Daemen College Academic Festival

Download a printable version of the program.

A Celebration of Academic Achievement, April 17, 2013.

The Daemen College Academic Festival 2013 brings us together on campus to celebrate the academic and creative achievements of Daemen students. This Festival Program Book contains the schedule, descriptive abstracts for all events and a student presenter index in the back section.

The Daemen College Academic Festival centers on student presentations to campus and community, providing a showcase for academic excellence and achievement through student and faculty presentations, exhibitions and performances. These presentations may reflect work done in a single discipline or be interdisciplinary in nature, and include posters, papers, panel discussions, exhibits, videos and artistic, musical or theatrical performances. In some disciplines, you will be viewing final capstone projects and/or research.

We are deeply appreciative of the level of student involvement in Academic Festival 2013. We are also appreciative of faculty support for this endeavor. Faculty sponsors have worked with students through teaching, research projects, Think Tank projects, study abroad experiences and by encouragement in the development of proposals.

Celebrating our 13th year, we thank President Gary Olson for his support of the Academic Festival. We also want to thank members of the Festival Planning Committee who have worked over the past year. Committee members are listed inside the back cover of this Program Book.

We hope you will enjoy the insightful and exciting ideas generated through student and faculty scholarship. Enjoy your day!

Veteran Correspondent and Best-Selling Author Rita Cosby

Rita CosbyRita Cosby is currently a special correspondent for the top-rated CBS syndicated newsmagazine Inside Edition, and hosts her own program, The Rita Cosby Show, on WOR radio. A renowned Emmy winning TV host, veteran correspondent, and best-selling author, Cosby anchored highly rated primetime shows on Fox News Channel and NBC.

Cosby’s recent New York Times bestseller, Quiet Hero: Secrets From My Father’s Past, details her fascinating discovery about her Polish father, a Nazi prisoner of war, who was saved by American troops. Cosby has spoken at the United Nations, Capitol Hill, and the Pentagon, and her critically acclaimed book has become required reading at many major U.S. colleges and universities. Quiet Hero also serves as a centerpiece for discussions on the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder on veterans and their families.

Throughout her illustrious TV career, Cosby has secured some of the biggest interviews, including exclusives with more than 20 world leaders, conducting historic back-to-back interviews with Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. Cosby was also granted rare meetings with Pope Benedict XVI, and years earlier, with Pope John Paul II to discuss death penalty issues after receiving an exclusive letter from Timothy McVeigh, explaining why he carried out the Oklahoma City Bombing.

The first reporter to see prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay and witness an actual interrogation, Cosby also interviewed Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic, who called her from his prison cell at the Hague where he stood trial for war crimes. While broadcasting live from Belgrade during the NATO bombing, she broke the news that three American POWs were going to be released. During Hurricane Katrina, she provided extensive, live coverage, hosting shows from New Orleans, revealing the widespread devastation, and soon after reported live from the war zone in Afghanistan, and then along the U.S.- Mexico border.

Additionally, Cosby has conducted exclusive interviews – both behind bars – with Erik Menendez and Dr. Jack Kevorkian. Throughout her career she has, also, interviewed many celebrities and sports stars, including Michael Jackson, Simon Cowell, Mike Tyson, Bruce Willis, Matt Damon, Stevie Wonder, Jon Bon Jovi, Hank Aaron, Dennis Rodman, and golfer John Daly.

Her first book, Blonde Ambition, was a New York Times bestseller and was called “the most talked about book in America” by Extra. Her second book, Quiet Hero: Secrets From My Father’s Past, is enjoying tremendous success, already hitting several bestseller lists, which include The New York Times, The Washington Post, and USA Today.

Honors for the three-time Emmy® winner include the Matrix Award, Headliner Award, and Jack Anderson Award for journalism excellence. She was also selected by Cosmopolitan magazine as a “Fun and Fearless Female.” A recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor and the Lech Walesa Freedom Award, she hosts the National Memorial Day Parade broadcast to all U.S. military installations around the world. In recognition of Cosby’s “extraordinary journalism and exemplary service on behalf of her community,” October 11, 2010, was officially named “Rita Cosby Day” in New York State. In 2011, she was recognized by Congress for her professional and charitable achievements.

Presentations

"s'Muther" - Film Screening and Q&A with the Director

Chase Woolner
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
3:15 pm - 4:00 pm
CVPA 201

Join guest artist Chase Woolner as he presents "s'Muther," his short film thesis presentation from California Institute for the Arts. Utilizing various puppetry techniques and adapted from true events, this film tells the story of a young mother and her three-year old son who become homeless. The mother, desperate for shelter and short on cash, leads her son to the local park to call on family and friends for help. Unable to reach anyone, she is forced to make tough decisions. Questions will be taken after the screening.

Bretagne: Music's Influence on Culture

Caitlin Chauvette
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
3:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Business Building 204

The French Province of Bretagne has been home to the Breton people since 458 AD. Its culture and traditions have survived for centuries despite invasion from Great Britain, conversion from paganism to Christianity, and continuous battles with France. Many Breton cultural traditions - their language in particular - continue to thrive in daily life. Others, like clothing and dance, are remembered only during special celebrations. Many elements contribute to survival of cultural identity, and music plays a vital role. In music’s context, language, history, stories, or attitudes can live on. Traditional music in Bretagne has been revived in the last few decades, and the harp and bagpipe have re-emerged. The music has integrated modern styles like rock, keeping it popular with both elders and younger generations. Songs about Breton stubbornness and the history of the land are written in Breton, French, and English, opening the culture to the world. I will discuss my findings on how traditional Breton music, which is now a mix of old and new styles, helps preserve their original culture.

Custom Foam Puppet Patterning, Quick and Dirty

Matthew Laird
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
12:00 pm - 12:45 pm
CVPA 201

Join guest artist Matthew Laird as he navigates through the unknown world of puppet patterning. As a fabricator at Animax Designs in Tennessee, Laird is no stranger to the ins and outs of puppet construction. This demonstration/workshop will reveal his simple yet effective approach to kinetic sculpture, empowering audience members to create their own puppets.

Daemen College Student Alumni Ambassadors

Hannah Marvin, Holli Nesbitt, Kelsey Reeder
Faculty Sponsor: Kathryn Graf
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 120

Student Alumni Ambassadors, the group in the yellow polos, can be seen around campus, but not many know the extent of their duties, their school pride, and their hopes for the future. Alumni are part of what makes change at Daemen possible, and the group helping to bridge the gap between current students and alumni is part of the culture of change. We will discuss Student Alumni Ambassadors’ current role in the Daemen community and the possibility of hosting a conference which Daemen Student Alumni Ambassadors attended in March – the Council for Advancement and Support of Education/Affiliated Student Advancement Program (CASE ASAP) District 2 Conference. Participating in this conference allowed new ideas and networking between regional student alumni organizations. These new ideas will soon be implemented by Daemen’s Student Alumni Ambassadors, who are always looking for new members devoted to Daemen to help raise awareness of their college, its history, and its ever changing future.

Dr. James Corasanti - the Ethical Dilemma of Zealousness

Samantha Spicer
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
11:00 am - 11:30 am
RIC 120

I will examine the Dr. Corasanti case and look at how social media affected it. I will further examine the ethical obligation of attorneys and paralegals and how they conflict with each other. The specific ethical principles I will be looking at are confidentiality and zealousness.

Effective Teaching Strategies

Taylor Miller, Sara Fretthold, Brianna Quaranto
Faculty Sponsor: Joan Bradley
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 101

Piaget, Vygotsky, and Gardner have contributed numerous helpful teaching characteristics to educational development in Western Society. Their theories present differentiation, a flexible approach to teaching with effective research based practices that cater to each student's individual needs. Differentiation requires that teachers equip themselves with a broad repertoire of strategies to ensure students' success. Its application improves the quality of pedagogical methodology. We will detail characteristics explored by these innovative theorists and demonstrate and explain application in the classroom, with a goal of informing and reiterating tactical practices for all teachers. Employing these effective teaching strategies through application of methods discussed in the presentation will help teachers facilitate knowledge regardless of background, learning style preference, and intellectual differences. Teachers must consider demographic trends, including ethnic and racial minority groups, socioeconomic status, developmental disabilities, and English as a second language.

Entrepreneurship in Action

Cathaleen Curtiss, Kazeem Adetunji, Michael Ferron, Joseph Gasiecki III, Brandon Hank, Katharine Meyer, Brittany Parker, Nathan Schultz, Ashley Scrinzi
Faculty Sponsor: Pauline Soeffing
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Schenk 202

Students from Entrepreneurship in Action (ENTR 401) will present five minute multimedia summaries of their individual business models. These models build upon techniques honed in ENTR 201 and 301, utilizing creativity and innovation, creative problem solving, brainstorming, and opportunity recognition. A panel of local entrepreneurs and experts will observe to provide feedback and discussion. Join us as student entrepreneurs inspire your creative thinking by presenting their ideas based upon individual skills, interests, and aspirations. You could observe the next great entrepreneur in action!

Examination of Performance Profiles of Children Ages 2 to 13 Years Old on Selected Static and Dynamic Balance Items from the Pediatric Balance Scale 2nd Edition

Meghan Pendergast, Kristy Arndt, Stephanie Blaszak, Ashley Currier, Erika Funnell, Erin Hake, Kehua Zhou
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
11:30 am - 12:30 pm
RIC 101

The Pediatric Balance Scale Second Edition (PBS-2) is a 25-item tool for examination of static and dynamic balance in children 2 years to 13 years 11 months of age. This study investigates the validity of the PBS-2 and determines if additional modifications are indicated. The specific purposes were to (1) examine the revised scoring rubrics, (2) examine and compare development of static standing balance on compliant and non-compliant surfaces, (3) examine new dynamic balance items, (4) examine new reaching items, and (5) examine revised performance of alternate stepping. Data from 189 children (girls: n=98, boys: n=91) was collected during the first year of a multi-year collaborative study with the DPT program at Belmont University, Nashville, TN. Children were recruited from daycare programs, preschools, and school-based settings in western NY and middle TN. Statistical analysis suggests that the PBS-2 is a promising test to examine balance in children ages 2 to 8 years of age.

High School Students' Reactions to "The Whisperer"

Chelsea Ventura, Breanna Barker, Lora Foran, Michele Mullar, Karissa Revell, Hillary Baritot, Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Waterrose
10:00 am - 11:15 am
Duns Scotus 35

We base our presentation on a brief, experimental high school tour of "The Whisperer" - an original play about cyber bullying devised and performed by Daemen students - and an observational study by Graduate Assistants with the Reynolds Center. In the spring semester, these Graduate Assistants monitored a range of high school students for responses to the performance and participation in post-show discussions. We will present scenes from "The Whisperer" and a panel discussion by both the student actors and Graduate Assistants. The discussion will include Graduate Assistants' observations of high school audiences and differences among various grade levels. Actors and co-creators of "The Whisperer" will participate in the discussion, commenting on their experiences writing and performing the play and on the impact it had on student audiences. Participants will address bullying and discuss whether it was successful to address them through an artistic medium and discussions.

History and Government Department: Senior Thesis Research Presentations

Kaleigh Ratliff, Mitchell Altman-Cosgrove, Wade Pietrocarlo, Brandon Grody
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Parshall
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

Four History & Government and Political Science majors will present their Senior Research Projects and discuss the senior thesis requirement's relevance to their professional careers. Mitchell Altman-Cosgrove: Apportioning the New York State Senate: A Historical Overview and the Debate for a 63rd Senate Seat in 2012. Apportionment in the New York State Senate over the last twenty years led to the 2012 addition of a sixty-third seat. Are deficiencies in an outdated constitutional formula in New York's redistricting process leading to more or less partisan activities? Wade Pietrocarlo: New York: A Case Study of Emergent Strategy in Reducing Medical Malpractice Costs. The Buffalo Medical Malpractice Court, its creation, and its difference from traditional health care reform methods are a product of Emergent Path Theory, which can explain New York's health care reform progression. Kaleigh Ratliff: The Buffalo-Niagara Region's Cultural Identification with Ancient Egypt: The Niagara Falls Mummy. The Buffalo-Niagara region and North America in general identified with Ancient Egypt racially, culturally, and religiously. The Niagara Falls Mummy is not a unique phenomenon but was directly caused by global fascination with Ancient Egypt. Brandon Grody: A Return to the Real America: How the American Revolution Inspires the Tea Party Movement. This evaluates the Tea Party invocation of the U.S. Constitution and popular constitutionalism in modern elections and the 2012 Presidential Election.

Hope For Tomorrow Armenian Medical Mission Trip

Anne Nikirk, Jessica Panepento , Thomas McGary
Faculty Sponsor: Lynn Matthews
10:30 am - 11:30 am
Duns Scotus 11

The Hope for Tomorrow Foundation travels each spring to a country in need of medical care to provide surgeries free of charge. This past spring a group of surgeons, nurses, and students traveled to the war torn Armenian country of Nagorno-Karabakh Republic (NKR), which is nestled in Azerbaijan. Over the course of three days, the students assisted the surgeons with 75 surgeries, including arthroplastic knee surgeries, plastic surgery reconstructions on children and burn victims, vascular surgeries, and fracture repairs. The Hope for Tomorrow foundation donated medical equipment and trained surgeons in more advanced surgical techniques so their work could continue after they returned to the US. During our stay we had the opportunity to meet the president of NKR, to experience Armenian culture, and to visit a local orphanage. The foundation's work was recognized in Rome as we met Pope Benedict XVI during a Vatican address. Come hear about our life changing experiences.

Karibu a Kenya!

Anita MacKay
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
10:30 am - 11:00 am
Duns Scotus 11

I traveled independently to Nairobi, Kenya to volunteer my time with Kings Kids Village Orphanage during January, 2013. This orphanage is a uniquely arranged home to more than forty orphans who are victims of the HIV/AIDS epidemic currently overtaking Africa. Twelve of the 42 children are infected, and about 30 (both infected and not infected) have been orphaned by their parents as a direct result of the HIV/AIDS virus. I spent a total of twenty-one days working at the orphanage's on-site school, spending time with the children and their families, visiting a local home for abandoned teenage mothers, and experiencing the welcoming and rich culture Kenya has to offer. My presentation will feature some of my cultural experiences, educational experiences, and comparisons between society, economy, and education. My pictures and videos captured in Kenya will provide a glimpse into the heart of the children of Kenya.

La Inmigracion Ilegal de Mexico a los Estados Unidos

Ashley Soluri
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Business Building 204

Since the 2008 presidential election and the presidency of Barack Obama, laws about illegal immigration have changed completely. Although "illegal immigration" is not a new term to many, new tactics have been established to diminish the number of illegal immigrants in the United States today. As of 2010, Alabama, Arizona and California have taken initiative in making laws to support and/or restrict immigrants. There are currently 11.5 million immigrants in the United States, with 59% from Mexico. I will discuss current United States immigration laws.

La Terapia de La Danza y El Cáncer de Mama

Abrianna Adler
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Business Building 204

According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 1.38 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008. In following years, breast cancer has been ranked second most common of all cancers. Patients with breast cancer are diagnosed within various stages depending on tumor size or metastasis to the lymph nodes, bones, or organs. After receiving invasive treatments to combat the cancer, patients often struggle with adverse effects such as lymphedema, issues with body image, depression, and an overall decrease of quality of life. Exercise and psychological interventions may be used during the rehabilitation period for patients with breast cancer; however, dance therapy has also been studied as an alternative therapy to increase physical and emotional well-being. In the Spanish language, I will present research from institutions of Spain, Greece, and the United States and demonstrate that dance therapy is a successful alternative therapy for breast cancer patients.

Living Interfaith Spiritual Traditions

Rev. Cassandra Salter-Smith, Dominique Graham, Chelsea Courtade, Jennifer Jeziorski, Kathleen Strorm, Crystal Day, Minni Mayumdodor
Faculty Sponsor: Cassandra SalterSmith
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
RIC 101

We live in a pluralistic society where there are people who belong to various faith traditions or none at all. Students in the Religious and Spiritual Tradition (REL/PHI 308-02) course will present their research papers on various faith traditions, including Native American Indians (Lakota), Daosim, Paganism, Hindu, and other world religions. Students will provide insights they gained through study of world religions and through visits to several places of worship other than those of their own faith.

Model UN Simulation - GVT 231

Aakriti Tandon
Faculty Sponsor: Aakriti Tandon
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Wick Social Room

A simulated UN Security Council session will discuss a resolution regarding nuclear armament of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea) and the country's refusal to cooperate with the UN or actively engage in the six party talks, which include the US, the UK, Russia, Japan, and the People's Republic of Korea (South Korea). Students will role play as diplomats representing member states in a simulated UN Security Council session and must debate, deliberate, consult, and develop solutions to world problems. Participants will be responsible for investigating international issues, presenting the position of a country they researched, and shaping and crafting a final joint resolution that will summarize the Security Council's response towards the situation. During the conference, participants must employ a variety of communication and critical thinking skills to represent their country's policies.

One Voice, Many Voices: Writing Multiple Characters for Solo Performances

Brodrick Jones
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
CVPA 201

Puppeteers often find themselves needing to perform multiple characters simultaneously. Whether a classic Punch & Judy show or a one-woman production on YouTube, the solo puppeteer faces a peculiar set of challenges when it comes to creating a script. Using a mix of written examples and live performance, guest artist Brodrick Jones will delve into the process of creating dialogue for one and explore the structure of storytelling using a single actor to portray an entire cast of characters.

Social Media Savvy and Stupidity

Sharlene Buszka, Stephanie Joerger, Matthew Koenig, Katharine Meyer, Roberto Serbinio, Kirsten Sharp, Todd Stannard, Jr, Brian Wilder
Faculty Sponsor: Sharlene Buszka
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Schenk 202

We will discuss how to put yourself in the best light on the internet and avoid making the uninformed mistakes others have made. This workshop will present issues relating to social media privacy and how students and prospective employees can use technology and its related tools in a positive way. Information about the following topics will be shared in an interesting, informative and interactive way: "Do employers have the right to monitor use of computers, iPads and iPhones during work, during lunch or breaks, or even off company property?" "Do employers need to inform you about these monitoring activities?" "What are the consequences if you get caught doing something you should not be doing?" "How much do employers use social media when making hiring (or firing) decisions?" "What are some good social media sites?" Presented by seniors in MGT 410, Seminar in Human Resource Management.

The Mystery of Hamlet in The Hunger Games with Faustus and Edwin Drood

Nicholas Sabia, Jenna Knaus, Sarah Brody, Emily Leschhorn
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Morace
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
RIC 120

Senior English majors will discuss their thesis research on four literary subjects, each using a different critical approach: Suzanne Collins' "The Hunger Games" (Marxist), the "Faust Legend" (New Historicist), Shakespeare's "Hamlet" (Psychoanalytical), and Charles Dickens' "The Mystery of Edwin Drood" (Biographical). The intellectual panel will be followed by a question and answer session.

Uncovering the Mystery of Czech Marionettes

Christine Dempsey
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
CVPA 201

Czech marionette use is a discipline of puppetry often overlooked by contemporary audiences. Join guest artist Christine Dempsey as she explores the rich history of this area of puppetry. Dempsey is particularly qualified in this field as she is currently working on developing this style of marionettes for the RoboPuppet Theater presentation of The Hobbit. The lecture will conclude with a short demonstration of these puppets, inviting audience members to try them out for themselves.

Veteran Mentors and the Success of the Buffalo Veterans Treatment Court

Jeremiah Pedro
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
10:30 am - 11:30 am
RIC 120

Judge Robert Russell of the Buffalo City Courts recognized a concerning trend in his drug treatment and mental hygiene courts. In response, he formed the Buffalo Veterans Treatment Court (VTC) to address the needs of veterans who have found themselves on the wrong side of the law. The VTC was the first court of its kind in the country and started in Buffalo, New York on January 15, 2008. Judge Russell had the assistance of a group of volunteer Veteran Mentors who helped participating veterans to keep their focus on treatment for substance abuse or mental hygiene issues. Because of the Veteran Mentors and the rest of Judge Russell's staff, the VTC has been able to maintain a recidivism rate of zero percent since its inception. This research examines the origins of the Buffalo VTC and how the Veteran mentor program has contributed to the low recidivism rates of the participants of the court.

Nursing Assessments

An Assessment of the Educational Needs of Members of the West Side Community Center Regarding Falls

Ashley Zoccano, Joshua Draves, Heather Peperone, Sarah Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Pamela Schmidt
2:00 pm - 2:20 pm
Business 104

According to the World Health Organization, 28-35 percent of individuals 65 years and older fall and sustain injuries each year, rising to 35-45 percent for populaces 70 years and older. A community assessment completed by Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students assesses risk for falls in a group of women from West Side Community Center. These women are between 65 and 90 years of age, ranging in ethnicity from African American to Italian to Polish to Hispanic. The West Side Community Center is dedicated to providing services to Buffalo's West Side population. Based on results of a survey created and distributed, we will create a presentation to educate West Side Community Center members in regards to fall risk and prevention.

Assessment of the Educational Needs of Daemen College Students Regarding Cigarette Smoking

Kristen Thomas, Melanie Carter, Kristen Rybacki, Megan Riccobono
Faculty Sponsor: Pamela Schmidt
2:20 pm - 2:40 pm
Business 104

According to the American Lung Association, cigarette smoking is one of the leading preventable causes of mortality in the United States. About 8.6 million Americans have at least one serious illness caused by smoking, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), coronary heart disease, stroke, oral cancer, pneumonia, and slow wound healing. Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment to assess the educational needs of Daemen College students in regards to cigarette smoking. An educational program was created for the targeted population based on the results.

Educational Needs of the Clients at the Jesse Nash Clinic Regarding Gonorrhea

Megan Votava, Larissa Blenker, Kayla Heiman, Jason Heim
Faculty Sponsor: Karen Kieliszek
2:20 pm - 2:40 pm
Business 107/109

The Jesse Nash Health Center, part of the Erie County Health Department, provides anonymous sexually transmitted disease (STD) screening, diagnosis, and treatment to the community. Healthy People 2020 has identified a specific goal noting the importance of providing equitable STD services to all tailoring educational programs to meet the needs of the population served. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment and determined that gonorrhea rates are increasing in Erie County and that the education provided on STD prevention may not meet the population's needs. This investigation's outcome resulted in development and implementation of a community education program addressing the specific educational needs of those in the targeted population regarding gonorrhea and sexual risk reduction.

Prescription Medication Usage

Jessica Zaccarine, Yolanda Fonville, Shawntres Currin, Edeline Noel
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Stonemetz
1:00 pm - 1:20 pm
Business 103

Residents of Ken-Ton Presbyterian Village Apartments completed a survey to assess their learning needs regarding prescription medications. The survey, distributed by Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students, was designed to identify any problems or concerns with any aspect of medication treatment. Taking medications as prescribed is vital to maintaining health and treating illness. Skipping doses, sharing medication, or discontinuing a medication without a healthcare provider's knowledge can all be detrimental to one's health. Utilizing the nursing process, a community assessment was conducted. The results were used to present an educational program for the residents regarding the importance of medication compliance and safety.

Risks of Smoking Knowledge Among Young Women

Kim Jankowiak, Kristen Martin, Rachel Collins, Shtara Redden
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Stonemetz
1:20 pm - 1:40 pm
Business 103

Members of a Welfare to Work program at the Seneca Babcock Community Center assisted Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students by completing a survey designed to assess knowledge of the dangers of smoking cigarettes. The survey respondents were all mothers who smoked cigarettes. Smoking poses multiple health risks not only to smokers but to their children and family as well. Using the nursing process, a community assessment was conducted. Information gathered from the assessment was utilized to develop an educational program which was then presented to respondents.

The Educational Needs of Participants of the Family Support Group at the Mental Health Association of Erie County

Nicole Wagner, Kadie Desbordes, Kaitlin Martz, Amanda Jakaub
Faculty Sponsor: Pamela Schmidt
1:40 pm - 2:00 pm
Business 104

Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students are assessing the educational needs of caregivers of mentally ill individuals ages 18 and over regarding stress management. The Mental Health Association (MHA) has provided essential programs and services to seniors, adults, families, and children in Erie County since 1962. The MHA runs the Child and Family Support Program, which offers support services and holds monthly support groups for parents of mentally ill children, teens, and young adults. This assessment's results will help develop an educational program for caregivers of this population.

The Educational Needs of Prospective Adoptive Parents at Adoption STAR

Amanda Thompson, April Kawka, Tina Murawski, Jeffrey Alger
Faculty Sponsor: Laurie Seier
3:00 pm - 3:20 pm
Business 104

Adoption STAR (Support, Training, Advocacy and Resources) is a NY state authorized child placement adoption agency located in Amherst, NY. It serves pregnant women, birth families, adoptive families, and adoptees. The services they provide include education and support, parent services, and support groups. Often, prospective adoptive parents do not have access to information about the care of a newborn in the same way that biological parents do (i.e. at the obstetrician's office). A community assessment and survey was conducted to determine the educational needs of prospective adoptive parents at Adoption STAR regarding newborn care. An educational program on basic newborn care was then developed and presented to a group of prospective adoptive parents at Adoption STAR.

The Educational Needs of Refugees at the Jewish Family Service Regarding Immunizations and Infectious Diseases

Heather Yaskow, Tamara Davis, Cathy McCool, Edmond Bass
Faculty Sponsor: Pamela Schmidt
1:00 pm - 1:20 pm
Business 104

If each newborn received routine immunizations, 33,000 lives would be saved, 14 million cases of disease would be prevented, direct healthcare costs would be reduced by $9.9 billion, and $33.4 billion would be saved from indirect costs, according to Healthy People 2020. Daemen College RN-BS Nursing students are assessing the educational needs of refugees at the Jewish Community Center regarding immunizations and infectious diseases. The assessment focuses on Arabic, Burmese and Nepali members in the refugee resettlement program ages 18 years or older who have been in the country for less than six months and speak English and Arabic. Based on results of a survey, a teaching plan will be developed. Jewish Family Services provides assistance for many things, including adoption certification, adoption counseling, children, and adolescents.

The Educational Needs of Residents at Bristol Village Regarding Nutrition

Natalie Deschamps, Allison Jerge, Colleen Occhino, Cathleen DiFlavio
Faculty Sponsor: Laurie Seier
2:40 pm - 3:00 pm
Business 104

Bristol Village is an assisted-living facility located in Clarence, NY. Assisted living allows residents to live as independently as possible for as long as possible. It is a bridge between independent living and a nursing home. Residents here may require some assistance with activities of daily living and medications, but not constant care. Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students completed a community assessment and survey to determine the nutritional knowledge of the residents. Based on this information, an educational program was developed and presented to the residents.

The Educational Needs of the Members of the Aurora Senior Citizen Center Regarding Advance Directives

Christina Deleo, Abigail Chittley, Riley Diemand
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:40 pm - 2:00 pm
Business 107/109

Advance directives are a formal written document a person develops outlining his/her wishes regarding health care in the event that the individual is unable to make these decisions. The document stipulates an agent to make decisions if needed. Advance directives are essential for all individuals to document, yet many do not possess them because they lack knowledge on the issue. In particular, elderly people who are vulnerable to life-threatening events often do not have these documents in place. Advance directives were the topic of focus for a community assessment undertaken to investigate the knowledge level of members of the Aurora Senior Center. Based on results of a survey, an educational program was formulated and implemented.

The Knowledge of Senior Citizens at Schiller Park Community Center Regarding Stroke

Shawnna Gustafson, Kristal Anderson, Kristen Braxton, Rebecca Lukasik, Jessica Rosario
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
2:00 pm - 2:20 pm
Business 107/109

Healthy Objectives 2020 has identified stroke as a focus area because it is a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Stroke is caused by an interruption in the supply of blood to the brain. The damaging events of a stroke can be reduced if treated early. However, oftentimes an individual lacks knowledge or ignores the signs and symptoms of a stroke. Stroke was the focus of a community assessment conducted with elderly members of the Schiller Park Community Center. We ascertained the knowledge level of the targeted population regarding risk factors, signs and symptoms, complications, and treatment of a stroke. We will present results of the assessment and a community education program implemented to increase the knowledge level of members of the Schiller Park Community Center regarding stroke.

The Learning Needs of Daemen College Students Over 18 Years of Age Regarding Risk Factors, Complications, and Management of Type II Diabetes

Helene Aguglia, Dila ElNasser, Kari Czubinski, Linda Kozlowski
Faculty Sponsor: Pamela Schmidt
1:20 pm - 1:40 pm
Business 104

An estimated 23.6 million people a year are diagnosed with Type ll diabetes, the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Risk factors include but are not limited to obesity, genetics, and sedentary lifestyles. Healthy People 2020 says that as the rate of diabetes continues to rise around the world, so do diabetes-related complications. Daemen College Nursing RN-BS students are conducting a community assessment of the educational needs of Daemen College students about diabetes. An educational program will be developed from the results and presented in Wick Center during lunch.

The Learning Needs of Guests of the Genesis House Regarding Hepatitis C

Holly Weaver, Jake Lundquist, Dianna O'Brien, Kristen Weaver
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:00 pm - 1:20 pm
Business 107/109

Hepatitis C, an infectious disease of the liver, is caused by the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and is estimated to affect 130-170 million people worldwide. Often the infection is asymptomatic. If untreated, it can lead to liver disease or gastric or esophageal varices that can be life threatening. Blood-to-blood contact is generally the virus' mode of transmission, so it is often found in intravenous drug users. A community assessment was conducted to ascertain the educational needs of past/present guests of the Genesis House, a homeless shelter in Cattaraugus County, regarding Hepatitis C. This was at the request of Genesis House's Executive Director, since many guests of the shelter are former drug users and are therefore susceptible. We will present results of the assessment and describe a community education program developed and implemented for the targeted population.

The Learning Needs of the Burmese Patient Population at Jericho Road Family Practice Regarding Medication Refill Issues

Christina Ewell, Nicole Norris, Jennifer Davis
Faculty Sponsor: Karen Kieliszek
3:00 pm - 3:20 pm
Business 107/109

Jericho Road Family Practice provides medical services to the medically under-served, including immigrant populations in our community. This practice services a large Burmese population that has recently immigrated to the United States. Often, these patients are burdened with a language barrier that makes tasks such as medication refill difficult. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment to determine what the population's care providers perceive as the greatest compliance issue surrounding medication refill and what might be the best way to educate this population. The outcome of the investigation resulted in the development of a community education video for the Burmese population detailing how to refill a prescription medication. Results will be presented to the Daemen College Community.

The Learning Needs of the Guests of Little Portion Friary Regarding the Harmful Effects of Tobacco Use

Samantha Olsen, Renee Alvira, Ashley Curry, Laura Ciraolo
Faculty Sponsor: Karen Kieliszek
2:40 pm - 3:00 pm
Business 107/109

Little Portion Friary provides home and shelter to 19 homeless men and eight homeless women in the Buffalo Community. Often this population lacks the education and means to address the most basic healthcare concerns. They are often fraught with addiction issues ranging from drug use to cigarette smoking. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BSN students performed a community assessment and determined that smoking was a significant issue with this population and was cited by Little Portion Friary guests as an area where more education was needed. A community education program was developed and implemented for both the targeted population and volunteers of Little Portion Friary. It will be presented to the Daemen College Community.

The Learning Needs of the Guests of St. Susan Center Regarding Heart Disease

Sarah Guthrie, John Munger, John Rice
Faculty Sponsor: Lynda Cessario
1:20 pm - 1:40 pm
Business 107/109

The St. Susan Center, a soup kitchen located in Chautauqua County, provides meals to vulnerable residents of the county. Often these residents lack knowledge of various health issues. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment to determine the knowledge level of guests of St. Susan Center regarding heart disease. We will present results of this investigation and description of a community education program developed for the targeted population.

The Learning Needs of the Members of the Hispanics United-Seniors Regarding Food and Nutrition

Amanda Dipiazza, Stephanie Myszka, Yvonne Strozyk, Alexis Trifunovic
Faculty Sponsor: Patricia Geiger
2:40 pm - 3:00 pm
Business 103

Poor nutrition is an ongoing health care concern as our population ages. Seniors often fail to recognize the importance of healthy eating as it relates to good health, and healthy eating is often not a priority in individuals who have limited incomes and resources. Proper Food and Nutrition was the focus of a community assessment conducted with elderly members of the Hispanics United Seniors. We ascertained the knowledge level of this population regarding the importance of proper diet and healthy living. We will discuss the results of the assessment and the community education program implemented to increase the knowledge level of identified community members.

The Learning Needs of the Members of the Moot Center Seniors Regarding Immunizations and Infectious Disease

April Gunsher, Tracy Nowak, Gina Virtuoso, Jessica Cook
Faculty Sponsor: Patricia Geiger
2:20 pm - 2:40 pm
Business 103

As our population ages, the importance of complying with immunization recommendations becomes a necessity. Senior citizens are particularly vulnerable for contracting communicable diseases that often can lead to chronic illness and death. To maintain good health, immunizations are essential for this population. Immunizations and infectious disease were the topic focus for a community assessment conducted by Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students. A survey was completed to investigate the knowledge level of members of the Moot Center Seniors. Data from this community assessment project was analyzed, and an educational program was formulated and implemented for the identified population of community members. We will highlight the community assessment during our presentation.

The Learning Needs of the Members of the St. John Tower Apartment Complex Regarding Advance Directives

Danielle Sutton, Danielle Pigeon, Amber Siwy, Victoria McCauley
Faculty Sponsor: Patricia Geiger
1:40 pm - 2:00 pm
Business 103

An advance directive is a formal written document that a person develops outlining his or her wishes regarding health care decisions in the event that the individual is unable to make them. The document stipulates an agent to carry out these decisions should it become necessary. Advance directives are essential for all individuals to document. However, many do not possess these documents due to lack of knowledge. In particular the elderly, who are vulnerable to life threatening events, often do not have these. Advance directives were the topic of focus for a community assessment undertaken to investigate the knowledge level of members of St. John Tower Apartment Complex. We will highlight results of a survey conducted and an educational program formulated and implemented as a result of this community assessment.

The Learning Needs of the Members of the St. John Tower Apartment Complex Regarding the Importance of Proper Oral Care Practices

Courtney Mulvey, Amanda Batcho, Amy Klopp, Laura Harper
Faculty Sponsor: Patricia Geiger
2:00 pm - 2:20 pm
Business 103

Poor oral care in vulnerable populations can be associated with other ill health outcomes. Proper oral hygiene and good nutrition as it relates to such populations is essential for the prevention of disease. Often residents of senior living facilities lack knowledge of various health issues. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment to evaluate the knowledge level of St. John Tower residents regarding the importance of proper oral care practices. An educational program was formulated based on a survey distributed to community members. The program was implemented as part of this community assessment and will be highlighted during the presentation.

The Learning Needs of the Parents of the Seneca Street Church Regarding Parents' Knowledge of Mental Health Issues in Children

Kathy Rogala, Vincent Cicatello, Edwin Irizarry, Jill Wisotzke
Faculty Sponsor: Patricia Geiger
3:00 pm - 3:20 pm
Business 103

Parents' lack of knowledge of mental health issues in children is a barrier to proper growth and development of stable mental health. The Seneca Street Church provides services to an under-served population, including children with emotional problems impacting their day to day life. Daemen College Department of Nursing RN-BS students conducted a community assessment to determine the knowledge level of community members of the Seneca Street Church regarding parents' knowledge of mental health issues in children. We will present the results of this investigation and a description of a community education program developed for the targeted population.

Posters

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A Pilot Study of Correlation of Vitamin D Level and Fatigue in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy Treatment: Preliminary Findings

Joann Liu
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Fatigue is the most distressing side effect experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy and can significantly affect a patient's quality of life. This scholarly research prospectively examines the relationship between vitamin D and fatigue levels for patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) undergoing chemotherapy. The hypothesis was that patients would have less fatigue with adequate vitamin D supplementation. The sample included male and female AML patients 18 years of age or older who were undergoing chemotherapy with Roswell Park Cancer Institute Leukemia Service. Serum vitamin D levels and fatigue (as per the Brief Fatigue Inventory) were measured at the time of AML diagnosis and monthly thereafter. Preliminary findings and recommendations for future research and practice will be presented and discussed in light of current standards of practice.

A Preliminary Investigation into the Feasibility of a Large Comprehensive Study Focusing on the Effects of Lower Limb Compression Wrapping on Arterial Blood Flow and Tissue Extensibility

Ryan Boggs, William Denz Jr
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Patients suffering from diabetic complications face potential amputation of life-threatening ulcerated lower limb wounds. This is particularly problematic in older patients with diabetes and peripheral artery disease (PAD), edema, and ulceration. Compression wrapping may be beneficial in decreasing edema, thus allowing increased blood flow and more optimum healing environment; however, this treatment option is contraindicated in patients with chronic wounds associated with PAD. This study analyzes arterial blood flow dynamics and tissue extensibility in healthy younger and older adults who will be treated with the Profore Multi-Layer Compression Bandaging System. We hypothesize that the Profore System will not alter blood flow dynamics of skin perfusion pressure, pulse volume recording, and ABI compared to baseline measurements and that dynamic and static ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and calf girth measurements will be improved compared to baseline in healthy older adults to be similar to healthy young adults. The study design is a quasi-experimental time.

A Quasi-Experimental Investigation of the Impact of A Campus Leadership Program on Male Minority Students

Alphonso Walker
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recent research suggests black college students fail to meet academic commitments due to experience with discrimination and feelings of inadequacy on predominantly white campuses (Hausmann, Schofield, and Woods, 2007). Financial issues, environmental factors, and racial discrimination have been found to influence development of these feelings. In order to help improve black college students' perception of belonging to their predominantly white institutions and to increase feelings of adequacy and efficacy, Hausmann, Schofield, and Woods (2007) suggest implementation of campus programs to create a stronger bond between black students and campuses in which they are considered a minority. The current study tests whether a Daemen College leadership initiative (supported by the recently acquired Title III grant) designed to target undergraduate minority males is associated with enhancement of minority college students' self esteem, sense of belonging, perception of social support, and self efficacy with regard to college success.

Advantages of Having Corporate-Owned Businesses As Well As Franchise

Samantha Rosen
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

When businesses grow and develop, owners must consider many tactical decisions. One is whether the corporation should stay directly owned or contract with outside buyers to become a franchise. There are benefits of doing both at once; in fact, my thesis is "Mixing both corporate-owned and franchised shops enables an organization to have a more sustainable business model." I will present the history of both corporate and franchise business models, examine stores that started as corporate stores and added franchises, and then provide a history of the first franchised stores and the start of franchising. I will include advantages and limits of a franchise and of a corporate-owned store and describe public perception of corporate-owned versus franchised businesses. Focusing on business' benefits in maintaining both corporate-owned stores and franchises, I will analyze differences and similarities between the two.

African Wild Dog

Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The African Wild Dog, an endangered animal, is quickly vanishing from East African Savannah lands. As part of my course work for Conservation Biology, I studied the African Wild Dog's role and habits, the reasons it is endangered, and creative ways to conserve this disappearing species. While these dogs do not know conditioned tricks like "sit" and "roll over," they are known to be social and intelligent animals and play a significant role in the circle of life. My poster will describe their behavior, their interactions with their communities, and the challenges they face today.

Another Life, Another Culture

Shantera Hogan
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Many people have traveled abroad to further enhance their education while experiencing the life and culture of the natives. I had this opportunity from March 9 to 18, 2013 when I traveled with other art students to Rome and Florence, Italy. This trip allowed me to evaluate lifestyle patterns, cuisine, and customs to see how life differs between here and there. I planned to record various angles of Italian experience. My method of presentation will be photography. By showcasing these photographs, I plan to show a more intimate view of the Italian culture via my experience through the Daemen College Study Abroad Program.

Antibacterial Activity of the Leaf Extracts of Vernonia Amygdalina and Vernonia Noveboracensis

Norin Kayongo
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Research is now targeting discovery of naturally occurring therapeutic substances because the effectiveness of synthetic drugs is decreasing. I tested leaf extracts for antimicrobial effectiveness. Leaf extracts were taken from Vernonia amygdalina and V. noveboracensis, two species from the same genus in the plant family Asteraceae. V. amygdalina, a species found in Africa, has been shown to produce antimicrobial compounds; however, locally grown V. noveboracensis has not been studied for its plant chemicals. The effectiveness of extracts from the two plant species on bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli) was compared to measured zones of growth inhibition by standard antibiotics (tetracycline and vancomycin). Extracts from V. noveboracensis resulted in a significant decrease in bacteria growth (p<0.05). Further studies will try to identify the plant chemicals responsible for inhibiting bacterial growth.

Aspects of Discrete Mathematics

Joseph Currier, Maria McGrath, Corey Zagst, Amanda Murphy
Faculty Sponsor: Norollah Talebi
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will discuss two aspects of discrete mathematics. 1) An Analysis of a Complex Argument: Valid Arguments: An argument is a finite collection of premises followed by a conclusion. An argument is valid if, whenever the premises are all true, then the conclusion is also true. We use algebra of propositional logic to analyze a complex argument and then verify the validity of the argument. 2) An Application of Recurrence: A sequence is said to be defined recursively if some initial values are specified and later terms of the sequence are defined by a number of earlier terms. We examine the application of recursion in computer programming languages such as C++.

Assistive Technology for Preschoolers

La'Quisha Pompey
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Assistive technology devices give students with disabilities the opportunity to function in their environment. There are low and high technology devices that can be used by students. As educators, it is important that we know both what assistive technology devices can do for students with disabilities and how to use these devices. Also, it is important that educators make accommodations for students who cannot afford high technology devices so that they receive the same education as their peers. I will present information about high and low assistive technology and their uses in the preschool classroom.

Attempts to Enhance the Infection Efficiency of Bacteriophages that Infect Staphylococcus Aureus

Saad Chaudhry
Faculty Sponsor: Douglas Kalinowski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Bacterial pathogens have developed a resistance to a variety of drugs due to misuse and overuse of antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a multidrug resistant pathogen, is a problematic bacterial strain in hospitals. Expenses and limitations of antibiotics for this make new or alternative treatments desirable. One alternative treatment is phage therapy, which uses viruses to kill specific bacteria. Phages are beneficial because they do not bind to eukaryotic receptors, allowing for potential use in humans. Studies on phage therapy indicate that phages kill bacteria with high specificity. Few studies, however, demonstrate the effects of mutating phages and the effects in killing bacteria. I investigated the effects of mutagenesis on bacteriophages with the hope of increasing the efficiency of phage infection of S. aureus. In the experiment, CDC 52 phages were used and effectively killed S. aureus cells in vitro. Attempts to mutagenize the phages and tests of their efficacy on the bacteria are underway.

BACK @ DC: A Day of Learning at the Burchfield Penney Art Center

Andrew Donahue, Shannon Gauthier, Ashley Marianacci
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Wolf
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will highlight a collaborative arts experience between Art Education majors from Daemen College, staff from the Burchfield Penney Art Center, and students and teachers from Waterfront and Colden Elementary Schools. College students guided elementary students to explore, describe, and analyze the artwork of Charles Burchfield and Ellen Steinfeld with a focus on Movement in Art. Our poster will outline the overall unit and lesson goals, which address New York State Arts Standards. We will share stories from the collaborative experiences and photographs of students-at-work and students' artwork. Though the project took place the day before the Academic Festival, we will write an article about it by May 10 to share with anyone interested. Funds from Daemen College's Think Tank provided transportation, admission, art supplies, and lunches for students at the Burchfield Penney Art Center.

Back @ DC: Seneca Babcock Through the Eyes, Hearts, and Art of Children

Shannon Gauthier, Ashley Marianacci, Andrew Donahue
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Wolf
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will highlight a collaboration between Art Education majors at Daemen College, members of Daemen's Center for Sustainable Communities and Civic Engagement, and staff and students from the Seneca Babcock Church after-school program. Daemen students guided Seneca Babcock students to see and understand their community in artistic ways. They explored and analyzed the artwork of photographer Vic Muniz to identify ways that the arts can be used to change people's perceptions about a community and empower community members. Our presentation will include a unit plan that addresses New York State Visual Arts Standards, photographs of the students at work, and students' photographs of their community. Daemen College Think Tank granted funds for materials, transportation, and supplies, including cameras, printing costs, and an art show which will showcase the students' visual and verbal work.

Benefits of Play on Cognitive Development

Taylor Spina
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Play is essential for every child's development, and there are many different forms that can affect cognitive development. Play augments creativity, abstract thinking, imagination, problem solving, social cognition, empathy, and the comprehension of new concepts. When playing, children are using their brains, whether they are role playing, developing a strategy for a game, or figuring out how to use a toy. Skills developed during play can then be useful and beneficial for academics. When children play and interact with other children, their language and vocabulary advance. Play can be used to help children comprehend concepts and numbers and acquire other knowledge that can be difficult to grasp. When teachers incorporate play into the classroom, it allows children to have fun without realizing they are learning. Overall, play is an important part of every child's cognitive development. I will focus on integration of play strategies into the classroom.

Benefits of Talent Management

Alvin Satram
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Applying talent management leads to corporate economic benefits and, ultimately, organizational success. By using talent management, organizations are maximizing their availability to attract, hire, train, develop, retain, and compensate employees while opening themselves up to numerous economic benefits. These include increased revenues, decreased costs, customer satisfaction, and, very importantly, employee satisfaction. All of these ultimately lead to profitability, which is a goal for any business. Talent management also incorporates the ethical nature of placing the right people in the right positions, which leads to employee satisfaction and organization success. I will discuss both positive and negative aspects of talent management's different areas and put them into perspective with respect to ethics and other organizational process and objectives. I will focus on how talent management leads to employee satisfaction and longevity, a big goal of any organization.

Business Policy and Behavior with Employees

Brittany Parker
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will demonstrate proven ways to set and manage organizational policies to achieve desired behaviors which can facilitate an organization's prosperity. It is expected that putting well-thought out business policies and behavior guidelines in place will drive the organizational framework for management and employees. However, actual workplace behaviors and corresponding corporate culture may not equal the original intent. Policies must be monitored and enforced, and the onus is on business leaders to appropriately evaluate their company's culture and manage policy effectiveness. This led to my research focus: "Diligent management of published corporate policies and behavior guidelines is necessary to ensure suitable conduct with an organization." Research included examining management policies of organizations, ways business professionals can structure values and beliefs to create a positive business environment, and opinions of business professionals about why published policies are not having successful effects on corporate culture.

Cervical Traction Efficacy in Reduction of Pain

Sarah Velarde, Marijke Van Leeuwen, Kelsey O'Leary, Kristina Lynch
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cervical traction, a form of mechanical traction, creates an axial pull on the spine through use of a mechanical system applied to the cervical spine. A number of physiological effects can be produced through administration of this treatment, including enlargement of intervertebral foramen; relief of pressure on intervertebral discs, nerve roots, blood vessels, and neural tissue; stretch of musculature; and distraction of vertebral facet joints. Due to these effects, cervical traction has been reported to decrease pain in ways such as releasing muscle tension and inhibiting pain signal transmission at the spinal cord level. This literature review determines the efficacy of cervical traction in decreasing patient neck pain.

Choosing Respite Care or Family Care for Children with Developmental Disabilities

Bridgett Smith, Kelly Hall, Caitlyn Rine, Kahla Cerrillo
Faculty Sponsor: Jessica Wiatrowski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As healthcare technology has advanced, children with developmental disabilities are living longer. Raising a child with special needs may place increased stressors on the family dynamic. Respite care can provide temporary relief from these stressors and may strengthen family cohesiveness. Current research has identified variables observed in families when choosing care for their child. We investigated patterns or commonalities between families of children with disabilities when choosing to pursue respite care. By understanding the patterns among families of children with disabilities, physical therapists may be better equipped to understand and advise families in making these difficult decisions.

Comparison of Three Sunscreen Brands and Their SPFs Before and After Exposure to UV Light

Bryan Booth
Faculty Sponsor: Kristin Fries
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sunscreens prevent UV-light from penetrating our skin and directly damaging DNA or generating free radicals, which cause photoaging and skin malignancies. This is prevented by use of UV-absorbing molecules. These can be organic or inorganic and work by absorbing the energy and dispersing it. Efficacy of sunscreens is measured using the sun protection factor (SPF), focusing on prevention of erythema. Erythema is caused by UVB-light, which causes basal and squamous cell carcinomas. The other type of UV-light, UVA-light, is thought to cause damage indirectly by generating free radicals. Melanoma is often associated with UVA-light and has been increasing in incidence for years. SPF may not be an adequate rating system for sunscreens because it does not take UVA-light into account. We will use the UV-spectrophotometer to measure absorbance of different brands of sunscreens, with 3 or 4 different SPFs per brand, before and after exposure to 30 minutes of UV-light. We will then compare the efficacy of samples after exposure.

Concussions: The Effect on Static and Dynamic Balance. A Systematic Review.

Megan Hendel
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A concussion is defined as "a complex pathophysiological process affecting the brain, induced by traumatic biomechanical forces." Symptoms may include loss of consciousness and somatic, cognitive, and/or emotional symptoms. Motor coordination, or balance, is one somatic deficit seen after sustaining an acute concussion. Current research focuses on static balance deficits; however, concussed athletes' return to play involves dynamic movements. It may therefore be prudent to assess dynamic balance before allowing them to return to play. I investigate current literature using a systematic review to determine if dynamic testing should be included into a concussion evaluation and return to play decisions. I will conduct a literature search using Sports Discus and Proquest Research databases. Keyword searches will include "balance," "static balance," "dynamic balance," "concussion," and "balance tests" to quantitatively and qualitatively assess ideal balance conditions to include in concussion assessment and return to play protocol.

Conservation Efforts for the Volcano Rabbit

Paulman Nguyen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Volcano Rabbit, Romerolagus diazi, has been classified as endangered since 2007 because of human activity, including livestock grazing and deforestation for fuel wood. The rabbit, found only in Mexico, typically feeds on grass and herbs but consumes tree bark to survive natural winter droughts. Current conservation efforts include policies to limit deforestation and ban the hunting and selling of these rabbits. I will critique current Volcano Rabbit conservation plans and include new ideas for saving this species.

Conservation of the Sea Otter

Katelyn Winkler
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The sea otter (Enhydra lutris), the smallest of marine mammals, is a member of the weasel family. Its habitat ranges from Mexico to Alaska and even to Japan. This mammal has a very thick coat of fur, which is responsible for its decline in numbers due to over-hunting of the species for the fur and oil spills which affect the insulating quality of its fur. Sea otters have also decreased due to poaching, oil ingestion, predation, and conflicts with fisheries. There is current legislation to protect their habitat, manage human impact, and make it illegal to buy, sell or possess this endangered species. I will elaborate on the current conservation plan to increase the population while also considering alternative solutions.

Copyrights, Patents, and Economic Growth

Jacob Blaustein
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My research examined the potential for reducing copyright patent laws and terms in the United States. This idea has the potential to help many creators and inventors who wish to use and improve upon an idea but are usually stopped by a lawsuit from a company that is not really using the patent it owns. By loosening copyrights, the work of fanfiction authors will be allowed to flourish further without the worry of stepping on anyone's toes. My research focus is: "by reducing terms and conditions of patents and copyrights and adding more to the public domain, the U.S. can achieve a higher degree of creativity, innovation, and growth, which is crucial towards economic growth."

Crocodylian Dental Morphometrics: An Analysis of Size and Shape Heterodonty Within and Between Extant Species

Megan Harmon
Faculty Sponsor: Domenic D'Amore
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Crocodylians are incredible predators that have roamed the earth for more than 200 million years. Previous studies of crocodylians include biomechanics of feeding, snout morphology, and tooth marks on bones after feeding. However, few studies have quantified tooth morphology, specifically size and shape heterodonty within an individual's tooth row or between species. This study's primary goal is to determine how the morphology of crocodylian teeth compares between several extant crocodylian species. The secondary goal is to determine whether the morphology of crocodylian tooth is influenced by ecological and/or phylogenetic pressures. In this study, 14 species of extant crocodylian skulls were collected, and each intact tooth was photographed. The photographed teeth were then quantified using semi-landmark based geometric morphometrics to separately evaluate size and shape at each tooth position. The results were analyzed using linear regression analysis with a post-hoc homogeneity of slope test, coefficient of variation, and Akaike's information criterion (AIC).

Daemen is Trying on a Green Roof

Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This project has designed a "green roof" atop a portion of the Visual and Performing Arts Center and is evaluating its feasibility. A green roof, or vegetated roof, is covered with plants, providing and restoring natural benefits such as storm water management, temperature moderation, air quality improvements, building durability, and improved aesthetics. We will present our design, the steps in the construction process, the necessary data collection to ensure suitability, and our hopes for the future. With this pilot project, we hope to demonstrate the feasibility of a green roof, raise our campus' environmental awareness, and increase our sense of environmental responsibility.

David Beckham's Impact on U.S. Soccer Industry

Michael Obermeier
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Soccer is one of the most rapidly growing sports in the United States and throughout the world, not only as a youth sport but also on a professional level. Professional soccer in the U.S. is becoming a booming business competing with other major league sports. I analyzed one of the major reasons for success in the US soccer market: the arrival to America of David Beckham, who is arguably one of the best soccer players throughout history. I will discuss comparisons of the amount of people playing soccer, the economies of the cities that have major league teams, and other factors from before and after David Beckham's arrival to play in the United States.

Development of Balance in Children

Chelsea Johnson, Julie Malinowski, Corinne Pro, Megan Hovey
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Balance, the ability to outwardly express postural control, involves input from a variety of contextual factors and body systems, including the musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary, and integumentary systems. Integration of various sensory systems allows individuals to maintain balance during static and dynamic conditions. One tool that allows measurement of these conditions in children is the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS), a modified version of the Berg Balance Scale for older adults. The PBS examines balance based on a variety of tasks in children 2 years to 13 years 11 months of age. We will focus on the time frame of maturation of balance in children based on integration of sensory systems and how different types of environmental or physical conditions affect balance.

Do Personality Traits Moderate the Effectiveness of Expressive Writing Interventions for Test Anxiety?

Kara O' Brien
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recent studies found that when students were given an opportunity to write about their feelings before a test in which they were presented with evaluative stress or a "high pressure" situation, their performance was significantly better than control students who were not given an opportunity to express their concerns in writing (Frattaroli, Thomas, & Lyubomirsky, 2011, Ramirez & Beilock, 2011). The current study examines potential moderators of these effects. I predict that trait anxiety, test anxiety, neuroticism, and perfectionism will moderate the effect of expressive writing on test performance, such that participants in an expressive writing group who have low levels of these moderators will perform significantly better on an anagram task than participants in a non-expressive writing (control) group. However, no significant differences between the expressive writing group and control group are expected for participants who score high on these individual difference variables.

Effect of a Six Week Runsmart Economy Course on VO2 Max in Recreational Runners

Lindsay Miller, Kristen Swanson, Lisa Farrell, Raechel Bugner
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As running gains popularity throughout the United States, distance runners search for ways to improve their running performance. Researchers have examined various intervention programs to determine which variables impact a runner's efficiency and ultimately his/her race time. Running economy, defined as the energy required to run at a given submaximal pace, closely relates to an individual's maximal volume of oxygen uptake (VO2 max). Current research demonstrates that athletes' running economy or VO2 max can be improved with the implementation of various interventions. RunSmart is a running intervention program designed to enhance a runner's form, particularly foot strike pattern, to improve performance and reduce the risk of injury. This program utilizes individualized drills and strengthening exercises to transition the runner from a rear-foot or fore-foot strike to a mid-foot strike pattern. Our research will examine the effectiveness of the RunSmart training program on improving foot strike and optimizing an individual's submaximal oxygen uptake during running.

Effect of Stander Use on Range of Motion in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

Rachael Tharp, Michelle Owczarczak, Jacqueline Slagor, Meghan Ward
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Children with cerebral palsy (CP) may have difficulty with voluntary movement and attainment of upright postures secondary to the presence of high muscle tone. Due to movement limitations, children with CP are at greater risk for soft tissue adaptive shortening. Shortening of soft tissue may lead to losses of joint range of motion (ROM) and the development of contractures. Such contractures can then result in additional limitations in movement and functional activities such as standing and walking. Stander devices provide support to maintain an upright standing posture for individuals who are unable to attain such positions independently. Previous research suggests that a program of prolonged passive stretching and weight bearing with a stander device may lead to improvements in ROM and spasticity in individuals with neuromuscular disorders. No study clearly defines ideal parameters for such a standing program. We will provide critical analysis of the literature regarding use of stander devices to improve ROM and prevent further progression of joint contractures.

Effectiveness of Cold Compression Therapy on Edema Control in an Orthopedic Setting

Joshua Butler, Angela Sood, Christopher Meyer, Ahmad Alaiwat
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cold compression therapy, a cryotherapy modality employed by physical therapists, utilizes a combination of low temperature devices and compression to treat edema for a variety of musculoskeletal disorders. It modulates edema by decreasing inflammatory processes, including metabolic reactions,and by pushing fluid back into the blood stream and lymphatic system so it can be removed from the injured area. This literature review addresses the efficacy of cold compression therapy on edema control in an orthopedic setting.

Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation for the Treatment of Painful Neuropathy

Justin Seward, Pat Fino, Kyle Backal, William Pacana
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brogan
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This literature review analyzes current evidence-based practice involving the use of electroanalgesia for the treatment of painful neuropathy. Neuropathy, or damage to the peripheral nervous system, can result in alteration or loss of sensory perception, proprioception, and/or motor control. Causes of neuropathy are not well understood; therefore, treatments for neuropathy aim to reduce symptoms and improve function for sufferers. Electrical stimulation is a non-pharmacological approach used in the physical therapy setting to treat patients with various forms of neuropathy. Previous research regarding effectiveness of electrical stimulation has been inconclusive; in comparison, no single form of electrical stimulation or parameters have been identified to be most efficacious in the treatment of neuropathy. Furthermore, little research has been conducted regarding the effects of high voltage pulsed current (HVPC) electrical stimulation as a neuromodulating intervention. We will determine effectiveness of HVPC on pain for neuropathic patients in a physical therapy setting.

Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation in Modulating Pain

Jerica Aderhold, Jacqueline Davidson, Amanda Grace, Emily Ohol, Courtney Talarico
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Electrical stimulation (E-Stim) is a modality that can be used for pain modulation, muscle contraction, tissue healing, edema control, and iontophoresis. The principle to pain modulation is either through the blocking of pain transmitting nerve fibers or the stimulation of the release of naturally occurring pain inhibitors within the body. Electrodes are placed on the skin at various sites relative to the source of pain. For this project, we will look at a number of articles which researched the efficacy of E-Stim on pain modulation when using a type of E-Stim unit known as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS).

Effectiveness of High Voltage Galvanic Stimulation in Wound Healing

Jennifer Seeger, Kearsten Renzi, David Santa Lucia, Craig Young
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

High Voltage Galvanic Stimulation (HVGS) is a treatment modality that uses electrical current to control edema and pain and to promote wound healing. This modality is applied to the skin and stimulates underlying nerves and muscles to initiate the healing process. HVGS is commonly used in the therapeutic setting for wound treatment. This literature review determines the efficacy of HVGS in a therapeutic sense for wound healing. If the application of HVGS for wound healing is successful, then appropriate parameters relative to its application will also be explored.

Effectiveness of the Functional Movement Screen on Injury Prediction in Athletic Populations

Elizabeth Garcia, William Tso, Brent Wilkey, Christopher Ahearn
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) is a recently developed screen focusing on 7 component tests that identify areas within the musculoskeletal system requiring further strengthening or stabilization. The goal of the screen is to predict injury risk that may occur in athletic populations; however, minimal research has been conducted to support the FMS' validity in injury prediction. A number of studies indicate that an FMS score below 14 could be a predictor of future injury. Small sample sizes and varying athletic populations necessitate further research to determine if the FMS predicts injury. This review of current literature will explore the effectiveness of the FMS in athletic populations.

Effectiveness of Therapuetic Ultrasound in Affecting Soft Tissue Extensibility

Michelle Butcher, Sarah Burke, Yasaman Razavi, Ryan Stoltzfus, Evan Mazur
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Therapeutic Ultrasound (TUS) is a modality used by physical therapists to prepare soft tissues for a variety of interventions. It can be used for affecting tissue extensibility to improve stretching intervention outcomes. TUS utilizes sound waves to increase soft tissue temperature and through this mechanism is hypothesized to increase tissue extensibility. We will determine the validity of TUS, its effects on tissue extensibility when combined with stretching interventions, and how this compares to stretching without TUS treatment. This review of literature will include appropriate parameters and interventions relative to the literature.

Effects of Aromatherapy on Anxiety and Depression

Anna Jaremko, Sharon Mayer, Andrea Overhoff, Andre Taulbee
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Depression and anxiety have recently become more prevalent in the United States. In 2005, the Centers for Disease Control found that more than 1 out of every 20 adults aged 12 and over reported being depressed. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America says that 3.1% of the adult U.S. population is affected by Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Some individuals diagnosed with depression and/or anxiety use complementary medicine in conjunction with conventional treatments. Aromatherapy is the use of essential oils, either through inhalation or topical application, to adjust one's moods, feelings, or overall health and wellness. We will review the literature and the effects of aromatherapy on relief of depression and anxiety when used to complement Western medicine.

Effects of Exercise on Anxiety and Academic Performance in Undergraduate Level College Students

Bryant Clark, Julie Cummings, Andrew Engelbach-Schafer , Jordan Nolan
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Undergraduate level college students experience a time of transition from the structured and guided environment of high school to the freedom associated with college. With additional freedom, students encounter many new responsibilities such as social relationships, financial obligations, housekeeping, and increased academic and personal autonomy. These responsibilities and increased pressure to excel cause increased levels of anxiety in undergraduate students. Test anxiety in particular is a major source of stress and is negatively associated with academic performance. To counter this, various strategies, such as exercise, may be implemented. By decreasing anxiety levels, exercise may be associated with improved academic performance. This literature review investigates the relationships among exercise, anxiety, and academic performance. Current literature indicates that exercise benefits undergraduate students in both categories; however, the supporting data derive from qualitative questionnaires and surveys. To improve objectivity, additional research should analyze the effects of exercise routines on undergraduate anxiety levels and academic achievement.

Effects of Grades III-IV Cervical Spine Mobilizations on Neurodynamics of the Upper Extremities

Heather Kramer, Adam Owczarzak, Ruben Silva, Ryan Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The role of neurodynamics in the management of musculoskeletal pain is gaining acceptance among physical therapists. Directly addressing neural tension utilizing neuromobilizations is associated with positive outcomes among patients suffering from acute-to-chronic musculoskeletal conditions. Interventions, including repeated movements in a directional preference and non-thrust joint manipulations, also indirectly decrease neural tension; however, the efficacy of these interventions' ability to improve neurodynamics has yet to be thoroughly investigated. This literature analysis examines the implementation of cervical non-thrust joint manipulations to decrease upper limb neural tension. Appropriate parameters (i.e. grade, duration, frequency) for applying non-thrust joint manipulations need to be identified so future research investigating their effectiveness can be conducted.

Efficacy and Cost-Effectiveness of Falls Prevention Programs in Community-Dwelling Older Persons

Michelle Kubiak, Matthew Costello, Matthew Kilburn, Ryan Mitchell
Faculty Sponsor: Raymond Hammel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

According to the World Health Organization, one in three community-dwelling older adults, 65 years or older, falls once a year. Fall-related injuries constitute the third leading cause of disability among this age group, which inherently relates to increasing the cost of health care. Preventative multi-factorial programs aim to decrease risk of falling and therefore eliminate post-care costs related to a fall. As referral to other medical professionals is often needed, individualized programs lead to an inevitable increase in the cost of care. After analysis of existing research, falls-prevention programs prove to be efficacious but demonstrate varying degrees of cost-effectiveness. This emphasizes the need for more research comparing the costs of a falls-prevention program led solely by a physical therapist versus a program referring patients to specialists for impairments contributing to a higher risk of falling. Consolidating the number of practitioners may help lower costs of these programs.

Efficacy of Cryotherapy in Modulating Pain

Cole Sanders, Stephen Austin, Andrew Gawron, Bethanie Marchese
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Physical therapists use cryotherapy to treat patients following an acute injury. The application of cold temperatures greatly impacts the person's ability to perceive noxious stimuli. By decreasing nerve conduction velocity and altering spinal gate mechanisms, patients reportedly feel less pain. Increasing the pain threshold can facilitate earlier movement during the acute phase of healing, which may lead to better functional outcomes. However, the extent of cryotherapy's effect on pain modulation during therapeutic intervention is vague, and more research is warranted. This literature analysis reviews the efficacy of cryotherapy for pain modulation. Parameters relative to application of cryotherapy will also be presented.

Efficacy of Laser Therapy for Musculoskeletal Treatment

Tanisha Wheatley, Mark Pellerin, Jeannethe King, Matthew Fitzpatrick
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is an athermal physical agent used to treat numerous musculoskeletal conditions in the acute (inflammatory) stage of healing. LLLT generates a single wavelength of light, which penetrates beneath the superficial tissues. It is widely used clinically due to its proposed bio-photo effects, including proliferation of various enzymes, cells, and tissues. Because of these proposed physiologic effects, the application of LLLT has the potential to reduce time needed for healing and promote an earlier return to function. Unfortunately, poorly defined parameters make successful clinical application of this physical agent difficult. This literature analysis examines the effectiveness of LLLT and identifies the most appropriate parameters to promote tissue healing.

Efficacy of Lumbar Traction in Patients with Low Back Pain

Joshua Kibler, Rebecca Wettlaufer, Robert Stewart, Robert Stanton
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Physical therapists apply mechanical traction as a physical agent to relieve pain, increase spinal segmental mobility, and improve muscle performance for patients who suffer from spinal pain. Lumbar traction is commonly used to ameliorate complaints of low back pain (LBP); however, LBP may stem from various pathologies such as disc herniation, spondylosis, and stenosis, creating difficulty in evaluating the effectiveness of lumbar traction. This literature analysis evaluates the efficacy of lumbar traction for patients with LBP and examines appropriate parameters for applying lumbar traction.

Efficacy of Soft Tissue Mobilization in Healing Various Soft Tissues

Amanda Batterson, Mike Nikiel, Leslie Davis, Katelyn Kivinen
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Soft Tissue Mobilization (STM) is a modality which uses various steel tools of various shapes to enhance the role of physical therapists in the manipulation of soft tissue. The goal of STM is to increase range of motion and decrease pain and muscle spasms by releasing the buildup of scar tissue, adhesions, and fascial restrictions. This literature review is in regards to the efficacy of STM on healing. If efficacy is established, there will be further investigation of appropriate parameters, indications, and contraindications relative to the application of STM.

Efficacy of Soft Tissue Mobilization on Increasing Range of Motion, Decreasing Pain, and Increasing Function

Melissa Singer, Paige Ronca, Alexa Amato, Tom Romano
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Soft tissue mobilization is a technique used by physical therapists to break down adhesions of fibrous scar tissue formed during the healing process. A range of techniques are available for soft tissue mobilization; some methods can be completed manually, while others can be performed with the aid of various tools. Some benefits of soft tissue mobilization are an increase in range of motion, decrease in pain, and increase in function. Soft tissue mobilization is helpful for realignment of scar tissue laid down during the healing process. This literature review looks at effects of soft tissue mobilization on increase of range of motion, decrease in pain, and increase in function.

Evidence-Based Guidelines for Heart Failure: How Well Are They Used by Health Care Providers in Clinical Practice?

Lucy Paul
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Heart failure is a chronic, progressive disease with a poor prognosis. It is the number one cause for hospitalization and re-hospitalization among the elderly. The economic burden of heart failure is staggering and will likely continue to rise considerably given its intensive resource requirements. Adherence to evidence-based clinical guidelines is one of the key strategies to improve patient outcomes and decrease the economic and social impact of heart failure. I will present a literature review related to health care providers' use of evidence-based heart failure clinical guidelines. Findings, conclusions and recommendations for further research and practice will be discussed.

Examining the Clinical Usage of Therapeutic Ultrasound by DPT Students in Their Final Academic Semester: Implications on Efficacy of Therapeutic Ultrasound as a Treatment Modality

John Stachura, Courtney Garlock, James Noll, Andrew Stapleton
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Therapeutic Ultrasound (TUS), a modality used in physical therapy practice, is aimed at treating numerous musculoskeletal impairments. In order to be effective, TUS must be delivered under parameters specific to the patient's impairment(s) and stage of tissue healing. We used an online survey to compare TUS decision making by Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students in their final academic semester. We hope to determine if consistencies exist among physical therapy students in determining the correct stage of tissue healing and utilizing appropriate TUS parameters for a given impairment.

Exercise on Anxiety and Academic Performance in Graduate Students

Stephanie Urban, Allyson Long, Adam Cagliuso, Matthew Przydrozny
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Stress and anxiety are common mental health problems that often accompany the academic course load of a typical graduate student and can impact assessments of learning. Lack of exercise, poor sleeping habits and an inadequate diet can often have a negative influence on an individual's physical and mental health. There is an increasing prevalence of mental health disorders, which has been shown to negatively affect the academic success of a graduate student population. We will present a review of the current literature regarding exercise and anxiety/stress levels on academic performance. We will conduct future research specifically analyzing the effects of varying modes of exercise on academic performance in graduate students at Daemen College.

Female Serial Murderers

Audrey Dollinger
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Very few studies have been conducted on the characteristics of female serial murderers. Some researchers suggest murderesses do not exist because women are incapable of committing such heinous crimes (Egger, 1984). However, recent studies suggest that women do commit these crimes, perhaps even more often than men, but use methods that make them more difficult to capture (Frie et al., 2006; Gurian, 2011; Vronsky, 2007). I will discuss studies that have been conducted on women who have committed serial murder - particularly, the behaviors, motivations, personal characteristics, and methods that enable these women to literally get away with murder.

Figure Studies in Rome and Florence

Kelsey Sullivan
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In this project, I will focus solely on how the nude figure was represented sculpturally and pictorially in Italian Renaissance and Baroque culture. My study in Florence and Rome will provide background material for a series of experimental drawings. From an educational perspective, the study of the figure through solid material contradicts our customary approach at Daemen, where we typically study with a live nude. By displaying my drawings, I hope to provoke the study of contrasts in technique, historical style, and visual experience.

For Patients with Parkinson's Disease, Does the PDQ-39 or the SF-36 Prove to be More Reliable and Valid in Determining Quality of Life?

Maureen Scanlon, Lauren Merica, Rebecca Miknis, Leah Woodard
Faculty Sponsor: Theresa Kolodziej
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects individuals worldwide. It is important to evaluate the impact of the diagnosis and progression of the disease from an emotional standpoint, including its effect on quality of life. There are a number of tools that have been used to evaluate the impact of the disease from the individual's perspective, including the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). Clinical research shows that there is no benefit of using a disease specific questionnaire such as PDQ-39 when compared to a standard questionnaire such as SF-36 when evaluating perceived quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease. We analyzed research which evaluates the validity and reliability of PDQ-39 and SF-36. This will help health care providers to better determine which tool is most appropriate for patients with Parkinson's disease..

Generic Manufacturing in Pharmaceuticals

Ashley Scrinzi
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The pharmaceutical industry develops, produces, and markets both brand name and generic products. Over the last decade there has been growing popularity in manufacturing and subsequent marketing of generic products. This tendency has been precipitated by the overall state of the economy. Since the recession, as the price of living has increased, behaviors in consumer decisions have shifted from the purchasing of brand name to non brand name items. This shift is a direct result of high unemployment rates, an aging population, and growing health care costs. I will show how generic drugs sales have significantly increased after the recession because of their appealing price, showing that consumer buying habits have shifted from brand to non-brand names in the pharmaceutical industry.

Geometry Through the Ages!

Joseph Currier, Melinda Montaperto, Elizabeth Spahn
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Geometry is a branch of mathematics that deals with shape, size, position, and many other properties of objects. It dates back more than 4000 years ago to places such as Mesopotamia, India, Egypt, and China. In these civilizations, geometry was used for practical reasons like measuring and finding areas. However, the ancient Greeks set the stage for modern geometry with their logical reasoning and proofs. One of the most important contributions was Euclid's Elements (300 B.C.), a series of books that summarized the Greek knowledge of geometry. The axiomatic method presented in the Elements revolutionized the study of geometry, which has since then evolved to the geometry we know today. We will explore the history of geometry and its contribution to modern geometry.

Housing Market Adjusting to the Rising Trend of the Millenial Generation

Lia Zahn
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Economies throughout the world naturally experience periods of growth and success. Current economic states drive government, businesses, and consumer spending, as the supply of money is critical for economic health. In recent years, the U.S. has seen a significant impact on the housing market due to a sluggish economy and changes in demographics, requiring cities to re-think long term strategies and re-invent themselves. The rising millennial generation has had an enormous effect on how U.S. cities sustain and rejuvenate their economies. I will address how Buffalo is managing housing markets to satisfy the millennial generation. I will demonstrate that marketing techniques such as segmenting and evaluating social economics are essential for a sustainable strategic plan. My research includes correlation of housing market trends with population, income, demographics, lifestyles, and entertainment. I will also address how Buffalo has adapted to economic changes and why change is vital to maintaining economic health.

Human Resource Departments' Responsibility in Overcoming Gender Bias in Asian and Arab Countries

Kirsten Sharp
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

With more companies participating in the global business world, it is increasingly important for Human Resource Departments to properly prepare employees leaving for overseas assignments. I have determined this is especially true for United States expatriates assigned to Asian and Arab countries because gender roles in these countries differ from those in the United States. Therefore, my research focus is “Human Resource departments bear the responsibility of managing expatriate gender bias in Asian and Arab countries.” I will provide an insightful look into gender bias in Asian and Arab countries, the role of the spouse in expatriate assignments, how and why expatriates can be better prepared, the ethics associated with training provided to expatriates, the ethical nature of imposing our culture on others when we send female managers to countries where they are not accepted, examples of successes and failures of previous expatriate assignments in Asian and Arab countries, and the reasons for those successes or failures.

If the Cause Fits: Choosing the Right Corporate Sponsorship for the Best Return on Investment

Katey Portner
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Corporate Social Responsibility is a crucial topic for companies to address today. Brand image can be tarnished by corporate greed and corrupt practices, so companies need ways to remove stigmas associated with past business practices and to give back to their communities. I examined how companies partner with non-profit organizations and what goes into the decision making process to ensure that they get the best return on their investment. Unlike philanthropy, where money is simply a donation, cause marketing and corporate sponsorships are promotional activities utilized in hopes of garnering increased brand image and higher sales. When done correctly, this benefits both the company and the non-profit organization by increasing consumer perception of a company and promoting the non-profit organization's cause. Among the most important factors is finding the best fit between the non-profit organization and the business' core mission.

Incorporating Sustainable Development into an Organizational Strategy Creates Competitive Advantages

Samantha Legros
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sustainability has become a growing trend in the business world. Concern for the long-term well being of the economy, the environment, and society has intensified, and businesses have realized that incorporating sustainability into their business model can create competitive advantages. Businesses with options to incorporate sustainable practices can be productive while ensuring future environmental and societal needs are maintained. Integrating sustainable practices can be cost effective for businesses in the near or long term. It may also be cost prohibitive; therefore, businesses have to weigh the impact upon their bottom line and balance the need to protect the environment and economy with the desire and ability to prosper and sustain profit. My research focus is "incorporating sustainable business development into an organizational strategy creates competitive advantages." I will discuss examples of sustainable actions and how implementing sustainable development has benefited many businesses. I will also present examples of businesses that do not implement this and the reasons for that decision.

Infidelity in Committed Relationships and Relationship Outcomes

Amanda Zanghi, Daniel Strebel
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Infidelity violates a basic relationship norm in regards to a partner's interaction with others outside the relationship. Such violations often leave the betrayed partner feeling jealous, humiliated, and depressed. There have been several research studies to determine effects of infidelity on betrayed individuals and effects of gender differences in the types of infidelity considered most problematic. However, fewer studies have examined effects of the amount of time which has passed since the infidelity (time frame of infidelity) and of other factors which moderate findings reported to date (Kluwer & Karremans, 2009; Treger & Sprecher, 2011). We will determine which factors contribute most strongly to relationship dissolution following infidelity, specifically examining effects of the time frame and of three types of infidelity. We will also examine potential moderator variables of these effects, including participants' attachment style, tendency to experience jealousy, gender, and general tendency to experience negative emotions.

Internet Security: Whose Responsibility?

Samantha Stanfield
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will address ethical obligations concerning the responsibility of securing electronic personal data. My research will demonstrate that "Internet security is the shared responsibility of users providing personal data on a computer or online and of organizations collecting or storing personal data." Those who choose to share their personal information on the internet and on computers must follow certain procedures to keep their information protected. Ethically, organizations must provide consumers with websites that allow their personal information to be safe and protected. Internet fraud is prevalent today, and many are falling victim to identity theft. Not only are individuals at risk, but organizations can also suffer from allowing consumers' personal information to be stolen.

Investigation into the Effect of Kinesiology Tape on Shoulder Proprioception

Sean Burfeind
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Athletes, especially those participating in upper extremity sports, are at an increased risk of developing glenohumeral joint injuries, which can cause a decrease in proprioception at the joint. There are claims that kinesiology tape improves joint stability. Research has shown stimulating proprioceptive cutaneous inputs by taping can be effective in enhancing position awareness, but there is little evidence that kinesiology tape yields these same proprioceptive benefits. We will evaluate the effect of kinesiology tape on shoulder joint reposition sense, a component of proprioception. We hypothesize that kinesiology tape will enhance joint reposition sense when applied to the shoulder compared to pre-tape joint reposition sense and compared to control condition. Joint reposition sense will be tested in healthy participants 18-30 years old in taped and control groups in a single session. Results will be analyzed through SPSS using independent and paired t-tests to determine differences in joint reposition sense between groups (tape;control) and time (pre;post), respectively.

Investigation of Two Functional Mobility Tools in Children: A Pilot Study

Emma Yingling, Zaid Chaudhry, Jessica Smith, Megan Weller
Faculty Sponsor: Sharon Held
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Physical therapists use standardized outcome measures to assist with clinical decisions related to an individual's level of function in society. Ambulation skills, including cadence and adaptability to environmental demands, are important aspects of functional mobility throughout typical development. The Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC) has been studied in children with and without developmental disabilities. It is supported as a reliable and valid assessment of functional mobility for various task conditions, physical features, and environmental dimensions. A scoring system and speed effect on quality of performance have been piloted in several samples. The Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), which examines ability to modify ambulation in response to various gait task demands, has not been used extensively with children. We will present preliminary review/analysis of current literature regarding the SWOC and the DGI and will provide foundation for a study further examining validity and reliability of these measures. Study results could lead to stronger tools for pediatric examination and more focused outcomes/intervention planning.

Measuring the Success of Daemen Seniors with the 2012 National Survey of Student Engagement

Intisar Hibschweiler
Faculty Sponsor: Karen Moronski-Chapman
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) was conducted at Daemen College during Spring 2012. Daemen participates in this every two years on average. Many NSSE survey questions align with Daemen Core Curriculum objectives; they measure the time and effort students put into their studies, educationally purposeful activities, and how institutions deploy their resources and organize curriculum and other learning opportunities to get students to participate in activities linked to student learning. I will compare Daemen student NSSE responses to those of other universities. This data can be used to identify aspects of the undergraduate experience in which Daemen excels or requires improvement both inside and outside the classroom.

Microscale Fluorescence Unfolding of Protein C

Stephanie Aurand
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Blood coagulation is an enzymatic process initiated as the result of tissue damage. The formation of thrombin from this damage clots blood by converting soluble fibrinogen to fibrin. Thrombin bound to co-factor thrombomodulin facilitates the activation of the protein C zymogen (PC). Upon activation by thrombin, protein C undergoes a conformational change and becomes a Vitamin K-dependent serine protease, activated protein C (aPC). This is an important part of the anticoagulant and cytoprotective pathways. By controllably unfolding a protein, the ΔG° associated with the unfolding can be measured by fluorescence. This study looks at the ΔG° of Bovine aPC, Bovine PC, and Human recombinant PC (hrPC), both alone and bound with an anticoagulant derivative and Vitamin K3. Human recombinant protein C has been involved in controversial research recently due to its role in the treatment of sepsis. A comparison between Bovine aPC and PC will ultimately be compared to the hrPC form for potential differences in stability with and without ligand.

Moderators of the Relationship Between Feminist Orientation and Romantic Relationship Quality

Audrey Dollinger
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Few studies have investigated whether there is an association between individuals' feminist orientation and characteristics of their romantic relationships. Rudman and Phelan (2007) found both men and women believe feminism creates problems in heterosexual relationships. Counter to these assumptions, these same authors found romantic relationships are positively affected by feminism. However, researchers have not yet determined potential moderators of the association Rudman and Phelan found. Prior research suggests several characteristics that appear to be good candidates for a moderator analysis of this nature; specifically, self-silencing (when an individual does not say what she would like to say), self esteem, and self and partner objectification (viewing an individual as an object, often a sexual one) have all been found to correlate with relationship status and quality. I will examine whether these characteristics moderate the correlation between individuals' feminist orientation and romantic relationships.

Music Exposure and Mate Preferences, Beliefs About Mates, and Self Concept

Ezada Capri-Alexander
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Prior research has suggested there is a correlation between certain genres of music and the sexual attitudes and behaviors of adolescents and adults. However, a large percentage of this research has focused exclusively on one particular musical style - rap music. In addition, most of the research to date has focused on sexual attitudes and beliefs in particular. The current study extends prior research by examining additional music genres and potential correlates of these genres beyond sexual attitudes alone. We examined the relationship between three genres of music (country, hip-hop, and rock) and college students' conceptualization of an ideal partner, beliefs about gender roles, and self concept.

Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program

Susan McCormick
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will present an exploration of the need for Nurse Practitioner (NP) Fellowship Programs. These programs allow the NP to obtain advanced didactic education, focusing on skills and knowledge needed to provide high quality patient care, and the ability to apply learned knowledge and skills in an inpatient or outpatient setting. Due to growing need for healthcare providers in the United States, there is a movement towards both hospital and community based NP Fellowship Programs. Fellowship Programs ensure the NP gains the appropriate knowledge and skills necessary to provide high quality expert care to patients, particularly in specialties such as neurology. The need for NP residency programs in WNY will be further discussed, along with recommendations for future research and practice.

Optimal Design for a Rain Gutter!

Joseph Currier
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Gutters play an important role in keeping buildings structurally sound and providing safety to the building as a whole. By using calculus, we will find the optimal design for a rain gutter in order to maximize the amount of water that can flow through. In this project, we will explore different geometric shapes and their optimal dimensions.

Pain Management Cost Analysis: Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Kayla Kaufman, Stephanie Joerger, Emily Grabowski
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Pain affects millions of Americans, and ways to treat it are evolving. Complementary and alternative medical practices are growing in both presence and popularity for a multitude of reasons. As America struggles with recovering from an economic recession and a significant lack of insurance coverage for its citizens, it is interesting to examine how individuals seek out and obtain health care typically not covered in full by health insurance companies. We will analyze the main reasons people turn to complementary and alternative care, focusing on cost measures both out of pocket and in terms of the seemingly rationed health care America offers.

Poetry in Special Education: Speech and Language Disorders

Teresa Polk
Faculty Sponsor: Joanne Sadler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There are over 6.5 million students receiving special education services in the United States. Approximately 38 percent have specific learning disabilities, and speech and language disorders account for nearly 20 percent of all learning disorders. Early intervention is the key. For students who struggle with stuttering, the causal effect is that their aptitude does not align with their academic achievements. Children who stutter often lack motivation, classroom participation, a sense of good self-concepts, and self-esteem; they are also prone to develop emotional and/or social behavioral problems. English Language Arts (ELA) curriculum is driven by New York State Standards, and it is vital for teachers to use effective strategies in instruction. I will consider the use of poetry as a tool to improve oral fluency from a pedagogical perspective.

Potential Moderators of the Association Between Religiosity and Interracial Friendships

Ayana Williams
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Various studies suggest religious involvement may be a key factor in the degree and type of interracial relations individuals have. Ironically, it may limit rather than expand their connections with people different from themselves (Mooney, 2012). The current study examines potential moderators of the association between religiosity and interracial friendship. I hypothesize that individual personality characteristics - namely (1) openness to experience, (2) conformity/rule consciousness, (3) unconventionality, and (4) warmth - moderate the association between religiosity and interracial friendships so the relationship will be strong for individuals with low openness, high conformity, low unconventionality, and low degrees of warmth but weak for individuals with high openness, low conformity, high unconventionality, and high degrees of warmth. I examine whether spirituality and interracial friendship have a positive relationship - in other words, whether individuals with higher levels of spirituality have more interracial friends.

Printmaking at the Buffalo Arts Studio

Ashley Marianacci
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Wolf
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will highlight a collaboration between Art Education majors at Daemen College and the staff and students at the Buffalo Arts Studio. Daemen students taught middle school students about safe and proper printmaking techniques and about local and internationally recognized printmakers. Students identified and used art elements and principles of design to create their own block prints, stencil prints, monoprints, and collages based on various themes and concepts. Photographs from the collaboration will be shared in addition to the overall unit plan that addresses New York State Visual Arts Standards.

Promoting an Open-Ended Environment in Early Childhood Education

Brittany Ruszczyk
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Today in classrooms across the United States, teachers are developing methods and interactive approaches to make learning fun for students. Students learning in an open ended environment can learn or build knowledge by finding meaning in playful, interactive experiences instead of passively receiving information from teachers. Though children need consistency and predictability, they also need environments designed with flexibility so things can be moved and rearranged for specific needs. Open ended environments should provide opportunities for children to feel empowered to explore their imaginations and ideas. Provided selections and arrangements encourage children to pursue their interests and questions, represent their thoughts, build strong relationships, and establish a love of learning. Elements of open ended environments include a flexible space that promotes a sense of belonging and open ended materials that engage the senses. I will discuss open ended environments in Early Childhood Education, including why they are important, how they are beneficial, and what to include when designing the environment.

Protecting the Coqui Llanero

Alexandra Fischer
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The coqui llanero (Eleutherodactylus juanariveroi) is a yellow-brown tree frog found in Puerto Rico. This dime-sized frog was discovered in 2005 and has been placed on the endangered species list by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Due to its highly specific environmental needs, low reproductive capability, and limited habitat of about 615 acres, the coqui llanero needs help in order to survive. I will evaluate the conservation plans already in place to aid its survival and will present my own ideas for conserving this species.

Semester in Mexico City, Mexico

Nicole Deliberis
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will discuss cultural and community experiences during a semester-long study abroad in Mexico City, Mexico as a North American Sustainability Scholar in the Consortium for North American Sustainability . My presentation will be bilingual for all students. My study abroad experience included service learning at Christel House Mexico, a school that prepares students living in poverty for a brighter future. Interactions with colleagues, students, families, and classmates helped make this experience worth so much more than being a tourist and studying. I also gained perspective on a new culture and a different way of life that makes the experience unforgettable.

Set: A Game of Sets

Sean Hellingman, Melinda Montaperto, Lei Wang
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Set is a card game created by Marsha Jean Falco while she was doing research on hereditary genetic diseases in German Shepherds. It can be played by any number of players, and the objective is to create different sets of cards based on symbols, colors, numbers, or shadings. We will explore the game's connections to set theory and probabilities and statistics. We will also demonstrate the game by allowing people to play Set and put the theory behind it into practice.

Sodium Alginates and Wound Healing

Daniel Mills
Faculty Sponsor: Kathleen Murphy
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Chronic wounds pose a large and expensive problem in healthcare in the United States. They can lead to greater infections and health complications if not treated. Wound dressings made from Sodium Alginate gels have been used to promote the process of chronic wound healing for many years. They provide a moist environment to wounds and are unique in that they can undergo ion exchange, which promotes healing. If there is a sufficient amount of calcium entering the wound, Sodium Alginate gel may also accelerate healing of chronic wounds. However, the rate of the flow of ions has not been studied. This is an important area to study because the Alginate dressings could then be modified to deliver an optimum flow of calcium to chronic wounds. Through a series of various experiments, we have measured the rate in which calcium ions leave the Alginate gel, which may then be related to the wound healing process.

Sustainable Design Seminar: Changing the Face of Daemen

Sarah Carpenter, Kenzie Reynen, Julia Roetzer, Evan Lyons, Kristina Poole, Kevin Dagher, Kevin Kegler, Brenda Young
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will showcase our individual and group initiatives to increase awareness and improve sustainable practices on our campus. As part of an effort to boost recycling, we used a targeted approach to educate resident students on how and why they should recycle. A six-week competition among residence halls provided additional incentives for participation. Data on electricity usage for the upper-class residence halls has been posted to an online dashboard for monitoring during our participation in the national Campus Climate Challenge. We will also share our plans for sustainability pages that are under creation for the Daemen website.

Talent Management Creates a Competitive Advantage

Kyle Harman
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

What makes a company function? How does a business succeed? The answer is utilization of employees - talent-laden employees. A company is only as good as the people who are part of it. For a company to flourish, employees must be considered highly valuable assets. Therefore, the 21st century theory of Talent Management needs to be harnessed by all businesses, especially their Human Resource departments. My focus is "The management of talent is critical for success in today's hyper-competitive economy." I will include statistics about productivity rate and employees' general feelings after the Talent Management theory was put in place. Corporate turnover rates demonstrate justification of how managing of talent will benefit organizations in today's super-competitive economy with respect to hiring, developing, and retaining quality employees. I will include unique views of HR professionals with respect to talent management and help show how important Talent Management is in the workplace when the company is aligning its key goals and aspirations.

Technology, Personality Characteristics, and Relationship Behaviors in College Students

Patrick Wozniak
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My current study explores predictive value of several variables in the literature which associate with stability and instability of college students' relationships. In particular, I will explore self-esteem levels, relationship attachment style, love styles, emotional stability, extroversion, and tendencies to experience jealousy as potential correlates and predictors of partner monitoring via technology like Facebook and cell phones. Previous studies attempted to identify the link between jealousy and use of technology to monitor relationships (Elphinston & Noller, 2011; Muise, Christofides, & Desmarais, 2009). Darvell, Walsh, & White (2011) used a combination of jealousy and self-esteem to predict who would monitor romantic partners with technology. The limited research done in this area has opened the door for researchers to explore other individual characteristics which may correlate most strongly with use of technology to monitor romantic partners.

The Association Between Sleep and Health Defeating Behaviors in College Students

Christina Van Dewater
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Poor sleep duration and poor sleep quality are related to an increase in health defeating behaviors, such as alcohol use, tobacco use, other drug use, and sexual behaviors (O' Brien & Mindell, 2005). Although several personality traits have been shown via prior research to be strongly correlated with health related behaviors, no studies to date have examined whether these personality variables moderate the association between lack of sleep (as measured via sleep debt and poor sleep quality) and engagement in health defeating behaviors (Hill, 2004; Raynor & Levine, 2009; Zuckerman & Kuhlman, 2000). It is hypothesized that conscientiousness, neuroticism, sensation seeking, and perfectionism moderate the association between college students' amount of sleep per night and engagement in health defeating behaviors. The association is expected to be strong for participants with low levels of conscientiousness and perfectionism and high levels of neuroticism and sensation seeking but weak for participants with the opposite characteristics.

The Benefits of Therapeutic Ultrasound in Physical Therapy

Nicholaus Salinas, Matthew Bala, Joanne Croos, Gretchen Morelli
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The application of therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) remains a subject of contention among physical therapists, especially when it comes to how TUS is used in the management of musculoskeletal injuries. Ongoing debate exists relative to the efficacy of TUS in significantly healing and restoring the function of injured tissues. It is proposed that successful delivery of ultrasound waves to damaged tissues results in diminished pain perception, increased blood flow, increased phagocytosis of damaged tissues, reduced muscle spasms, reduced viscosity of fluid elements in tissues, and increased healing rates of soft tissue. Unfortunately, the beneficial physiologic effects of TUS are not easily identified in a clinical setting where the primary emphasis is directed at improving impairments. This literature analysis investigates the effectiveness of TUS' ability to aid in soft tissue healing. We will also investigate parameters relative to the application of TUS.

The Changing Face of Athletic Administration Personnel

Monica Kosior
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I examined the revolution of women holding NCAA administrative positions before and after Title IX. I also looked at my thesis of how "the recent glut of sport management graduates has created a complex and competitive employment environment for athletic administrators and coaches." The need for more women in athletic administration roles is best understood by women, minorities, college graduates, athletic administrators, and NCAA personnel or prospective employees. These groups also understand the importance of a more diverse population within athletic administrative personnel and the importance of Title IX and its effect and influence on women in sports. Personnel directors or hiring managers of those seeking athletic administrative positions can capitalize on specific scholarships, internships, and positions created just for women in the NCAA because of Title IX. I will address historical progressions of those holding athletic administrative positions, NCAA requirements for potential administration employees, historical and current barriers to women landing these jobs, and NCAA gender issues.

The Comparative Analysis of Fibrin Specific and Fibrin Non-Specific Drugs in the Treatment of High Risk Pulmonary Embolism

Caitlin Scheeler
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

High risk pulmonary embolism (PE) accounts for approximately five percent of all acute PE, which is the third most frequent cause of cardiovascular death. I analyzed nine medical research articles to compare different types of treatments for high risk PE in order to determine which treatments were most effective. Analysis of the research showed that thrombolytic treatment was the best treatment option. This treatment can be fibrin specific and fibrin non-specific; research suggested that the fibrin specific thrombolytic treatment was more effective. Additional research is still necessary to compare all of the fibrin non-specific drugs to the fibrin specific drugs, as existing research studies of these drugs each compare only one fibrin specific to one fibrin non-specific treatment.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning

Joseph Colasurdo
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will discuss the Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning (CIEL). CIEL was established by a group of like-minded campuses that share the idea of progressive education. These schools are committed to student-centered learning, with particular emphasis on the interconnectedness between teaching and learning, and each has its specialized fields of study. The CIEL exchange allows students to study at any of the twelve institutions in this collaboration, ranging in location from California to Florida to New Hampshire to Washington. If a student at a CIEL school cannot find a program at his or her home institution, he or she can apply to study at another CIEL university for up to two semesters at the tuition rate of the home institution. CIEL opens boundaries for students.

The Correlation Between Mood State and Perceived Importance of Psychological Intervention by an Athletic Trainer: The Athlete's Perspective

Lauren Duft
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Injury rehabilitation consists of multiple factors to ensure successful athlete recovery. The ability of athletic trainers (ATs) to understand the athlete's individual mood state may determine the successfulness of rehabilitation. Researchers measure mood state using questionnaires comprised of mood-describing adjectives, such as "Profile of Mood States" (POMS). The importance of using imagery techniques during rehabilitation has been measured with the "Attitudes about Imagery" (AAI) but has only evaluated this technique from the AT perspective. I will determine if a correlation exists between mood state and importance of imagery intervention from the athlete's perspective. Division II athletes will complete the POMS and AAI to determine if a correlation exists between mood state and perception of the importance of imagery during rehabilitation. We hypothesize that athletes with a negative mood state will rate the importance of imagery intervention differently than athletes with a more positive mood state. Data will be analyzed in SPSS with Spearman's correlation.

The Effect of Compression Therapy on Secondary Injury and Vascular Return

Michele Kujawa, David Baldanza, Joseph Gelose, Laura McGorray
Faculty Sponsor: Philip Tonsoline
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Compression Therapy is a modality that can be used to decrease edema by aiding in venous return. Edema can build in pathologic or over-worked tissues, potentially exacerbating secondary injury or creating uncomfortable swelling. Compression socks or ace bandages can be worn in an attempt to halt secondary injury and edema in order to return to full function. We will review controlled studies concerning the efficacy of compression therapy on reduction of edema in swollen tissue. If a significant relationship is found, we will identify appropriate parameters concerning when to begin and cease the therapy.

The Effect of Prophylactic Ankle Tape on Perception of Static Balance Performance

Adam Wysocki
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Prophylactic ankle taping is used in athletics to prevent ankle injuries and is proposed to decrease ankle range of motion and increase ankle stability, which may improve balance. Self-adherent tape has been suggested as superior to cloth tape or no tape in limiting range of motion and increasing stability. There is a feeling of comfort, stability, and increased performance for a person taped with cloth tape, but these factors have not yet been evaluated with self-adherent tape. I will determine if stability perception is influenced by tape type and examine if there is a correlation between stability perception and balance. Static balance and stability perception will be assessed under three tape conditions (self-adherent, cloth tape, control). I will perform statistical testing in SPSS to assess stability perception across ankle tape conditions and the correlation between stability perception and balance.

The Effect of Prophylactic Ankle Tape on Static Balance Performance

Lizabeth Aiello
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Prophylactic ankle taping is used in athletics to prevent ankle sprains. To date, studies evaluating the effects of ankle tape on range of motion, joint proprioception, and balance have only assessed adhesive tape; however, a new self-adherent tape with different properties has recently become commercially available. This new tape has shown superior range of motion limitations, which may be associated with improved stability. We will evaluate static balance when healthy ankles are taped under three different tape conditions (adhesive tape, self-adherent tape, control). We hypothesize that ankles taped with self-adherent tape will result in improved static balance compared to adhesive tape and control. The study will be a crossover design; all participants will undergo each tape condition. Participants will complete the Balance Error Scoring System, following each tape condition. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA, using PSWA Statistics, will be conducted to analyze study results. An alpha level of p< 0.05 will donate statistical significance.

The Effectiveness of Short-Wave Diathermy on Orthopedic Disorders

Ryan Boggs, Lauren Billotti, Joseph Gravino, Kevin Esperti, Alyssa Hanlon
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Short wave diathermy (SWD) is a high frequency modality emitting electromagnetic energy to mediate various musculoskeletal conditions limiting tissue extensibility. The effects of SWD are both thermal and non thermal. One of the thermal effects is to heat tissue prior to stretching. Non thermal effects include increasing the patient's pain threshold and restoring membrane function to aid in the healing process of various soft tissues. This is a review of literature in regards to effectiveness of SWD in treating musculoskeletal disorders.

The Effects of Globalization in the Retail Industry

Sherita Wilson
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will discuss my thesis that "Customer satisfaction, customer service, and corporate loyalty are hindered when employing foreign-speaking call center representatives to deal with the aspects of consumer purchasing." The retail industry will benefit from knowing about communication barriers and impact on levels of customer service as a result of hiring foreign-speaking call center representatives - specifically, positive and negative effects when employing foreign-speaking phone representatives with respect to product sales and customer satisfaction. I will present a comparison of customer service levels and overall customer satisfaction for companies employing non-foreign speaking phone representatives. I will also discuss information about the retail industry's perception on employing foreign-speaking and non-foreign speaking phone representatives and why the industry decides to hire more foreign-speaking employees than non-foreign-speaking employees. Some research was collected by surveying students about customer service, customer satisfaction, and corporate loyalty with respect to employment of foreign-speaking call center representatives. Information was gathered by interviewing professionals in the customer service business.

The Effects of Self-Selected Music on Functional Anaerobic Tests

Patrick Palkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Music is a common motivator in sport, and both aerobic and anaerobic performances are essential sport components. Although past research establishes positive psychophysical effects of music on aerobic performance, anaerobic performance is less studied, which leads to inconsistent results. We will determine if self-selected music affects functional anaerobic performance. We hypothesize that the music group will perform significantly better than the no music group in vertical jump, sprint speed, and agility testing. This study will include thirty participants 18-27 years old who participate in 20 minutes of physical activity 3-5 times per week. A pre-test/post-test randomized control group will be employed. Participants will be randomized into music and no music groups, and they will complete a pre- and post-music intervention vertical jump, 40-yard sprint, and t-test. An independent t-test will compare the music groups, and a dependent t-test will compare pre-test and post-test results.

The Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on Vertical Jump Performance Between Males and Females

Adam Domroes
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Athletes typically perform pre-activity warm-ups like stretching before exercise, with dynamic stretching proposed as being more favorable than static stretching to enhance performance. To date, stretching protocols have presented parameter differences between studies; therefore, it is difficult to discern whether static or dynamic stretching may have different performance benefits for males or females. We will determine if static or dynamic stretching affects vertical jump performance differently between sexes. We hypothesize that dynamic stretching will increase vertical jump performance for both males and females, whereas static stretching will cause no change in performance. Thirty recreational college athletes will be recruited for this study. Participants will be randomly assigned to a static, dynamic, or no stretch protocol and pre/post-test vertical jump will be assessed. Data will be analyzed through SPSS using a mixed methods ANOVA.

The Importance of Play on Social Development

Samantha Schaefer
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Healthy social development in young children exhibits a positive correlation with healthy cognitive development. With healthy social and cognitive development, there exists a strong foundation for future academic success and achievement of a student. Teachers must not only focus on a student's cognitive development but also assist in promoting strong social development. Play fulfills a crucial role in the development of social competence, and teachers can use it as a way to help children develop socially. I will explore the importance of play, its role in social development, and how teachers can implement play in the classroom.

The Positive Impact of Meditation on Athletic Performance

Stacy Neelin, Sonesavanh Xomvilaysack, Anthony Lawton
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Improvement of both the mind and body for increased success in many areas of life can occur through the practice of meditation. We will introduce recent research on meditation as a method of enhancing athletic performance. Anxiety experienced by athletes prior to or during competition may negatively impact their performance through decreased concentration and a lack of ability to focus, but meditation positively influences overall physical activity and athletic performance. Numerous studies regarding the efficacy of sports meditation provide our supporting evidence.

The Prevalence of de Quervain's Tenosynovitis in College-aged Cell Phone Users

Jesse Furlong, Jessica Brand, John Salvas, Johnna Sorensen
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

De Quervain's tenosynovitis manifests as a stenosing of the tendons in the first dorsal compartment of the hand. Research indicates that repetitive trauma disorders, or cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs), contribute to the presentation of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. Mobile phone use emphasizes the recruitment of the abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis muscles (whose tendons lie within the first dorsal compartment) during talking, texting, and other activities. As society continually develops electronic devices for communication and everyday use, the prevalence of CTDs will likely increase; consequently, a widespread increase in incidence of de Quervain's tenosynovitis may follow. Clinically, Finkelstein's test presents a valid option to assist in the diagnosis of de Quervain's tenosynovitis; however, few research studies exist that correlate a positive Finkelstein's test to cell phone use. We will review current literature and discuss the findings associated with the prevalence of de Quervain's tenosynovitis in college-aged cell phone users by implementing Finkelstein's test as the primary diagnostic assessment.

The Relationship Between Core Stability and Dynamic Balance in Healthy, Active College-Aged Students

Kayce Wagner
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The body's musculoskeletal core, or lumbo-pelvic hip complex, includes the spine, abdomen, hips, pelvis, and proximal lower extremity structures. During athletic activities, the lumbo-pelvic hip complex provides core stability. Research advises examining core stability through dynamic balance to identify predisposing injury risk factors; however, there is little research analyzing this relationship. Therefore, we will evaluate if there is a correlation between core stability and balance. We hypothesize that individuals with better core stability will have superior dynamic balance and that males will have greater core stability and dynamic balance compared to females when normalized for body weight and leg length. Healthy, physically active male and female college-aged students 18-28 years old will perform four core stability tests followed by the Y-Balance test to compare core stability and dynamic balance performance. A Pearson Product Moment Correlation will be used with IBM SPSS version 20.0 to analyze core stability to dynamic balance performance.

The Role of Doctoral Prepared Nurses in Transforming Healthcare Outcomes

Ventricia Harris-Victor
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Since the establishment of the Nurse Practitioner (NP) role in 1965, the founding vision of the NP has focused on providing better care to under-served patients. Today, as technology improves and demands for primary care increase, a new vision of the NP profession's role is becoming clearer. I will highlight how the role of doctorally prepared nurses can significantly impact and transform healthcare to meet various gaps in current healthcare delivery systems. In particular, the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) degree provides a clinical option for advanced preparation in nursing practice, focusing on a blend of clinical, organizational, economical, research, and leadership skills necessary to accomplish such goals. I will discuss findings and recommendations for research and practice.

The Role of Gender Differences and Personality in Obsessive Relational Intrusion

Brittney Nasca
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Obsessive Relational Intrusion (ORI) is a "pre-stalking" behavior that has been found to occur with relatively high frequency in college students. ORI activities can be classified as "covert" (e.g., harassing phone calls, cyberstalking) or "overt" (e.g., following a person, showing up at a person's place of employment). The current study investigated predictors of ORI. Although literature reports some association between certain personality traits, attachment styles, gender, and stalking, there is much less information available about the correlates and predictors of ORI, especially with regard to the perpetration of "overt" vs. "covert" behaviors. This study investigated correlation between ORI behaviors and neuroticism, emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. In addition, I examined gender differences in overt versus covert ORI methods and the attachment styles correlated with ORI perpetration vs. victimization.

The Use of Physical Agents in Wound Care

William Denz Jr, Rachel Ottaway, Clay Case, Jeremy Long, Zakkee Moghul
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Individuals suffering from cutaneous wounds frequently seek out physical therapists for treatment. Because the consequences of an untreated cutaneous wound range from infection to amputation, treatment must be immediate and effective. By reviewing current literature, physical therapists can better prepare themselves to treat patients presenting with cutaneous wounds. Physical therapists possess the knowledge and means to use a variety of physical agents, several of which effectively treat these wounds. Moist heat, therapeutic ultrasound, laser, diathermy, electrical stimulation, pulsatile lavage, whirlpool tanks, and compression treat cutaneous wounds with varying degrees of efficacy. Through a brief review of the research detailing physical agents available in wound care, therapists can identify pros and cons to each treatment, allowing treatment decisions to be made on an individual level.

The Validity of the QTF in Predicting Outcomes in Patients with Low Back Pain

Helen Lawrence, William Marshall, Russell Zeiss, Gillian Taylor
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Patients with low back pain (LBP) of unknown origin represent 85% or more of all patients experiencing and being treated for LBP by primary care providers. Evidence shows that patients treated using an LBP classification system report a greater improvement in disability after treatment and a faster return to full-time work than patients treated using solely clinical guidelines. Numerous classification systems exist, such as Bernard and Kirkaldy-Willis, Dellito and Colleagues, McKenzie, Cyriax, Maitland, Sahrmann, and Quebec Task Force Classification (QTFC). Each focuses on different approaches in the classification process. We conducted a literature review to determine the validity of QTFC system. This research will prompt further investigation of the outcomes and interventions used during the treatment of previous patients with LBP within the Catholic Health System Physical Therapy Departments of Western New York, with examination of retrospective classifications using the QTFC system.

Tibetan Refugee Identity in India

Matthew Ullery
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Tibetan refugees are typically viewed as outsiders in India. I investigated the integration process of Tibetan refugees within India, mainly focusing on how Tibetan cultural identity is formed and maintained and how the community identifies a sense of belonging within this larger country. I also researched how Tibetan cultural history is taught within the schools for Tibetan refugees and how it affects their identities. I argue that the majority of the Tibetan refugee community still views Tibet as "home," regardless of where they were born, and that Tibetan cultural identity is centered around this sense of homelessness. The younger population is recognizing that this return to their former home is unlikely as China gains an ever-stronger foothold in Tibet. This has a significant impact on their sense of belonging and identity within India.

Traditional Chinese Medicine: The Association Between Acupuncture on Pain Management for Knee Osteoarthritis

Korianne Sulzbach, Richard Hughson, Leslie Frankish
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This research involves a review of the practice of acupuncture, an ancient form of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Acupuncture is the technique of placing fine needles into the surface of the skin at specific points. It is believed that acupuncture initiates the release of endorphins, which have an inhibitory effect on pain signals. One popular use is pain management among persons with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Stimulation precipitated by insertion of the needle deactivates parts of the limbic system and has proven effective in reducing peripheral inflammation associated with OA. This literature review displays a relationship between acupuncture and pain management. It also shows the promise acupuncture has for reducing dependency on prescription pain medication and prolonging the time before knee surgery becomes necessary.

Traditions and Symbols of Native Hawaiian Culture and Buddhism

Nathan Wiktor, Leigh Alexander
Faculty Sponsor: Cassandra SalterSmith
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

We will look at the traditions and symbols of Native Hawaiian residents and how they have changed from the past, addressing major differences between Native Hawaiian culture and Buddhism. We will take a deeper look at the history of Buddhism and compare key similarities, such as values and traditions, to the native Hawaiian cultures. Focusing on native Hawaiian ways of life, it is possible to understand the significance of traditions in daily life, political situations, and social behavior. The similarities of religion based upon symbols, values, and social roles will allow for a better understanding of how religions affect an individual and group of people.

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Rosemary Hansen
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Aortic stenosis, a stiffening of the heart's main valve, is a deadly disease of the elderly and has a poor prognosis. The gold standard treatment for aortic stenosis is surgical intervention. Elderly patients often have multiple comorbidities increasing their surgical risk and compromising their quality of life. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is a new, minimally-invasive alternative intervention for this select patient population. I examined the benefits and outcomes of patients who undergo TAVR. Is there improved quality of life and survival in patients who undergo it? What are the outcomes for these patients in the western New York area? I will present a review of current literature and public registry data and discuss findings, conclusions and recommendations for future research and practice.

Trends in Superbowl Advertising

Joanna Fretthold
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Superbowl is one of the most popular sporting events in the United States. Ratings from the 2013 Superbowl show that it was the most watched TV event in U.S history. One of its many popular aspects are commercials; these 30 second spots are an advertiser's dream. A CNN representative reported that these clips sold for an average of 4 million dollars. Many people have recently become more and more interested in these commercials, and some watch the game for only this reason. I will discuss trends in Superbowl advertising from 2005-2013, focusing specifically on changes in niche and mass marketing before and after the 2008 recession. This recession has had a major impact on millions of Americans' lives, and companies' advertising plans needed many modifications to support changing trends in spending.

Use of Anesthetics on Seahorses: Are Intrageneric Dose Correlations Possible?

Melissa Muth
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Exploitation of Hippocampus spp. is an ongoing epidemic that can be ameliorated through refined use of anesthetics on seahorses during transit and aquaculture. My research investigated the efficacy of two anesthetics, tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) and eugenol (clove oil), in Hippocampus erectus. Efficacy was determined based upon induction times within 180s and recovery times within 300s. A dose of 150mg/L of MS-222 was effective for sedation. Eugenol concentrations of 30, 40 and 50 mg/L did not effectively sedate H. erectus. Findings were compared to a study by Pawar et al. (2011) in H. kuda; no significant intrageneric differences existed in induction times for any MS-222 concentrations. Low eugenol concentrations presented significantly different induction times between the two species. Trends between these anesthetics are discussed as consequences of their unique chemical properties - specifically, how interplay between the anesthetic polarity and differing environmental conditions may have attributed to these findings.

Use of Intranasal Naloxone for Opioid Overdose Patients by EMTs in the Prehospital Setting

Chad Shepherd
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Drug overdose is a significant problem in New York State. According to the most recently compiled statistics from the New York State Department of Health, in 2008 there were a reported 1,818 drug-related deaths, 9,135 emergency department visits and 21,202 hospital admissions due to opioid (prescription pain medication and heroin) overdoses. I will present a review of literature related to use of Intranasal Naloxone (Narcan) for opioid overdose patients, considering its use by Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the prehospital setting. I will further discuss recommendations for research, practice, and a Doctor of Nursing Practice scholarly project, such as developing and implementing an algorithm or protocol related to EMTs' prehospital use of Intranasal Naloxone in New York State.

Using Electrical Stimulation to Help Improve Muscular Strength Gains

Caitlyn Napoli, Leighann Marble, Amber Bonito, Kyle Braunscheidel
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Electrical stimulation is a physical agent with a variety of applications. Physical therapists use electrical stimulation in addition to other forms of intervention to address a wide range of impairments, including pain and altered muscle tone. Electrical stimulation is purported to be beneficial for addressing muscle weakness following injury or prolonged disuse. Unfortunately, the parameters for such a use are still in dispute. Identifying appropriate parameters for addressing muscle weakness would be helpful to physical therapists whose main goal is addressing such an impairment. This literature analysis investigates the efficacy of using electrical stimulation to help increase muscle strength in a patient population that may not benefit from a strength training program alone.

Video Games and Their Impact on Children with Special Needs

George Rock IV
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The first video games were missile simulators inspired by World War II. While these are the granddaddies of all video games, no one could have envisioned their impact today. From an early age - when fine motor skills are developing - to our senile years, video games can be a great benefit to the mind. Children who play games are known to be able to make decisions faster, read better, and problem solve quicker. And if these are the benefits for children developing without an identified disability, imagine how it can be implemented into special education! Video games have been studied as an alternative to medication for children with ADD/ADHD and as a way to treat children with brain injuries, to help with learning and social skills for children with autism, and to serve as moral educators. Video games have endless possibilities, so I, dressed as Super Mario, will explain the significance of video gaming for childhood development.

Whistleblowing and Ethical Standards

April Furman
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym, Athletic Center
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

When an employee realizes or witnesses acts of unethical behavior within his organization, this employee faces a most difficult decision: whether or not to be a whistleblower. Without the cooperation of whisteblowers, corruption can spread and negate ethical business practices. Focusing on internal and external benefits of whistleblowing, my thesis was "Whistle blowing is prevalent in, and necessary for, companies to maintain ethical standards." I will explain information regarding internal whisteblowing compared to the pros and cons of external whistleblowing, present whistleblowing regulations within a company, and discuss current events regarding whistleblowing practices. I have analyzed both types of whisteblowing and have presented my conclusion based on my own ethical background and practices.

Exhibits

"Drawing the Banality of Evil"

Jacek Fraczak
Faculty Sponsor: Andrew Wise
10:30 am - 4:00 pm
DS Art Gallery

In January 1945, as Russian forces advanced through Poland, a fleeing Wehrmacht soldier dropped an envelope of personal photographs near Rawa Mazowiecka. Showing bureaucrats working at their desks or posing "heroically" before ruined villages, these give little hint of the death-camp soldiers' daily blood atrocities. In a series of nine collages of pen/ink drawings and photographs, Polish artist Jacek Fraczak inserts the photos within larger vistas that give the victims' viewpoints - what they saw as they peered through doorways or over roof tops, watching their enemies snap souvenir-photos. This imaginative expansion beyond the Nazi's camera lens reminds us of the banality of evil and of the bureaucracy that undergirded genocide.

Art Club's "Objects of Vision"

Veronica Giurdanella, Jamie LeRoy, Kayla Leach, Jordan Quinones, Isabella Constantino, James Schroeder, Trevor White, Joshua Miller, Marissa Pearson
Faculty Sponsor: Felice Koenig
10:30 am - 4:00 pm
Wick 113/115

The Daemen College Art Club traveled to Toronto in February and visited the Art Gallery of Ontario's "Objects of Vision" exhibition, which celebrates Canadian artist Michael Snow's achievement as the 2011 winner of the Gershon Iskowitz Prize. Snow describes himself as "a pure sculptor.... An artist who makes objects." During the trip, Art Club explored cultural differences between Canadian and American art. Afterwards, we created artwork and developed this exhibit that creates an aesthetic experience in response to "Objects of Vision."

Art on the Daemen College Ecotrail

David Mawer
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Kegler
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Meet in Canavan hall by 1:00PM- Ecotrail

Daemen College's Ecotrail is home to a diverse collection of student and faculty-created artwork. The Ecotrail's latest addition is a mixed-media sculpture that reflects the living and breathing character of nature itself. This exhibit will increase awareness of the work put into Daemen's Ecotrail while simultaneously sharing a student-created sculpture. The student artist, Dave Mawer, will give an introduction of the work before soliciting comments and answering questions.

Haberman Gacioch Center for Visual and Performing Arts Senior Exhibit

Laura Sommer, Casey Cole, Jennifer Cook, Molly Ederer, David Mawer
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
10:30 am - 4:00 pm
Haberman Gacioch Center for Visual and Performing

Student artwork will be on display in the gallery throughout the Academic Festival. Casey Cole will receive a B.S. in Art, Minor in Graphic Design. Jennifer Cook and Dave Mawer will receive a B.S. in Visual Arts Education (Art Ed). Molly Ederer will receive a B.S. in Art, Minor in Sculpture.

Performances

"SYMPHONY" by Michele Costa

Robert Waterhouse, Christian Brandjes, Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
6:30 pm - 7:15 pm
CVPA 201

TheatreFigüren presents SYMPHONY. Aaron Copland's "Symphony #3" is the musical backdrop for poetry, puppetry, and yards of scrolling art colliding to tell the story of a forgotten man and his dog. The man and dog have been living in a cozy hand-dug hole beneath a roadside billboard. Now, they emerge to rediscover their city, the world, and all that life has to offer. Conceived, designed, and performed by Michele Costa/TheatreFigüren. Music recorded by the Philharmonia Orchestra. Poem by Michael Sulzbach.

Festival Musicale

Chris Malik, tba
Faculty Sponsor: Christopher Malik
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

Music is a language that crosses all borders and unites humankind, expressing an artistic appreciation of our commonality. It is an art form that can be appreciated by the passive experience of simply listening. However, by engaging in the actual creation of music one can connect to this spiritual plane in an even deeper, more personal, and more intimate way. Whether you arouse to the rhythm of drumming, simmer to the strum of an acoustic guitar, or glow in the warmth of a Steinway piano, you don't need to be a professional musician to participate in the joy of making music. This annual event organized by the Student Activities Office seeks to engage students, faculty, and staff in exploring a variety of musical styles with performances that challenge and stretch the experience for both performers and listeners.

Hands Up for Puppetry: Fighting the Devolution

Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
4:15 pm - 5:00 pm
CVPA 201

Puppetry is an ancient art form that dates back to the genesis of storytelling itself. Despite puppetry's rich tradition of being accessible to all audiences, the dawn of the industrial and television revolutions have relegated the art form to a children's medium. This interactive workshop will explore the vast depths of puppetry and its value in contemporary culture. We will look first to history, exploring what aspects of the revolutions contributed to puppetry's devolution. Garrity will then present and demonstrate various types of puppetry to stimulate a discussion on what the form gives to its audience and how it can be utilized throughout the performance industry. Garrity is the recipient of Daemen College's Think Tank Grant, which provided him funds to both perform and attend puppetry performances throughout the Northeast. He will reflect upon his own experiences working with some of the country's premier puppeteers, including those who work with The Muppets.

Musical Jam

Denise Emer, Jerry Hall, John Mayer, Robert Gunther, Steven Barnes
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Alumni Lounge

Come join the party! The musical jam is a one hour musical presentation by a band comprised of faculty and students. We will perform a mix of genres with great songs from the past and present, so come check it out and enjoy the jam!

Puppetry Slam

Cameron Garrity, TBD
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
7:30 pm - 9:00 pm
CVPA 201

Our talented guest artists will host various short-form puppet performances. Puppetry Slams provide artists with endless opportunities to create new characters, deliver new stories, and test the limits of puppetry.

Songs of the Erie Canal Puppet Show

Robert Waterhouse, Christian Brandjes, Cameron Garrity
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Outside Wick

Local puppeteer, designer, story teller, and artist Franklin LaVoie will circulate some of his creations around Wick patio, giving brief presentations of his latest puppets and their stories. This will be a 30 minute presentation involving a wagon, puppets, and music.

The Pre Law Association's 11th Annual Moot Court Experience

Mitchell Altman-Cosgrove, Wade Pietrocarlo, Jill Spytman, Jordan Sieracki, Samantha Spicer, Sarah Rodman, Tanya Koragoda
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Parshall
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenk 107

The Pre-Law Association will present its 11th Annual Moot Court Experience. Students will stage a mock trial, complete with opening statements, testimony from witnesses, closing statements, and a jury deliberation to determine the verdict. This year will be a criminal trial simulation involving the charge of "Homicide by Negligent Handling of Fire."

Other

Alex's Lemonade Stand

The Psychology Club
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
12:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Wick Lobby

Core Competencies

The Daemen College core is an innovative competency-based curriculum. Every course approved for core credit includes at least three competencies, including at least one primary competency. Course syllabi state the learning objectives that relate to the competencies and the assessment techniques that will be used to determine mastery.

Committee

Michael Brogan -Vice President, Academic Affairs
Ronald Schenck - Dean, Health & Human Services Division
Kevin Telford - Dean, Arts & Sciences Division
Margene Weiss - Conferences & Events
Diana Alvarado - Print Office
Jim Bachraty - Classroom Technology Services
Sabrina Fennell - Academic Support Services
Greg Ford - Physical Therapy
Mary Fox - Education Off-Campus Programs and CIEL
John Frederick - Executive Leadership & Change
Sherrie Gustas - Office of the President and Board of Trustees
Colleen Kashino - Psychology
Felice Koenig - Visual & Performing Arts
Chris Malik - Student Activities
Margaret Mazzone - Physical Therapy
Yolanda Morris - Enrollment Management
Doris Murphy - Academic Affairs
Kim Pagano - Orientation & Student Leadership
Laura Sommer - Visual & Performing Art
Peter Siedlecki - English
Joyce Strobel - Publications
John Suckow & Ryan Richardson
- Daemen Dining Services
Robert Waterhouse - Visual & Performing Arts
Tom Wojciechowski - Web Communications
Brenda Young - Global/Local Sustainability, Natural Sciences
John Zaepfel - Academic Computing

Student Editor Program Book

Emily Stoll, B.A. English/Communications, 2013

Student Proposal Logistics Review

Amanda Smith, B.S./R.N. Nursing, 2016

Special Thanks To

Brenda Rosen, Conferences & Events and Liz VanDeusen, 2015; Printing Office staff, Classroom Technology Services, Daemen Dining staff and Maintenance staff

Academic Festival T-Shirt Design

Erin Hutchinson, B.S. in Art, minors in Graphic Design, Painting, and History, 2013

Design for Program Book & Poster

Mike Morgan, Joyce Strobel, Elise Wright, Publications

Program Book Managing Editor

Margene Weiss, Conferences & Events

World of Opportunity Wizard

Wow! Did you know business students have endless opportunities for internships?

Our Business students interned at all sorts of companies, from M & T Bank and Fisher Price to New Era Caps and the Buffalo Sabres.

Start Your Journey Now

Front Cover

2013 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

GRAVEYARD, Oil Paint
Kimberly Cox, BFA in Painting, 2015

Back Cover

2013 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

DISTANCE, Colored Pencil
Leanna Lehman, B.S. in Visual Arts Education, 2015

Student Workers

STUDENT EDITOR PROGRAM BOOK For 2012 and 2013

Emily Stoll
B.A. English/Communications, 2013

STUDENT PROPOSAL LOGISTICS REVIEW

Amanda Smith
B.S./R.N. Nursing, 2016

FESTIVAL T-SHIRT DESIG

LUMINOSITY, photogram
Erin Hutchinson

B.S. in Art, minors in Graphic Design, Painting, and History, 2013