. Studying a large number of patients admitted to hospitals for stroke can aid deeper analysis of factors impacting delay in seeking treatment and reasons for those factors. Further understanding requires a larger scale study, and continued studies must be given more consideration and effort.

Hispanics United of Buffalo Service Learning Experience

Emily Litwin
Faculty Sponsor: Melissa Fiori
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

Hispanics United of Buffalo is Buffalo's only community based not-for-profit, multi service organization serving low and moderate income Hispanics, African Americans, and immigrants. Their mission is to promote self-sufficiency and improve quality of life for Hispanics in Erie County. This presentation will focus on the Seniors Program which is designed to capture the culture and heritage of the Latino Community to make a comfortable location for Latino senior citizens. I will discuss my role as a part of "Case Management" along with my responsibilities, difficulties, and accomplishments throughout my service learning experience.

Hope for Tomorrow Medical Mission: Haiti 2011

Erika Funnell, Virginia Kaufman
Faculty Sponsor: Lynn Matthews
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Schenck 107

In May 2011, a group of surgeons from Buffalo and students from Daemen and D'youville Colleges traveled to an earthquake stricken Haiti on a medical mission with "The Hope for Tomorrow Foundation". The goal of the mission was to help by providing surgeries in the small town of Les Cayes. Students had the opportunity to experience Haitian culture, history and leadership and to assist the surgeons in life changing surgeries. Over the course of five days, the group met with Haitian leaders, donated supplies, performed over 100 surgeries and visited a local orphanage. Surgeries performed included hernia repairs, club foot repair, keloid removals, microphlebectomies, sclerotherapy and tibial and femoral fracture repairs. This mission had a great impact on the people of Haiti but had an even greater impact on these students. Join them as they take you through their experiences and share how it changed their lives as people and students.

Improving Sustainability on our Campus

Kenzie Reynen, Robert Altenburger, Ashley Barnard, Sarah Carpenter, Chelsea Courtade, Connor Delaney, Alicia Dolan, Kelsey Fahy, Colleen Frantz, Kayla Hampton, Amber Jablonski, Mark Kerner, Jamie Leroy, Ameliah Martinez-Tiberi, Hannah Marvin, Coren McLaughlin, Anthony Olan, Morgan Olson, Andrew Piatkowski, Angela Sikora, Jordan Spehar, Kelvin Tavarez, Sharon Benz
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Schenck 107

As part of our learning community, “Introduction to Sustainable Communities” and “Introduction to Environmental Science,” we discussed how we can improve sustainable practices on the Daemen College campus. We will share what we are currently doing on our campus and how we might incorporate best practices from other schools to take our commitment to sustainability to the next level. Groups will discuss some possible options for campus food services, landscaping, energy use and recycling.

Integrative Rehabilitation: A Perspective on Future Rehabilitation

Kehua Zhou
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brogan
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 101

In the United States, the concept of Integrative Rehabilitation is relatively new to both clinicians and patients, although the phrase Integrative Medicine has been popularized. The emerging concept of Integrative Rehabilitation has been historically exercised in China for many years; however, the practice with respect to a global perspective has yet to be fully established. Alternative and complimentary therapies, such as dry needle technique, types of massage, and forms of relaxation exercise have garnered interest and, to some extent, clinical integration throughout the world. Given the level of interest associated, we need to explore understandings in the establishment of academic and research initiatives and the creation of clinical centers in Integrative Rehabilitation. The aims of this presentation are to: 1) review the history and current status of Alternative Rehabilitation - mainly Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) - and integrative rehabilitation, 2) make comparisons between Alternative (like TCM) and Conventional (physical therapy) Rehabilitation medicine, and 3) explore innovative strategies in this integration.

Part I: Uses for Natural Gas from Fracking the Gas Shale- Can We Achieve Energy Independence?

Brittany Latray, Kristen Miles, Jessica Rutkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RIC 101

Fracking is a process that extracts natural gas or oil from the Earth by injecting chemicals and liquids into underground rocks to widen existing fractures. It seems a very attractive option when considering the possibility of 100 years' supply of natural gas in the Marcellus Shale and its multimillion dollar economic impact on central and western New York. This presentation will describe the process, looking at the feasibility of true production levels from the shale and what sectors of the economy the increased supply of natural gas could address. It will also answer the question of how big  a contribution fracking could make to true energy independence in the long run for the United States.

Part II: Fracking Shale and the Potential for Environmental Impact

Hayley C. Brown, Brad Casper, Matthew Thompson
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RIC 101

Fracking is a process that extracts natural gas or oil from the Earth by injecting chemicals and liquids into underground rocks to widen existing fractures. Since the advent of fracking ten years ago, a body of scientific evidence has begun to be gathered that can provide a valid basis for deciding what environmental risks fracking would involve. This presentation will talk about the steps in the process that could adversely affect the environment and what scientific evidence has been accumulated to assess these risks. It will also deal with questions that could be asked and what New York State has done to address these concerns in allowing fracking to occur in the state.

Part III: Concerning the Health Issues, Water and Air Pollution from Fracking - Who Would Bear the Cost?

Margaret Duffy, Laura McGorray, Daniel Mills
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
RIC 101

This presentation will describe types of water pollution and incurred clean up costs. It will look at the history of air pollution from fracking and the costs of monitoring the pollution that has been part of the Texas and Pennsylvania experience, possibly describing residents' experiences with fracking. There will also be a discussion of published literature and a summary of the data that has been collected on this topic.

Piercings, Tattoos, Body Hair and Personal Appearance in the Workplace: What is Acceptable and Unacceptable?

Holly Hogg, Paige Ranieri, Mike Sciascia, Mario Bermudez, Alyssa Chawgo, Dan Busch
Faculty Sponsor: Sharlene Buszka
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
Schenck 202

Freedom of expression is a valued right in the United States. In our culture, choices regarding hair style, clothing, beards, tattoos and body piercings are some ways individuals exercise this right. However, does this freedom extend into the workplace? Can employers discriminate against you on the basis of how you choose to exercise this right? How do employers perceive those who choose to express themselves in unconventional ways? To find these answers, attend this entertaining, interesting and informative presentation by a group of Human Resource Management students. ALSO A LEAP ACADEMY EVENT.

Service Learning in Spanish: El Buen Amigo

Abrianna Adler
Faculty Sponsor: Melissa Fiori
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

After completing a semester abroad in Mexico in Fall of 2011, I wanted to continue my use of the Spanish language through the rest of my college career. Daemen's Service Learning Core requirement gave me the opportunity to do that at El Buen Amigo, a fair-trade nonprofit store that sells products from Latin America. As I stepped into the store, I felt a sense of connection to the diverse world in which we live. I was assigned a task to help the store organize their International Women's Month, taking place in March 2012, and through this project, I was surrounded by the Spanish language, met local community members, and learned how to use successful organizational and communication tools. It is a beautiful feeling to have taken part in such an empowering event for women, and my discussion will focus upon my overall experience at El Buen Amigo.

Setting Up a Business as a Non-Business Major

Miranda Roth, Kirsten Hensberry, Timothy Martin , Katlin Daigler, Erin Hutchinson
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Kegler
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Duns Scotus 136

Design Garage is a graphic design studio launched from the Visual and Performing Arts Department at Daemen College in 2011. Comprising graphic design professors and BFA students, we are a design team working from principles that support sustainable practices and solutions. Our business model was developed through a Daemen College Think Tank project and offers students an opportunity to learn and practice entrepreneurship while engaging in the design process through practical application on purposeful community based projects.

Transforming Design Garage from a student-faculty project into a functional business was challenging but not impossible. We were able to successfully develop our mission statement, create a brand identity, find an off-campus studio space, develop a pricing system, and reel in new clients. Not as easy as 1, 2, 3, but it goes to show that it's possible to start a business with the right resources, strong commitment, and lots of ambition!

Sustainability in Rural Africa

Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenck 107

My three-week experience interning at an Agriculture Center in Kipkaren, Kenya provided me with an education that will take years to dissect. Interacting with 30 college-age students and 10 trainers provided a foundation for learning about the small village’s sustainability, the environmental systems of the area, and the dynamics of an African farming civilization. The conversations I had about each of these subjects explored ethics, logic, and emotions, all of which I am eager to share. I participated in activities including cleaning chicken houses, maintaining a greenhouse, transplanting seedlings and shrubbery, and visiting the nearby clinic for personal healthcare – a different twist to sustainability than I was expecting from my agriculture internship. Each activity broadened my understanding of a community’s functionality, interdependent relationships, and strategies for sustenance. Examining these sustainability designs during the experience provided daily revelations which continue to inspire me today.

The Use of Anesthetics on Marine Life, Specifically Seahorses and the Need of Studying Anesthetic Doses. Are Dose Correlations Possible?

Melissa Muth
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 101

Seahorses have been exploited due to their use for Chinese medicine, curios, pets and specialty foods, causing a threat to their populations - specifically all Hippocampus species. Currently all seahorse species of Hippocampus are listed on the Red List of Endangered Species as either vulnerable or data deficient. Though trade of seahorses is extensively explored, proper doses of anesthetics used to reduce stress during harvesting are not; therefore, many seahorses are killed in the process of trade, compounding their extinction. Presently anesthetics have been researched only on Hippocamus kuda. My research focuses on identifying the lowest effective level of anesthetics used on a seahorse, Hippocampus reidi, in hopes of making comparisons for correct anesthetic doses across various types of seahorses. Correlating doses in between species of the same genera could lead to better approximations on the doses used on aquatic animals, helping save species worldwide.

What Is the Lived Experience of Type 2 Diabetic Adults Being Treated with Intensive Insulin Therapy?

Veronica Lee
Faculty Sponsor: Cheryl Nosek
10:45 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 120

This phenomenological, qualitative study sought to gain insight into the lived experience of being intensively treated with insulin therapy. Purposeful sampling was used to select four participants recruited via snowball sampling. They were individually interviewed using a semi-structured approach. The interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data was analyzed utilizing Collaizi’s nine-step method. Four core themes and two sub-themes emerged from the data analysis: (1) “It’s life-changing” with a sub-theme of “Never really free from the needle,” (2) “You have to accept it” with a sub-theme of “It saves your life,” (3) “It becomes an everyday routine,” and (4) “Social support helps.” The findings described the life-changing experiences encountered by type 2 diabetic adults undergoing intensive insulin therapy.  Results indicated the need for providing diabetic care wholistically and empathetically, promoting patient interaction and social support, as well as reinforcing patient/family education. Healthcare providers may use the findings to better meet the needs of this population.

World Religious and Spiritual Traditions

Cassandra SalterSmith, Michael R. Carlo, Katherine A. Comerate, Bernadette Johnson, Daniel R. Loomis, Eileen T. Mayfield, Shawn C. Spellman Wynn, James M. Vanhalle, Thomasina E. Wilson
Faculty Sponsor: Cassandra SalterSmith
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Wick 113-115

Religious and Spiritual Traditions students (REL/PHI 308-02) will present their research on several traditions of the world. Participants will discuss a faith tradition of their choosing. Students will provide the insights that they gained through the study of world religions and through visits to several places of worship other than those of their own faith.

Nursing Assessments

A Community Assessment of the Ability to Communicate with Health Care Providers in the Senior Adult

Dawn Beebe, Nancy Kipp, Gabriella Mott, Sue VanOrman
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
2:30 pm - 2:50 pm
Business 104

A community assessment of the senior adult was conducted to determine their ability and comfort in communicating with Health Care Providers (HCP). St. John Tower provided the setting to conduct a survey which addressed this issue. Healthy Objective 2020, which states “most people depend on [many] different [HCP] and insurance programs for their health care,” provided the focus for this assessment. The premise was that better communication between HCPs and patients promotes better care and outcomes. The survey results and a total community assessment identified a deficit in the senior adult's ability for and comfort in communication with their HCPs. A teaching plan was developed and presented to St. John Tower residents, focusing on techniques which may be implemented to result in an effective and productive HCP office visit.

A Domestic Violence Program for 18 to 24 Year Old Adults

Lauren Wolf, Kadie Curry, Ashley Dixon, Lauren Howe
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
12:30 pm - 12:50 pm
Business 104

The Family Justice Center of Erie County has a focus on providing confidential services to victims of domestic violence. It includes advocacy, civil legal assistance, safety planning, counseling, shelter referrals, medical examinations, and access to criminal and civil courts. Although adults ages 18 to 24 are known to be victims of abuse, the population appears reluctant to access services available and/or recognize signs of abuse. An assessment was conducted to ascertain the knowledge level of adults age 18 to 24 on services available and the signs of abuse. A survey was also developed on this topic and distributed to adults in this age group. An educational program was developed based on their educational needs and was delivered to the targeted population.

Community Assessment of Bullying in Elementary School Children

Kristin Hein, Katherine Flower, Michael Robertson, Xika Zhao
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
1:50 pm - 2:10 pm
Business 104

A community assessment was conducted with the focus of assessing parents' perceptions of bullying in elemetary school children. Buffalo Public School #39 was used to conduct a parent survey questioning parents' knowledge levels and awarness of bullying. With the survey results and a total community assessment, a teaching plan addressing the isssue of bullying was prepared and presented to the parents at a Parent Teacher Meeting at the school. Healthy Objectives 2020 provided the basis and focus for this work - specifically that if parents establish communication and relationships with their children, the incidence of bullying may be lessened.

Community Assessment of the Knowledge of Depression in the Senior Adult

Rebecca Fray, Amy Manocchio, Jill Danson
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
1:30 pm - 1:50 pm
Business 104

A community assessment of the senior adult population was conducted to determine knowledge and awareness of depression. The Clarence Senior Community Center provided a venue for the administration of a student developed survey addressing this issue. Healthy Objective 2020, which states that “mental health disorders are one of the top causes of disability and have been linked to physical health deviations,” was used to focus this assessment. It was reasoned that being proactive in identifying the issues of depression will result in earlier intervention and contribute to increased mental and physical health. The survey results and a total community assessment identified a knowledge deficit of common warning signs of depression. A teaching plan was developed and presented which addressed recognition of early warning signs and techniques that seniors may use to assist in the symptom management.

Community Assessment of the Knowledge of Diabetes in the Senior Adult

Jennifer Loewen, Cathleen Conway, Cate Cronmiller, Nichole Principio
Faculty Sponsor: Rosemary Walter
2:10 pm - 2:30 pm
Business 104

Daemen College RNs conducted a community assessment of the senior adult regarding the knowledge of diabetes. The study's focus was provided by Healthy Objective 2020, which states “(that to) increase the proportion of persons with diagnosed diabetes who receive formal diabetes education (will improve outcomes and contribute to quality of life).” The MOOT Community Center for Senior Adults, located in Buffalo's Fruit Belt section, was the setting for a student developed and administered survey on the topic. The survey of this population and the results of a total community assessment revealed that knowledge of “sugar” diabetes - also known as Type 2 diabetes - in the senior adult may be limited, requiring further education and information. A teaching plan was developed with a focus on this deficit and was presented at the MOOT Community Center.

Fall Prevention at Bristol Village

Tiffany Fabian, Amy Ceisner, Julie Nicoll, Charlene Quinn
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
12:50 pm - 1:10 pm
Business 104

Bristol Village is a residential community in Clarence that provides varying levels of assistive residences to seniors. The facility offers independent living residences, assistive living areas, and respite care for seniors who require this type of care. Due to identification of the topic of falls as an area needing investigation, the senior population within this community was surveyed to determine educational needs on this important topic. An educational program was developed and delivered to this population.

Knowledge Level of Seneca Babcock Residents Regarding Physical Fitness

Amanda Yung, Christopher Bona, Megan Kelly, Jessica Vail
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
2:30 pm - 2:50 pm
Business 103

Lack of physical fitness is a major health issue for individuals, families, and communities. Physically active adults are healthier, are less likely to develop many chronic diseases, and have better aerobic fitness than physically inactive adults. Daemen College RN students explored this issue by conducting a survey of Seneca Babcock Church Members, ages 18 years and older. A community assessment was conducted, and an education program was presented to the community members to increase knowledge level regarding physical fitness, exercise and healthier physical lifestyles. Results and recommendations will be presented.

Knowledge Level of Seneca Babcock Residents Regarding Stroke

Megan Vickers, Jennifer Fuoco, Keith Levine, Jennifer Simon
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
2:10 pm - 2:30 pm
Business 103

Stroke is a leading cause of death and serious long-term disability in the United States, and people of all ages and backgrounds can be at risk. Students partnered with the Seneca Babcock Community Center to survey and assess the knowledge level of adults age 55 and older regarding stroke. Results of the survey and various aspects of the community assessment will be presented. The survey data and assessment findings were used to develop and present an education program regarding stroke prevention and treatment.

Knowledge of Seniors Regarding Diabetes

Olga Dishunts, Melanie Battaglia, Christy Sylvester, Eliud Kosgei
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
1:10 pm - 1:30 pm
Business 104

Kenton Presbyterian Village Apartments in Kenmore, NY is a facility that offers assistive living services to senior residents. Since the residents' age group has been noted to have a knowledge gap regarding diabetes, a survey was developed to determine their educational needs on this topic. An educational program was developed and delivered to these residents to increase their knowledge of diabetes.

Learning Needs of Members of the West Side Community Center Regarding Advanced Directives

Leanne Skidmore, Kimberly Ignatowski, Hui Ching Ko, Annie Manko
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
3:10 pm - 3:30 pm
Business 104

The Westside Community Center is a 60-year-old United Way agency which serves not only the needs of west side Buffalo residents, but the needs of the entire community as well. Due to HealthyPeople.gov identifying advance directives as a topic requiring education, we distributed surveys to determine educational needs on this topic for adults 18 or older who use this community center. An educational program based on the survey findings was delivered to the clients of the Westside Community Center.

Loneliness and Social Interaction in the Senior Adult

Kimberly Hall, Stephanie Ark, LaToya Hurd, Elisabeth Baglia
Faculty Sponsor: Paula Hibbard
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
Business 103

Studies have demonstrated that continued physical and mental activity in the senior population is of vital importance to prevent or delay some effects of aging. To research this, Daemen College RN students distributed a survey regarding senior social activity and loneliness to Schiller Park Senior Center members. A community assessment was conducted and the results will be presented. Survey results and community assessment research were used to present an education program intended to increase knowledge level regarding the importance of physical and mental activity and how both can benefit the aging process.

The Educational Needs of Patients of the Comprehensive Dialysis Center Regarding Hemodialysis Access Lines

Amy George, Samantha Newton, Melissa Mrozek, Ying Lou
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:50 pm - 2:10 pm
Business 103

The incidence of renal failure has steadily increased in recent years, requiring individuals to undergo renal hemodialysis/peritoneal dialysis. Patients who receive dialysis require extensive education regarding the disease process, access lines, and treatments available. In light of this growing health care issue, an assessment was conducted to determine the knowledge of hemodialysis patients regarding access lines. This presentation will focus on the investigation's results and an educational program developed and implemented for this vulnerable population.

The Educational Needs of Patrons of St. Susan Center Regarding Community Services

Jennifer Mitchener, Nathan Dossey, Colleen Olmstead, Abbi Stiles
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:10 pm - 1:30 pm
Business 103

The St. Susan Center, in the Souther Tier of Western New York, is a soup kitchen which provides meals to lower income individuals residing in Chautauqua County. Individuals who utilize this soup kitchen often lack knowledge of community services that can help meet their many needs.  To determine the knowledge level of this vulnerable population regarding available resources, a community assessment was conducted by the Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students. This presentation will report the results of this investigation as well as describe a community education program that was presented to the population.

The Knowledge Level of Elderly Clients at Hispanics United on HIV

Shelia Lekanka, Ron Oakes, Catherine Loiacono, Bonnie Olejniczak
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
2:50 pm - 3:10 pm
Business 104

Hispanics United is an organization which strives to provide social, educational, cultural and economic assistance to members of the Latino population and other immigrants in the Buffalo area. It was determined that their senior population has an educational need in regards to the disease Human Immunodeficiency Virus as it pertains to this age group. Therefore, seniors in the Latino and immigrant community were surveyed on this topic area. Educational needs were identified and an educational program was delivered to this population at the Hispanics United location in Buffalo.

The Learning Needs of Guests of the Genesis House Regarding Respiratory Infections

Michele Orcutt, Janice Elliott, Jacqueline Torpey, Rose Williams
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
12:30 pm - 12:50 pm
Business 103

Homelessness is a major issue in the United States for both individuals and families. As a result, Genesis House - a faith-based organization in Olean, New York and Cattaraugus County - continually strives to meet the varied needs of homeless families. At the request of Genesis House, a project was conducted to determine educational needs of their guests age 18 and over regarding respiratory illnesses. In addition, various aspects of the community were examined. This presentation will focus on the investigation's findings and report on a community education program implemented for the population.

The Learning Needs of Members of the Aurora Senior Center Regarding Infectious Diseases

Susan Roberts, Becky Kucharczak, Tina Pembleton, Amy Yelen
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:30 pm - 1:50 pm
Business 103

Lack of treatment or a delay in treatment of infectious diseases can be fatal,
particularly in the elderly. With knowledge of appropriate health promotion measures, individuals can reduce their risk of contracting these infectious diseases. In collaboration with the Aurora Senior Center, a community assessment was conducted to ascertain the knowledge level of senior citizens regarding infectious diseases. Findings from this investigation were analyzed, educational needs were identified, and a community education program developed from the results was implemented for seniors.

The Learning Needs of Members of the Jamestown Nutrition Club Regarding Exercise and Physical Activity

Shaina Reynolds, Kimberly Bielata, Miguel Colon, Melinda Young
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
12:50 pm - 1:10 pm
Business 103

Exercise and physical activity is essential to the health and well being of individuals throughout their lifespan. An assessment of members of the Jamestown Nutrition Club was conducted to ascertain their educational needs regarding exercise and physical activity. This presentation will focus on the findings from this inquiry and present a summary of the educational program developed and implemented for the identified population.

Posters

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

"The Dow" Company Swap

Maryam Aref
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average - or “the Dow” - is a stock market Index that shows how 30 large, publicly-owned, U.S. based companies trade in the stock market. It was created by Charles Dow, Wall Street Journal editor and Dow Jones & Company co-founder, and is of importance to stockholders worldwide. The Dow Jones is very particular about which companies are included in its Index; it replaces companies that do not meet expectations with those more appealing to investors. From its founding in 1896, the Dow has replaced its components (companies) 48 times, with General Electric the only major company that has not been replaced. We will review changes within the Dow, from statistical data trends to important historical events that have led to these changes. 

A Comparison of Ginger Use in Contemporary U.S. Medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine

Bianca Gjorgievski, Caitlin Illig, Jennifer Sullivan
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation is an investigation of current literature to document the medicinal use of ginger in the United States and China. Our goal is to determine if medicinal use and indications are comparable across these two cultures. Currently two-thirds of the world’s population relies on traditional medicine as their primary source of healthcare. In particular, ginger has been used in China to aid in symptom relief of an irritated digestive system. In the United States, it has been determined that approximately three out of ten Americans use herbal supplements. Our presentation will examine the evolution of ginger use in both modern medicine and ancient Chinese tradition.

A Practice-Based Theoretical Framework for Promoting Wellness in Breast Cancer Survivors

Ann Marie Bauer
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster presents a practice-based theoretical framework related to promoting wellness in breast cancer survivors. Survivors face physical, psychological, social, and spiritual issues from diagnosis through the rest of their lives. Providing a platform for patients to learn and utilize wellness behaviors will potentially improve their overall quality of life. This framework will be explained through a personal philosophy of nursing and other existing and established nursing theories. It will include interventions and outcomes and be translated for best use in practice.

A Practice-Based Theoretical Framework Related To Implementing a Psoriatic Clinic Within A Local Dermatology Practice

Melissa Mele-Delgado
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune skin disease caused by a fault in the immune system that confuses skin structures for pathogens. As a result, skin accumulates, potentially causing body image disturbances, discomfort, and secondary infection. Best practices in dermatologic treatment and management of psoriasis patients must be executed to serve this growing patient population.The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework for a psoriatic clinic within a local dermatology office. This framework will be explained within the greater context of a personal philosophy of nursing and other existing/established nursing theories, will include interventions and outcomes, and will be translated for use in practice.

A Review of the Effects of Ginkgo Biloba on Preventing Alzheimer's Disease

Jessica Doersam, Emily Strub, Kayla Kaufman
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation is a review of literature to determine the effects of Ginkgo biloba extract on Alzheimer’s patients. Alzheimer’s is a neurological disorder of the brain that is considered the largest single cause of senile dementia. An extract of the plant Ginkgo biloba contains several compounds that may have positive effects on protecting the cells of the brain and preventing deterioration. Ginkgo biloba has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that regulate neurotransmitter function and protect cell membranes. Information on the efficacy of Ginkgo biloba extracts will be presented, as well as the possible correlation between its use and the reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

A Selective Attention Study in Athletes With a History of Concussion

Brianna Cooper
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A large percentage of those suffering from mild concussions may experience persistent symptoms including headache, dizziness, and cognitive deficits. Studies suggest that brain tissue damage from concussion leads to persistent disabilities. However, limited research exists specifically focusing on 1-3 years post injury regarding concussion effects on selective attention. Further, current research on selective attention has also focused mainly on subjects who are experiencing post-concussion symptoms. The purpose of this study is to examine selective attention in asymptomatic athletes with a history of concussion compared to age and gender matched controls. It is hypothesized that subjects with a history of concussion will demonstrate attention deficits 1-3 years after a concussive episode compared to those with no history of concussion. The Stroop test, proven effective in determining attention deficits, will be administered to participants in the concussion and control groups in a single session. Results will be compared and analyzed through SPSS using an ANOVA to determine any differences in selective attention.

A Sustainable Future for Daemen College

Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Daemen College is striving to become a more environmentally-conscious campus and has created an opportunity for students to be actively involved in this process as paid Sustainability Stewards. The Sustainability Steward student position aims to provide a more sustainable campus for Daemen College through collection of data, education of fellow students, and creative development of ways to maintain a healthy campus – including everything from turning off lights more frequently to exploring improvements in food services. The task of sustaining this campus cannot be accomplished single-handedly though, so please come out and meet your Sustainability Steward. Share your thoughts – brief or extensive – and see where our shared ideas can take us!

A Theoretical Framework Related to Managing Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting

Joann Liu
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster presents a practice-based theoretical framework related to controlling chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The theoretical framework will be explained within the greater context of a personal philosophy of nursing; Roy’s Adaptation Model, which views nausea and vomiting phenomena as responses to internal and external stimuli; and other established theories. Interventions and outcomes will be discussed, and the framework will be translated for use in practice.

A Theoretical Framework Related To Preventing and Decreasing Complications of Diabetes Through Education

Cerrillo Mary
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

More than 24 million Americans have diabetes, with 1.6 million new cases of type 2 diabetes diagnosed in the U.S. each year (UPMC Endocrinology Update, winter, 2010). Although there is no cure, it is possible for persons living with diabetes to prevent and decrease complications by being knowledgeable about the disease. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to increasing education and knowledge of diabetes to prevent and decrease diabetic-related complications. This framework will be explained within the greater context of a personal philosophy of nursing and other established nursing theories, include interventions and outcomes, and be translated for use in practice.

Accounting Ethics

Kimberly Mack
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Over the years, there have been instances where the media reports that professional accountants have committed fraud and embezzled money from their companies. These professionals have had a great deal of schooling and are extremely well educated; they understand money and how it works within a business better than almost everybody. This gives them the opportunity to secretly put money in places that will benefit themselves. The addition of an ethics course into every college accounting program may cause a decrease in the amount of crimes committed by accountants. Through implementation of an ethics course, students will become aware of the issues and resist performing these immoral and illegal actions when faced with making decisions in the real world. They will be more likely to do what is right than what is easy.

Addressing Chronic Pain Holistically: A Practice-Based Theoretical Framework

Veronica Mason
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

One of the United States' biggest presidential issues in 2011 was the problem of prescription drug abuse. This is becoming the nation’s fastest growing health issue, and alternative solutions are needed to help resolve the ever increasing problem. The purpose of this poster is to share a practice-based theoretical framework related to the use of non-traditional therapies to treat patients with chronic pain. The theoretical framework will be developed within the context of a personal philosophy of nursing and other established nursing theories. Use of the theoretical framework to help guide nursing care decisions will also be discussed.

America: The Unequal Distribution of Wealth

Joseph Colasurdo, Michael Lavender
Faculty Sponsor: Joseph Sankoh
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Today, the distribution of income in America has created a greater inequality than ever before. Over the years the income of the top one percent has increasingly surpassed what many consider ‘equal.’ The wealth in our country is becoming more unevenly distributed, and political dispute on the subject is progressively more prominent. What is in store for the American people? How will we deal with the prosperity gap on the social, economic and political platforms? This poster will explore where we in this country are heading economically and how the citizens living in a middle-income bracket will be affected.

An Eccentric Calf Strengthening Program: Can it Increase Function in Athletes with a History of Achilles Tendinopathy?

Alexe Pask
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recent research supports positive impacts of eccentric training on rehabilitation of athletes with Achilles tendon pathology. These studies evaluated the effects of eccentric training on pain scales and return to activity.  Individuals with Achilles tendinopathy usually demonstrate decreased range of motion and strength, which can lead to decreased function. The purpose of this study is to investigate if an eccentric training program can improve function in subjects previously diagnosed with Achilles tendon pathology. We hypothesize that an eccentric training program will increase range of motion, strength, balance, and self-reported function. Subjects will participate in a six week eccentric training program consisting of eccentric heel raises. Data will be obtained through pre and post testing measures using the weight bearing lunge test, heel raise test, Y-balance test, and Foot and Ankle Ability measure. A correlated t-test will be performed using IBM SPSS statistics software to assess these changes from pre to post testing.

Assessment of Balance in Children Developing Typically Ages 10 to 13 Years

Kristy Arndt, Stephanie Blaszak, Meghan Pendergast
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Development and refinement of balance abilities creates the possibility for children to run, jump, climb, and play. Physical therapists routinely assess a child's balance capabilities as a component of the evaluation process. The Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS) is a criterion referenced test containing 14 items and was developed to examine functional balance in school aged children. The PBS has excellent reliability and good to very good concurrent validity with the PDMS-2 and the BOT-2. A ceiling effect has been noted, with developing children typically achieving the upper boundaries of the tool by age 7 years. This poster reviews the literature related to the development of the PBS and investigates the process of modification of an assessment tool. Our research project investigates modifications to the PBS to improve its sensitivity and specificity in children ages 10 to 13 years.

Assessment of Non-Athletic Training Management Responsibility of Certified Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

Michael Wild
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Anecdotal evidence suggests that Certified Athletic Trainers (ATCs) in the collegiate setting perform non-athletic-training-related administrative or management tasks. To date, research has focused on the responsibility and preparedness of clinical Athletic Trainers, as well as their abilities in administration or management as related directly to their field. Since further examination is needed, this study will evaluate the level of responsibility the collegiate ATCs have in these additional roles.

We hypothesize that collegiate ATCs have increased responsibilities at smaller institutions by performing non-athletic-training management tasks and that they perceive themselves as unprepared for these additional responsibilities. A 24- question survey was distributed to 1000 randomly sampled ATCs working in the collegiate setting to examine their involvement in clinical Athletic Training and in administration or management for both Athletic Training and non-Athletic Training. There is no research in this area; therefore, the study design will be exploratory to provide data for future research.

Bull vs. Bear Market

Cindy Altman
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The bear market has presented many challenges for America over the last 8 months – we still have high unemployment, U.S. homes are currently underwater (worth less than they were bought for) and many Americans are falling behind on mortgage payments. In addition, both European and American stocks have been affected by Italy’s recent downgrade and a fear of Greek default. A concurrent aspect to this situation is that a poor economy worldwide will naturally decrease demand for raw materials, reducing costs to make and deliver goods and services. This in turn may lead to gradual restoration of the economy into a state of long-term balance.

A small stimulus package in the American economy could lower interest rates, boosting corporate profits and driving stocks higher to move us back into a bull market. I will discuss different market trends – Primary Trend, Secondary Trend and Minor Trend – within an alternating secular bull and bear market and the cyclical markets within secular markets.

Chemiluminescence of Hemoglobin

Brittany Boyce
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Forensic investigators can determine what transpired at a crime scene using blood evidence, which has often been cleaned and must be exposed with a substance such as Luminol (C8H7N3O2). Luminol is a solution, used in a spray form, which reacts with iron in the blood’s hemoglobin to produce a chemiluminescent glow. This poster will outline three semesters of thesis research in this area, including crude dark room experiments and quantified data from experiments on the Cary Eclipse Flourescence Spectrophotometer. These experiments investigate the luminol-hemoglobin reaction, how this reaction changes with both dilution and time, and the effect of protein unfolding on the chemiluminescence emitted from the reaction. These studies have potential practical application in recovering previously cleaned blood stains at a crime scene.

China's Path to Adopting International Financial Accounting Standards

Xin Wan
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation explores the difference in accounting standards between China and the United States. A brief description of the current accounting system of both countries will be presented and three major differences will be addressed: the Certified Public Accountant requirements, the work ethics, and the annual reports of the listed companies. I also will explore and discuss China’s pathway to adopt international financial accounting standards.

Comparative Analysis of Unilaterally vs. Bilaterally Supported Lower Body Resistance Training: A Meta-Analysis

Sean McGuire
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Most sports require athletes to spend much of their time on one leg or with the body’s weight disproportionately distributed between two legs. However, unilateral lower body training is regularly ignored or underutilized in the training of athletes. Recently, strength and conditioning coaches have proposed that single leg training would contribute to faster sport-specific performance benefits and more effectively strengthen the lower body and core musculature in comparison to bilaterally supported exercises. Data from multiple studies will be compiled to construct a comprehensive meta-analysis comparing the benefits associated with unilaterally and bilaterally supported lower body resistance training. A systematic literature search using sportdiscus and ebschohost will be conducted using keywords such as “unilateral stance”, “bilateral stance”, “double- and single-leg” and “lower body resistance training” to identify studies relevant to this meta-analysis. Once studies are collected and identified as pertinent to the research, they will be grouped according to their outcome measures and study design.

Concentrations of MTBE in Egg Contents of Scyliorhinus retifer and the Possible Effects on Embryonic Development

Abby Cryan
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Scyliorhinus retifer is a commercially exploited marine shark found in northern coastal Atlantic waters. As an oviparous species, it performs internal fertilization and then releases a resilient egg case composed of varying collagen fibers into the seawater. Through the stages of development, the embryo may be exposed to a variety of chemicals, including heavy metal ions and toxic molecules found in runoff from everyday human activities. One source of such chemicals is petroleum, which continues to be a cornerstone in the constantly developing global economy. Elements in petroleum that are of concern to the environment include benzene and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). MTBE readily dissolves in water, making it a large concern to humans and marine organisms during oil spills. This experiment, consisting of my original research, analyzes the concentration of MTBE in S. retifier eggs and determines possible effects on embryonic development.

Dangers Await Less Savvy Social Media Users

Kimberly Marron
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Social networking can affect individuals in the work place with respect to hiring, promotion and maintaining employment. While social media - such as Facebook or Twitter - is economical, functional and easy to use, the use of social media has consequences that hinder the unsuspecting from accomplishing their dreams. The focus of my project is that social media networks are open to people of all ages; although there are age restrictions, these do not stop the less savvy from hurting themselves in the future.

Many companies and schools are using Facebook or similar social media networks to promote themselves, and being part of a social media network is productive when proper precautions are taken. Social media is also used by employers to audit employment candidates, but there is an ethical dilemma about employers judging out-of-work activities and associations as a basis for employment. There are rights for employees and the public as well as associated ethical standards.

Discrete Mathematics and its Applications

Elizabeth Spahn
Faculty Sponsor: Norollah Talebi
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

To illustrate one of the peculiar properties of infinite sets, we examine the Hilbert’s Grand Hotel. Intuitively, once a hotel is fully occupied, no more guests can be accommodated. We will show that this is not true about the Grand Hotel. To enumerate computer code words using recursion, we consider the string codes of length n>0 consisting entirely of digits 0-9. A computer system considers a string a valid code if it contains an even number of digit 0. This presentation will explore how many valid codes there are of length 12.

Discrete Mathematics and its Applications

Katie Auge, Miranda Kinney, Taylor Mango
Faculty Sponsor: Norollah Talebi
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will discuss applications of mathematic principles.

Pigeonhole Principle: Linda has 6 weeks to prepare for a board examination with 50 hours maximum to study. She plans to study 1, 2, or 3 hours every day. No matter how she schedules it, there is a period of consecutive days where she will have studied exactly 33 hours.

Recurrence: A sequence is said to be defined recursively if some initial values are specified and later terms are defined by a number of earlier terms. How many ways can you get from the ground floor of Daemen’s DS building to floor three if there are 60 steps and you take 1 or 2 at a time without two consecutive 2 steps?

Valid Arguments: Arguments are finite collections of premises followed by conclusions. They are valid if, whenever premises are all true, then conclusions are also true. We use algebra of propositional logic to analyze a complex argument and verify the argument’s validity.

Discrete Mathematics and its Applications

Nicolette Korpolinski, Dean May, Katie Lutz
Faculty Sponsor: Norollah Talebi
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will highlight the applications of mathematic principles.

Graphs and Trees: How do we store a large collection of words in the memory of a computer in such a way that it is easy to determine whether or not a word is in the collection, and, if a word is not in the collection, that it can be easily added to the collection and stored in the memory?

Modulo Arithmetic: The central computer at a large company maintains records of each of its customers. Assuming a record is identified by using the customer’s Social Security number as the key, how can we assign memory locations of the central computer so the customer record can be retrieved quickly?

When a character is entered into a computer, it is converted into an 8-bit binary word. In most files, some characters appear more often than others. We use Hoffman coding to reduce the number of bits required to store a file.

Disney Princesses: Are They Appropriate Role Models for Girls?

Katherine Honeck
Faculty Sponsor: Erica Frisicaro-Pawlowski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Starting with the release of Snow White in 1937, Disney Princesses became the icons of the 21st century. In 2001, a marketing director for Disney attended a “Princess on Ice” show, saw girls in homemade princess costumes, and thought to capitalize on the idea. This was how the Disney Princess line started. Because girls continue to watch the Princess movies and buy their products, my research analyzes the influence that the movies have had on college-aged women. This project presents results of a survey used to determine whether college women who watched Disney movies as children felt that Disney Princesses were appropriate role models for girls aged 5-10. The survey was sent to 39 women, ranging in age from 18-25. They answered questions soliciting their opinions on what a role model is, which Disney princesses are the best and worst role models, etc. This poster will showcase the results of the survey and highlight additional characteristics of the princesses.

Do Moist Heat Packs and Static Stretching Increase Hamstring Flexibility as Effectively as Ultrasound and Static Stretching?

Andrew Benzin
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

It has been proposed that use of heat will increase muscle tissue length. Current research suggests therapeutic ultrasound has greater effects on tissue elongation compared to moist heat packs. However, comparison between these two heating methods has yet to be made directly. This research compares effects of therapeutic ultrasound and moist heat packs on tissue elongation. The hypothesis is that therapeutic ultrasound will have a greater effect on increasing muscle tissue length compared to moist heat packs. This research study will consist of thirty collegiate students with no current or previous history of low back, hip, knee or hamstring injury. Subjects will be randomly assigned into one of three treatment groups; moist heat-pack, therapeutic ultrasound, sham ultrasound. The treatment leg will be randomized and non-treatment leg will serve as the control. Hamstring flexibility will be measured pre and post treatment using a sit-reach box. Data will be analyzed using one-way mixed model repeated measures ANOVA.

Dow Jones Utility Average

Jacob Blaustein
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
none - none

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will focus on the Dow Jones Utility Average - specifically, the state of the stock for utility companies involved from 1929 (when the average was implemented) to present day. Since the number of companies involved in the average has changed over the years, I will focus on those that have remained on the list since its creation. This is to show how the average has changed over time and to explore the reasons for those changes, especially for any large abbreviations in the numbers. I will explain the original intention for creating the average and see if there has been any change in its purpose or in how others have viewed it over time.

Effect of Stander Device Use on Range of Motion (ROM) in Children with Mobility Impairments

Shawna Kober, Katie Tomala, Erica Gurak, Amy Hewson
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Children with limited weight bearing opportunities or ambulation capabilities may experience adaptive shortening of lower extremity musculature. Additionally, these children are at increased risk for developing secondary musculoskeletal problems like contractures, decreased range of motion (ROM) and muscle atrophy. Consequently, the ability to complete upright functional tasks and maintain appropriate postures may be further limited.

Stander devices are pieces of assistive technology that provide support to achieve and maintain standing positions for individuals who are unable to do so independently. Stander device use is encouraged among clinicians to decrease musculoskeletal impairments, promote independent standing and improve social interaction. Upon analysis of the available research in this area, support for these clinical implications is limited. However, research implies that prolonged stretching, weight bearing, and standing via a stander device may improve ROM. Evidence within pediatric literature to support or refute use of a stander device to improve ROM remains inadequate. This poster presents analysis of current research literature.

Effectiveness of External Ankle Support on Athletic Performance

Gabrielle Lorusso
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

External ankle supports are used in athletics to prevent lateral ankle sprains; however, conflicting results of previous studies make it difficult to determine if athletic performance is negatively impacted. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of external ankle support on performance measures in female college basketball players. We hypothesize that there will be no significant difference between the external support conditions on vertical jump height, sprint speed, and balance. This study will employ a pre-test post-test randomized control group design. Participants will be randomized into one external ankle support condition: brace, tape, or none (control). Participants will complete a vertical jump, 40-yard sprint, and a Y-balance test before and after the external ankle support condition is applied. Statistical testing will use a 3 x 2 repeated measures mixed model MANOVA with a p value of < 0.05 indicating significance. In the case of statistical significance, a post hoc Tukey's HSD will be used.

Effectiveness of Therapeutic Ultrasound

Brian Murray, Michael Hall, Lakisha Pierre
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Therapeutic Ultrasound (TUS) is currently used to treat a variety of musculoskeletal disorders. Its uses range from creation of tissue extensibility to decrease of pain and inflammation. When considering use of TUS, it is important to consider the type of tissue and its relative depth, the stage of healing of the tissue, and the purpose of TUS use relative to the aforementioned variables.  Used appropriately, TUS can be a valuable modality to enhance physical therapy interventions. Use of appropriate parameters is essential to the effectiveness of the modality; hence it is necessary to apply these specific parameters to match the stage of healing of the disorder. Current research neglects this, since most of this research suggests TUS is ineffective no matter what parameters are used.  Our research attempts to determine whether inappropriate parameters or poor research designs in current literature lend to the proposed ineffectiveness of TUS.

Effectiveness of Transitional Planning and Support for Students in the Special Education System

Holly Tomasello
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There are two federal statutes outlining protocols for transitional support. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 2004 defines transitional services and states that they should be implemented in the appropriate setting when the student turns 16 (or 15 in New York). In conjunction with IDEA, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act (1973) allows students with disabilities to continue receiving services after age 21 and states that students with disabilites shall not be denied services under any program or activity, such as attending post-secondary institutions.

My project investigated effectiveness of transitional planning and support for students with specific disabilities. My research focused on the availability of community resources intended to provide students, families, and school districts with transitional support.

I surveyed school administrators, parents of special education students, and college students currently receiving accommodations to determine whether services should begin earlier and whether appropriate transitional services are available and effective for students with disabilities.

Effects of Alcohol-Related Motivational Cues on Propositional Reasoning in the Preconsumption Phase of Alcohol Intake

Jim Prosser
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Alcohol consumption is associated with a variety of behavior changes. A dual-process model for explaining the link between alcohol and subsequent behavioral changes incorporates these changes over two phases: preconsumption and consumption. During preconsumption (i.e., before alcohol is consumed), it is theorized that memories evoked by alcohol-related expectations can lead to alcohol-related behavioral changes (Moss & Albery, 2009; see Fillmore and Vogel-Sprott, 1995). The consumption phase consists of both deficits in propositional reasoning as well as the effects of active alcohol-related memories.

The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that individuals exposed to alcohol-related motivational cues in the preconsumption phase will demonstrate impaired propositional reasoning. Participants watched a drama series clip followed by a neutral or alcohol commercial, completed a memory quiz over the clip content, and were evaluated on a stroop task, a test which displays color words (i.e. red, blue, green) in a font color that may or may not match the word. It was predicted by the Dual-process model that stroop performance would be worse for the alcohol commercial group compared to the neutral commercial group.

Effects of Nutritional Protein Supplementation on Lean Muscle Hypertrophy: A Meta Analysis Review

Craig Frost Jr
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The increasing of lean body mass requires exposition of muscle tissue to training stimuli and creation of favorable conditions for tissue recovery. Muscular hypertrophy, or muscle tissue enlargement, occurs when the rate of intramuscular protein synthesis exceeds protein degradation, creating a positive net balance of amino acids in tissue. In order to achieve hypertrophic results, national governing bodies – including the National Academy of Sports Medicine, National Strength and Conditioning Association, and American College of Sports Medicine – recommend differing levels of protein ingestion, but this lack of consistency creates difficulty in discerning which level of protein ingestion is advantageous for hypertrophy. This research investigates current literature using a meta-analysis approach to validate which levels of protein ingestion elicit the greatest lean body mass increases. A literature search will be conducted using Sports Discus and Proquest Research databases, and keyword searches will include “protein”, “hypertrophy”, “nutrition”, “carbohydrate”, “performance”, and “resistance training” to quantitatively and qualitatively assess ideal protein ingestion levels for muscle hypertrophy.

Effects of Speed on Walking Performance in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as Assessed by the Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC)

Amber Fake, Michael Stranges, Kristie McFadden, Rachel Chittley
Faculty Sponsor: Sharon Held
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) display functional difficulties in their environment due to impairments in gross and fine motor skills, postural control, behaviors, and attention. The Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC), a reliable and valid assessment of functional mobility, examines walking skills, including various task conditions, physical features, and environmental dimensions. This tool has not yet been used to investigate walking performance and quality, such as speed effects, for individuals with ASD. This presentation contains a preliminary review and analysis of current literature regarding the functional deficits of individuals with ASD and the SWOC tool. It therefore provides the theoretical foundation for a study that will examine SWOC testing at increased speeds to determine functional mobility levels of individuals with ASD. Study results could provide a stronger tool for patient examination and influence physical therapy outcome and intervention planning.

Epigenetics

Veronica Lee
Faculty Sponsor: Karl Terryberry
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Genetics, genomics, and environmental influences dynamically interact to cause multifactorial diseases and disorders, such as hypertension (HTN). HTN affects individuals’ health and accounts for a significant share of healthcare spending, which warrants both national and international efforts to research its etiology. This includes often overlooked genetic causes. A new surge of genome-wide studies in common complex diseases helps identify HTN's causative genetic risk factors. Accumulated evidence indicates that blood pressures may be associated with α-adducin (ADD) genes and that mutation in genotypes may contribute to renal/vascular dysfunctions, stroke, and coronary heart disease. Understanding variations in chromatin structure (epigenetics) of ADD variants helps unravel the complex pathogenesis and inheritance of polygenic HTN. Furthermore, epigenetic drugs are used to reverse abnormal gene expression profiles related to a disease state. Information on antihypertensive pharmacogenetics provides opportunities to further explore genes underlying HTN and develop targeted epigenetic therapy.

ETF's Then and Now

Heather Sullivan
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation will consider aspects and avenues of buying and selling exchange traded funds (ETFs). I will explain the history of ETFs, discuss the various types and their popularity, and provide a brief synopsis on whether ETFs are and/or will become more popular than mutual funds. There will be a variety of definitions listed for clarity on topics discussed. Popularity will be shown with trending graphs of the amounts of ETFs and mutual funds being purchased. My goal is to conclude whether mutual funds or ETFs will have more popularity in future fund trades.

Ethic Standards in Accounting

Zane Tester
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This project will address ethical standards within accounting and will include research of ways to increase knowledge of these standards during both college and career experiences.  It will also inform viewers of certain situations where ethics could be challenged while in the field of accounting. Furthermore, it will provide knowledge regarding the challenges faced while working for public or private companies.

Evaluation of Contraceptive Use: A Practice-Based Theoretical Framework

Karen Kieliszek
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

More than half of the reproductive age women at a Family Planning Clinic in Buffalo use no reliable form of contraception, though multiple forms - including long-term reversible contraception - are available to them at little to no cost. This represents a significant social issue, adding increased, unnecessary cost and burden to the health care system related to increased numbers of unintended pregnancies and pregnancy termination. It is theorized that outside influences like family input, media, sexual education, and social input may determine a woman's choice of contraception and method compliance. An action plan, inclusive of interventions and outcomes, will be developed based on that understanding. This poster presents a practice-based theoretical framework for evaluation of patients’ contraceptive usage in relation to outside influences. This framework will be explained in a greater context of a personal philosophy of nursing and other established nursing theories. Implications for and translation to practice will also be discussed.

Evaluation of Nitric Oxide and Homocysteine as Potential Biomarkers for Predicting Wound Healing in Diabetic Lower Extremity Ulcers

Samuel Garofolo
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Edsberg
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The lifetime risk of a person with diabetes developing a foot ulcer is estimated to be as high as 25%, and there are currently no known biomarkers for wound healing. To evaluate the effect of topical oxygen therapy on diabetic lower extremity ulcers, the pilot study that this research is part of enrolled a total of six subjects whose wounds had closed. Samples and pictures of the wound bed were taken throughout the healing process. Nitric oxide (NO) and homocysteine (Hcy) were measured in the wound samples. Percent granulation tissue and percent wound closure were calculated using Photoshop. Concentrations of both NO and Hcy were correlated with granulation tissue and wound closure to evaluate their potential as biomarkers to predict clinical outcome.

Expense Account Fraud

Benjamin Brown
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Fraudulent use of employee expense accounts has become an important problem in today’s fast moving, volatile corporate culture and is prevalent in manufacturing companies. The focus of my study is that managing and monitoring expense accounts is essential to corporate vitality. I was prompted to propose further research of this topic because I work in a manufacturing environment where expense accounts are often used to entertain prospective buyers.

There is a need to become more aware of statistics surrounding expense account fraud. More importantly, we can do more to monitor this unlawful, unethical action; there is an ethical responsibility on the part of expense account users to be honest and on the part of management to set boundaries and monitor usage. Unfortunately, damage is widespread when employees, managers or owners operate in an unlawful or unethical manner.

Extended Business Reporting Language (XBRL)

James Bakert
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In today’s business and financial world, communication is the key to success. When companies post their financial statements for both governmental and customer review, there is a need for the use of a standardized software language. Extended Business Reporting Language (XBRL) was developed for this purpose. This computer language allows for the exchange of financial information whereby users could translate it from all forms of report into a single readable format for evaluation by regulators and financial analysts. It also facilitates more effective and efficient decision making. My presentation will focus on present day application of XBRL.

First Semester Freshmen Assessment of IND 101

Elizabeth Bauer, Taylor Miller
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Learning Communities foster collaboration, dialogue, camaraderie, and achievement (Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991) and are widely considered among best practices for freshmen student retention and success. We conducted a survey of freshmen enrolled in Learning Communities in fall 2011 to conclude whether students reported any social or knowledge benefits. This was intended to determine immediate benefits of the learning community model. Freshmen were invited to respond to the 19-item survey in the 13th week of their first semester. Nearly 90% of students reported adequate basic understanding of the core curriculum and core competencies. Responses were largely in favor of the social aspect of Daemen Learning Communities; most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that they appreciated the social-cohort and were more comfortable with their Learning Community classmates and instructors compared to non-Learning Community counterparts. They also responded in an overwhelming majority that the best parts of the course were events that led to the development of relationships.

Future Contracts

Thomasina Wilson
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will define the investment vehicle called future contracts, contractual agreements - generally made on the trading floor of a futures exchange - to buy or sell a particular commodity or financial instrument at a pre-determined price in the future. Future contracts detail the quality and quantity of the underlying asset; they are standardized to facilitate trading on a futures exchange. Some future contracts may call for physical delivery of the asset, while others are settled in cash.

Gambling in Intercollegiate and Professional Athletics

Thomas Barrett
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My research touches on the growing issues surrounding gambling, such as illegal betting and corruption. While sport gambling may bring profits to some, it is damaging the image of both intercollegiate and professional athletics.

Illegal betting is a growing issue worldwide but is most prevalent in the United States because this is the home of most “professional” organized sport leagues. This betting also has far reaching ethical implications. Law enforcement resources – both physical and financial – spent on detection and handling of these activities detract from law enforcement services that could benefit society at large. Various forms of corruption, like point shaving, have affected the sport industry in a few cases over the past few years – all stemming from gambling. I feel that this topic has received very little attention and that, as a result, the image of sports has been tarnished.

Homeopathic Remedies and the Reduction of Cancer Treatment Side Effects

Lauren Bevacqua, Christina Turner, Ashley Betz
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cancer affects thousands of individuals and their families each year. Common treatment methods of chemotherapy and radiation therapy can often result in unpleasant side effects such as nausea, depression, fatigue, and pain throughout the body. Homeopathy, a common complementary and alternative therapy, uses diluted solutions to trigger a natural healing response in the body, often aiding in treatment of many diseases and conditions. When applied in conjunction with mainstream cancer treatments, homeopathy can provide a natural escape from the problems associated with those cancer treatments. Based on a review of the current literature, we will demonstrate the relationship between homeopathy and reduction of cancer treatment side effects.

Homeopathy Versus Standard Practice in the Dairy Industry: Implications on Health and Environment

Renee Retton, Carly Kensinger
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Changes in the production of our food supply impact animal and human health, as well as the health of our environment. As our population increases, the need to produce food more quickly and in larger quantities has led to the use of antimicrobial agents and hormones to alleviate animal illness, increase production and expedite growth. Industrialized dairy practices must continue to seek alternative methods that can be effectively replicated on a large scale. This poster will describe current dairy practices, weigh the ethical and economic pros and cons of alternative and commercial practices, and further explain the implications on human, animal and environmental health.

Interventions For Thoracic Spine Pain Based on Acuity of Symptoms

Andrew Calvete, Lauren Fuest, Chris Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Currently, literature pertaining to management of patients experiencing thoracic spine pain is limited. Incidences of this pain are low compared to episodes of cervical or lumbar spine pain, but prior to intervention, clinicians must differentiate between a musculoskeletal or visceral origin. One system which allows for more effective and efficient treatment is demonstrated in literature examining the classification of patients with mechanical lumbar spine pain into subgroups. This analysis of the literature examines the effectiveness of interventions in managing thoracic spine pain based on the presence and acuity of symptoms.

Investing in Your Future Using the Bond Market

Sarah Levin
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation demonstrates different ways to enhance your retirement portfolio using the bond market. It will explain briefly the history and size of the bond market and will evaluate the different types of bonds, with examples including government savings bonds and private corporate bonds. Additionally, it will help the viewer assess differences in risk between different types of bonds. This presentation will allow you to understand the different options available when investing in the bond market; it will help you decide how to select and invest in a bond that is perfect for your future retirement.

Legacies of the 60's: Battle of Wounded Knee

Joshua Radecki, Noelle Thompson, Abbey Herbstritt
Faculty Sponsor: Shawn Kelley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Our discussion will address the impact of Hollywood on the Native American Indian movement. In 1971, the American Indian Movement marched on Washington D.C. to protest treaties broken by the U.S. government. The situation escalated to a seventy-one day armed standoff between U.S. forces and Native Americans at Wounded Knee, South Dakota in 1973. Sacheen Littlefeather, an Apache actress, spoke at that year's Oscars award ceremony on behalf of Marlon Brando about the situation at Wounded Knee, which brought national media attention to the problem.  To display his anger toward the U.S. government, Brando refused to accept his award for The Godfather. Hollywood actors and actresses had a large influence during this time period due to less media coverage, and this action increased public support for Native American rights.

Legacies of the 60's: The Pill and Reproduction Rights

Maron Brauer, Alexandra Bethge, Jessie Irlbacher
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The 1960's gave rise to some of the largest social upheavals and changes of the century. One of these changes was centered on the reproductive rights of women, especially access to birth control. One of the most controversial debates of the time, pro-contraception and anti-contraception advocates argued their different positions.

In 1957, when a pill was developed to treat gynecological disorders, women soon realized that it had the ability to prevent pregnancy. And so, “The Pill” was born. General reproductive rights were heavily debated, especially abortion and a woman’s right to control her body. The legacy of the movement has stayed with us as these issues are still hotly debated, with abortion rights in question and the creation of Obama’s Health Care Initiative with respect to contraception. We will discuss  the history of birth control and women's reproductive rights and how they pertain to life today.

Legacies of the 60's: Watergate Scandal

Laura McDonald, Shannon Nash, Meghan Diehl
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In June of 1972, President Richard Nixon was caught up in a massive scandal involving a burglary of the Democratic National Committee office in Washington D.C. Due to his extreme paranoia, Nixon wanted information involving his opponent of the upcoming election, George McGovern. Nixon’s administration attempted to cover up the burglary, but due to the hard work of Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, they were unsuccessful. Several of Nixon’s top officials were tried, convicted, and incarcerated. Nixon himself resigned in 1974 before a possible impeachment. This scandal affected many people’s attitudes towards the government during that time period and even now. Today, they no longer put all of their trust in the government and wonder exactly how corrupt it really is. The scandal also enhanced the status of journalism as demonstrated in the 1976 movie All the President’s Men. This scandal will always be known for its corruption of the general trust Americans felt towards their leaders.

Legacies of the 60's: Woodstock

Matthew Arida, Carly Blair, Brandon White
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The famous Woodstock music festival, held from August 15 to 18, 1969, drew a crowd of more than half a million people who had come to spread peace and openness, express culture and support causes for organizations. The turnout was so big that some of the 32 acts had to be brought in by helicopter to avoid blocked roads. Woodstock included performances by Jefferson Airplane, Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, The Who and others and inspired two later festivals, held in its honor in 1994 and 1999.

Literary Legacies: The Black Panther Movement

Yolanda Stewart, Myesha Henderson
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

During the 1960s, the Civil Rights era, a controversial movement arose in America to promote racial equality for all people of color. The Black Panther Party (BPP) was perceived as a threat to society because it used bold and daring means to challenge societal views towards racism and oppression. Unlike civil rights groups who used peaceful methods, the BPP sought equality and African American empowerment through violence and aggression. Its tactics were viewed as a threat to the white society, but to many African Americans, who had been racially oppressed for centuries, it offered a sign of hope and justice. Although the BPP is no longer as active as in previous decades, its contributions to African American society have had a profound impact on the promotion of racial equality. The legacy of the BPP will forever remain.

Literature Review of Physical Therapy Interventions for Low Back Pain

Tracy Hahn, Erin Murphy, Christopher Johnson, Anthony Boergers
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Low back pain (LBP) is an impairment affecting a large number of people in the United States. Physical Therapists (PT) are investigating evidence-based interventions appropriate for the various stages of healing resulting from this condition. A review of the literature disclosed that back education programs for acute LBP resulted in a decrease in lost work time. A retrospective review study of 164 subacute cases found that 66% to 74% of practitioners chose active therapies for their patients, and another systematic review of those with chronic LBP found that multidisciplinary and behavioral treatments were the most effective in decreasing pain intensity as reported by patients. Further, an analysis of patients with LBP treated with manual therapy found that this patient population had a lower cost of managed care compared to patients not receiving manual therapy. Overall, evidence supports PTs' use of a wide range of treatments with some being influenced by the patient's stage of healing. Our discussion will focus on four research articles addressing different stages of healing and types of treatment.

Luna Lodge: Ecotourism in the Osa Penninsula

Brittany Boyce
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will discuss a successful model for ecotourism and conservation in Costa Rica that I observed during my January study abroad experience. Luna Lodge, built and operated by owner Lana Wedmore, allows tourists to experience the beauty of southern Costa Rica’s Osa Peninsula while maximizing preservation and conservation efforts. The lodge’s conservation efforts include preservation education and projects, such as the White Hawk Project and the Harpy Eagle Project. They have constructed their lodge in a way that has minimal impact on the surrounding area, including the 100,000 acre Corcovado National Park. This park is home to over 6,500 species of animals, among which are endangered species such as the jaguar, puma, and tapir. Through these efforts, Luna Lodge is helping to preserve the beauty of this tropical paradise.

Major Exchanges of the World

Gary Arruda
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Though some residents of Western New York may only know about one stock exchange - the New York Stock Exchange - there are many exchanges around the world. This poster will demonstrate how these exchanges affect each other on a daily basis, from the Toronto stock exchange to the Shanghai stock exchange and everything in between.

Methods Elementary Teachers Can Implement to Help Prevent Bullying in Children's Future

Emily Wilwol
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
none - none

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In today’s society, bullying has become a serious issue. When children are in kindergarten, they fight one minute and are best friends the next. Yet in middle and high school, they persistently abuse each other verbally, leading to suicide by some of the abused. Elementary school teachers need to find and implement ways to help prevent children from being bullied. Researchers have found that almost three-fourths of teachers and aides studied were uninformed about bullying incidents in their own classrooms. This analysis of previous research will explore strategies and methods that teachers of young children can use to lessen the negative effects of bullying. The poster will describe actions and interventions teachers can employ to forestall bullying in their own classrooms.

Mutual Fund Investing

Kristy Redding
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

If deciding how to invest in 2012, mutual funds may be the perfect opportunity. Some of the greatest strengths of mutual funds are their accessibility and simplicity. Almost anyone can buy them, and they are easy to understand. They are simply a means of combining or pooling the funds of a large group of investors, with buy and sell decisions made by a financial manager. Some advantages of mutual funds are diversification, professional management, and a minimum initial investment. However, with that come drawbacks such as risk, initial costs and fees, and taxes. This presentation will discuss everything you want to know about how mutual funds operate, how to find information about their performance, the different types of mutual funds, and the workings of exchange-traded funds and hedge bonds.

NASDAQ: A Deeper Look Into the Market

Katherine Keller
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will offer an opportunity to gain a better understanding of what the National Association of Securities Dealers Automated Quotations (NASDAQ) market is, how it works, and why investors decide to keep investing in this market. I will discuss new and important NASDAQ news and provide information pertaining to the most popular stocks to purchase and sell.

Newest Aids For Children With Visual Impairments

Melissa Fabrizio
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

For years, visual impairments have interfered with millions of young children’s academic progress and social development. Traditional methods are still used to help visually-impaired children succeed in early childhood and elementary classrooms. However, many of the more traditional treatments, originally designed to treat typical problems, are of little use in the treatment of unusual or severe impairments. As we progress into an evolving era of technology, many devices are emerging that assist with more severe visual problems. Medical researchers and educational professionals are now discovering methods and devices that allow many children with visual impairments to see the world vividly for the first time. This poster will highlight several of these methods and devices that are now available.

On Their Merry Way: The Legacy of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters

Christopher Butler II, Jennifer Klemann
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The counterculture movement of the 1960s introduced many new and scandalous ideas and practices into American culture. These led to the creation of a new subculture within America's youth that placed an enormous emphasis on change and experimentation. Novelist Ken Kesey and his Merry Pranksters took the subculture of drug culture to new heights by introducing LSD to the public as a recreational drug rather than one being developed and studied in labs and hospitals. Kesey, who began experimentation with LSD through one of the aforementioned labs, wished to share its liberating properties with those around him and gathered his friends (the Pranksters) on their bus, "Further," for a drug filled journey across the United States. They travelled to the World Fair and back, introducing everyone to the wonders of LSD along the way. Kesey's exposure of the drug culture revealed both its negative side effects and positive experiences. This contributed to negative associations of the illegal drug culture today.

Optimal Duration to Reduce the Risk of a Non-contact ACL Injury In College Athletes Using a Sport Specific SportsmetricsTM Program

Brian Duchscherer, Carl Calabrese, Steven Doermer
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Four-fifths of all anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur during non-contact landing and cutting movements, specifically when the knee is slightly flexed and the tibia is rotated in either direction while weight bearing. Recent studies have identified that increased valgus knee alignment during landing or accelerating into a jump significantly increases the risk of ACL injury. Certain functional neuromuscular training programs (NMTP) are effective in limiting non-contact ACL injury by focusing on lower extremity strengthening with proper alignment and biomechanics. NMTP increase sports performance and decrease the risk of injury in competitive athletes in jumping sports by incorporating stretching, plyometric exercises, and weight training. Research on the different NMTP used to prevent non-contact ACL injuries has shown beneficial results with variable frequency and duration.

To promote efficiency of training, research is required of a specific functional NMTP like SportsmetricsTM to determine the optimal duration and frequency needed to improve valgus angulation alignment at the knee.

Optimal Duration to Reduce the Risk of a Non-contact ACL Injury In College Athletes Using a Sport Specific SportsmetricsTM Program

Steven Doermer, Carl Calabrese, Nick Duchscherer
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Four-fifths of all anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries occur during non-contact landing and cutting movements, specifically when the knee is slightly flexed and the tibia is rotated in either direction while weight bearing. Recent studies have identified that increased valgus knee alignment during landing or accelerating into a jump significantly increases the risk of ACL injury. Certain functional neuromuscular training programs (NMTP) are effective in limiting non-contact ACL injury by focusing on lower extremity strengthening with proper alignment and biomechanics. NMTP increase sports performance and decrease risk of injury for competitive athletes in jumping sports by incorporating stretching, plyometric exercises, and weight training. Research on different neuromuscular training programs used to prevent non-contact ACL injuries has shown beneficial results with variable frequency and duration. Research of a specific functional NMTP - like SportsmetricsTM to determine the optimal duration and frequency needed to improve valgus angulation alignment at the knee - is required to promote efficiency of training. This presentation will review existing research.

Physical Fitness of Daemen Students

Gregory Cring, La'Quisha Pompey, Brittany Hakes, Korianne Sulzbach, Margaret Duffy, Corey Pepero, Casey Harris, Maegan Olson
Faculty Sponsor: James Moran
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation will address Daemen students' involvement in various forms of physical fitness. We will gather information through short surveys distributed to students of varying majors in order to determine how their field of study affects their involvement in physical activity. We will also analyze some factors that influence this involvement.

Physical Therapy Intervention for Acute Neck Disorders

Christina Kelly, Paul Whissel, Ashley Siejak, Sherman Roberts Jr
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Neck pain is one of the most common, potentially disabling, and costly musculoskeletal conditions seen in physical therapy (PT). The causes of neck pain can vary, and patients may present to PT with differing signs and symptoms. To account for these varying presentations, classification systems are required to provide appropriate intervention. One method of classifying patients is by stage of healing. Combined with the history, physical examination, and diagnostic imaging, the stage of healing and level of irritability can allow a more definitive categorization of the condition and subsequently guide intervention. This analysis of literature attempts to determine if particular interventions are more effective during specific stages of healing for the management of neck pain. Further research is warranted to better support intervention for acute, subacute and chronic neck disorders.

Polar Bears' Behavior

Jenelle Putzig
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My research focuses on the behavior of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) in captivity at the Buffalo Zoo. Polar bears live in the circumpolar north, found in Alaska, Canada, Russia, Greenland and Norway. U. maritimus spends the majority of its time in the sea hunting seals, a high calorie food source. Since wild polar bears spend the bulk of their time in water, my research focused on quantifying the amount of time that the captive bears spend on land versus in the water. Two polar bears share an enclosure at the Buffalo Zoo. I documented the amount of physical contact between them and identified any differences in use of water between the male and the female.

President Bush and Public View

Chelsea Ventura
Faculty Sponsor: Jamie Bono
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This presentation explores how public opinion of President George W. Bush was displayed in the media during and following his presidency. The presentation begins by examining the acts of terrorism on September 11, 2001 and evaluates who was to blame according to public opinion and federal documents. It explores the following events which highlighted Bush’s presidency: the United States involvement in Iraq, the U.S. relationship with Osama bin Laden and how Bush interacted with the students he was reading to on the day of the attacks. Research included examination of political cartoons, newspaper articles, interviews and photographs. A final aspect of this presentation is how political cartoons must be inferred upon to create meaning and how this process is different than reading a newspaper article or reading an interview.

Reggio Emilia Approach vs. Traditional Preschool Approach

Kaitlin Markowski
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A traditional preschool teaching approach is teacher directed and curriculum based. Alternatively, the Reggio Emilia Approach is child directed, focusing on the students' interests. Although these two approaches are different, implementing practices drawn from the Reggio Emilia Approach into traditional preschools can promote children’s engagement in their own learning. This poster will include information on the Reggio Emilia Approach and the traditional preschool classroom's approach, including history, concepts, philosophy, materials, curriculum, and environments of both.

Relationship Between Academic Contingencies of Self-Worth and Performance Over Sex and Ethnicity

Joycelyn Rockwood
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Self-esteem is not based entirely on an objective self-evaluation; it can be influenced by how others judge the person’s abilities and, consequently, what the person comes to believe about himself or herself. For example, European-American students who base their self-worth on academics underperform on verbal tasks when in an environment that assesses performance compared to one that assesses learning only (Lawrence & Crocker, 2009).

Stereotype threat (Steele & Aronson, 1995) purportedly occurs when a negatively stereotyped group (e.g., women in relation to math performance), in fear of confirming this stereotype, achieves worse results in a performance environment. The present study assessed the construct of stereotype threat by administering math items to two negatively stereotyped groups (European-American women and African-Americans) in both performance and learning environments. It was predicted that if stereotype threat operates, women of both ethnicities and African-American men will have worse results than European-American men in the performance environment only.

Relationship between Emotions and Performance in Collegiate Athletes

Rachael Bowler
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The intensity and valence of emotions vary; a person may be frustrated at one moment, be excited a moment later, or even experience both emotions simultaneously. The intensity of emotions can moderate athletic performance (e.g., Cerin, 2003; D’Urso, Petrozzo, & Robazza, 2002). Interaction of positive and negative emotions has not been studied with regard to athletic performance, though such interactions have been studied in other emotional contexts (e.g., Shimmack, 2001).

The present study aimed to address the co-occurrence of emotions in the context of athletic competition and its relationship to athletic performance. Participants were male and female collegiate athletes who were eligible to play and in season at the time of data collection. Following an athletic event, participants completed emotion questionnaires and self-rated their athletic performance. Coaches also provided a rating of performance for each participant. Data were analyzed to determine whether anxiety and/or excitement, alone or in combination, related to overall ratings of athletic performance.

Relationship Between Narcissism Trait of Group Leaders and Decisions Involving Empathy

Sarah Hartman
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

High levels of the trait narcissism are associated with a number of undesirable behaviors and characteristics (Emmons, 1987). Narcissism has been repeatedly linked to negative group performance (e.g., see Nevicka, Ten Velden, De Hoogh, & Van Vianen, 2011). In group settings, narcissists often emerge as leaders (Brunell, Gentry, Campbel, Hoffman, Kuhnert, & DeMarree, 2008), but attributes of high narcissists include communicating poorly with other members, being overly dominant, being controlling of information, and lacking empathy. As a result, narcissism's traits can inhibit success in specific group situations, especially if an individual who scores high on narcissism is in a leadership role. The hypothesis was that group performance for tasks requiring empathy will be rated lower by group members with a leader who scores high in narcissism. To test this, participants were scored on narcissism and empathy and put into groups such that half had a high narcissistic leader. Group and leader performance on a task was later rated.

Revolution of Online Trading and its Positive and Negative Effects on the Economy

Matthew Weigand
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The technological revolution, specifically invention and application of the internet, has greatly impacted the stock market. My research focuses upon the high levels of profitability that stock market traders have experienced as widespread use of the internet has allowed for establishment and growth of the online trading industry.

Rapid expansion and use of online trading platforms have positive and negative economic effects. I have highlighted the progress of the trading world and provided information potentially usable by traders to realize benefits and profits. I have also explored issues of insider trading and the responsibility of administrators to safeguard customer information.

Semester in Guanajuato, Mexico

Abrianna Adler
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Since freshman year, my heart was set on a study abroad experience. As a Physician Assistant major, I knew planning it might take some flexibility, but I was determined to take the chance. Luckily, I was selected as a Sustainability Scholar in the North American Mobility Project and had the opportunity to study in Guanajuato, Mexico for five months. This program with the Consortium for North American Sustainability allowed me to explore the importance of environmental, social and economic issues across the United States, Canada and Mexico.

While in Guanajuato, I participated in a project which researched residual waters and the effects on health. I learned a great deal about the beauty of Mexican culture and had my eyes opened to the diverse world in which we live. I also gained knowledge of the Spanish language, which I plan to use within the medical field after graduation. I will discuss my overall experience, including interactions with the language and culture.

September 11, 2001 - The Birth of a New Fear

Brittany Reynolds
Faculty Sponsor: Jamie Bono
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

After the attacks on September 11, 2001, the final death toll was estimated to be more than 6,000. Though the physical damage was heartbreaking, it was eventually restored. It was the psychological damage that altered the course of history. This project allows 9/11 to be viewed as more than just a tragic event in the history of the United States; it was the beginning of a different way of life, worldwide. This project will be viewed as the equivalent of an electronic poster, using Microsoft PowerPoint to let viewers navigate through it at their own pace. Using this approach, viewers can experience the largely criticized Microsoft PowerPoint being pushed to its full potential as it illustrates key points on a delicate matter.

The Chemistry of Death: Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) Released During the Decomposition of Human Remains

Molly Tyrrell
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

One expanding field in the area of Forensic Science is the analysis of states of decomposition and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by decomposing tissue. A corpse can exhibit from four to six stages of decay. By assigning specific criteria to these stages, researchers can better locate a buried corpse and determine the time interval since death. Thanatochemistry, or the chemistry of death, is a technique used to study these VOCs given off postmortem from decomposing carcasses. VOCs are important in the development of cadaveric material detection devices, the training of cadaver dogs, and the determination of the postmortem interval. This research looks at the various stages of decomposition a corpse goes through as well as determines a method to collect and analyze the VOCs released during said stages.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning

Fiona Burzynski
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning (CIEL) is a group of like-minded campuses that share the idea of progressive education. These schools are committed to student-centered learning, with particular emphasis on interconnectedness between teaching and learning. The CIEL exchange allows students to "study abroad" while remaining in the United States. There are currently twelve institutions in this collaboration, ranging from California to sunny Florida to New Hampshire. Each school has its specialized fields of study, and students from any of the schools in CIEL can attend any other CIEL school for their home institution's tuition. This exchange can last from a semester to a whole year. CIEL opens the boundaries for students to see more of the United States and provides opportunities for students to see what other schools with progressive ideas have to offer.

The Dow Jones Transportation Average

Zane Tester
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will present information on the Dow Jones Transportation Average (DJT) . It will detail the history of the index, tell which companies comprise it and explain how to use the Dow Jones Industrial index in conjunction with the DJT plan to make investment decisions.

The Effect of Hip Range of Motion on Low Back Pain: A Comparative Study

Kelly Dreimiller, Thomas McGary, Shane Setlock
Faculty Sponsor: Raymond Hammel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Low back pain (LBP) encompasses multiple diagnoses, and current approaches identifying local causal anatomical sources are often ineffective. For diagnosis and direct treatment of LBP, global models are currently used, such as the Functional Movement Screen, the Movement Systems Impairment examination, and the ScapStick. These models assess functional, weight-bearing movement via various criteria. Specific to LBP, these modes of assessment help to clarify the relation of the movement at one joint, qualitatively and/or quantitatively, and its effect at neighboring segments.

Evidence shows that the hip joint’s transverse plane range of motion (ROM) is correlated with LBP. The central hypothesis to this relation proposes that lack of hip ROM requires the lumbar spine to compensate during physiologic movement, therefore requiring increased motion and placing increased stress on tissues of the lumbar spine. This poster presentation provides a review of current evidence that is suggestive of lumbar spine compensatory motion leading to pathology in the low back.

The Effect of Prophylactic Ankle Tape on Perception of Static Balance Performance

Adam Wysocki
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
none - none

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Prophylactic ankle taping is used in athletics to prevent ankle injuries; it is proposed to decrease ankle range of motion and increase ankle stability, which may improve balance. Self-adherent tape has been suggested as superior to cloth tape and no tape in limiting range of motion and increasing stability. There is a feeling of stability, comfort, and performance when taped with cloth tape, but these factors have not yet been evaluated with self-adherent tape. The purpose of this study is to determine if stability perception is influenced by tape type and to examine if there is a correlation between stability perception and balance. Static balance and stability perception will be assessed under three tape conditions (self-adherent, cloth tape, control). Statistical testing will be performed in SPSS to assess stability perception across ankle tape conditions and the correlation between stability perception and balance.

The Effect of Sportsmetrics ACL Training on Valgus Knee Angulation between Female and Male Athletes Pre and Post Test

Lindsey Wheeler, Kevin Ormsby, Aaron Bartolomei
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common site for injury during athletic activities such as soccer, basketball and volleyball. The ACL prevents anterior translation of the tibia on the femur and provides stability throughout the knee. Multiple risk factors suggest that athletes may be more susceptible to ACL injury, specifically female athletes. Recent literature suggests these injuries may be the result of a valgus angulation at the knee while the athlete attempts to land from or accelerate into a jump. Additional literature reveals that genetic, hormonal, environmental, and neuromuscular or biomechanical influences also affect the incidence of ACL injury in athletes. SportsmetricsTM is an ACL injury prevention program that incorporates six weeks of jump training. Our research examines the effect of the SportsmetricsTM training program on valgus knee angulation, comparing between female and male athletes pre and post test.

The Effect of Therapeutic Massage on Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kristen Robinson, Kimberly Corbin, Mackenzie Pierce
Faculty Sponsor: Jessica Wiatrowski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Autism Spectrum Disorders are associated with multisystem impairments, including hyposensitivity or hypersensitivity to the five senses and deficits in communication, social interaction and behavior. Sensory impairments have been linked to stereotypical autistic behaviors such as a lack of social reciprocity, inflexible adherence to routines and decreased attention. Sensory integration therapy has been utilized clinically to decrease aversion to sensory modalities. Two methods that may be effective in promoting this sensory integration are touch therapy, defined as manipulating soft tissues using pressure and traction, and Qigong massage. Through this integration and treatment of sensory impairments, positive changes in motor function and sensory organization may be obtained. This poster presentation will present a limited review of literature that supports the influence of sensory integration through therapeutic massage in improving motor performance and decreasing stereotypical behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. These findings support further research in this area.

The Effects of a Gluten-Free Diet on Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kimberly Flaig, Kelsi Maciejewski, Joseph Christensen
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A controversial topic in complementary and alternative health practice is the use of the gluten-free diet. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and other grain products. It is also used as a food additive to enhance flavor and thicken foods. The gluten-free diet is commonly known as the treatment for Celiac disease. However, this exclusion diet has started to become more frequently prescribed by healthcare professionals for individuals with gastrointestinal issues as well as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

ASD is a recently growing diagnosis that affects the way a child relates and communicates with other people. Symptoms range in degrees of severity, impairing several different developmental markers like social interaction, communication skills, and imagination development. Both the causes and treatments are very controversial among healthcare professionals. This poster will present current research on possible reduction of ASD symptoms with the implementation of a gluten-free diet.

The Effects of a Sportsmetrics™ Program on Valgus Angulation of the Knee in Collegiate and High School Athletes

Alyssa Carducci, Heather Meyris, Kaitlin Butler
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Plyometric jump training programs are designed to reduce risk of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in athletes. High school and collegiate athletes are at risk for these injuries due to genetic, environmental, hormonal, neuromuscular, and anatomic factors. Imbalances in hamstring to quadriceps muscle torque and a valgus knee alignment are key factors that increase an athlete’s susceptibility to serious knee injuries.

The goal of plyometric jump training programs is to educate the athlete on proper lower extremity alignment during a drop jump. Plyometric jump training programs are a safe and effective way to limit ACL injuries during participation in sports by increasing hamstring strength and improving hip and knee alignment. This research assesses the implementation of a plyometric jump-training program on teenage athletes.

The Effects of Self-Selected Music on Functional, Anaerobic Tests

Patrick Palkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
none - none

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Music is a common motivator in sport and both aerobic and anaerobic performances are essential components of sport. Although past research establishes positive psychophysical effects of music on aerobic performance, anaerobic performance is less studied, producing inconsistent results. The purpose of this study is to determine if self-selected music affects functional, anaerobic performance. We hypothesize that the music group will perform significantly better than the no music group in vertical jump, sprint speed, and agility testing. This study will include thirty participants (18-27 years) that participate in physical for 20 minutes, 3-5 times per week. A pretest/posttest randomized control group will be employed. Participants will be randomized into music and no music groups and they will complete a pre and post music intervention vertical jump, 40-yard sprint, and t-test. An independent t-test will compare the music groups, and a dependent t-test will compare pretest and posttest results.

The Effects of Tool Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization of the Iliotibial Band on Hip Rotation Range of Motion

Kathryn Fazio, Karen Sonner, Brittany Agness, Kelsey Ricketts
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Patients often present to physical therapy with complaints of pain and decreased function which may be attributed to soft tissue restrictions, also known as adhesions. Recently, to address these restrictions, practitioners began using a technique called Tool Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (TASTM), which has been proven to have a beneficial effect on a range of impairments throughout various locations in the body. Current literature focuses on the effects of this technique to increase range of motion, decrease pain, decrease healing time, and improve general function. However, sufficient evidence is lacking on the effects of this technique at the iliotibial band (ITB). The ITB originates at the iliac crest as an extension of the tensor fascia latae muscle and attaches distally to the lateral condyle of the tibia. Restrictions and tightness of this tissue often cause limitations and pain. This study aims to determine the effects of this technique at the ITB on hip rotation range of motion.

The Ethics of Promoting Workout Supplements

Alvaro Orozco
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Workout supplement usage has been prevalent throughout history. Instead of dedicating necessary gym time to achieve desired fitness results, some use supplements that help get better results with less time and effort. Not all of these supplements are to enhance muscles; some are energy boosters to allow extended or heightened activity levels or to assist in overcoming short-term obstacles like exercising.

This research is to raise awareness of short and long-term negative effects from workout supplement usage, the ethical nature of product labeling and advertising on the part of manufacturers and distributors, and the ethical nature of trainers promoting supplement use. This information is beneficial to many demographic groups, specifically young college men who are commonly trying to improve their physique to obtain the highly desired ‘splendid’ body. The focus of my study is that excessive or even occasional use of workout supplements has long-term negative effects on one’s body.

The Fibonacci Sequence

Fiona Burzynski, Melinda Montaperto
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will address the Fibonacci Sequence, which dates back to a question - regarding the rabbit population - posed in the year 1202 by Leonardo of Pisa, author of the math book Liber Abaci. The sequence follows the pattern 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, and so on. It can be represented in an array called a matrix. We will use the theory of matrices to present a few applications of the Fibonacci Sequence. Some applications are in music, and others in nature - for example, shells and flowers.

The Impact of "IClicker" Use Within an Academic Intervention Upon Third and Fourth Grade Students' Attitude Toward Lesson Participation

Shannon Weber, Kristin Duggan, Matthew McCall, Bridgette Burke, Melissa Dukett, DeAnna Lawton, Amber Penfield, Heather Williams
Faculty Sponsor: Elizabeth Wright
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In this project, 21 participants, 7 urban and 14 suburban, received a prescribed remedial lesson aimed at improving their content knowledge in relation to math vocabulary found on the New York State Math Assessment. Each was randomly assigned to either a treatment group or a control group. The treatment group participated in lessons with an IClicker device, while the control group participated in a separate location by raising their hands. All incidents of participation were logged. Attitude and vocabulary content knowledge were assessed with pre- and post-test measures.

The Impact of E-Banking on the Client-Customer Relationship

Shawn Gillen
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The focus of my research is that benefits of E-Banking for both the customers and the banks outweigh the lack of trust and customer relationships sacrificed with the use of technology.

Although participation varies with age, banking customers are utilizing E-Banking services at increasing rates. However, E-Banking comes at a cost, despite how highly beneficial it is for both financial institutions and their customers in terms of convenience, ease of use, higher interest rates, savings on account fees and overall cost savings. Some consequences include customers’ lack of trust, diminishing bank/customer relationships and increasing virtual relationships. Ethical consequences discussed include meeting expectations of a diverse customer base, managing and protecting customer information, and allocation of fees for services.

The Impact of Lythrum salicaria (Purple loosestrife) on Community Wide Pollination

Ann Montaperto
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Purple loosestrife, a common invasive plant found throughout North America, competes with native plant species for nutrients, water, sunlight and space. Its showy floral display has hundreds of brilliant, nectar-rich magenta flowers that attract a diverse group of insect pollinators. Therefore, the presence of purple loosestrife can pose a significant threat to native species through competition for pollinators. My research investigated the effects of purple loosestrife on pollination activity of native species near Buffalo, New York. I monitored experimental plots with and without purple loosestrife to determine pollinator densities. I also collected pollen from honey bees and bumblebees visiting native and invasive species in order to determine how many plant species were visited by an individual bee. My results should demonstrate whether pollinator density increases in plots with the invasive species relative to plots with native species and whether an individual bee's faithfulness to a given plant species may negatively impact native species.

The Impact of The 150 Credit-Hour Education Requirement For CPA Licensure

Manuel Cardona
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The 150 credit-hour requirement for licensure of a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) was first implemented in the State of Florida in 1983. Since then, 48 states and jurisdictions of the United States have adopted, or plan to adopt, the 150 credit-hour requirement in place of the 120 hour requirement. The impact of this change is considerable, affecting the field of accounting both positively and negatively. I will examine some of the more significant effects and determine if this requirement's positive results outweigh its negative consequences. This will be determined by examining a number of studies that evaluated the impact of this requirement in areas such as education, licensure success rates, supply of CPA's, and additional cost for businesses.

The Inter and Intra Rater Reliability of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS)

Greg Blanford, Trevor Lewis, Aimee Snyder
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The functional movement screen (FMS) consists of seven tests designed to evaluate movement patterns and identify muscular and skeletal asymmetries. These tests were chosen to best create an observable platform for identifying limitations in mobility and stability, which can present as weakness or imbalance. Practitioners of physical therapy (PT) have the ability to utilize this tool with accuracy in certain patient populations.

A review of literature has shown that there is evidence to demonstrate the inter- and intra-rater reliability of this test. Our presentation will examine this reliability on PT students, trained by an experienced practicing PT certified in FMS. Inter-rater reliability will be assessed by comparing across scores of each tester according to FMS guidelines. Intra-tester reliability will be assessed by repeating the FMS at multiple times using the same human subjects. This study will provide data for future clinicians who wish to use the screen efficiently and efficaciously.

The Money Market: a Component of the Financial Market

Danielle Squire
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Money Market is a financial market component involved with short-term and highly liquid lending and borrowing. This presentation will illustrate important information regarding the Money Market in order to educate the Daemen community on different types of short-term security options involved with these types of investments. Illustrated examples of Money Market Securities will include Certificates of Deposit, U.S. Treasury Bills, Commercial Paper and Banker’s Acceptance. Current interest rates in regards to the Money Market, including local interest rates, will be shown. A graphical demonstration on ways to invest in these securities will explain how to invest in this market and why people choose to invest in these securities over other investment options. It will also show possible returns on investment.

The New York Stock Exchange

Julia Giczkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) began with 24 brokers signing the Buttonwood agreement on May 17, 1792. This agreement established the rules for buying and selling bonds and shares of companies.  When the first constitution was drafted in 1817, the organization was named the New York Stock & Exchange Board, but  it was shortened to its current name in 1863. The first company that began to trade at 68 Wall Street was the Bank of New York.  Over the years the market continued to increase until Black Thursday (October 24, 1929) when the stock market crashed by a volume of over 16 million shares. This event marked the beginning of the Great Depression and showed the public how life-changing the stock market can be. This poster will present a history of the NYSE, major events that affected the exchange and other historical data and trends.

The PICSSL Model: A New Theoretical Framework for Addressing Patients' Intimacy Concerns

Maureen Ryan
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Health care providers are often challenged to address patients' intimacy and sexuality concerns. Sexuality issues are prevalent, and educational programs for providers are essential to improve quality of care. Knowledge and comfort level are key predictors of nurses’ willingness to incorporate sexual health assessments in their practice (Katz, 2005). Lack of training and education regarding sexuality may prevent providers from delivering this care, and throughout all levels of nursing education, absence of theoretical framework about sexuality inhibits opportunities to develop communication and counseling skills for patients’ sexual health (Julien, 2010). This poster presents the Path to Intimacy, Connection, Sexual Satisfaction and Love (PICSSL) Model, a practice-based theoretical framework to enhance knowledge, comfort, and frequency of discussions with patients about intimacy and sexuality.

References: Katz, A. (2005). Do ask, do tell: Why do so many nurses avoid the topic of sexuality? American Journal of Nursing, 105(7), 66-68. Julien, J.O., Thom B., Kline, N.E. (2010). Identification of barriers to sexual health assessment in oncology nursing practice. Oncology Nursing Forum, 37(3): 186-190.

The Rise of Minorities in Sports Administration: A Crack in the Glass Ceiling?

Chandler Williams
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Historically, women and minorities have been faced with obstacles that have reqired them to work harder and longer in sports administration to achieve the success level of their white male counterparts. While service and support positions are plentiful for minorities, opportunities for middle and upper management/administrative positions are less likely. However, it seems that recently small cracks have formed in this glass ceiling. Therefore my focus is that sports administration positions have become increasingly open to women and minorities in recent years.

This project brings to light the significant strides made by minorities, with legislation as an obvious contributor. This research also benefits individuals from diverse backgrounds and demographics by informing them of these minorities' important contributions while  discussing the ethical nature of hiring and promoting women and minorities.

The S & P 500

Jeffrey Jones
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The S&P 500 is a weighted market index used to help determine the economy of the U.S. The value is a collection of the 500 largest publically owned American companies, including 13 based outside of the U.S. that are still traded here. The index has changed in tandem with the economy and is now considered one of the best tools that an investor can utilize. I  will discuss the index's history from its start in 1957 with the S&P 90, and I will illustrate the index's values over the years with a graph. I will also explain how the S&P 500 is a free float capitalization weighted index, meaning the index is calculated using the total market value of a company’s outstanding shares.

The Zodiac Killer

Sarah Gray, Tahja Ferguson
Faculty Sponsor: Shawn Kelley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

During the late 1960s and early 1970s, a mysterious murderer plagued the Northern California Bay area - the Zodiac Killer. Why he chose this name is still unknown; however, he was most famous for leaving behind cryptograms and letters that informed police of his latest victims. His weapons of choice were knives and guns, which he used to target young couples. Although he supposedly has claimed thirty-seven lives, only seven were confirmed by the police, and two of his victims survived. Could he still be at large? I will explore this possibility and what is known of his history in my presentation.

Title VII Quotas and Reverse Discrimination

Philip Tabbi
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Reverse discrimination in both federal and state civil service testing is growing, and, in a shift from historic progression, it is becoming increasingly difficult for Caucasian candidates to succeed in these positions.

It is clear that the demographic profile of personnel working in police and fire industries is changing, and the root cause of this is Title VII's establishment of quotas for specific races in certain positions. This study looks at certain judicial decisions and evaluates whether proper procedures are in order. It also addresses new occurrences of reverse discrimination and compares them to one another, further evaluating the necessity and adequacy of the standards in place to determine if special treatment based on race is constantly occurring. Lastly, it explores the ethical nature of discrimination and the impact on civil service employees and society.

Trading on Margin

Nathan Rydzynski
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will go into detail about margin calls and how they affect buying on margin. I will begin my discussion with some basic definitions of trading on margin and related terms - initial margin, maintenance margin, and others. The poster will address pros and cons of trading on margin and benefits of borrowing money to invest through two scenarios, one of which has an investor losing money due to the market. I will also explain how frequently the topic is employed and how one is affected when trading on margin. Furthermore, this presentation will include a detailed problem on figuring out when your account is due for a margin call and what happens at that time.

Treasury Bills and Notes

Nicholas Spencer
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The most important thing to consider in the world of investments is that in order to achieve reward, one must take some risk. I intend to help educate people on the risk and return properties of treasury bills and notes in comparison to other investment opportunities. I will explain how expected return on investments varies over time depending largely on the situation, the rating of the bond (which include D, C, CC, CCC, B, BB, BBB, A, AA, and AAA rated bonds), inflation, and other such factors based on different investing strategies. Historically, Treasury Bills have been a safer choice for investors. However, as much of today's populace believes, safer is not always the correct choice. I will attempt to simplify the confusing terms and give examples of how each would benefit the current investor.

U.S. Treasury STRIPS

Heidi Cheston
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

U.S. Treasury separate trading of registered interest and principal (STRIPS) are considered to be the safest, most risk-free investments. STRIPS are created by "stripping" the coupons and principal payments of U.S. Treasury notes and bonds into separate parts. The Treasury auctions zero-coupon bonds to brokers and financial institutions, and these buyers strip them into an interest payment and principal payments. The STRIPS are then sold to individual investors in the secondary markets. Just like bonds, the STRIPS' volatility is directly linked to interest rates and inflation. In June 2011, Bloomberg reported that U.S. Treasury STRIPS were becoming a Wall Street favorite. The focus of this presentation is to provide a brief history of U.S. Treasury STRIPS and to analyze how last year's U.S. credit rating downgrade has affected their yields and popularity among investors.

Using SWOT Analysis to Understand Impacts of Wind Energy on a Community

Rebecca Howell
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The United States has been promoting expansion of wind energy for the last couple of decades. As of 2010, fourteen states have adopted wind energy in the form of windmill farms. These windmill farms produced 2.3% of the United States' energy (95 terawatt hours). This study will present an analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) of windmill farms and discuss how the wind energy industry impacts social-economics of the Wyoming County Community in WNY.

Using SWOT Analysis to Understand the Impacts of Biofuel on our Communities

Charles Montaperto
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Fossil fuels are depleting significantly each day, causing countries around the world to seek out new, innovative renewable energy sources. One developing source is biofuel, ethanol made from corn. However, as trends in the biofuel industry continue to grow, so do concerns of its impacts on surrounding communities. Concerns over production of ethanol are the destruction of forests and farmlands, dissolution of jobs, water shortages and soaring food costs. This report presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT)  analysis on current impacts of biofuel on our communities.

Using the SWOT Analysis to Understand the Demand and Supply of Solar Energy

Sounai Mohammad
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The present industrialized world relies heavily on fossil fuels, such as oil, natural gas, and coal. These are beneficial, and without them it would be impossible to heat homes, drive cars or have electric power. However, there are some severe negative impacts on the environment because these fuels are not renewable. Solar panels seem to be an ideal source of renewable power, and an analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) of the solar panel industry will provide an insight into the supply and demand of emerging solar energy technologies. This presentation investigates the benefits and restrictions of innovative renewable energy sources, such as solar panels. My research goal is to use the SWOT analysis to determine supply and demand of solar energy and its effects on businesses.

Utilizing Mindfulness Techniques to Treat Depression in a Primary Care Setting

Susan Nierenberg
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Depression accounts for 10% of primary care visits (AIMS, 2012) and, according to the World Health Organization is the second leading cause of disability.  In a 2005 National Comorbidity Study, Wang reported that 41% of those suffering from depression accessed treatment, with 54% of these patients receiving care in primary care settings.

This poster will present a practice-based theoretical framework - inclusive of interventions and outcomes - related to holistically managing depression in patients seeking care at urban, multicultural primary care clinics.

Knowledge will be drawn from practice experience in a busy, inner-city primary care clinic and a personal philosophy of nursing based on years of practice in the profession. Other resources will include Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction approach, Roy’s Adaptation model, and other existing theories and constructs like Prochaska and DiClemente’s Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change.

Validity of the Pediatric Balance Scale in Children Developing Typically Ages Five to Seven Years

Erika Funnell, Ashley Currier, Erin Hake, Kehua Zhou
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Balance is the ability to maintain alignment, orientation and stability of one's body in space for function. Optimal balance creates the possibility for efficient and effective movement. As a child grows, their balance strategies evolve. Accurate, efficient, and effective assessment of balance capabilities is an important component of the physical therapy examination. The Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS) is a 14-item criterion referenced measure that examines a child's functional balance abilities. A PBS performance profile for 643 children developing typically reported a ceiling effect by age five years. The purpose of this poster is to examine the psychometric properties of the PBS and the modification process of a standardized measure.

A Rasch analysis of PBS performance data for 1000 children is currently in process. Pending the results of Rasch analysis, our research project will investigate item and criterion modifications to the PBS to improve its usefulness in children ages five to seven years.

Vitamin D Status in Correlation with Nutrition and Anthropometric Measures in Exercise

Kandace Over
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Although supplementation of Vitamin D and active exposure to sunlight helps to reduce the incidence of Vitamin D deficiency, it is still prevalent in adults and children. In Western New York, deficiency (<20ng/mL) and insufficiency (<30ng/mL) rates may range from 31% deficiency and 40% insufficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is linked with decreases in physical function and alterations in an insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system binding protein.  Variations are noted in the IGF system after exercise. Thus a study was developed to potentially discover a correlation between effects of both Vitamin D and exercise on the IGF system, with focus on IGF’s binding proteins. The focal point of this subset of data from the cohort of the above larger study is to examine Vitamin D levels in conjunction with diet (Food Frequency Questionnaires and Three Day Diet Records), metabolism, physical activity, and depression. Factors such as demographics and anthropometric measures are taken into consideration when determining relationships between these factors.

Were the victims poisoned? Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) used to determine heavy metal concentrations in hair samples

Joycelyn Rockwood
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There is an abundance of research on lethal concentrations of heavy metals such as Lead, Cadmium, Arsenic, and Mercury. However, high concentrations of Chromium, Iron, and Magnesium can also have the same detrimental effects on humans and are potentially lethal in high doses. Symptoms of heavy metal poisoning include decreased motor speed, impaired vision, and impaired memory. The present study tests the hypothesis that forensic researchers can determine if an individual has been poisoned using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) on hair samples collected from the victim.

Yoga and the Reduction of Stress Symptoms

Charlotte Basher, Marisa Alfieri, Erika Collado
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Stress is an everyday occurrence and has become a universal problem. Many people experience multiple symptoms, such as anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain and medical illnesses. Research indicates that almost 80% of all illnesses are related to stress. One way to help reduce the symptoms associated with it - particularly the mental and physical health issues - is the practice of yoga, a holistic system of mind-body practices for mental and physical health. Yoga incorporates multiple techniques including meditation, breathing exercises, sustained concentration and physical postures. Based on a review of current literature, this poster will explore the research conducted on the effectiveness of yoga and reduction of stress symptoms.

Exhibits

The Beauty and the Horror

Alicia Malik, Dave Mawer, CJ Szatkowski, Skylar Herman, Taylor Heald, Miranda Roth, Jessica Rosenberg, Kayla Leach, Adrian Bowman, Nicholas Lennert, Jaime Schmidt, Joe Evans, Lauren Fratantonio, Isabella Constantino, Jamie Leroy, Sarah Murphy, Joe Gasiecki, Elizabeth Kenison, James Schroeder, Alyssa Crane
Faculty Sponsor: Felice Koenig
10:45 am - 11:15 am
Wick Lobby

This year, the Art Club traveled to New York City for artistic inspiration found not just in the museum and gallery, but also in busy city life. Each member kept his or her eyes open for sites that provoked strong responses, either positive or negative, and kept a photographic documentation of this experience. Art Club now comes together for the Academic Festival to share their aesthetic interpretations of New York City's "beauties" and "horrors" of 2012. This presentation is a group documentary project that will consist of a gathering and sharing of individual perspectives from this experience.

Visual and Performing Arts Senior Exhibit

Alyssa Crane, Clinton Szatkowski, Jason Tower, Kiyara Moore
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Kegler
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Goldman/Greenfield Gallery in Duns Scotus

Student artwork will be on display in the gallery throughout the Academic Festival. Clinton Szatkowski and Kiyara Moore will receive a B.S. in Art. Jason Tower and Alyssa Crane will receive a B.S. in Art Education.

Performances

10th Annual Moot Court

Sabrina Rodriguez, Mitchell Altman-Cosgrove, Wade Pietrocarlo, Samantha Spicer, Anne Brady, Sarah Brody, Jenna Knaus, Amy Grimes, Kaitlyn Castner, Kevin Gills, Kevin Koons
Faculty Sponsor: Laurie Walsh
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Schenck 202

The Pre-Law Association, in conjunction with the History and Government Department, is proud to present the 10th Annual Moot Court Experience. Students will stage a trial - complete with opening statements, testimony from witnesses, closing statements, and a jury deliberation to determine the outcome. Students participating in Moot Court have studied the “art” of law, perfecting questioning, presentation of evidence, and, most importantly, framing their legal arguments. This year's case involves a medical malpractice. The trial will conduct in-depth analysis consisting of questioning and witness testimony to determine whether the defendant is at fault for the homicide and suicide committed by her patient. Moot Court is a mock trial situation where facts and information will be examined in a trial-like manner.

Festival Musicale

Student Activities, Laura McGorray, Holly Tomasello, Jeremy Hall, Andrew Polla, Taylor Miller, Kathleen Boone, Emily Lotterer, Melanie Schott, Clay Case, Stephen Barnes, Anne Brady, Peter Siedlecki, Molly Tyrell, Liz Sanderson, Jared Benjamin, Sarah Rodman, Denise Emer, Jonie Hamilton, Joe Tosto
Faculty Sponsor: Christopher Malik
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

Music - a language that crosses all borders, unites humankind, and expresses cultural individuality and cross-cultural appreciation of our human condition.  Joy and sadness, solitude and celebration - feelings and understandings that illustrate our commonality.

Music is so pervasive in our daily lives that we can be unconscious to its presence, but truly listening or engaging in its creation reveals an intimate connection to a spiritual plane and another world. Whether you arouse to the rhythm of drumming, simmer to the strum of an acoustic guitar, or melt to the warmth of a Steinway, you do not need to be a professional musician to participate in the joy of making music.

This annual event organized by the Student Activities Office seeks to engage students, faculty, and staff in exploring a variety of musical styles and connecting in performances and collaborations that challenge and stretch the experience for both performers and listeners.

Musical Jam

Denise Emer, Jerry Hall, Stephen Barnes, John Mayer, Robert Gunther, Chris Malik
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

This musical performance will be approximately 1 hr long with songs from a variety of genres, including Pop, R & B, Blues, Rock, and Country  from recent radio as well as the past.

Puppetry: The Universal Language

Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Alumni Lounge

Puppetry is a 'Universal Language.'  Its various techniques and styles are deeply rooted in culture and cultural identity.  Puppetry skills provide the ability to communicate across cultural boundaries with an awareness of the rhetorical effects of language in a variety of situational contexts (including non-verbal contexts). 

Developed in conjunction with Cameron Garrity, Professor Brandjes, and Dr. Waterhouse for a Student-Faculty Interdisciplinary Think Tank, this performance explores puppetry’s ability to communicate effectively - specifically, its links to kinesthetic intelligence, a form of learning and intuition linked to tactile abilities by Howard Gardner in Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences

Participants will hear a brief history of puppetry, experience basic puppetry techniques, and identify ways the medium can be used to educate.  

Readings at the RIC

Peter Siedlecki
Faculty Sponsor: Peter Siedlecki
6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
RIC Pad

Daemen's "Readings at the RIC" series of poetry readings has become one of Western New York's cultural staples, featuring the area's premier authors. This special edition of the series will present the works of the college's most outstanding student poets. It will be an open reading, with some invited participants.

Service Learning Performance: Health and Wellness Instruction Through Zumba-like Dance

Kelsey Fahy, Heather House, Samantha Legros, Jessica Reichart, Stephanie Woleben
Faculty Sponsor: Sharlene Buszka
3:30 pm - 5:00 pm
Wick Social Room

A group of Daemen Service Learning students and refugee middle school students from the Jericho Road Ministries F.L.Y. after school program will perform a Zumba-like dance routine. Offering this dance class has been part of a service learning grant to provide health and wellness instruction to youth from such countries as Somalia, Nepal, Bhutan and Burma (Myanmar). Find out about unique ways Daemen College students are reaching out locally to this globally diverse population.

Step Team Performance

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Wick Dining Room

The award winning Daemen College Step Team will thrill and excite all with their creative choreography, razor sharp execution and indomitable spirit. Stunning to see and hear, come watch why this powerhouse of a team is the pride of Daemen College.

The Whisperer

Robert Waterhouse, Justine Paulson, Dan Stachewicz, Ashley Pesch, Kristyn Radford, Cameron Garrity, Taylor Miller, Hillary Baritot, Cam Kogut, Stephen Barnes, Claire Spangenthal, InkChild, Jennifer Jeziorski, Brittany Crawford, Jessica Goodison, Timothy Shaw, Anne Brady, Cierra D'Amico
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Alumni Lounge

This new play, devised and performed by the student ensemble, responds to the roles of digital gossip, cyber-bullying, and electronic communication in our community.

Other

A Grand Night For Singing

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Musicalfare Theatre

Call Musicalfare Theatre for Tickets at 839-8540.

Free Campus Lunch

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
11:00 am - 2:00 pm
Wick Dining Room

Free Campus Lunch

Information

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Lumsden Gym

Information Table

Information

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Wick Center

information table

Poster Presentations

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym

During the day, 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM. Page numbers for abstracts are noted in parentheses ( ).

Poster Session

Brenda Rosen
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Lumsden Gym

Posters on display 9am-2pm.

Poster/Cover Art Signing

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Wick Lobby

Artists' signing of posters and program book covers

President's Welcome

Emily Lotterer
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:30 am - none
Lumsden Gym

President's Reception for all presenters, faculty sponsors, campus community and guests. Refreshments provided. Please join us!

The Helping Hats Project

Linda Kuechler, Michele Flint, John Blest, Brian Fehr, Angela Vacanti
Faculty Sponsor: Linda Kuechler
11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Wick Lobby

The Helping Hats Project, run by the Accounting/MIS Department in conjunction with Business Administration, demonstrates how a community service project can be integrated into academic courses and reinforce course objectives. This initiative produced close to 300 scarves and 300 hats that will be distributed to various organizations throughout Western New York. It was also used as a basis for simulations in Cost Accounting, Operations Management, Human Resource Management and Marketing. Forty students, five faculty members, and the incredible Carol Blest participated.

Core Competencies

The Daemen College core is an innovative competency-based curriculum. Every course approved for core credit includes at least three competencies, including at least one primary competency. Course syllabi state the learning objectives that relate to the competencies and the assessment techniques that will be used to determine mastery.

Committee

Michael Brogan -Vice President, Academic Affairs
Ronald Schenck - Dean, Health & Human Services Division
Kevin Telford - Dean, Arts & Sciences Division
Margene Weiss - Conferences & Events
Diana Alvarado - Print Office
Jim Bachraty - Classroom Technology Services
Sabrina Fennell - Academic Support Services
Greg Ford - Physical Therapy
Mary Fox - Education Off-Campus Programs and CIEL
John Frederick - Executive Leadership & Change
Sherrie Gustas - Office of the President and Board of Trustees
Lauren Jaeger - Annual Giving and Alumni Relations
Felice Koenig - Art Department
Chris Malik - Student Activities
Joyce Strobel - Publications
Yolanda Morris - Enrollment Management
Doris Murphy - Academic Affair
Kim Pagano - Orientation & Student Leadership
Laura Sommer - Visual & Performing Art
Peter Siedlecki - English
John Suckow - Daemen Dining
Tom Wojciechowski - Web Communications
Brenda Young - Global/Local Sustainability, Natural Sciences
John Zaepfel - Academic Computing

Student Editor Program Book

Emily Stoll, BA English/Communications, 2013

Student Proposal Logistics Review

Emily Lotterer, BFA Graphic Design, 2012

Academic Festival T-Shirt Design

Sara O’Brien, BFA Graphic Design, 2014

Special Thanks To

Brenda Rosen and Liz VanDeusen, 2015, Conferences & Events; Printing Office staff, Classroom Technology Services, Daemen Dining staff; Maintenance staff

Design for Program Book & Poster

Mike Morgan, Joyce Strobel, Elise Wright, Publications

Program Book Managing Editor

Margene Weiss, Conferences & Events

World of Opportunity Wizard

Wow! Did you know Daemen students travel to help people in need!

Health Care Studies Professor Justine Tutuska, accompanied by her students, traveled to the Dominican Republic to work on Public Health Issues and school building.

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