Daemen College Academic Festival

A Celebration of Academic Achievement, April 16, 2014.

The Daemen College Academic Festival 2014, our fourteenth year, brings us together on campus to celebrate the academic and creative achievements of Daemen students. The Academic Festival centers on student presentations to the campus and community, providing a showcase for academic achievement and excellence through student and faculty presentations, exhibitions and performances. These presentations may reflect work done in a single discipline or be interdisciplinary in nature, and include posters, papers, panel discussions, exhibits, and videos, artistic, musical or theatrical performances. The Festival Program contains the schedule and the abstracts for all presentations. We are deeply appreciative of the level of student involvement in this Academic Festival 2014.

We are also appreciative of faculty support for this endeavor. Faculty sponsors have worked with students through teaching, research projects, study abroad experiences and encouragement in their proposals. We hope you will experience the exciting and insightful ideas generated through their scholarship.

The members of the planning committee have worked very hard over the past year to make this 2014 Academic Festival a success.

Literary and Legal Scholar Stanley Fish

Stanley FishDr. Stanley Fish is considered one of the leading public intellectuals in the United States and a world-renowned literary theorist and legal scholar.

Currently serving as Floerscheimer Distinguished Professor of Law at Cardozo Law School, Fish is a regular contributor to “The Opinionator” blog for the New York Times. His divisive perspectives on culture, language and the law have captured the attention of a wide range of readers, from scholars to the general public.

Read More »

Presentations

Breastfeeding and the Risk of Childhood Obesity

Danneil Aitcheson
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:45 am - 12:00 pm
Business Building 107/109

Globally, the number of obese children has increased rapidly since the 1970s. A number of research studies have investigated prevention strategies as well as etiology. Recent research has included the role of breast milk consumed during infancy in preventing obesity later in life. This research is a secondary review of the literature to determine if breast milk consumed during infancy is protective of the development of obesity later in childhood. Additional factors affecting risk of obesity, such as duration of exposure to breast milk as a primary nutrition source compared to a combination of formula, pureed food, and breast milk will be discussed.

Efficacy of Surgical and Ultrasound Debridement in Patients with Chronic Wounds

Lindsey Nowak
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
3:00 pm - 3:15 pm
Business Building 107/109

The prevalence of chronic wound cases is increasing, and care for chronic wounds has expanded into other fields of medicine, such as Physical Therapy. Research as to the most effective standard of treatment is ongoing. The initial step in treating a wound is often debridement of the wound bed. Surgical and ultrasound debridement are two widely practiced forms of wound debridement. The present research will evaluate the two methods of wound debridement by a secondary review of research studies. Results of safety and efficacy of chronic wound healing progression using both surgical and ultrasound debridement procedures will be provided.

A Comparison of the Italian and U.S. Health Care Systems: A Physical Therapist's Point of View

Raechel Bugner, Emma Yingling
Faculty Sponsor: Theresa Kolodziej
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenck 202

This presentation will highlight key similarities and differences between the Italian and U.S. health care systems with specific references to the Physical Therapy profession. Our presentation is intended to inform the audience regarding the Italian National Health care system, and the pros and cons that go along with such a program, based on our experiences working in both U.S. and Italian rehabilitation facilities. Some of the information presented was gathered through direct observations of Physical Therapy services in Italy as well as discussions with Italian health care providers.

A Nursing Student’s Experience In Archaeology

Amanda Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Brian Hammer
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Center for Visual & Performing Arts (CVPA) 20

A liberal arts education offers opportunities for students to pursue interests inside and outside of their field of study. As a nursing student I have a passion for working with others and caring for those in need. However, there is more to me than my major. I am also interested in archaeology, and during the summer of 2013 I was given the opportunity to travel to the Greek island of Crete to volunteer for an archaeological excavation at the ancient Minoan town of Gournia. Although I was the only nursing student among a majority of classicists, anthropologists, and art historians, I was able to contribute by applying many skills I acquired at Daemen. This presentation provides a brief history of the site and what a day on an archaeological excavation is like. It also demonstrates the value of pursuing other interests and the valuable learning experiences that result.

Analysis of the Successes of Worksite Wellness

Nicole Donofrio
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
1:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Business Building 107/109

Throughout the last decade the concept of "worksite wellness" has become mainstream, especially among large corporations. Despite the popularity and the growing number of programs, the question remains: Do worksite wellness programs work? Are the benefits of the initiatives worth the investment? The 'potential' benefits of a worksite wellness program can be many, including less absenteeism, greater employee productivity, increased satisfaction among employees with employer and greater quality of life. This presentation will review the literature on outcomes of worksite wellness programs, in addition, the wellness programs offered at corporations such as Google and Johnson and Johnson, which have been in covered in the media for their successes will be discussed. 

CANCELLED: Efficacy of Silver Dressings in Physical Therapy Wound Care

Angela Sikora
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
2:45 pm - 3:00 pm
Business Building 107/109

Daemen College Physical Therapy Wound Care Clinic provides clinical services to those within the Western New York community. Chronic wounds continue to be a growing public health concern, especially within the aging population. Not only can wounds be difficult to treat, but very costly and time intensive. According to several research studies conducted over the last two years, one of which used silver dressings for wound care, silver dressings have been shown to treat chronic wounds effectively. The present research provides information on the treatment of chronic wounds using silver dressings. This presentation will provide information on the efficacy and safety of silver dressings for wound care along with some background information of the etiology, risk factors, and other treatment options for patients with wounds.

Cardinality of Sets

Elizabeth Spahn
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

Cardinality is the measure of the “size” of a set, or the number of elements it contains. The set S={0,1,2,3} is countable and has a cardinality of 4. But what does it mean to be countable? A set such as S is finite, but what happens when there are infinitely many elements? This research looks for a one-to-one correspondence between the elements of the set and the natural numbers, ℕ. The set of all rational numbers ℚ and the set of all real numbers ℝ both form infinite sets. However, it will be shown that ℚ forms a countably infinite set whereas ℝ is uncountable. This leads to the exploration of the peculiar concept of the different sizes of infinity.

Classic and Contemporary Criticism of Culture and Literature

Molly Stroka, Christina Lee, Maverick Cummings, Thomas Wilkie
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Morace
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 101

How Bruce Springsteen controls the discourse in accordance to the election cycle in the new millennium. Feminist criticism of Moll Flanders and the Wife of Bath and how each author provided a survival guide for women who have fallen on hard times. Harry Potter is often placed on a pedestal by readers because he is the hero. A psychoanalytical examination of Harry Potter in The Order of the Phoenix will show his many psychological problems and show he may not belong on that pedestal. An examination of Mr. Rochester’s women in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea and the way that patriarchal societies, in which the stories are set, shape the women and their fates.

Comparing The Use Of Fish Oils And Statins To Reduce High Cholesterol

Ashley Pinette
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
1:15 pm - 1:30 pm
Business Building 107/109

This secondary review compares the use of statins and fish oil for the treatment of high cholesterol. The overall effectiveness to reduce cholesterol, side effects with each form of treatment, and the cost and accessibility will be compared. Studies show that both statins and fish oils are effective in lowering total cholesterol as well as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol significantly. These studies also show that statins have a greater number and higher severity of side effects compared with fish oils. Statins are routinely prescribed by physicians to patients with elevated cholesterol levels; however, fish oils may be just as effective, less costly and associated with fewer adverse effects.The results of this investigation will be presented.

Daemen’s Green Buildings: Testing their Claims

Kenzie Reynen, KrisTina Poole, Julia Roetzer, James Stumpf, Yun Liu, Xiao Yang
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
RIC 120

NOTE: Faculty Co-Sponsor David Lanfear   Two of Daemen’s buildings, the Research and Information Commons (RIC) and the Visual and Performing Arts Center, have received LEED Gold certification for their design and construction. These awards recognize the innovative strategies used in these buildings to conserve energy, create welcoming spaces, and minimize negative environmental impacts. For example, the RIC was designed with a south-facing facade to allow winter sun to help warm the building, but shade the interior from the heat of summer sun. Students in the Green Buildings Course are using several building science instruments to investigate whether the buildings are functioning as designed.

Developing an Entrepreneurial Idea

Thomas Wilkie
Faculty Sponsor: Daniel Shanahan
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 120

Effectiveness of Assisted Outpatient Treatment

Nicole Bauder
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Wick 113/115

Assisted Outpatient Treatment is a court order that requires non-compliant patients with mental illness to follow treatment. Many states in the country implement assisted outpatient treatment effectively to prevent those who suffer from mental illness from harm to themselves and others. This presentation examines the states who currently lack these statutes and advise enactment of effective use of assisted outpatient treatment laws. I will utilize New York States assisted outpatient treatment law, known as Kendra’s Law, and its success across the state. The specific statute is N.Y. Mental Hyg. § 9.60 (McKinney, 2013).

Effects and Outcomes Associated with Pitocin Induced Labor

Cherrelle Brown
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
12:00 pm - 12:15 pm
Business Building 107/109

Oxytocin is a natural hormone produced in a woman's body which causes uterine contractions during labor. Pitocin is the synthetic form of oxytocin, generally used to induce, or to augment (speed up) labor. However, contractions created by Pitocin are different compared to the body's natural contractions in both strength and duration. A secondary review of the literature was performed to investigate the health effects of Pitocin on a women and her fetus. I hypothesized that Pitocin induced labor leads to adverse maternal health outcomes. This research investigated the risk of cesarean section following induced labor, abnormal fetal heart rate/distressed fetus, and whether Pitocin impacts the infant-materinal bond in the hours post delivery.

Effects of Bisphenol A on Reproductive Health

Hollie Kishel
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
2:00 pm - 2:15 pm
Business Building 107/109

Various chemicals have been known to act as endocrine disruptors. Previous research has shown that Bisphenol A, a weak chemical with estrogenic activities, acts as an endocrine disruptor when present in the body in even small levels. Humans are exposed to Bisphenol A daily as it is used in many consumer products such as plastics and linings of food and beverage containers. Associations between exposure to BPA and adverse health implications have been established. The current research is a secondary review of the scientific literature to examine the effect of exposure to Bisphenol A and the association of decreased reproductive function in both men and women. In addition, the role of BPA in the promotion of cell proliferation that can result in various cancers will be explored.

Efficacy and Possible Contraindications of the Malaria Vaccine Among Pregnant Women and Young Children in Sub-Saharan Africa

Ashley Nesselbush
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
1:30 pm - 1:45 pm
Business Building 107/109

Malaria continues to be a global health threat in developing nations, especially among pregnant women and young children. While there are several strategies that are currently being used for intervention methods of malaria control, further options for control are in the process of being developed. The use of indoor residual spraying and insecticidal nets continue to be primary preventative measures; however, the development of a malaria vaccine has been the focus of ongoing research within sub-Saharan Africa. Although research surrounding a malaria vaccine is still in its infancy, I hypothesize that the benefits of a malaria vaccine outweigh the associated risks and potential side effects. A secondary review of existing literature is being presented and results discussed.

Efficacy of Asthma Treatment in Children

Tracey Pamphile
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:00 am - 11:15 am
Business Building 107/109

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways. It is a reversible airway obstruction, occurring among eight to ten percent of the population worldwide. Patients with asthma have an airway hyper-responsiveness and an increase in airway smooth muscle cell mass. The main choice of therapy for asthma patients is B2-adrenergic agonists. Racemic albuterol has been the drug of choice for short acting bronchodilator for many decades, but since the development of levalbuterol, there is the question of which drug is a better choice for therapy. The efficacy and safety of levalbuterol verses racemic albuterol as treatment for children with asthma will be investigated . Results will be discussed.

Encryption Cracked: Behind the Code

Taylor Heinold, sam schaefer, whitney seaner
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

This presentation focuses on the development, theory, and application of encryption. Encryption was used as early as the time of Julius Caesar (100 B.C.- 44 B.C), who used a cipher to send protected messages to his military. Modern encryption is much more advanced and plays a major role in the security of information, particularly in today's computer age. Encryption can be represented by using modular arithmetic, a technique of coding and decoding. The presenters will explain encryption using math theory and will demonstrate the application of encryption through an executable example.

Entrepreneurship in Action

Pauline Soeffing, Jordan Broas, Juavon Bell, Quniesha Ballard, Shanon Dill, Jonathan Hutchinson, James Regan, Lisa Collier, Meghan Lipinoga
Faculty Sponsor: Pauline Soeffing
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Schenck 202

Students from Entrepreneurship in Action (ENTR 401) will present individual business plan pitches that were developed for this capstone course in the interdisciplinary entrepreneurship minor. Their business model canvases build upon techniques honed in ENTR 201 and 301, utilizing creativity and innovation, creative problem solving, brainstorming, and opportunity recognition. Students will share what they learned by "getting out of the building" and interacting with potential customers.  Join us as student entrepreneurs inspire your creative thinking by presenting their ideas based upon individual skills, interests, and aspirations. You could observe the next great entrepreneur in action!   Note: add additional presenters: Kathryn Boeckel, Christopher Logan, Rachel Mazur, Danielle Peres, Steven Wrzochul, Selina Zaccaria

Facebook: Forever Changing Social Media

Aaron Davis
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 120

Facebook has transformed the social media industry, creating an easy and free way for people to connect through words, audio and pictures. Today, Facebook is the world leader in social media networks. However, this industry is very trendy. The influence of early players in the social media environment, like Myspace, VitalSkate, and CoonectU, have waned. Facebook has expanded its market beyond the original target of high school and college students, connecting businesses to consumers and creating successful revenue streams. Such a commercial and diverse presence may lead the brand to become less appealing to their original audience. Facebook’s challenge is to stay connected to their members while adding value to its main source of revenue, the consumer industry. This study discusses opportunities for Facebook to continue evolving and to avoid being another fallen trend in social media.

ICEA - Animation & Visual Effects

Lucky Prak, Kira Dennis, Aaron Koscielniak, Connie Cartwright
Faculty Sponsor: Ashley Tinkey
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Center for Visual & Performing Arts (CVPA) 201

Join students from the Animation and Story Development Club as they demonstrate the basics of animation production in an interesting and understandable way. Learn what the Animation Department does and how its curriculum correlates with industry praxis. It will be an interactive look at the animation pipeline using the Tri-main studios, student work as visual aid, and walk the viewer through the typical workflow of an animated feature. All aspects of prior production and post-production will be presented. Video and talkback: TRT: 40 min

January 2014 Service Learning in Dominican Republic

Kari Brown, Holly Turano, Felicia Chandler, Katie Nokovich, Sarah Zammiello, Sarah Ramsperger, Nicole Donofrio, Angela Doria
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Center for Visual & Performing Arts (CVPA) 20

A group of eight Daemen students completed a service-learning trip to the Dominican Republic. We spent our time in Santo Domingo being immersed in the culture by staying with host families; taking Spanish language, dance and cooking classes, along with exploring the historical landmarks of the city. We also worked directly in HIV/AIDS infected communities in Hato Mayor/El Seibo installing water filters and building community gardens. Our presentation includes our experiences, both cultural and educational, and the impact this service learning has had on our group as well as the local communities served in the Dominican Republic.

New York State Teacher Preparation and Assessment

Allison McAdoo, Nicole DeLiberis
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenck 202

This presentation will discuss edTPA New York State teacher preparation and assessment for teacher candidates. New York State teacher candidates will benefit from this presentation, which includes application of classroom management, application of standards, examples of using authentic material, and being autonomous in implementing subject matter in any classroom. This presentation will also discuss the challenges and positive aspects of the process of teacher preparation and assessment. This presentation will demonstrate where the candidate's ability should lie before starting student teaching. Attendance is highly recommended for education students in their 1st, 2nd, and 3rd years.

Optimal Design of Downhill Racecar Wheels

Maria McGrath
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

If you had a choice between solid disk wheels, bicycle wheels, or solid, spherical wheels to use as wheels on a racecar, which wheels would make the car go downhill the fastest? By using the laws of kinetic energy from Physics, and the theory of integration from Calculus, this presentation with illustrate the basic relationship between moment of inertia and angular acceleration by concluding which wheel type will yield the fastest speed.

Pesticides and Parkinson's Disease: Investigating the Relationship

Brittany Jensen
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm
Business Building 107/109

The use of pesticides has become a dominant practice across the globe. The over utilization of pesticides has ignited many questions as to whether or not pesticides may be threatening the health of communities. Recently, researchers have investigated the potential association between pesticides and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects the nerve cells in the brain and inhibits the production of dopamine. Numerous studies have associated genetics to be an etiological factor but do not fully explain the onset of sporadic PD. However, several other epidemiological studies have explored whether pesticides are correlation with the onset of PD.  The present research is a secondary review of the scientific literature to further investigate the relationship between pesticides and Parkinson’s disease. Results will be discussed.

Prolotherapy, a New Treatment for Pain Resulting from Common Musculoskeletal Disorders

Mariah Wassel
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
3:15 pm - 3:30 pm
Business Building 107/109

When tissues are injured, inflammation is a common, natural occurrence in the healing process, yet many treatments suppress this response. Proliferation therapy, or prolotherapy, is a treatment designed to produce low-grade inflammation by injecting a mildly irritating substance into the problem area to stimulate tissue repair and pain relief. This presentation will explore the efficacy of prolotherapy to relieve chronic pain and evaluate differences in treatment response for three different musculoskeletal ailments: low back pain, knee osteoarthritis, and tennis elbow. An analysis of existing research was performed and results will be discussed.

Student Research in History & Political Science

Elizabeth White, James Stumpf, Amber Zielinski
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Parshall
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

Three students present the findings of their major research projects in the fields of history and political science. James Stumpf, a political science major, examines the effects of fiscal stress on Erie County Towns and Villages and the pressures facing local governing officials, in his senior research project. Liz White, a physical therapy major and women’s studies minor, explores the history of women in science and medicine from Medieval Europe to the present in her Independent Study Reading Project. Amber Zielinski, a political science major, employs public policy scholarship to explore the role of corporations in keeping effective environmental policy off of the U.S. institutional agenda, in her senior thesis project.   NOTE: Co-faculty sponsor: Dr. Penny Messinger

Sustainable Solutions Using Biomimicry: Transportation Issues

Julia Roetzer, KrisTina Poole, Brett Reckart, Marissa Ward, Max Winterburn, Amanda Schultz, Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
RIC 120

NOTE: Faculty Co-Sponsor: Kevin Kegler. The Sustainable Design Seminar courses will present their response to the 2013-2014 Biomimicry Design Challenge. This international competition is aimed at teams of college students who work collaboratively to apply biomimicry concepts to develop sustainable and innovative design solutions to real-world problems. This year’s theme is transportation-related, and we explore how we can mimic the processes or structures in natural systems to address transportation efficiency, accessibility, and environmental impact.

Texas T.R.A.P. Law - A Trap for Women or a Safer Choice for Abortion?

Kristen Higgason
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Wick 113/115

This review examines Tex. Health & Safety Code Ann. § 171.0031 (Vernon 2013) that was enacted July 18, 2013 and went into effect October 29, 2013. This section requires a physician providing an abortion to have admitting privileges at a hospital within 30 miles. This particular section is part of what is known as a TRAP (Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers) law. This review further examines if this specific section violates a woman’s right to privacy. I hope to discover if sections like this are in violation of the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment, or if they truly do make abortion providers safer for women.

The Effect of Black Carbon on Cardiovascular Health

Kelly Stypa
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
1:45 pm - 2:00 pm
Business Building 107/109

Black carbon is an environmental air pollutant that has a negative impact on human, animal, and ecosystem health. Black carbon is emitted directly into the atmosphere from mobile and stationary sources. Though mobile sources would seem a temporary problem, chronic daily exposure to black carbon, and other fine particulate matter, have a cumulative effect on health outcomes. As people age, the body begins to function less efficiently, leaving the body more susceptible to pathogens and toxins. Elderly persons are particularly susceptible to the compounding effects of black carbon. This systematic review evaluates the current literature regarding black carbon exposure and cardiovascular health of the elderly population.

The Effects Of Creatine Supplementation On Body Composition And Strength

Robert Mowery
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm
Business Building 107/109

Athletes and bodybuilders are constantly seeking improvements through supplementation such as creatine monohydrate. Derived from amino acids, creatine increases phosphocreatine (CP) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) energy stores; therefore, the potential training workloads will increase. Current research will provide information in regards to the beneficial and safe impact creatine supplementation exhibits on human muscle. The purpose of this study and presentation is to demonstrate that oral intake of clinical doses of creatine monohydrate will result in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and strength when combined with resistance training. Also, creatine supplementation is associated with a reduction of body fat. A meta analysis of research was performed and results will be discussed.

The Efficacy of Antibacterial Treatment or Non-Treatment on Otitis Media in Pediatrics

Katie Kosis
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:15 am - 11:30 am
Business Building 107/109

The recurring onset of Acute Otitis Media (AOM), or middle ear infection, accounts for the leading cause of pediatric illness visits in the United States during the first three years of life, subsequently following a viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI). Disease pathogenesis suggests a direct correlation between the viral onset of URI and the increased risk of bacterial infection within the middle ear, distinguishing AOM as a polymicrobial and multifactorial disease. Commonly, the viral-bacterial interactions have previously suggested the recommendation of antibiotics for pediatric patients demonstrating significant signs of distress. However, in 2013, the American Academy of Pediatrics reestablished the recommendations restricting antibiotic overuse in pediatric patients, and advocated for further diagnostic testing and clinical assessment prior to treatment outcomes. The present research is a secondary review of the scientific literature to investigate if supportive therapy is as effective as antibiotic medication for the treatment of AOM. Results will be discussed.

The Efficacy Of Infant Massage In Reducing Postpartum Depression

Jemila Grant
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
12:30 pm - 12:45 pm
Business Building 107/109

Postpartum depression is a common mental condition that inhibits mother-infant interaction and negatively affects maternal self-esteem. Infant massage provides beneficial outcomes for infants and mothers through relaxation, stimulation, and bonding between the mother and infant. This meta-analysis explores the benefits of infant massage as an intervention to improve mother-infant interaction and consequently reduce postpartum depression amongst mothers. The practice of infant massage by depressed mothers improves maternal understanding of baby cues and increases maternal confidence due to the infant feedback and connection with their mother. Different mechanisms of infant massage influence mother-infant interaction and produce beneficial outcomes. Through analysis of various studies and research, it is expected that infant massage will be an effective alternative intervention for postpartum depression amongst mothers.

The Evolution of Promotion through Social Media

Rasheedah Muhammad, Jenna Wright
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Morace
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
RIC 101

Recently Facebook celebrated ten years of operation. During that decade Facebook evolved from a social site for college students to a site for everyone, including celebrities, business owners, and public figures. What does this say about the movement of social media? It says, that use of social media is a tool for promotion, if handled with skill. This presentation explores the evolution of promotion through social media. One presentation focuses on the promotion of movies, and the other focuses on the promotion of sex education.

The Experience of African Americans at Predominately White Institutions

Brittany Scott
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Schenck 202

African American college students attending Predominately White Institutions (“PWI”s) have faced a number of challenges ranging from experiences of racism or discrimination on campus or in surrounding areas, feeling isolated from the college community, not developing a sense of belonging, as well as securing lower grade point averages (GPAs), and having lower retention rates when compared with their Caucasian peers. This study seeks to discover some of the key factors that affect black student success at PWIs. For the purpose of this study, success will be defined by how well the students perform academically, how comfortable they feel at the school, and whether or not they complete their degree. Qualitative and quantitative data will be gathered from local college students and analyzed. A series of recommendations for improving the experience of African American students at PWIs will be made based on the study’s conclusions.

The Relationship between Obesity, Polycystic Ovary Disease and Fertility

Tanisha Lorquet
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:30 am - 11:45 am
Business Building 107/109

Obesity has a negative impact on overall health and is a risk factor for a number of chronic health diseases, including Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS). PCOS has been linked to fertility issues in women. A secondary analysis of the literature was performed to determine the relationship between obesity, PCOS, and infertility. This presentation will discuss the risk factors for PCOS and fertility problems, the role of obesity, and other contributing factors to the conditions.

The Riemann Integral vs The Lebesgue Integral

Joseph Currier
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
10:30 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

This presentation examines a few different integrals. The Riemann integral is the most general, the most common and the most known. The presentation focuses on two different types of integration that have various applications to mathematics.

The Uganda Project

Ashley Nesselbush, Regina Mowry
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Center for Visual & Performing Arts (CVPA) 20

This presentation provides an overview of the work we completed during our journey to Kyotera, Uganda, in addition to discussing local poverty and health disparities. The focus of our work was delivering HIV/AIDS health education workshops to the school children at Bethlehem Parent School (BPS) and Orphanage in order to address the local public health problem that plagues a large percentage of the population. Daemen College played a substantial role in donating many supplies, including solar lights and clothing, that also benefited these children at BPS. We traveled halfway across the world and would like to share with you our life changing experience, beautiful photos, and personal reflections.

The Use of Artificial Nipples and its Effect on Breastfeeding

Meagan Ford
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
12:15 pm - 12:30 pm
Business Building 107/109

The use of breastfeeding as a primary method to nourish infants has decreased since the 1960s. Artificial nipples (bottle-feedings, pacifiers, and nipple shields) have been perceived to have a negative effect on breastfeeding and early weaning. According to several research studies, artificial nipples can cause the phenomenon of “nipple confusion.” The present research provides information on the usage of artificial nipples and effect on the breastfeeding process. The World Health Organization/Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative provides accurate steps and recommendations on breastfeeding to maximize the experience. The goal of this meta-analysis is to determine if artificial nipples impact breastfeeding outcomes. The hypothesis is that the use of artificial nipples contributes to a negative effect on breastfeeding. Results will be discussed.

Treatment of PTSD: Exposure Therapy Versus Antidepressants

Kristina Lord
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
12:45 pm - 1:00 pm
Business Building 107/109

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a newly emerging disease; it was not until 1980 that PTSD became an official diagnosis. Posttraumatic stress disorder occurs when a person has been through a traumatic or life threatening experience. Between 5 to 20 percent of military personnel returning from active deployment will be diagnosed with PTSD, most of whom had experienced a combat situation. There are several treatments for PTSD; most common are psychological therapy and antidepressant medications. The present research is a secondary review of existing literature to evaluate if exposure therapy has a greater effect in reducing PTSD symptoms compared to antidepressant medications. Results will be discussed.

Was the Mission That Killed Bin Laden Legal Under International Law?

Dennis Ziolkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Wick 113/115

This presentation reviews the mission that killed Osama Bin Laden to determine if the United States violated international law, specifically the United Nations Resolution 3314, which defines "Aggression" as "Invasion of a state by the armed forces of another state, with or without occupation of the territory." (G.A. Res. 3314 (XXXIX)Dec. 14, 1974) On the surface, this mission seems to meet the definition of aggression, but what other factors contribute to the reasons for the mission that may keep the action of the United States within the bounds of international law?

Water, Water Everywhere: Problems of Quantity and Quality

Katelyn Winkler, Mariah Collett, Victoria Buchanan, Deborah Comi, Cierra D'Amico, Benjamin Damico, Christian Lasal, Sarah Litwin, Nicole Lotta
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
RIC 120

NOTE: Co-presenters: Gregory Miller, Paulman Nguyen, Audrey Ogorek, Easton Osborn, Kishan Patel, Jenelle Putzig, Brett Reckart, Kenzie Reynen, Heath Riehle, Robert Semple, Pasang Sherpa, Stephanie Simard, Marissa Ward, Lindsay Whipple, Katelyn Winkler   Students in the Global Water Issues course will present their community education projects designed to increase awareness about problems facing the waters in this region. Buffalo’s combined sewer overflow system can’t accommodate the extra volume associated with storm events and runoff from paved surfaces. Green infrastructure, encouraged by the EPA and other groups, provides alternative ways of reducing stormwater volume. In suburbs like Amherst, stormwater runoff is untreated and goes into our streams which flow into the Great Lakes. Community awareness helps to reduce the amount of pollutants that enter storm drains, and the projects promote alternative ways of minimizing impact.

World War II and Public Memory in Poland

Caitlyn Ebert, Elizabeth White, Tyler Vanice, Chelsea Sieczkarek
Faculty Sponsor: Andrew Wise
2:00 pm - 3:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

This presentation will discuss several topics related to the memory of World War II in Poland. Topics will include the role of women in the resistance movements, public memorials to the victims of the Nazi and Soviet occupations, and the preservation efforts at some historic sites. The restoration underway in Przemyśl’s Jewish cemetery will also be discussed. Challenges and long-term goals for the restoration and mapping project will be the main focus for this portion of the discussion. There will be time for a question and answer session for students thinking about participating this summer.

Posters

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A Look at Central Mexico and how University Students are Leading the Way to an Accepting Aditude for Gays

Anthony Thomas
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

It is widely perceived that Mexico is a very anti-gay country. After spending two summers and three semesters in Mexico City and Cuernavaca, Mexico, the presenter has observed a more accepting shift in attitude among university students towards gay people. This project takes into account Mexico's past to help understand why homosexuality was oppressed for such a long time. The role of legalization of same-sex marriage is discussed, and how all of this has brought about a more accepting attitude today among the educated youth of Mexico.

Gluten-Free Market Potential - Rich Products Case Analysis

Christopher Logan
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Gluten-free has become one of the major differentials for the food service industry in America. Individuals with celiac disease must avoid a protein that is found in most grains including wheat, barley, and rye. Celiac disease limits their food selections and makes gluten-free consumers extremely loyal to the brands and places that value their by needs selling gluten-free products. Rich Products is one of the nation’s most well-known and respected companies in the bakery industry. This study will evaluate Rich Products' potential to market gluten-free products in restaurants across the United States. The analytical framework will include Rich’s current competition, gluten-free population size, and restaurants' and food service stores' interest. The objective is to determine if Rich Products should invest in gluten-free products, along with a promotional approach to business to business sales.

A Comparison of 3 Different Aquaponic Cultures Using Tilapia and Lettuce

Hillary Baritot
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Aquaponics is the combination of growing plants by hydroponics and growing fish by aquaculture. In a freshwater aquaponic system, plants take up nutrients from the nitrate-rich fish wastewater, and then return clean, filtered water back into the fish tanks. This research study compared three different aquaponic systems to determine which is most effective in terms of water conservation, nutrient removal, and fish growth. Blue tilapia fingerlings, Oreochromis aureus, and ‘Parris Island Cos’ lettuce plantlets were used to test for differences between the media-based technique, the floating raft technique, and the nutrient film technique. Results of the study are used to evaluate the relative merits of the three systems on an industrial scale.

A Flight into the Future of the Aerospace Industry: The Boeing Company

Derek Garigen
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Boeing Company is the largest aerospace company in the world, specializing in the manufacture of commercial airplanes, defense, space and security systems. Boeing has faced many decisions within the airplane manufacturing industry in terms of outsourcing. This research examines Boeing within the aircraft manufacturing industry, as well as the trends in the travel and airline industry. It reviews all aspects of the Boeing Company from its marketing strategy, finances, international business and level of social responsibility. By examining the aerospace industry, the presenter will make recommendations for the Boeing Company's strategic efforts.

A Group Model in Diabetes Management

Wencan Lu
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States (Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2011). Diabetes causes complications in multiple organ systems which can be reduced through glycemic control. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to the group management of diabetes provided by nurse practitioners. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories, including the Roy Adaptation Model, were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

A Review of the effects of Lumbar Traction in Patients with Low Back Pain (LBP)

Carly Sno, Gary Styn III, Alison Gerew, Dan Fingland
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Mechanical Lumbar traction is one of many therapeutic interventions utilized in the management of patients presenting with low back pain (LBP). Due to the heterogeneous, patient specific nature of LBP, different treatment parameters must be utilized to address each patient individually. Unfortunately, lumbar traction is commonly used as an intervention for patients with LBP without regard to each patient presentation. This review of literature will examine the efficacy of lumbar traction relative to specific sub-groups of patients with LBP; appropriate parameters will also be discussed in detail.

A Theory of Acceptance of Primary Care at Home

Jodi Regan
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Primary care provided in the home setting is in growing demand due to an aging population in America. The purpose of this poster is to show a practice-based theoretical framework related to providing in-home primary health care to the home bound patient. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories such as Florence Nightingale’s Environmental Theory and Hildegard Peplau's Theory of Interpersonal Relations, were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

Active Tissue Release

Jennifer Steele, Maria Corio, Olivia Young, Allyson Muehlemann
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

 Active Release Technique (ART) is a treatment utilized for soft tissue injuries in an effort to reduce pain and improve quality of movement. While this modality can be used to treat various populations with soft tissue injuries, the most common subjects are athletes. Soft tissue injuries typically occur from overuse activities affecting muscles, tendons, ligaments, or nerves, which may lead to scar tissue formation. The scar tissue makes regular motion within these structures difficult, which is where ART is beneficial to gain normative function. ART breaks up the scar tissue formation via a combination of massage and movement to the affected tissue. This poster presentation is designed to reveal the literature pertaining to the efficacy of active release technique on various soft tissue injuries where scar tissue has developed. Current research on ART is relatively limited; therefore, efficacy is not definitive. Further research must be conducted to validate the effects of ART.

Acute Effectiveness of Static vs. Dynamic Stretching

Andrew Tonsoline
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

For many decades, static stretching was thought to help performance and decrease the chance of injury. Currently, however, dynamic stretching is becoming more popular in the athletic and general population. Dynamic stretching is a type of stretching while moving, using slight momentum. This type of stretching not only helps a person’s coordination, but also has a positive acute effect on physical function. The present study is a secondary review of the literature to examine if dynamic stretching has greater effectiveness on flexibility and physical or athletic performance than static stretching. A comparison of the safety of the methods was investigated and results will be discussed.

An Investigation to Determine Whether Relationships Exist Between Focused Coping Strategies and Emotional Responses Following Major Life Stressors

Kara Dudek
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The belief that gains result from a stressful event is known in the Psychological literature as benefit finding (Affleck & Tennen, 1996). Some studies suggest that benefit finding leads to better overall mental health, where others suggest it may be related to negative coping strategies such as avoidant and intrusive thoughts about a stressor. Such strategies are assumed to lead to poorer mental health outcomes, but they instead may reflect underlying cognitive processes that could lead to better mental health outcomes. To investigate this possibility, undergraduate students who reported a major life stressor in the previous 5 years were asked to report on avoidant and intrusive thoughts related to the stressor (Weiss, 2007), benefit finding (Tomich, Helgeson, & Vache, 2005), and current mental health status (Radloff, 1997, as cited in Rush, First, & Blacker, 2008). Data were analyzed using multiple regression to determine whether the presumed negative coping strategies and benefit finding were positively related to current mental health.

Analysis of Totem Poles in Pacific Northwest Culture

Caitlin Clarkin
Faculty Sponsor: Blake Thurman
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This is an Honors project contracted for Anthropology 210 that will take an in-depth look at the artistic representation and cultural context of totem poles in Pacific Northwest Coast Native American cultures. Three miniature totem poles will be constructed from clay representing the specific uses and meaning of totem poles. In the poster prominent religious and symbolic figures will be discussed, along with general artistic motifs characteristic of the culture.

Barriers Affecting MOLST Form Completion

Teresa Snyder
Faculty Sponsor: Virginia Hart
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster presentation communicates the results of the research thesis topic of MOLST. MOLST is an acronym for medical orders of life sustaining treatment. Completion of a MOLST form allows seriously ill people the choice to decide what medical treatments or procedures they wish to receive at the end of life. This research thesis examined several factors as potential causes of poor rates of MOLST form completion in healthcare settings. Nurse practitioners were surveyed on the barriers affecting timely MOLST form completion such as lack of reimbursement, lack of time, lack of education, inability to talk about death, and an overly lengthy and burdensome form. In depth MOLST form education for all healthcare providers and the community is recommended and will increase the use of the MOLST form.

Barriers and Facilitators to Nurse Practitioners' Provision of Exercise Counseling in the Primary Care Setting

Paula Leszak
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Lou Rusin
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The goal of this study is to identify existing facilitators and barriers, coupled with potential facilitators, through the in-depth interview of Nurse Practitioners who practice in the primary care setting. This project will ascertain the barriers and facilitators associated with the provision of exercise counseling, and will explore which methods have been successful. An action plan will be developed to minimize identified barriers while maximizing the use of identified facilitators. The benefits of exercise are well established and yet only about half of providers offer exercise counseling. An active lifestyle that includes aerobic exercise is associated with health and well-being, while a sedentary lifestyle is associated with obesity, hypertension, depression, cancers, loss of functional capacity, and possibly dementia. Considering the illnesses associated with a sedentary lifestyle, the growth of the elderly population, and the soaring cost of healthcare, efforts to understand exercise counseling from the Nurse Practitioner’s perspective are a worthwhile endeavor.

Beating the Craft Out of Craft Beer

Nathan Schultz
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There is a new trend sweeping consumer beer drinkers worldwide: craft beer. Craft beer has been around for hundreds of years but has recently gained popularity due to its high alcohol content and assortment of tastes and flavors. Craft beer is made by small breweries in limited quantities. This provides a challenge for big corporations such as Anheuser Busch. In order to remain competitive, it is essential that Anheuser Busch combat this growing segment of craft beer with a combination of marketing, management, operations, finance and strategic planning. This research will outline the steps necessary to win over craft beer consumers.  

Benefits of Palliative Care at the End of Life

Brenda Fix
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Death and dying is part of the cycle of life . Palliative care involvement at the end of life is beneficial to patients and families. The purpose of this poster presentation is to present a practice-based theoretical framework to demonstrate the benefits of palliative care at the end of life. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

Bite-Force Performance in Australian Skinks

David Meadows
Faculty Sponsor: Domenic D'Amore
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Bite-force remains an undervalued aspect of science that can shed insight into ecological variation and morphological evolution. The purpose of this research is to investigate biting performance within Australian skinks, and to see if there is a correlation between bite-force and intrinsic structural factors such as body mass and morphology. Although much is known about the general ecology of skinks, there is little existing data in regard to their structural or mechanical properties. Research was conducted at El Questro Wilderness Park in the Kimberley region of Western Australia. Bite-force measurements were obtained from 37 of 48 wild caught skink specimens. Regression analysis demonstrates that bite-force performance was highly correlated with body mass independent of species. This study provides the groundwork for standardized studies of bite-force and morphological variables. 

Businesses Increase use of Social Media

Kelly Weber
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As technology continues to improve, the ability to access social media increases. This project shows the use of social media contributing to increased brand awareness and brand recognition, whether that increase resulted from ethical or unethical use of social media. Businesses are becoming aware of the increasing popularity of social media and are using that knowledge with the intent to increase organizational success. The focus of the research was how the ethical use of social media by businesses can impact brand awareness and profitability in a positive way. Businesses need to consider social responsibility associated with creating and maintaining social media usage guidelines, accurate information, privacy, consumer trust, and more. The research shows how businesses engage in social media and the respective impact for the businesses, how they should act and react in an ethical manner to be socially responsible at all times to all parties, and how the ethical use of social media aids growth and profitability.  

Clean Money

Tashi Lawrence
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Businesses around the globe face challenges that regularly test their morals and ethics against their desire for more money. Raising awareness about this, recognizing which businesses do not abide by the laws, and publicizing these ethical and moral issues to consumers, encourages organizational responsibility in business culture. Making unethical decisions to maintain economic vitality has become a frequent risk taken, with some decisions being more difficult to make than others. The research focus was whether businesses are disobeying the law because the fines in the short term are economically more efficient for the company than operating in an ethical manner; this leaves other people and resources to suffer. Research was focused on a few well-known companies and if their decisions ultimately impacted the welfare of society and the environment. Many unethical actions and the repercussions were discovered. At times the cause was management being pressured to commit unethical crimes due to financial and economical responsibilities to the company.

Cold Compression

Gardner Courtney, Autumn Zendarski, Connor Taylor
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cold compression, a physical agent used by physical therapists, utilizes a cuff filled with ice water that compresses the injured area, while providing the beneficial effects of ice. During the inflammatory stage, physical therapists may follow a treatment method of PRICE (Protection, Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation), which includes the implementation of a cold compression device to control inflammation. The application of cold compression affects many aspects of healing and protection, including hemodynamic (blood flow), neuromuscular, and metabolic effects. This literature review examines the use of cold compression as an effective treatment for the control of inflammation.

Comparing the Health Issues of Bisphenol A and Bisphenol S

Sarah Sack
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of this research is to identify health effects of a Bisphenol A (BPA) substitute, Bisphenol S (BPS). BPS has a similar structure to BPA and may have similar hormone characteristics such as mimicking estrogen in the body. The present research will review the scientific evidence on BPS to determine if it is a safer alternative to BPA or if it has been linked to negative health effects. Results will be discussed.

Demystifying the MOLST Form for Health Care Professionals & Students

Holly Wasiewicz
Faculty Sponsor: Virginia Hart
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Demystifying the MOLST Form for Health Care Professionals & Students: The Medical Order for Life Sustaining Treatment or MOLST form has caused a considerable amount of confusion amongst the heath care community and general public since its initiation in New York State in 2010. This presentation is meant to help students, and heath care workers alike, obtain a better understanding of the form for themselves in order to provide better information, education, and overall care to the public in the health care setting.

Depression Prevalence in African American Women

Fatoumata Gassama
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

African American women are identified as a group at high risk for depression; in addition, they are more likely to be misdiagnosed, underserved, and under treated. The present research examines existing literature on depression in African American women compared to other races in the United States. The goal of this research is to determine if the causes and risk factors for depression in African American women are different than for women of other races/ethnicities. Factors such as violence, lack of education, poverty, and social support will be explored as well as treatment options and effectiveness. Results will be discussed.

Developmental mechanims of wing color patterning in Hypolimnas misippus, a sexually dimorphic butterfly

Leslie Rosner
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ramos
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

  The butterfly species Hypolimnas misippus exhibits sexually dimorphic wing patterns. The color patterns on female wings mimic those of Danaus chrysippus, a toxic monarch butterfly, protecting female H. misippus from predators, while the males exhibit a different wing pattern that does not have the same protective benefits. We found that when examined in the visible spectrum of light, female H. missipus clearly resemble the monarch model, but when examined under ultraviolet illumination, females display a cryptic eyespot pattern along their hindwings.  In this project, we investigate this wing pattern of female H. misippus and the potential molecular mechanisms of their wing coloration and patterns. We have used immunohistochemistry to investigate the expression patterns of Notch, Engrailed, Spalt, and Cut proteins, which have previously been linked to eyespot formation in other butterfly species and Bric-a-bràc, a protein linked to sexual dimorphic characteristics in Drosophila melanogaster.

Differences and Similarities among Full, Half, and Step Sibling Relationships

Jennifer Karnyski
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This study examined the differences and similarities among full, half, and step sibling relationships. A modified version of the Acquaintance Description Form (ADF-2) and the Questionnaire about Sibling Relationships were used among 111 college students (M=19) to determine the extent of different sibling relationships in areas of relational strength, interpersonal rewards, tension, differentiation, and favorability as well as what makes the participant feel closer or more distant to his/ her sibling. Only 15 participants provided data for two types of siblings, and differences in relationship strength among types were not found.

Different Movement Behaviors of Ocelots

Nicole Richter
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The ocelot, Leopardus pardalis, is a small wild cat from the Felidae family. Ocelots are found throughout South America, Central America, and Mexico, and individuals spend most of their time during the day in trees. Ocelots are mostly nocturnal with territorial characteristics. This study is going to observe the sequence of behaviors performed by a male ocelot in a captive setting at the Buffalo Zoo. I will be specifically recording movement, territory marking, and resting behaviors during my observations. The results of my work will be compared to patterns observed in ocelots in the wild.

Disney and the Video-Streaming Market

Shannon Dill
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As more people rely on mobile communications, there is a large trend for video streaming and mobile movie watching. The growth of the video-streaming market continues to increase and this is an opportunity for large companies to promote their television shows and movies online. Disney is one company that has caught onto this trend with its purchase of almost a third of Hulu, a subscription- and ad-based video-streaming service, in 2011. The presenter will explore the rise in online streaming and determine the opportunities for Disney with Hulu.

Do Adolescent Romantic Relationships Influence College Relationship Satisfaction?

Claire Spangenthal
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of this study was to examine the potential relationship between sexual behavior and current (or most recent) relationship satisfaction using the Perceived Relationship Quality Component Inventory, a Sexual Behavior Questionnaire (developed for use in this study) and an open ended question (also developed for use in this study). Results showed no relationship between the age when an individual begins to engage in various sexual behaviors and relationship satisfaction.

Does Service Learning Affect Students' Understanding of People of Low-Income?

Special Thompson
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Service learning is intended to produce reflection and other educational outcomes (Bringle, Phillips & Hudson, 2004). This project examines whether service learning and reflection are related to students’ perspectives on low income and underprivileged families. Participants in service learning and psychology courses were assessed with the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, Selfism scale and open-ended questions using Steps for Better Thinking. No relationships were found between students’ service learning experience and the outcome measures.

Ecomorphology of Felid Pelves

Nicole Richter
Faculty Sponsor: Domenic D'Amore
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The cat family, Felidae, is a large family with a varying range of habitats and habits. These differences can lead to anatomical differences in different species. Here, we investigate the possibility that ecological or phylogenetic differences correlate with differing pelvic morphologies. Unlike other areas of their anatomy, morphometric studies of felid pelves are non-existent. Fourteen Felidae species’ pelves were collected and photographed from the ventral view. The photographed species show pelvic variation, such as widening and narrowing ilial and ischial lateral margins, with obturator foramen movement. No correlation between size and shape is apparent, indicating that variance in Felidae pelves is related to ecology and not allometry. Pelvic variance provides representation of evolution of each individual felid species based on habits. This variance may be able to be explained by multiple species with running habits have a flared ischium, while those with a tendency to climb have a wider ilium.

Effect of a Plyometric Jump Training Program on Knee Valgus Angulation During a Drop Jump in Adolescent Female Recreational Soccer Athletes

David Santa Lucia, JERICA ADERHOLD, MARK PELLERIN, KEARSTEN RENZI
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Females experience a greater frequency of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprains than do males. While the exact cause is largely unknown, it has been postulated that the increased occurrence can be associated with a variety of mechanical explantations. The mechanical contribution of injury may be related to: Q-angle, hamstrings versus quadriceps strength ratio, femoral anteversion, tibial torsion, foot pronation, and ACL size compared to interchondular notch width. Sportsmetrics, a plyometric intervention program, was developed to enhance muscle strength and endurance along with training the athlete on how to land from a jump or cutting maneuver in an ACL safe position. This program has been implemented to decrease the risk of non-contact ACL injuries in athletes participating in a multitude of sports and rigorous training activities. Sportsmetrics has exhibited success in improving performance, agility, speed, strength, and lower limb alignment in an athletic population. Future research investigating the effects of Sportsmetrics on lower limb alignment in female adolescent soccer players will be conducted.

Effect of Famliy Support in Stroke Patient

Jianing Xiao
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Thirty percent of patients are disabled after a stroke, which significantly impacts their quality of life (Tierney, Mcphee & Papadakis, 2013). Family support plays a significant role in the process of recovery for patients who suffer strokes. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to family support in the recovery of patients who have suffered stroke. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories, including Leininger’s Culture Care Theory, were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

Effect Of Intra-Articular Corticosteroid Injections in Osteoarthritic Knee And Hip Joints

Jessica Reichart
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is a common problem among persons ages 55 and older. This disease causes stiffness in the joints, joint pain, and can be debilitating, leading people to live a sedentary lifestyle. The purpose of this meta-analysisof research studies is to investigate if intra-articular corticosteroid injections in patients 55 and older, with osteoarthritic knees and hips, is a beneficial method to help reduce and manage pain. In addition, positioning of the injections, administration schedule and patient satisfaction with outcomes will be investigated as well as any adverse events associated with corticosteroid injections. Findings will be discussed.

Effect of Pulsed Electromagnetic Energy (Diathermy) on Wound Healing and Tissue Re-sensitization

Joshua Kibler, Matthew Bala, Joseph Gelose, Angela Sood
Faculty Sponsor:
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Wounds and ulcers are common occurrences and complications that can arise as a result of a variety of conditions, disorders, and circumstances. The presence of wounds is often associationed with pain, immobility, embarrassment, and social isolation. Physical therapists may apply diathermy (Pulsed Electromagnetic Energy) as a physical agent for relieving pain, controlling edema, and accelerating wound, soft tissue, and bone healing. The purpose of this analysis of the literature is to evaluate the efficacy of short-wave diathermy on chronic venous and pressure ulcer wound closure and tissue re-sensitization.

Effect of Speed on Functional Ambulation in Children With and Without Developmental Disabilities as Assessed by the Standardized Walking Obstacle Course

Laura McGorray, Katelyn Kivinen, Michele Kujawa, Emily Ohol
Faculty Sponsor: Sharon Held
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Standardized outcome measures are objective tools health care providers use to assess patient’s functional abilities and needs. The Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC) is a reliable and valid standardized outcome tool used to assess functional walking with varying task conditions, physical features, and environmental dimensions. The impact of speed on quality of performance has been piloted with several groups; however, further study is needed to develop reference values and predictors of performance on the SWOC at various speeds. This presentation contains preliminary review/analysis of current literature regarding the SWOC, variability in mobility of children, and aspects of walking speed, providing the foundation for a study further examining these areas for children with and without developmental disabilities. Study results could provide physical therapists with a stronger tool to measure functional mobility at various walking speeds, enhancing outcome planning, and intervention programs in pediatric care.

Effect of Stander Device Use on Muscle Tone in Individuals with Neuromuscular Disorders

Joseph Gravino, Leighann Breuer , Amanda Grace , Bethanie Marchese
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Children with cerebral palsy often present with limitations in function, which are frequently attributed to alterations in muscle tone, muscle strength, and joint range of motion. Increased muscle tone, or hypertonicity, is an increased resistance to passive movements. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) is frequently used to assess changes in muscle tone. One clinical treatment for increased muscle tone is through the use of a stander device, which provides supported weight bearing in an upright position for individuals who are unable to stand independently. Limited research suggests that prolonged standing increases passive range of motion of the weight bearing joints, as well as decreases muscle tone. A decrease in MAS, in conjunction with increased passive range of motion of weight bearing joints, demonstrated a positive effect of prolonged standing both on muscle tone and muscle tone related impairments. The reviewed research reported that a standing program has positive effects on hypertonicity and related impairments. However, there are limitations in the research including population size, use of control groups, analogous outcome measurements, and bias within the design.

Effect of Whole Body Vibration on Knee Extension ROM

Matthew Fitzpatrick, Leslie Davis, Robert Stewart, Jeremy Long
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Stretching is an efficacious method of increasing tissue extensibility to improve range of motion (ROM) and prevent injuries. Whole body vibration (WBV), in conjunction with static stretching, may be more effective at increasing tissue length to improve ROM and decrease the risk of injury. Current research supports the use of WBV as a means to increase muscle flexibility and enhance muscle performance. WBV utilizes a dynamic platform, which produces vertical oscillations to stimulate the neuromuscular system by increasing blood flow and tissue temperature, activating muscle spindles in the agonist muscle, and inhibiting pain. Further research must be conducted to determine if the use of WBV is more effective at increasing tissue extensibility to improve ROM versus traditional static stretching alone. Our research assesses the effect WBV has on increasing knee extension ROM in healthy adults ages 18 to 65 years old, measured in a hamstring 90-90 test position.

Effectiveness of Compression Therapy on modulating Venous Ulcers of the Lower Extremity

Alexander Schuman, Travis Turcer, Kelsey Lewis
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Effectiveness of Compression Therapy on modulating Venous Ulcers of the Lower Extremity Compression therapy is a modality that manages peripheral edema and venous insufficiency of insulted tissues. It is commonly used in the treatment of venous ulcerations. Compression therapy encompasses many aspects of the healing process including tissue re-epithelialization, lymphatic drainage, and relief of venous pressure. This project is a review of the literature with respect to the efficacy of compression therapy as a potential treatment option for venous ulcers of the lower extremity. If research demonstrates compression therapy to be consistently efficacious for the treatment of venous ulcers, then indications, contraindications, and parameters for treatment will be discussed as well.

Effectiveness of Cryokinetics in Modulating Pain

Sean Rimmer, Justin Kozlowski, Matthew Dorsey
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cryokinetics is a compound intervention consisting of a cryotherapy based modality and therapeutic exercise. Cryotherapy is the application of a cold source (cold pack, ice pack, ice immersion, ice compression, and ice massage, etc.) to superficial tissue. In addition, cryotherapy is administered during the inflammatory stage of healing to provide hemodynamic, neuromuscular, metabolic, and tissue extensibility effects. The overall goal of cryokinetics is to desensitize the injured tissue allowing the individual to return to functional activities faster. This literature review examines the administration of cryokinetics as an effective therapeutic modality with pain modulation.

Effectiveness of Cryotherapy in Modulating Pain

Gregory Talbot, Philip Palisano, Dawn Kolovrat, Ethan Dinan
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cryotherapy is a physical agent used in rehabilitation. The hemodynamic, neuromuscular, and metabolic body systems are altered by this modality and its therapeutic effects. Cryotherapy is used to limit secondary injury by modulating pain. This process inhibits the sensory nerve conduction velocity, decreases the patient's pain perception and decreases the rate of reactions associated with acute inflammation to reduce secondary injury. It is important to reduce the risk of secondary injury with cold in order to maximize the patient's functional abilities. This literature review examines the uses of cold as an effective modality to modulate pain.

Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation on Muscle Strengthening

Kevin Stevens, BJ Drozynski, Alicia Palmatier
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation on Muscle Strengthening Electrical Stimulation (E-Stim) is a therapeutic modality that employs electrical currents through electrodes to intervene in a variety of musculoskeletal disorders. E-Stim functions by eliciting a muscle contraction that has the potential to strengthen muscles during training of healthy athletes and rehabilitation of injured patients. Additionally, E-Stim is used to stimulate muscles and nerves weakened following immobilization or surgery, as well as treating muscles that are organically weak. The purpose of this project is to review literature with respect to the efficacy of Electrical Stimulation in regards to strengthening muscle. Parameters relative to the application of the modality will be investigated.

Effectiveness of Low-Level Laser Therapy

Tatum Poell, Matthew Thompson, Mark Fox
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

  Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a modality that uses light beams to alter cellular function. Research suggests that LLLT reduces pain related to inflammation by lowering prostaglandin levels, while simultaneously stimulating mitochondria to increase oxygen levels in the damaged tissue. LLLT offers a non-invasive modality to reduce healing time. This literature review explores the efficacy of LLLT as a modality intervening with a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders. Appropriate parameters relative to the application of LLLT will also be investigated.

Effects of Vibration Therapy on Lower Extremity Flexibility

Laura Favaro, Evan Mazur, Caitlyn Napoli, Michael Nikiel, Robert Stanton
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Favaro
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The purpose of this literature review is to explore the efficacy of vibration therapy to improve flexibility. Vibration therapy is a treatment modality in which a patient stands or places the body part to be treated on a vibration plate. Research suggests vibration therapy may enhance flexibility in young athletes; however, research varies with regard to the most effective parameters and short term and long term benefits of vibration plate therapy on increasing flexibility of tissues. Vibration therapy effects on flexibility have been examined in conjunction with static stretching, vibration therapy alone, and static stretching alone. 

Efficacy of 5-HTP in the Treatment of Depression

Joseph Karikas
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Tryptophan is an essential amino acid found in food, then converted into hydroxytryptophan by the human body. Hydroxytryptophan is converted into serotonin, an important neurotransmitter. A supplement, 5-HTP, has been synthesized from an African plant called Griffonia simplicifolia, which can be taken in pill form to aid in raising serotonin levels in the body. Serotonin aids in brain function and mental health. The effect 5-HTP poses on serotonin levels is promising as a potential treatment for depression. This research is a secondary review of the literature to investigate the safety and efficacy of 5-HTP as a treatment for depression. Results will be discussed.

Efficacy of Hybridized Learning in DPT Students

Melissa Singer, Ahmad Alaiwat, Rachel Ottaway, Cole Sanders
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) is an alternative method for delivering educational material. CAI typically consists of videos or learning modules that require fairly inexpensive audio and visual capturing software to develop. CAI provides students with accessible, self-paced, affordable, and individualized instruction, while resolving limitations of physical lecture space and faculty availability. This project is a review of the literature with respect to acquisition and retention of information utilizing CAI compared to traditional face-to-face instruction in collegiate medical programs. Further research will be discussed regarding the efficacy of CAI's application in a DPT physical agents course.

Efficacy of the Graston Technique on the Treatment of Tendinopathies

James Lanze, Sarah Lang, Haley Bradley
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization (IASTM) is a therapeutic technique that requires clinicians to use uniquely designed instruments to locate and treat soft tissue dysfunctions. A prominent IASTM technique currently used by clinicians is the Graston Technique (GT). Advocates of GT claim that GT stimulates the healing process in tendinopathies by creating microtrauma to re-initiate an inflammatory response. This project reviews the current literature involving the efficacy of GT for the treatment of tendinopathies; appropriate treatment parameters will also be discussed in detail.

Efficacy of Therapeutic Ultrasound for Bone Healing

Ameliah MartinezTiberi, Timothy Connors, Kathryn Moens, Brad Casper
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Therapeutic Ultrasound (TUS) is one of many interventions used to facilitate tissue healing in musculoskeletal conditions. The direct mechanical stimulus and non-thermal physiological effects of TUS has been shown to accelerate the healing process of damaged bone. Clinically, non-union fractures and delayed union fractures may respond favorably to a low-intensity ultrasound treatment. The purpose of this review is to examine the available literature on low-intensity ultrasound treatment regarding its effectiveness and efficiency in treating non-union and delayed union fractures. Additionally, parameters relevant to the management of bone healing will be discussed. 

El Buen Amigo Experience

Sarah Munella
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

El Buen Amigo houses a small classroom and is the storefront to 80 Latin American groups that work with Santiago Masferrer. El Buen Amigo is a small, unique shop hidden as a diamond in the rough. The tables, shelves, and walls are bursting with bowls, vases, jewelry, and decorations all crafted by hand. Santiago Masferrer’s passion is evident within the shop, but it is a struggle to bring a steady flow of clients. Through my time with Santiago I assisted with his online Etsy shop and began increasing awareness for the store, while developing my awareness of Latin American culture and the Spanish language.

Electrical Stimulation's Influence on Tissue Healing

Connor Smith, Amanda Moore, Nicole Youngman
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation on Tissue Healing (Pressure Ulcers): Electrical Stimulation (ESTIM) is a modality that uses electric current in the treatment of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders including pressure ulcers. In treatment, Electrical Stimulation can be used to accelerate a tissue’s rate of healing. The accelerated healing rate can be observed by decreased wound surface area and wound width. This project reviews current literature with respect to the efficacy of Electrical Stimulation in accelerating the rate of healing. The parameters relative to the application of the ESTIM will also be investigated.

Emotional Stimuli and Residual Working Memory Capacity in Non-Clinical Social Anxiety

Chris Suchan
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Threatening emotional stimuli lead to attentional biases in individuals with social anxiety; faster detection times (Klumpp & Amir, 2009; Moriya & Tanno, 2011; Pishyar, Harris, & Menzies, 2004; Weiser & McTeague, 2012) and slower disengagement times (Buckner, Maner, & Schmidt, 2010; Schofield, Johnson, Inhoff, & Coles, 2012) are displayed more toward threatening emotional stimuli than toward positive, non-emotional stimuli. Since utilization of attentional resources reduces residual working memory capacity, it is proposed that social anxiety will be negatively related to residual working memory, to threatening emotional, but not to positive and non-emotional stimuli. The present study assessed social anxiety and residual working memory in undergraduate students. Participants reported social anxiety and were later exposed to facial stimuli having different emotional valences (positive/negative/neutral). Accuracy of the location of faces was analyzed using a two factor repeated measures MANOVA. A Pearson product-moment correlation was also conducted, which revealed whether residual working memory capacity was negatively correlated with social anxiety for each valence condition.

Employers and Students: Do they Agree?

Thomas Wilkie
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

With slow recession recovery and high student debt, finding a job after graduation is more important than ever. These recent events lead to the questions, what skills do employers believe are important? And, have they been satisfied with their recent hires? While there are many reports that reflect employers’ opinions, the same attention has not been given to students. It is not only important to know what employers want, but to know if students understand what employers want. This presentation aims to find if differences in student and employer opinions exist and what these differences mean for students, employers, and education moving forward. This research was completed for a Spanish Senior project and will be presented bilingually.

Ethical Communication within the Workplace

Shelbie Oberther
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Many organizations rely heavily on communication within the organization, with other organizations, customers and society as a whole. This project focuses on whether accurate and clear workplace communication, delivered in an ethical manner, can foster increased organizational success. This research shows that businesses face a challenge to balance specific workplace communication with the level of ethics associated with that communication. The challenge continues as businesses recognize the need to communicate ethically and to manage and resolve ethical issues. Organizations choose to communicate internally in many ways and rates of success have varied. The presenter explores the needs and responsibility of businesses in terms of ethical workplace communication and the consequences associated with all types of communication as an organization communicates with its members. Ethical and unethical communication impacts a business, and an employee’s perspective on ethics is important.

Ethical Competition Between Online and Physical Retail Stores

James Regan
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Contemporary shoppers desire convenient venues with increased technology. Online shopping has become popular among many shoppers who formerly only shopped in physical stores, and also for those who did not or could not shop at physical stores. The focus of research was whether both online merchants and physical retail stores must behave in a socially responsible manner to ensure ethical competition, trust in the marketplace, and sustainable profitability. Research showed shopping habits for age groups and gender for both online and in-store shopping. The reasons why shoppers shop as they do and when shoppers modified shopping habits was also researched. An interview with a retail store manager to learn challenges competing with online shopping was performed. Ultimately, the research shows how online shopping has changed spending habits and consumption levels of consumers, and while it is clear that many consumers have shifted some of their shopping purchases from in-store to on-line, physical retail stores have demonstrated stability and still appeal to many shoppers.

Etiology of GERD

Alisha Harrold
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) has increased over the past several decades. Many prescription and over the counter drugs have been developed to treat symptoms of the disease, however a 'cure' has not been discovered. There have been numerous studies conducted to determine the possible causes of GERD, and the current research will investigate the etiology of GERD by performing a meta-analysis. The results will be discussed.

Evaluating Heart Rate as an Indicator of Emotional Content of True and False Memories

Brett Gorton
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Despite emotion having a clear impact on susceptibility to misinformation (Porter, Spencer, & Birt, 2003), some research suggests that the accuracy of a memory cannot be determined based on the emotional content of the event (Laney & Loftus, 2008). In the present study, self-rated emotionality of, and confidence in, both true and false memories was recorded along with heart rate. Participants were asked to report on the emotionality and certainty of the occurrence of several potentially emotional memories (to form true and false memory categories). At least one week later, participants were asked again about the emotionality and certainty of their various memories. Data were analyzed to determine whether reported emotionality could discriminate the categories of memoires (true/false), and also whether heart rate, as a measure of autonomic nervous system activation, paralleled emotionality as a measure of memory accuracy.

Financial Stress as a Barrier to College Success

Jacquetta Lee, Zaire Hairston
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There are high costs associated with attending college including tuition, housing, books and fees. Avery and Turner (2012) found that Stafford and Federal loans have increased since 2009 as a rising numbers of college students struggle financially to secure their education. There is also an increase in anecdotal reports of food insecurity and homelessness on college campuses. Ellis (2013) indicates that some 58,158 college applicants indicated on federal financial aid forms that they were homeless for the 2012-2013 academic year, which is up 8% from the previous year (53,705). This is still likely a gross underestimate of the number of college students living in cars, motels or available buildings. Drawing on data from local college students, this study will seek to better understand the impact of financial stress (including food instability and homelessness) on college success. Recommendations will be made to college administrators and staff based on the study’s conclusions.    

Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis

Kaley Vazquez
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

One of the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century is water fluoridation. Adding fluoride to the public water supply began in 1945 to prevent dental caries and tooth decay. New research has questioned the safety of routine fluoridation and some studies have found a relationship between fluoride and dental fluorosis, which is the deterioration of the tooth enamel. This research examines the relationship between fluoride consumption and the risk of dental fluorosis, a secondary review of the literature was performed and results will be discussed.

General Electric-- Quickly Becoming an Energy Powerhouse

Alyssa Primavera
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

General Electric has been a leading company in the Industrial Goods sector since 1892. The Energy Management segment of the company has been on the rise in recent years. This segment of the company subdivides into a variety of catergories including electrical distribution, lighting, and power panels. This presentation focuses on the growth and expansion of General Electric's Nuclear Power segment and the future of the Energy Sector. There is also a discussion of  the moral and ethical responsibilities the company is accountable for, and how General Electric can decrease energy costs in the future while keeping the energy distribution evironmentally safe to the public.

Generations in the Workplace

Alexandra Skomra
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Managing multiple generations in the workplace is challenging. My research focus was in order to maintain a proper workplace and to keep the day-to-day operations flowing, management must be able to ethically communicate with employees spanning multiple generations, specifically Generations X, Y, and the Baby Boomers. I discovered the main differences between workers of different generations are gender roles, work ethic, expectations, and knowledge of technologies. My research shows that in today’s workplace management must uniquely relate to its employees using varied management styles to effectively communicate with workers of the Baby Boom generation, and Generations X and Y, to foster a strong, cooperative work environment, which contributes to organizational success. I have highlighted major differences in the attitudes of workers from different generations as they relate to workplace and organizational efficiency, focusing on perceptions and work ethic, including the technological savvy of different generations and the role that plays within a workplace, between coworkers, and between management and subordinates.

Gluten-Free Diets: Is There a Benefit Among Individuals Without Gluten Intolerance?

Erika Rusaw
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As the harmful effects of gluten on those with gluten-intolerance become emphasized within the health and food industries, more people who do not have a gluten intolerance are deciding to adhere to a gluten-free diet regimen. This presentation will explore the current popularity of the gluten-free diet and whether it is beneficial for those without gluten intolerances. Many recent studies have investigated the effects of gluten (or the lack thereof) in the diets of individuals without a gluten intolerance. Through meta analysis, the effects of gluten in both individuals with and without gluten-intolerance will be discussed. Results will be discussed.

Heat Efficacy in Tissue Healing

Casey Hewitt, Samantha Smith, Rachael Banasik, Kelly Miller
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Heat is a commonly used therapeutic modality to provide healing to damaged tissues. Heat can provide superficial and deep tissue healing using various types of thermotherapy such as moist hot packs (MHP), paraffin baths, infrared lamps, ultrasound, whirlpool baths, and diathermy. Through administration of these treatments, hemodynamic and metabolic changes occur to promote tissue healing. For example, heat modalities increase circulation by the process of vasodilation, which provides tissues with ample nutrients, promotes waste removal, and aids in maintaining proper tissue temperature. In addition, heat modalities have metabolic effects such as increasing chemical and biological reaction rates and increasing oxygen uptake. This literature review examines the physiologic effects heat provides and determine the efficacy of using heat to promote tissue healing.

Heat on Tissue Extensibility

Kaitlin Watchey, Noelle Thompson, Dillon Fedak, Megan Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Heat modalities have demonstrated therapeutic effects on tissues by decreasing joint and muscle inextensibility. Examples of heat modalities include ultrasound, moist hot pack, and diathermy, all used in clinics today. These thermal agents aid in muscle relaxation, provide analgesic effects, increase pain threshold, body temperature, tissue extensibility, and pulse rate, and decrease blood pressure. Furthermore, heating modalities are applicable to most age groups and regions of the body. This literature review seeks to examine which modality was most effective in increasing ROM.

How is Cell Phone Communication Related to Perceived Happiness and Security in Romantic Relationships?

Megan Friol
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This study investigated cell phone communication in romantic relationships. Participants (N = 62) completed three questionnaires: The Relationship Rating Form: A Measure of the Characteristics of Romantic Relationships and Friendships; a measure assessing cell phone use, and a demographic measure. I hypothesized that students who were happier and more satisfied in their relationships would use their cell phones to communicate more often, and the content of their communication would include less negative dialogue like discussing serious issues and arguments. The results supported the hypotheses.

How Parenting Styles and the Environment Impact the Development of a Child with Down Syndrome

Jennifer Harvey
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Down syndrome is a genetic disorder that is caused by having an extra chromosome 21. This disorder is characterized by a mild to severe mental impairment. Children diagnosed with Down syndrome have low tone, a shorter body structure, and distinctive facial features. Having a child with Down syndrome strongly affects the family. Parenting styles can have both positive and negative impacts on the child’s development. Children with Down syndrome respond differently than children developing typically to the environment around them. Research indicates that families with moderately directive parenting styles experience positive outcomes for their child's development. This poster explores the critical factors that have a direct impact on the family and the child, such as parenting styles and the environment.

Improving Treatment of Hypovolemic Shock in Pediatric Patients

Caitlin Scheeler
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Over the last forty years, trauma has been the leading cause of death in pediatrics in the Unites States, in large part due to the onset of hypovolemic shock. Hypovolemic shock is a more serious condition for children than adults due to their increased physiologic needs. Several articles were analyzed comparing the diagnostic requirements and the different treatment regiments implemented by hospitals around the U.S., as well as the type of IV fluids utilized. The research showed that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment of shock lead to lower mortality rates. Further research indicated that the use of crystalloid fluid during treatment had lower mortality rates in adults compared to colloid fluid. Additional research into better treatment options specifically geared towards the pediatric patient are still necessary as most research available pertains to adults.

Interaction Patterns Between Mother and Baby Western lowland gorilla

Daniela Getman
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I completed an ethogram (behavioral study) of the Western Lowland gorillas at the Buffalo Zoo. My research investigated the degree of direct physical contact between an adult female and her baby (born in September, 2013). I specifically compared the time of contact when other individuals are within 1.5m, or when they are farther away from the mother and child. My initial observations indicate that the mother increases her physical contact with her baby when other gorillas are within close range (about 1.5 m). As animals in captivity may behave differently from those in the wild, I compared my results from a zoo setting with studies conducted in natural settings.

Investigating Whether a Relatedness, Self-Determination, and Academic Achievement are Associated in College Students

Lineth Santos
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There are a number of positive outcomes in children who report a greater sense of relatedness to their teachers (e.g., Furrer & Skinner, 2003, Skinner & Belmont, 1993). It has also been shown that self-determination is linked to higher achievement motivation and higher grades in children (Deci & Ryan 1987, Ryan & Deci, 2000). It is not currently understood whether these relationships exist in college age learners. The present study attempts to determine if self-determination and relatedness contribute to academic achievement in college-aged learners. Undergraduate students completed self-report measures of relatedness and self-determination. Academic performance was reported by course instructors and was regressed on relatedness and self-determination to determine whether they contributed independently to outcome.

Investigating Whether Moral Disengagement is Inhibited by Negative Affect

Kaitlin Hager
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Moral disengagement acts to interfere with one's moral judgment in given contexts, and thus increases the perceived morality of one’s immoral behavior (Bandura, 1990; 1991). Moral disengagement is enhanced by positive affect, although this effect is counteracted to some extent by manipulations that raise self-awareness (e.g., Vincent, Emich, & Goncalo, 2013). To investigate whether negative affect interferes with moral disengagement, undergraduate students were randomly primed (positive, negative, neutral) by video clips. Half of participants were randomized into a self-awareness condition. They completed measures of moral disengagement and performed a timed number summing task. After, they were asked to anonymously report the number of correct answers for a chance at a monetary reward based on accuracy. Data were analyzed using a 3 (affective state) by 2 (self-awareness) MANOVA to test the hypothesis that participants primed into a state of negative affect would display a decrease in moral disengagement and more honest reports in task accuracy.

Jewish Refugee Scholars Teaching at Historically Black Colleges and Their Perception of the Civil Rights Movement

Matthew Ullery
Faculty Sponsor: Shawn Kelley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

During the 1940s and 1950s many Jewish refugee scholars fled oppression by the Nazi regime and the aftermath of World War Two. Some refugees came to the U.S., and many taught at historically black colleges. They were constantly confronted with the intense racism that their African American students faced everyday and offered a unique perspective, as they had themselves been the second class citizens of Europe. Many of these scholars sympathized with their students and took part in the civil rights movement, having a profound impact on their students and the movement towards racial equality in the United States.

Knowledge About the Long Term Effects of Alcohol Abuse Among Graduate Students

Cristopher Palomino
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ryan
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Alcohol addiction is one of the most devastating and debilitating disorders among the general population. The majority of the U.S. population consumes some amount of alcohol, and it is the most widely consumed drug in the world. About 8% of the U.S. population meets the criteria for alcohol dependence. The purpose of the study is to assess graduate students' knowledge about the long-term effects of alcohol abuse. The study will demonstrate the general knowledge and ideas associated with long term alcohol abuse following completion of a questionnaire. By first assessing the students’ current knowledge about the harms of long term alcohol use, health care providers, mental health counselors, school educators, as well as other professional services, can provide better screening tools, moral support, and organize alcohol abuse awareness events to keep all students well-informed. At least 40 graduate students will be included in the study. Descriptive data summarizing the surveys will be presented.

Legacies of the 1960s: Military Service

Samantha Kaczmarek, Erick Dytche, Caitlyn Grover, Matthew Tanner
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue.   note:Faculty Co-Sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Assimilation and Migration

Christina Auguste, Ashley Fraser, Branily Banggaroo
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue.   Note: Faculty Co-Sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Cold War & Civil Rights

Morgan Zakes, Kaleigh White, , Lizzy Duga
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue.   *Note:Faculty co-sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Gender Roles

Jessica Titus, Elizabeth Pesch, , Kathryn Villar
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue. *note Faculty co-sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Gender Roles

Ja'Niekqua Ashton, Hannah Wolfanger, Tadd Masterson
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue. Note: Faculty Co-Sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Student Activism

John LeMar, Stephen Kern, Grant Goldpenny
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue.   Note: Faculty Co-Sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Legacies of the 1960s: Work and Economics

Kara Koch, Julianna Brnik, Hanna Perillo
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

These posters are group projects created by students in the “Legacies of the Sixties” Learning Community. This Learning Community examines the history, politics, and culture of the United States from the 1950s through the recent past, emphasizing important themes in recent American history while also analyzing how the American film industry has helped to interpret and create the popular understanding of that past. Each group has chosen a major theme or issue and members have contributed to a poster that draws upon class materials, primary document research, oral history interviews, and film analysis to explore that issue.   **Note: Faculty co-sponsors: Dr. Kelley & Dr. Messinger

Measurement of Outcomes for Patients with Centralizing versus Non-Centralizing Neck Pain using Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy

Joshua Butler, Tanisha Wheatley, Ryan Stoltzfus, Nicholaus Salinas
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Literature suggests that physical therapists who utilize a classification system to treat patients with spinal pain demonstrate more favorable outcomes. Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy is one such classification system which uses repeated and sustained end range movements to expose pathology, classify patients, and establish a direction of preference or centralization of symptoms. Direction of preference is a movement to promote a positive symptomatic response and is used to prescribe movement for self management of symptoms to prevent recurrences of neck pain. Centralization is one clinical indicator of directional preference. Centralization is the decrease of the most peripheral symptom in response to movement in the direction of preference. Upon analysis of the literature, in the lumbar spine, centralization is a valid predictor of an effective outcome; however, for the cervical spine, centralization as a predictor for a favorable outcome requires further study.   

Mechanical Cervical Traction

Sara Grana, Kevin Walther, Matt Walsh, Jake Horstman
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Mechanical traction is a modality that expands the intervertebral foramen between each vertebra in effort to relieve neurological symptoms and decrease the amount of compression exerted on the intervertebral discs. Clinically, mechanical traction is used to treat a variety of patients presenting with mechanical neck pain and neurological symptoms; unfortunately, not every patient responds favorably to mechanical traction. The following review of the literature reports on the efficacy of mechanical cervical traction, the patient population who will most likely benefit from mechanical traction, and the appropriate parameters for safe and effective treatment.

Melatonin vs. Ambien for Treatment of Insomnia

Devin Kinney
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Insomnia is a condition that affects millions of Americans. Many different treatments exist for insomnia including the use of prescription and over the counter (OTC) sleeping pills, and a more natural substance, melatonin, which is produced by the human body and helps regulate the Circadian rhythm. The present research is a secondary review of the literature to determine the effectiveness of melatonin as compared to OTC sleeping pills and prescription medication such as Ambien. Safety, side effects, and dependency of each will be investigated. Results will be discussed.

Neural Mobilization as a Potential Treatment for Contracture

Kyle Braunscheidel, Marijke Van Leeuwen, Alyssa Hanlon, Sarah Velarde
Faculty Sponsor: Jessica Wiatrowski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A contracture is described as an abnormal state of muscle shortening as well as joint fixation resulting in structural changes within the joint. Review of current literature, suggests that no single intervention has been proven most effective as a treatment for contracture. Articles cited in this review discuss the prevalence of and various treatments for contracture in nursing home patients. Our purpose is to explore literature that relates neural mobilizations to contracture as a potential treatment method. While a limited number of studies exist showing a direct correlation between these two topics, a small number have proven the effectiveness of neural mobilization in improving range of motion in patients. We believe that further research may support the use of nerve mobilization as a technique to improve and maintain range of motion and function in patients with joint contracture.

Neuromobilizations Compared to Grade IV Non-thrust Manipulations of the Cervical Spine on Reduction of Adverse Neural Tension.

Thomas Romano, Jennifer Seeger, Amber Bonito
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Patients with cervico-brachial pain syndrome commonly exhibit adverse neural tension. Physical therapists may use a variety of interventions to reduce adverse neural tension, two of which include grade IV non-thrust manipulations to the lower cervical spine and upper limb neuromobilizations. This review of the literature analyzes the effectiveness of upper limb neuromobilizations compared to grade IV non-thrust manipulations directed at the lower cervical spine on reducing adverse neural tension. A recommendation regarding which of these two interventions is most effective at addressing adverse neural tension is discussed based on the available literature. Ultimately, future research is warranted to strengthen the advocacy of these treatment options for reducing adverse neural tension.

Observed Grooming Behaviors of Captive Dasyprocta Leporina

Kristen Strobel
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

NOTE: Italicize Dasyprocta leporina in the title I am presenting my ethogram (behavioral analysis) on Dasyprocta leporina, commonly known as the Brazilian or Red-Rumped Agouti. My research specifically investigated the self-grooming and social-grooming activities of a group of six agoutis living at the Buffalo Zoological Gardens. Brazilian agoutis are rodents native to South America and weigh from 3 to 6 kg. They usually live in small family groups with a breeding pair having one to four offspring twice yearly. The young are born precocial and may stay with the parents for more than five months. I compared my results for agoutis in a captive setting with patterns observed for animals in the wild.

Olympic Games 2.0: The Effects of Politics and Ethics on "The Olympic Spirit"

David Schneggenburger
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This project focuses on how unethical behavior and global tensions are ultimately changing the “Olympic Spirit,” the ideal on which the Olympic Games were founded. The presenter gathered, analyzed and compared the opinion of individuals on their beliefs regarding the true nature of the Olympic Games and the nature of the games today. Recent allegations of unethical behavior by athletes, officials and committee members are discussed. The presenter shows that these controversies and escalating global tensions have changed the nature of the event and considers what can be done to make the Olympic Games a beacon of pure sport.

Parents and Coaches as Predictors of Types of Sport Motivation

Samantha Engel
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In sports, motivation varies greatly among athletes ranging from participating for one's self, to participating for rewards such as scholarships, ice cream, or attention from parents. Female soccer players from two different age groups: youth (age12-13) and collegiate (age 18-22) completed questionnaires on their type of motivation and their perceived types of support from mothers, fathers, and coaches. Results indicate that fathers' support is positively correlated with intrinsic motivation to "experience stimulation" and negatively correlated with amotivation (lack of motivation) at the collegiate level. For youth players, differences in effects of parental and coaches' support were not found.

Practice-Based Theoretical Framework Related to Correctly Prescribing Antimicrobial Therapy in Caring for Patients with URI

Ventricia Harris-Victor
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Despite the predominantly viral cause of upper respiratory infections (URI), antibiotics are frequently, incorrectly prescribed to patients by health care providers. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to correctly prescribing antimicrobial therapy in caring for patients with URI. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories, including Lydia Hall’s Core, Care and Cure Model, were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

Problems with Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Forensic Approach

Maranda Kress
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A forensic scientist analyzes different sequences found in DNA. One sequence that can be examined is the Alu sequence, which is 300 base pairs long and repeated around 500,000 times. The PV92 region is included in the Alu sequence that is found on chromosome 16 and is only found in some individuals, making an individual homozygous (1 band) or heterozygous (2 bands). Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is then used to amplify the Alu sequence by using a kit that contains all the components needed. While PCR is used in forensics, the problems that can occur are not well understood. Previous research shows that when there is interference in the sample, one of the bands in the gel electrophoresis product will disappear. While testing the samples collected, one or both bands disappeared. By examining the band that disappeared unexpectedly, the disappearance can be associated with the PCR kits.

Promotion of Health within Personal Relationships

Shanell Lane
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This study explores the effect that attachment to friends, romantic partners, and parents have on exercise, eating habits, and other health behaviors. Participants (N=62) are Daemen College students, who completed three different questionnaires: The Exercise Motivations Inventory, Food-Life Questionnaire, and Behavioral Systems Questionnaire. I hypothesized that secure attachments would have a positive relation to exercising and positive health behaviors. The results indicated that having a secure friendship is related to social reasons for exercising.

Protective Factors of Multivitamins

Taylor Jamison
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Dietary vitamins and minerals are very important for maintaining health. Approximately 50 percent of U.S. adults take multivitamin supplements (Maruti 2009). This research examines if multivitamin supplements are health protective. A review of existing literature was performed to examine the relationship between multivitamins and the development of breast cancer, in particular. It is hypothesized that multivitamins, taken by supplementation, are protective of the development of breast cancer. Results will be discussed.

Public Knowledge of Health Effects of Obesity

Lisa Reno
Faculty Sponsor: Virginia Hart
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Despite efforts made to increase public awareness, obesity remains an epidemic in the United States. Why do we still have high rates of overweight and obese Americans? What does the general public understand regarding the health effects of obesity? The presenter’s thesis research on the general public's knowledge of the health effects of obesity is an attempt to answer these questions. The ORK-10 scale, a knowledge assessment scale developed in the United Kingdom, was incorporated into a survey distributed to 75 participants across the United States online via Survey Monkey. The survey measures general knowledge of obesity's health effects. The presenter used quantitative, descriptive statistics to evaluate the results.

Relationships among Personality, Work Motivation, and Job Performance in a Retail Setting

Danielle Majchrzak
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Multiple studies indicate that conscientiousness is directly related to job performance (Barrick & Mount, 1991; Barrick et al., 2001; Hurtz & Donovan, 2000; Schmidt et al., 2008; Tett et al., 1991). Researchers have also demonstrated a relationship between work motivation and job performance (Grant, 2008; Judge, Simon, Hurst, & Kelley, 2013; Tremblay, Blanchard, Taylor, Pelletier, & Villeneuve, 2009) and personality (Barrick, Mount, & Strauss, 1993; Judge & Ilies, 2002; Judge, Simon, Hurst, & Kelley, 2013). Data were analyzed using regression to determine the extent to which work motivation contributed to the relationship between personality measures and job performance. Employees of a specialty retailer of consumer electronics and computers reported on their workplace motivation and completed the Big Five Inventory personality assessment and the Workplace Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation Scale. Sales revenue (percentage of goal at time of study) was used as a performance measure.  Data were analyzed using regression to determine the extent to which work motivation contributed to the relationship between personality measures and job performance.

Relationships Between Self-Disclosure on Facebook and Narcissistic Personality Traits

Megan Hyneman
Faculty Sponsor: Ellen Banks
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The anonymity of Social Networking Sites (SNS) provides an outlet through which people can freely express themselves. Does the type of environment in which one can choose exactly how he presents himself to others cater more to those with narcissistic personality traits? Previous studies have indicated that narcissists portray a similar persona online as they do offline (Buffardi and Campbell, 2008). This study examines possible relationships between self-disclosure on Facebook, and narcissistic personality (NPI) traits in participants. Results indicate that the combined NPI scores were not related to narcissistic types of Facebook posts, but types of Facebook posts were related to one another.

Retaking the “Over the Counter” Pain Reliever Market: A Marketing Strategy for Tylenol’s Resurgence into the Pain Reliever Market

Brendan Altman-Cosgrove
Faculty Sponsor: Luiz Pereira
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Over the last few years, companies who make pain relievers have faced much scrutiny with their voluntary recalls due to various airborne contaminants and the realization of the dangers of acetaminophen (a common ingredient). These complications have led Tylenol market share to plummet from 48% to 8%. These complications left pain reliever products off the shelves for an extensive period of time. It remains to be seen if Tylenol can regain the top spot in the rapidly growing industry, much like they did after the controversial recall in 1982.

Semestre en México, D.F.

Nicole Deliberis
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster discusses cultural and community experiences during a semester-long study abroad in Mexico City, Mexico as a North American Sustainability Scholar in the Consortium for North American Sustainability (supported by Fund for the Improvement of Secondary Education) . This presentation is bilingual for all students and details my study abroad experience including service learning at Christel House Mexico, a school that prepares students living in poverty for a brighter future. It also details how interactions with colleagues, students, families, and classmates helped make this experience worth so much more than being a tourist and studying.

Short Wave Diathermy For Tissue Extensibility

Joe DellaValle, Kara Engle, Mark Nearhood, Tyler Nolan
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Short-wave diathermy (SWD) is a thermal modality by which high frequency electromagnetic waves induce deep heating to increase tissue length. Some research suggests that SWD, in conjunction with therapeutic stretching, may be more advantageous than stretching in combination with superficial heating techniques or therapeutic stretching alone. Several studies have reported beneficial effects of SWD in respect to elongation of soft tissue and dense connective tissue alike. The following will review the efficaciousness of SWD in regard to its ability to change tissue extensibility; appropriate parameters required to increase tissue length will be described in detail.

Should College Athletes be Paid?

Brandon Hank
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Throughout the history of college sports, athletes have had a significant role on college campuses, bringing visitors to the campuses and providing entertainment for other students; they are also used as icons at the schools. Although many collegiate athletes are compensated with partial or full scholarships for education and boarding, recent debate has surfaced about whether that level of compensation is enough. The research focused on the benefits schools receive from athletes and whether college athletes deserve any compensation if their image is used for marketing or for product sales or inclusion in video games. Different perspectives were uncovered on this topic from sports analysts, present college athletes, past college athletes, and college administrators. This poster dsiplays the ethical nature of schools and the NCAA making a profit from, and not compensating, the collegiate athletes.

Singapore Mathematics Approach: The Impact a Problem Solving Heuristic, the Strip Model, has Upon Students with Learning Disabilities Ability to Solve Story (Word) Problems in an After-School Setting

Taylor Mango, Katie Auge, Jessica Barbis, Ashley LaPorta, Alyssa Serba, Amanda Todd, Holly Tomasello
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Waterrose
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Third and fourth grade students in a local after school program are being taught a mathematical problem-solving heuristic called the Singapore strip model. Twenty student participants receive instruction from graduate assistants who are pursuing their Masters Degree in Special Education. The strip model helps students solve addition and subtraction story (word) problems by drawing a rectangle in order to help them visualize the relationships between the quantities. Students have the opportunity to apply the strip model to solve joining, separate, and part-part-whole problems. The strip model provides students with a visual representation to assist with determining the correct operation to solve the problem. Baseline data were collected using a series of curriculum based measures. Students began the intervention at staggered intervals once a trend in the data was obtained. Intervention consisted of an explicit instructional approach known as "I DO, WE DO, YOU DO."

Social and Emotional Learning

Sarah Verdaasdonk
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is a process in which children learn self-awareness, self-management, relationship skills, responsible decision-making, and social awareness. SEL teaches children to effectively and ethically manage themselves, their relationships, and their work. The skills that are developed through SEL are used in work, family, and community situations. Learning these skills can not only help prevent bullying and violence, but can also affect how and what children learn in school. Research shows that early childhood is the essential time to teach social and emotional skills because children are just learning how to regulate their emotions and distinguish between positive and negative feelings. This stage determines how children will view themselves, others, and the world. This poster explores what social and emotional learning is and why it is important in early childhood.

Social Interaction Among Vampire Bats

Joseph Biddle
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Desmodus rotundus, better known as the common vampire bat, is a small flying mammal living in tropical and subtropical regions. These parasitic mammals feast solely on the blood that they extract from their victims via their razor sharp teeth. Vampire bats are the most social of the bat species. This experiment seeks to discover the amount of time these bats spend interacting with one another. Through observation of the vampire bat exhibit at the Buffalo Zoo, I will quantify social interactions within this species.

Spanish Service Learning in the Dominican Republic

Sarah Zammiello
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster presentation, in Spanish, describes a two-week period spent completing international service learning in the Dominican Republic. The needs of the rural communities (including safe drinking water and the availability of healthy foods in the homes of those affected by HIV/AIDS), as well as how these needs were met in a sustainable manner, will be described. Projects completed through a local agency in the Dominican Republic included building of gardens, installation of natural water filters, and presentations about nutrition and safe water use to families affected by HIV/AIDS. The presentation also includes a brief description of the time spent in cultural immersion through cultural and historical presentations, visiting impoverished, rural neighborhoods, a local hospital, and a tour of the historical zone of Santo Domingo.

Squirrel Monkey Ethogram

Samantha Wozniak
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The New World monkey, Simia sciureus, or commonly known as the squirrel monkey exists in the tropical forests of Central and South America. Although they make great pets and are vitally significant for medical research, the squirrel monkey spends a majority of time “playing." They are extremely active within their given environment. My research is investigating the proportion of time that a group of squirrel monkeys spends playing compared to other activities within an enclosure at the Buffalo Zoo. I will use scan sampling ethogram techniques to determine how much play time these squirrel monkeys experience.

Stadium Concessions: The New Star Power of Selling Tickets

Trevor Hill
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Since the beginning of sport, athletes have shined brighter than the average person, becoming heroes, villains, saviors, and goats. Athletes, and the love of the game, were traditionally the reason spectators would attend live sporting events. Today, fans attend live sporting events for more than just the game; they go for the whole stadium experience. Team owners continue to make the experience better through hospitality features. I researched the need for owners to consider the ethical nature of using concessions to drive up attendance and enhance fan experience at professional sport stadiums. I found concession venues and products offer fans a unique experience at live sporting events, and are a large revenue stream for stadiums. I researched whether ticket sales and attendance are rising and the relationship to concessions. I discovered some extraordinary dining experiences and viewing areas at some stadiums, and that concessions draw customers away from their regular seats to watch the game away from the live action.

Stepping Outside the Classroom

Kelly LoTurco
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In order to fulfill my last requirement for my Spanish minor, I am taking part in a Spanish service learning. I assist in a classroom twice a week at a bilingual school where I work with first grade students who are native Spanish speakers. This experience is extremely educational because it allows what students have learned in the classroom to be put into practice. I’m able to speak directly with the students and the teacher while helping them with their school work. My poster presentation will represent how my Spanish speaking skills have increased through this experience and what I have learned from it. I hope my presentation inspires other Spanish minors to take part in this type of service learning in order to expand their language skills.

Student Loans Hindering U.S. Economy

Casey Sheehan
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reported that outstanding student debt surpassed $1 trillion in the third quarter of 2013. College graduates are leaving school with mountains of debt, and this influences spending capacity and spending decisions, ultimately hindering the economy. This issue needs to be highlighted to promote the understanding of its severity, encourage discussion, and make progress in solving the issue. Colleges and government must be mindful of the ethical consequences for the student debt burden, and be socially responsible in finding solutions to the problem of growing college loan debt hurting the economy. While a college education is valuable, high-paying jobs do not always result, and when income makes it difficult to make a loan payment, college graduates, or parents who are responsible for loan payments, delay purchases such as cars and homes, and delay getting married and having children. These purchases and events are necessary to contribute to economic prosperity.

The "Space-Time" Nursing Theory

Chad Shepherd
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

At times, nurses are required to make split-second decisions in their clinical practice. These decisions must take into account the patient as a whole as well as the environment they are in. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to this decision making process. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory and its development, will be presented. My personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories, including Rosemary Parse's
Human Becoming Theory, were analyzed, evaluated, and utilized in developing the
theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge and implications for practice
and research will be discussed.

The Assessment of Balance in Children Developing Typically

Alexa Amato, Stephen Austin, Gretchen Morelli, Rebecca Wettlaufer
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Balance assessment is an important aspect of pediatric physical therapy examinations, particularly in children with neuromuscular disorders. Efficient and effective dynamic balance is necessary in the performance of functional activities. Standardized outcome tools such as the Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS) and the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (BOTMP-2) are commonly used to evaluate static and dynamic balance in the pediatric population. This literature review compares and contrasts these two tools in a pediatric population. Current literature indicates that females outperform males during balance testing. Limitations such as ceiling effects, sensitivity to functional change, and variability in younger children have been identified using the PBS. Future research evaluating balance in 2 to 15 year olds using the PBS instrument will allow physical therapists to gain an enhanced understanding of typical balance development and may aid in the identification of children with balance dysfunction.

The Benefits of Early Childhood Intervention

Anastasia Snuszka
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Early childhood intervention is a system of various supportive services for infants and toddlers with developmental delays and disabilities. Early intervention programs provide these children with exceptional resources and incredible support in order to help them reach their utmost physical and cognitive potential. Approximately one in six children are diagnosed with developmental disabilities or delays. Targeting these children’s needs before they reach school age can have tremendous positive effects on their physical, social, and emotional development. Infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities who receive early intervention tend to be more successful when they begin school. These children are better able to adjust to primary school and are more likely to be prepared for the challenges that come with their individual disabilities. This poster explores the extraordinary benefits of early intervention and the range of services provided for children with developmental disabilities and their families.

The Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning

Joseph Colasurdo
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will present information about the Consortium for Innovative Environments in Learning (CIEL). CIEL was established by a group of like-minded campuses that share the idea of progressive education. These schools are committed to student-centered learning, with particular emphasis on the interconnectedness between teaching and learning, and each has its specialized fields of study. The CIEL exchange allows students to study at any of the twelve institutions in this collaboration, ranging in location from California to Florida, and New Hampshire to Washington. If a student at a CIEL school cannot find a program at his or her home institution, he or she can apply to study at another CIEL university for up to two semesters at the tuition rate of the home institution. CIEL opens boundaries for students.

The Effect of Bankruptcy

Steven Wrzochul
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Much of the current debate over bankruptcy reform is prompted by the extremely high bankruptcy-filing rate in the late 1990s. Two of the many factors why this rate has increased are debt and fraud. Debtors claim bankruptcy to obtain relief from debt, which will affect society, taxpayers, government, corporate sponsors, and others. This project focuses on how bankruptcy creates unethical situations, and highlights bankrutcy of individuals, including professional athletes, and also of businesses. Data was gathered and analyzed with respect to bankruptcy, the impact on businesses and society, and whether businesses are socially responsible with respect to bankruptcy. Although there are laws in place to guide ethical practices, businesses have the responsibility to engage in actions that provide organizational stability and societal economic stability.

The Effect of Depression On College Students Academic Success

Katie Nokovich, Chelsea Lombardo
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

National research suggests that nearly one in three college students experiences depression so debilitating that it is difficult for the student to function or engage in tasks of everyday life (National Institutes of Health, 2012). As a result, many depressed students disengage by removing themselves from peers, cutting classes, performing poorly on assignments or tests, earning poor grades and ultimately deciding to leave college (Salzer, Wick, and Rogers, 2008). This study looks at the impact depression and related psychological issues can have on academic performance. It also examines the role formal and informal supports can play in mitigating the effects of depression to support college success. Survey data was collected from local college students and analyzed to determine if the use of formal and informal supports makes it easier for depressed students to continue their education. This research is critically important as it may provide needed support for the expenditure of additional resources to address depression on college campuses.

The Effect of Parabens, Synthetic Preservatives on the Induction of Vitellogenin in Poecilla Reticulata

Perolyn Williams
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Gunther
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This study addresses environmental pollutants that concern today's culture. Parabens have been implicated in effects on the body, such as altering gene expression and causing dysregulation of normal basal functions. Exposure to them is nearly unavoidable because parabens are highly used, inexpensive organic compounds. Several studies have shown that they mimic the steroid hormone estrogen. Mimicry of the estrogen hormone causes endocrine disruptions, which can cause unexpected effects on the body. The following hypothesis was tested: Parabens mimic estrogen and will act as an endocrine disruptor in common guppies, Poecilla reticulata. This research has examined for abnormal expression of proteins and physical changes in male Poecilla reticulata exposed to either estrogen or butylparaben. The researchers have been using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, attempting to detect vitellinogen, an egg protein normally made only by female fish. If this protein is detected in treated males, it may provide evidence that parabens mimic estrogen and cause endocrine system disruption.

The Effect of Reduced Ankle Dorsiflexion Range of Motion on Lower Limb Overuse Injuries

Zhujun Zhou
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A total of 29.3% overuse injuries were reported in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005-2008 season. Lower leg/ankle and foot/toe overuse injuries were most prevalent at 16.8% and 6.2%, respectively. Reduced ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) has been suggested to predispose athletes to a variety of lower extremity overuse conditions based on retrospective study. The purpose of the study is to prospectively evaluate whether reduced ankle dorsiflexion ROM predisposes athletes to lower extremity overuse injuries. The hypothesis is reduced ankle dorsiflexion ROM will predispose athletes to a greater incidence of lower extremity overuse injury. Division II athletes without diabetes mellitus, rheumatoid arthritis, or lower extremity injuries that limited them from participation in sports, participated in the study. A bi-plane goniometer was used to measure ankle dorsiflexion. The injury data will be collected at the end of sports season and the association between lower extremity overuse injuries and reduced ankle dorsiflexion ROM will be assessed by using Chi-square test.

The Effectiveness of Electrical Stimulation for Pain Modulation

Krysten Saccocio, Lindsay Welsh, Sarah Leach
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Electrical Stimulation (E-Stim) is a type of electromagnetic modality often used by physical therapists to modulate patients’ pain. The electric currents can be applied to the body in a number of ways; however, the most common method is the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). This process involves high frequency pulses at an intensity below the point of muscle contraction. E-Stim directly reduces pain, and it indirectly reduces pain by decreasing muscle spasms temporarily. This project is a review of literature regarding the efficacy of E-Stim for pain modulation.

The Effects of a Commercial Patellar Strap on Vertical Jump Performance

Ryan Bohn
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

One common injury that frequently affects jumping athletes is patellar tendinopathy; this pathology is regularly treated by using a patellar strap. Patellar straps have been proposed to be effective at treating pain because they decrease infrapatellar fat pad pressure and alter the patella-patellar tendon angle. Although they are popular to treat pain, how they affect functional performance, such as jumping, is not well understood. Previous studies have shown that similar interventions, such as McConnell taping, have increased knee extensor torque, which may increase jumping ability. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of a commercial patellar strap on vertical jump height in recreationally active participants aged 18-30 that are free from current lower-extremity injury. It has been hypothesized that patellar strap application will increase vertical jump height. This crossover study design requires participants to perform vertical jump tests with and without a patellar strap. A dependent t-test with P≤0.05 will be used to calculate the pending results.

The Effects of Exercise on the Neuromuscular and Musculoskeletal Deficits Associated with Parkinson’s Disease

Kelsey O'Leary, Joanne Croos, Courtney Talarico, Lauren Billotti
Faculty Sponsor: Theresa Kolodziej
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This literature analysis examines the efficacy of physical therapy interventions in the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects neurophysiologic function, movement abilities, and quality of life. Much speculation exists regarding whether physical therapy is effective in delaying the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal deficits associated with PD, compared to pharmacological and surgical interventions. A specific exercise program for the unique struggles of this population needs to be identified to improve their quality of life by maximizing function, thereby delaying physical deficits.

The Effects of Health on College Success

Holly Turano, Gina Natoli
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In New York State, only 33% of college students complete their degrees within a four-year period. This is part of a nationwide trend causing great concern among administrators, employers, and families alike. One significant factor related to college success may be the health of today’s college students. While studies have shown that positive health practices can lead to greater self-esteem, stronger relationships, better performance in class, and greater overall life satisfaction among college students, many of today’s students do not regularly engage in healthful behaviors such as eating a nutritious diet, exercising, or engaging in regular self-care. This study examines the role these dimensions of healthy behavior play in supporting college success as measured by Grade Point Average (GPA) and grade completion. Data from local college students will be collected and analyzed. A series of recommendations will be made based on the study’s conclusions.

The Effects of Stander Device Use on Range of Motion (ROM) in Children with Neuromuscular Disorders

Amanda Batterson, Michelle Butcher, Andrew Gawron, Yasaman Razavi
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Priore
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Standing devices are a type of assistive technology used for individuals who cannot stand independently. Standers are used in a variety of populations including individuals with impairments of the neuromuscular, cardiovascular, or musculoskeletal systems. Atypical development leads to mal-alignment of body structures due to the use of repetitive movement patterns with little variability, as well as constant forces overtime leading to breakdown of soft tissues and adaptive shortening of muscle, ligaments, tendons, and joint capsules. The use of standing devices to achieve a prolonged stretch has been implemented in treatment to prevent tissue shortening and to increase range of motion (ROM). This poster details a review of the effects of standing programs on ROM in children with neuromuscular disorders. If efficacy is found, further investigation on appropriate parameters, indications, and contraindications relative to stander device effects on ROM will take place.

The Effects of Substance Use on Academic Success

Raymond Ross, Amanda Miller
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Substance abuse among college students, while declining, is still an issue in the United States today. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), four out of five college students drink alcohol, and among these, half have engaged in binge drinking. Similar studies show that more than half of full-time college students have used or abused prescriptions or partaken in illegal drugs. Decreased academic performance is one of the most common outcomes of this usage. The NIH reports that about 25% of college students have reported academic consequences of their substance use including missing classes, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall. This study examines the effect frequency of substance abuse (including binge drinking, marijuana, and illegal use of prescription drugs) has on college success. Using data from local college students, this study will determine if more frequent users are more likely to experience academic problems compared to “social” users.

The Efficacy of a PT-driven Falls Prevention Program for Community Dwelling Patients

Jeannethe King, Paige Ronca, David Baldanza, Jacqueline Davidson
Faculty Sponsor: Raymond Hammel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

An estimated one in three adults over age 65 fall each year; however, through coordinated efforts of patients, family and healthcare providers, fall incidences may be reduced by 30-40%. Valid and reliable standardized measures may be administered by physical therapists to assess risk and demonstrate treatment impact. Patient self-reported confidence in daily tasks (Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale), combined with balance and functional mobility testing (Single Limb Stance (SLS) and Timed-Up and Go (TUG)) are examples of useful clinical measures. Focus on Therapeutic Outcomes (FOTO) is a computer adaptive test (CAT) that generates a functional score that is valid, sensitive to change, and when combined with clinical expertise, assists in the development of effective and individualized PT intervention plans. The purpose of this research is to determine the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of a PT-directed falls prevention program for at-risk community dwelling adults over the age of 55, utilizing an evidence-based best practice model of assessment, triage, intervention, and outcome reporting.

The Efficacy of Short Wave Diathermy in Bone Growth

Julie Rodland, Travis Enser, Zachery Eustance, Domenick Russolello
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Short Wave Diathermy (SWD) is a therapeutic modality which involves the emission of a high-frequency electromagnetic energy to facilitate tissue repair. Research indicates that cell repolarization and repair occurs in tissues, such as bone, when pulsed SWD is administered. Clinically, the application of SWD may be useful when addressing complications associated with non-union fractures. This project aims to review the evidence relative to SWD and its ability to aid in the regeneration of new bone tissue following a non-union fracture; appropriate parameters will also be discussed.  

The Ethical Nature of Personality Testing by Employers

Natasha Kane
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Employers are relying more on personality tests to evaluate job candidates to hire for new positions or for job advancement. This project focuses on how the use of personality testing challenges employers to be socially responsible in hiring and job advancement decisions based on test results that may give employers false impressions. The researcher studied whether employers and employees believe personality tests are beneficial in the hiring process or during employment and evaluated legal cases related to personality tests. Surveys and interviews of business professionals were conducted of college students for opinions about the use of personality tests, specifically whether they are appropriate, ethical and helpful. Not surprisingly, there are varying views about the efficiency and credibility.

The Impact Of Physical Fitness On Gestational Diabetes

Melissa Woodin
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

According to information provided by the CDC in 2010, there were 25.6 million Americans diagnosed with diabetes, of which 12.6 Million were women. This metabolic disease is chronic, and if left untreated can cause serious health problems, including heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney disease. Gestational Diabetes is the onset of Diabetes during pregnancy. This particular form of the disease is seen as potentially harmful to both mother and child if not diagnosed and carefully managed during pregnancy. The current research will examine the scientific literature to determine the role of exercise and physical fitness on the prevention of gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Results will be discussed.

The Impact of Soccer Players of Immigrant Descent on The French National Team

Zakariah Hall
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My analysis will examine whether the impact of naturalized French players has in fact been positive for soccer team performance. France has had a history of naturalized foreign soccer players contributing to and succeeding for the French national team. This influence has grown over time, and today the impact of these players is remarkable. This continued attitude of acceptance of  immigrants, in terms of sporting ability, widens their recruitment pool massively. This diversity and wide range of talent can, I will argue, only be a good thing for performance. The different cultures and playing styles that are brought to the squad should create a dynamic, adaptable, and mercurial footballing force.

The Importance and Impact of Business Ethics in the Information Age

Lisa Collier
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In this information age, competitors and consumers have almost instant access to news about the ethical behavior of companies. Businesses have become more accountable for their actions and must promote ethical behavior. This project focuses on businesses that partake in harmful unethical behaviors that negatively affect the environment, customers and employees. The presenter researched the appropriate time and methods for organizations to implement ethical behavior, and examined whether college ethics classes promote ethical behavior in the workplace. The presenter shows how ethical and unethical behaviors can positively and negatively affect a company and tools it can use to overcome the effects of unethical practices.

The Mission of Meerkats

Kenzie Reynen
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

As part of my course in Animal Behavior, I studied the behavior of meerkats, a small mammal in the mongoose family. The opportunity for first hand observation at the Buffalo Zoo allowed me to complete a behavioral analysis, or ethogram, for this species. These active animals, naturally found in the southern half of Africa, perform a range of behaviors including playing, standing or sitting on hind legs, digging, and more. My ethogram focused on quantifying specific behaviors performed by the eight meerkats in the Buffalo Zoo and comparing my findings with research on individuals in the wild.

The Physiological Efficacy of Biofeedback Training

Shanique Forte
Faculty Sponsor: Simona Carrubba
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Biofeedback training is a technique that is used to teach people how to regulate their physiological activity. It has been used to help people alleviate stress, increase performance, and reduce unpleasant symptoms associated with various neurological diseases. Many research studies using  biofeedback training lack appropriate control groups. For this reason, the technique’s reliability and validity have been questioned throughout the scholarly community. To test its physiological efficacy, twenty healthy participants were randomly assigned to either a control group or a treatment group. Each subject’s brain electrical activity was measured using electroencephalography (EEG) before and after training (treatment) or relaxation (control). The EEG recordings were then analyzed for differences in brain activity across each patient using a conventional method for time series analysis (frequency analysis).

The Predictability of Cervical Spine Patient’s Outcomes Using a Cervical Relocation Test

Kristina Lynch, Sarah Burke, Zakkee Moghul, Craig Young
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Painful conditions of the cervical spine may affect proprioception of the head and neck. Proprioceptive afferent input from neck muscles plays a role in the perception of body segment position, body orientation in space, and control of posture and gait. Accurate and reliable evaluation of neck proprioceptive abilities is of great importance for function. Neck pain may play a factor in maintaining neutral head position. Although research on neck pain has been unable to reliably determine underlying pathophysiological mechanism for this relationship, there appears to be a relationship between postural balance and cervicocephalic kinesthetic sensibility among patients with chronic neck pain. This study examines the ability of the cervicocephalic relocation test to predict outcomes in people with neck pain.

The Relationship Between Core Endurance and The Functional Movement Screen

Shelby Knoeller
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A high rate of injury has been reported in collegiate sports requiring a need for injury risk investigation. The Functional Movement ScreenTM (FMS) has previously determined injury risk using a series of 7 tests: deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, shoulder mobility, active straight leg raise, trunk stability push up, and rotary stability, scored on a 0-3 scale with a composite score of 21. Research shows activation of core musculature during completion of FMS tests. Core endurance has been related to sport performance by providing a solid base for limb function. Core endurance can be tested using functional assessments including a single leg repetitive squat and a single leg wall sit hold. This study will determine if a correlation exists between core endurance and FMS performance. The hypothesis is that high core endurance will correlate with high FMS performance. Data will be analyzed using SPSS with a Spearmen Rank Correlation and a Pearson Correlation.

The Relationship Between Core Endurance, Lower Extremity Range of Motion, and the Functional Movement ScreenTM

Ron Cooper
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

People seek medical attention for sport-related injuries each year. Screening tools have attempted to identify individual injury risk factors. However, since injury is multifaceted, it’s necessary to examine multiple factors. The Functional Movement ScreenTM (FMS) is a series of 7 tests: the deep squat, hurdle step, in-line lunge, straight leg raise, shoulder mobility, rotary stability, and trunk stability push-up. These tests assess multiple intrinsic injury risk factors through movement pattern analysis. Tests are scored on a 0-3 ordinal scale with a max composite score of 21. Studies have correlated low FMS scores and injury risk; however, no current literature correlates lower extremity (LE) ankle, knee, or hip range of motion (ROM) and FMS scores. This study will evaluate the effects of LE ROM on FMS scores. The hypothesis is that poor LE ROM will negatively affect FMS scores. Participants will include recreational athletes ages 18-30. Spearman rank and Pearson correlations will analyze the data and results will be presented.

The Relationship Between Music Preference and Emotional Reactions to Music

Dean May
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Researchers who study neuroaesthetics of music investigate the underlying effect of music on emotions. One difficulty with this area of research is in controlling music preference and baseline emotional state across participants. The aim of the present study was to create comparison groups of self-reported music preference in advance of musical stimulus selection to minimize within-group preference differences, and thus investigate the degree of emotional effects between preference conditions. Undergraduate students were pre-screened for music preference (The Short Test of Music Preferences; Rentfrow & Gosling, 2003) and then randomly assigned to a preference (high/neutral/low) condition. A baseline mood measure was recorded. After, participants listened to a musical selection and subjective (Geneva Emotional Music Scale; Zentner, Grandjean, & Scherer, 2008) and objective (heart rate) emotional reactions were recorded. Measures were analyzed separately using a between subjects ANOVA to determine whether mean emotional reactions differed over musical preference.

The Reliability of Laser Doppler for Measuring Skin Perfusion Pressure to Predict Wound Healing: Review of Literature

Kevin Esperti, William Denz, Ryan Boggs, Clay Case
Faculty Sponsor: Nicole Chimera
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Skin perfusion pressure (SPP) is a measurement used to determine ischemic severity and wound healing (WH). Measurable by Laser Doppler (LD), SPP has been used in predicting WH in patients with diabetic foot ulcers, amputations, and other ulcerative conditions. Although limited, research supporting specificity and sensitivity (SS) of LD to measure SPP for predicting WH is available; consequently, this review of literature aimed to determine the SS of SPP measured by LD to predict WH. Databases used include MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PubMed; keywords, searched individually and variously combined, included skin perfusion pressure, SPP, laser Doppler, wound, healing, ulcer, specificity, and sensitivity. Search results yielded data suggesting SS values supporting the use of LD for measuring SPP as a predictor of WH. Accepted articles measured SS of LD to measure SPP for predicting WH, and the values were deemed reasonable by the respective authors. Analysis suggests that measuring SPP through LD to predict WH is supported in terms of SS.

The Rise Of Fair Trade Among U.S. Colleges and Universities

Zahra Nayyeri
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Fair Trade officially was recognized in the United States in the 1960s. From its roots, Fair Trade organizations around the world have been actively trying to raise awareness about the negative impacts associated with some conventional trade, and trying to induce change through implementing more equitable trade practices. Fair Trade certification is awarded to products that meet the criteria established to ensure reasonable compensation to workers and safe working conditions. The recognizable Fair Trade logo gives consumers insight about the production, the workers, and their living conditions. Not only do the workers benefit from Fair Trade, but so do consumers. Consumers become globally aware and communities become more economically sustainable with living wages paid to workers.

The Rising Impact of Energy Drinks in Society

Paige Tilert
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Consumption and sales of energy drinks have dramatically increased as they are used by athletes, students, and everyday workers; therefore, the focus of this research was to show that although college students view the consumption of energy drinks as beneficial, the unethical promotion of them, specifically the lack of appropriate information on long-term effects, can prevent consumers from knowing about potential harmful effects related to various consumption levels. The amount of drinks consumed, and the frequency of consumption, has varying effects on different people (college students, athletes, employees, children), and that energy drinks can be beneficial, but also can be harmful to the human body. The research explores the reasons society consumes energy drinks to the level that they do, the impact from athlete sponsorship or strategic marketing in nightclubs, the ethical nature of promotion, specifically with respect to the responsibility of manufacturers, distributors, and supporters, and the ethical nature of the speed and intensity of actions taken when problematic situations develop.

Theoretical Nursing Model for Practice Based Care - Patient Education

Susan McCormick
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Theoretical Nursing Model for Practice Based Care Post operative discharge/teaching instructions for the Surgical Cardio-Thoracic Open Heart patient is important to health, wellness, and healing. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice-based theoretical framework related to providing post-operative discharge education to the Cardio-Thoracic patient. A visual model of the theoretical framework, in addition to an explanation of the theory, and its development will be presented. A personal philosophy of nursing, practice experiences, and existing nursing theories were analyzed in developing the theoretical framework. Translation of knowledge, in addition to implications for practice and research, will be discussed.

Theoretical Nursing Model for Practice Based Care in Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

Rosemary Hansen
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Ball
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Severe calcific aortic stenosis is a deadly disease affecting the elderly. Gold standard treatment for aortic valve replacement requires open heart surgery for those who qualify. Inoperable and high risk patients may be candidates for a new treatment therapy. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) is a complex treatment requiring extensive nursing intervention. Nursing science is based on theoretical frameworks of patient and nursing interactions. The purpose of this poster is to present a practice based theoretical framework related to treating TAVR patients. A personal philosophy of nursing and Betty Neuman’s Systems Model are integrated into the development of the theory and pictorial model. Nursing interventions, knowledge, and patient outcomes are translated into practice implications.

Therapeutic Ultrasound for Tissue Extensibility

Mary Emminger, Mary Emminger, Abigail Herbstritt, Stephen Maxwell, Kurtis Adams
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Therapeutic Ultrasound (TUS) is a mechanical modality that uses acoustic energy to induce thermal and non-thermal changes in the musculoskeletal system. If tissue elongation exercises are applied in accordance with the thermal effects of TUS, tissue elongation can occur. Thermal effects of TUS include decreased joint stiffness, reduced muscle spasm, and diminished pain perception, in addition to an increase in tissue extensibility. Thermal effects are attained through the vibration of molecules caused by TUS. This literature review examines the efficacy of TUS in altering tissue extensibility.

Title: The Effects of Opedix Core-Tec Shorts on Core Stability and Dynamic Balance in Physically Active Populations.

Jamal Cort
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Romano Besch
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Core stability and dynamic balance influence core and lower extremity injury. Research suggests that the unilateral wall sit and Y Balance Test may predict core and lower extremity injury. OPEDIX CORE-Tec shorts have been proposed to increase core stability and dynamic balance. This study will determine the effects of OPEDIX CORE-Tec shorts on the unilateral wall sit and Y Balance Test. The design will be an experimental, pretest-posttest randomized group. The hypotheses are that participants will score significantly higher on both tests while wearing the shorts as compared to the pre-testing and as compared to the control group. Participants will include healthy men and women aged 18 to 35 who exercise 2-3 times a week for at least 30 minutes. Independent t test and dependent t test with an alpha level of 0.05 will compare between group and within group results respectively, using IBM SPSS V.22 to analyze the data.

Transverse Friction Massage

Jennifer Placanica, Alex Fischer, Julie Strychalski
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Stachura
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Effectiveness of Transverse Friction Massage in Treating Tendinopathy: Transverse Friction Massage (TFM), also known as Cyriax physiotherapy, is a manual therapy technique developed by James Cyriax, M.D. In this treatment, the gate control theory is used to modulate pain, and the disruption of cross-link fibers serves to destroy adhesions leading to scar tissue. Additionally, the Transverse Friction Massage stimulates local inflammation, which initiates a healing cascade to occur in the human body. This presentation explores the literature in regards to the efficacy of Transverse Friction Massage in treating the impairments of pain and decreased range of motion in several tendon pathologies. Specific guidelines regarding the use of Transverse Friction Massage will be investigated.

Treating Bulimia Nervosa: Psychotherapy Vs. Antidepressants

Rachael Masser
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Bulimia Nervosa is an eating disorder that has been on the rise in the past decade. It is a chronic mental health condition that has been treated successfully by psychotherapy, antidepressant medication, or a combination of the two. This research is a secondary review of the literature and compares the effectiveness of the two treatment options for abatement of bulimia symptoms. Results will be discussed.

Unfolding Studies of the Human Estrogen Receptor and Hormone Binding Domain

Anthony Sciortino
Faculty Sponsor: Derrick Swartz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

 

The human estrogen receptor, a nuclear receptor that interacts with the hormone 17-β-estradiol, regulates the expression of genes essential for growth and development. Recent research established that bisphenol-A and phthalates widely used in plastics mimic 17-β-estradiol when interacting with the receptor. However, these interactions are also believed to contribute to the development of breast cancer. The study focused on quantifying the changes in Gibbs free energy when unfolding the receptors from their native to denatured state, using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and urea as a denaturant. The ligands bisphenol-A, diethyl phthalate, and benzyl butyl phthalate were bound to both receptors. Through these studies, we’ve determined the strength and stability of these interactions by comparing the differences in Gibbs free energy and unfolding patterns between samples. Additionally, the role of secondary and tertiary structure in ligand binding has been assessed by comparing differences in Gibbs free energy and unfolding pattern between the hormone binding domain and the entire receptor.    

Use of Positive Behavioral Support in an Early Childhood Setting

Brianna Quaranto
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Fox
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

“No running! Don’t put that in your mouth! Stop talking!” These are some examples of common, yet ineffective exclamations that are often heard in the classroom. These statements use negative language, which includes words such as no, don’t, stop, etc. While these are often knee-jerk reactions to undesirable behaviors, basic psychology teaches us that positive reinforcement yields the best results. Positive language, encouragement, and redirection are all tactics that provide a more favorable behavioral outcome. Especially in early childhood settings, the use of positive language and behavioral supports is critical to the success of the child, as well as the maintenance of a stable classroom environment. In this poster the effective applications of positive behavioral supports will be presented, as well as the implications of these supports on the classroom as a whole. The psychology behind these positive reinforcement principles will also be explored.

Water Conservation, the Widely Unrecognized Issue

Jason koziol
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Despite conservation awareness and efforts in the U.S., many Americans and businesses still take the fresh water supply for granted. I have discovered more American people and businesses should be more concerned than are currently concerned. Business responsibility, educational efforts, and regulations need to be ramped up for preservation of our national fresh water supply to avoid severe shortages, increased prices, and other repercussions, if the water supply is significantly diminished or disappears. The focus of this project was to show how as the necessity of managing our fresh water supplies becomes more pertinent, the obligation to conserve and preserve water should fall heavily on businesses to be socially responsible both in their usage and with respect to related regulation. Important concepts with respect to this are consumption trends, water supply levels, water conservation efforts, legal requirements, businesses educational marketing efforts on the importance of water conservation efforts, and opinions of past and projected behaviors of the general public.

Exhibits

Haberman Gacioch Center for Visual and Performing Arts Senior Exhibit

Elizabeth Kenison, Amanda Kociszewski, Lindsey Walczyk
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Watts Sommer
10:30 am - 5:00 pm
Haberman Gacioch Center for Visual and Performing

B.S. in Art students Elizabeth Kenison, Amanda Kociszewski and Lindsey Walczyk will exhibit their paintings and sculpture at the Tower Gallery of Art at the Haberman Gacioch Arts Center. Each student has pursued an area of focus and will present thesis work.

Music Illustrated

Stephen Peluso
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Kegler
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Wick Oddy Lounge

Music illustrated is an enveloping art exhibit featuring famous musicians and their instruments at work. Predominantly done in oil pastel, each life size illustration will be accompanied by an audio track of the rendered artist. The music will serve as an extra element in defining the figure in a multi-sensory way. The exhibit will emphasize the passions and cultures of past and present performers by merging audio and visual experiences. Viewers will be encouraged to wear provided headphones when viewing the large works.  Hits of the depicted musical artists will be played through the headphones. The marriage of sound and sight will allow for a union of perceived experiences on the synapses in the human brain. I will present two art works as well as discuss the effect of art and music on the brain.

Physics is Fun!

Simona Carrubba
Faculty Sponsor: Simona Carrubba
10:30 am - 5:00 pm
RIC Lobby

In order to engage students with science, I offered them extra credit to produce a video related to the material that they learned in Physics courses. In the past year I collected fifty videos. By playing, dancing, and even singing, my students illustrated that science can be fun and entertaining.

Poster Session

Academic Festival
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
9:00 am - 2:00 pm
Lumsden Gym

Posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Performances

2014 Moot Court Experience: The Pre-Law Student Association (PLSA) and the American Association of University Women (AAUW) Student Club Present a Mock Trial Simulation and Talk Back Session on Sexual

Jordan Sieracki , Special Thompson , Jarett Streicher , Nigel Hayes , Amy Grimes , Emily Kraft , Troy Hamlin , Caitlyn Ebert , Zahra Nayyeri
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Parshall
10:30 am - 12:30 pm
Schenck 107

Since 2003, the (PLSA) has presented a mock trial simulation as part of the Annual Academic Festival. This year, the PLSA has teamed up with the newly-forming American Association of University Women Student Club to present a simulation of a sexual harassment case to be followed by a talk-back session that will address workplace discrimination. The trial is a civil case in which the defendant, Ms. Roberts, is suing her employer for failing to remediate a hostile work environment. Following the presentation of the case, there will be a post-trial discussion among students, faculty and experts on the issues of sexual harassment in the workplace. *Some students are also participating in the Model UN* We need a 2.5-3 hour time block and if we could be in the morning it would be more convenient. NOTE: Co-faculty sponsors: Lisa Parshall, Penny Messinger, Dr. Serife Tekin Co-Presenters: Plaintiffs Counsel Special Thompson(Team Leader), Jarett Streicher, Nigel Haynes Witnesses: Amy Grimes (Dr.Patricia Issacs), Emily Kraft (Plaintiff), Elise Roberts, Troy Hamlin (Detective Kenneth Puma) Defendants Counsel Caitlyn Ebert (Team Leader), Jordan Sieracki, Zahra Nayyeri Witnesses: Tom Aldrich (Defendant), Kevin Murphy, Jolene Longley (Frances Troy), Carla Hernandez (Sandy Yu) Alternates and Jurors: Jessica Mark, Jessicca Todd, Keyla Marte, Jessica Maulucci, Tianna, Washington, Christina Auguste, Aesha Sanders AAUW Panel Participants Holly Turano Yolanda Stewart-Jones Dior Manning    

Art Club Live Art Performance

Veronica Giurdanella, Veronica Giurdanella, Jamie LeRoy, Jonathan Hutchison, Gabrielle Dereu, Ryan Koch, Sydney Mangin, Kaleigh White, Trevor White
Faculty Sponsor: Felice Koenig
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Wick Center Lobby

In March of 2014, Daemen College Art Club visited the Albright Knox Art Gallery to experience, in person, the inspiring works of Sandra Cinto that are currenly on display at the Gallery. Sandra Cinto is most well known for her detailed paintings and drawings, especially her room-filling installations of rolling waves, twinkling stars, and pouring rain. After exploring this work, the Art Club created a live painting inspired by Cinto’s installations. The painting will be performed as a group during the Academic Festival. The Art Club intends to use their own skillsets, along with the styles and influence of the artist they will experience during the trip, to create a work inspired by Sandra Cinto.   Note: add: Matt Arida, Tom McDonnell, Isabella Constantino, James Schroeder.

CANCELLED: Musical Jam

Denise Emer, Steve Barnes, Jerry Hall, Robert Gunther, Charley Wesley
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Emer
4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Wick Alumni Lounge

Sorry this has been cancelled 4/7/14. They will be back next year for the 2015 Festival.  

Irish Traditional Music, Song and Dance from the 1900's to the Dawn of the Riverdance

Mary McPartlan
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Rosary Hall

Mary McPartlan, an Irish singer and presenter, will present "Irish Traditional Music, Song and Dance from the 1900's to the dawn of Riverdance" in Rosary Hall on Wednesday, April 16 from 7:00pm-8:30pm.

MODEL UNITED NATIONS (UN) SIMULATION

Aakriti Tandon
Faculty Sponsor: Aakriti Tandon
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Wick Social Room

A simulated UN Security Council session will discuss a resolution regarding nuclear armament of Iran and the country's refusal to cooperate with the UN or engage in talks with the United States, the United Kingdom, Russia, China, and Israel. Students will role play as diplomats representing member states in a simulated UN Security Council session and must debate, deliberate, consult, and develop solutions to world problems. Participants will be responsible for investigating international issues, presenting the position of a country they researched, and shaping and crafting a final joint resolution that will summarize the Security Council's response towards the situation. During the conference, participants must employ a variety of communication and critical thinking skills to represent their country's policies.   Note: Add the following participants: Francois Acosta, Christina Auguste, Jenil Bell, Ashley Cheff, Anthony Difrancesco, Ryan Fritton, Thaddeus Gibson, Allison Goodwin, Christina Heppner, Stephen Kem, Paige Kippley, Luke Schaefer, Daniel Vennero, Keyla Marte, China Palmore, Nicholas Paveljack, Manuel Ramirez, Hannah Wolfanger, Sarah Zammiello, Mei Yan Zhan, Nigel Haynes, Zahra Nayyeri, Kathryn Procknal

Musicale

Christopher Malik, Special Guest: Mary McPartlan, Laura McGorray, Joyce Perez, Denise Emer, Rebecca Robel, Katie Huber, Taylor Miller, McKinley Estime
Faculty Sponsor: Christopher Malik
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Wick Alumni Lounge

Additional members: Abby Lindberg, Samantha Ilacqua, Mark Poblocki, Matt Vandermortel, Diana Lohrman, Andrew Polla, Erin Nichols, Peter Siedlecki, Rebecca Haley, Anastasia Snuszka    Music is a language that crosses all borders and unites humankind in artistic expression. It is an art form that can be appreciated by the passive listener or by a musician actively engaged in the creation and/or performance of music. Whether you arouse to the rhythm of drumming, simmer to the strum of an acoustic guitar or glow in the warmth of a Steinway piano, you don't need to be a professional musician to participate in the joy of making music. This annual event organized by the Student Activities Office seeks to engage students, faculty and staff in sharing their unique (and sometimes hidden) musical talents.

Paper Slippers

Robert Waterhouse, Hillary Baritot, Laura Bowman, Maurice Brown II, Rachel Colby, Hallie Collins, Isabella Constantino, Tanner Ford, Theresa Gabalski
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Wick Alumni Lounge

An original play, devised and performed by students within the Applied Theatre Program, PAPER SLIPPERS examines the effects of drugs, alcohol, and self-harm on a group of teens in a rehabilitation facility. Though struggling in their own ways to cope with addiction and recovery, the young people discover that their way forward is through one another. NOTE: ADDITIONAL PARTICIPANTS: Samantha Ilacqua (samantha.ilacqua@daemen.edu), Abby Lindberg (abby.lindberg@daemen.edu), Leah Swallow (leah.swallow@daemen.edu), Jennifer Jeziorski (jennifer.jeziorski@daemen.edu), Sydney Mangin (sydney.mangin@daemen.edu)  please add: Laura Newman Dates: Wednesday 4/16 and Thursday 4/17 7:30-8;30pm in Wick Alumni Lounge

Step Team Performance

Michelle Jimenez, Jinell Webb, Christina Auguste, Sohaula Depeyster, Rashidah Salaam, Ebony Fripp, Nyoka Hutchinson, Miriam Sintim, Rainelle Henry
Faculty Sponsor: Pia Grizzle
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Wick Dining Room

The award winning Daemen College Step Team will thrill and excite all with their creative choreography, razor sharp execution and indomitable spirit. Stunning to see and hear, come watch why this powerhouse of a team is the pride of Daemen College.

Other

Basket Raffle for Roswell Park Cancer Institute's Bald for Bucks

Matthew Ullery, Caitlin Scheeler
Faculty Sponsor: Matthew Ward
10:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wick Center Lobby

Daemen College Honors Program will be holding a basket raffle to raise money for Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Daemen College consistently raises more money than any other college in Western New York, and we look forward again to being at the top of the list and help assist cancer patients and cancer research. The basket raffle tickets will be drawn on April 24th in the Wick Student Center during the Bald for Bucks event. Winners do not need to be present at the event in order to win.

CANCELLED Stanley Fish on 4/15

Academic Festival
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Wick Social Room

Academic Festival Program QR Code.

Health Care Studies Presentations

Academic Festival
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
11:00 am - 3:30 pm
Business Building 107/109

Academic Festival Program QR Code.

Language and Loss in Brian Friel's TRANSLATIONS: A Workshop

Jenna Wright, Rachel Bossard, Megan Denney, Christian Lee, Aubry Moll, Wilhelmina Nolting, Justin Richmond, Olivia Harris, Emily Valone
Faculty Sponsor: Shirley Peterson
1:00 pm - 2:30 pm
RIC 101

This session will be organized as a workshop involving Daemen College students with special Academic Festival visitor Mary McPartlan, the Irish performer and creative director from National University of Ireland, Galway. Participants will discuss Brian Friel’s 1980 play Translations, first produced in Northern Ireland by the groundbreaking Field Day Theatre Company during the political turmoil known as “The Troubles.” Translations is set in 1833 colonial Ireland and involves the British ordnance survey of their territory, which included the replacement of Gaelic district names with Anglicized versions. Described by Friel as a “play about language,” the workshop explores its linguistic tensions through readings of the play in a performative mode, delving into the interaction of colonialism, language, and myth. As the late Irish poet Seamus Heaney explained, Translations invites us to consider "the need we have to create enabling myths of ourselves and the danger we run if we too credulously trust to the sufficiency of these myths.”

Mock Interviews with Human Resource Professionals

Samantha Maiarana, Brittany Anthon , Kathryn Boeckel , Kayla Clark , Kathryn Gross , Tatyana Korogoda , Danielle Majchrza, Rachelle Tyner , Selina Zaccaria
Faculty Sponsor: Sharlene Buszka
3:00 pm - 5:00 pm
RIC 120, 2nd & 3rd Floor Study Rooms

Daemen students can experience being interviewed by a Human Resource professional and receive immediate feedback on their career interview skills. Members of the Buffalo Niagara Human Resource Association (BNHRA) have volunteered to spend two hours on the Daemen campus to help students develop their skills. Students who will be interviewing for internships, graduate school, or employment should take advantage of this opportunity. Those interested may contact Dana Kelley at dkelley@daemen.edu to sign up for a 30-minute appointment. The student should show up at the scheduled time and assigned location, be dressed professionally and provide a current resume and sample job description in an area of interest.

Program Book

Academic Festival
Faculty Sponsor: Margene Weiss
6:00 am - 11:59 pm
Daemen College

Academic Festival Program QR Code.

Core Competencies

The Daemen College core is an innovative competency-based curriculum. Every course approved for core credit includes at least three competencies, including at least one primary competency. Course syllabi state the learning objectives that relate to the competencies and the assessment techniques that will be used to determine mastery.

Committee

Michael Brogan -Vice President, Academic Affairs
Ronald Schenck - Dean, Health & Human Services Division
Shirley Peterson - Dean, Arts & Sciences Division
Margene Weiss - Conferences & Events
Diana Alvarado - Print Office
Jim Bachraty - Classroom Technology Services
Sabrina Fennell - Academic Support Services
Greg Ford - Physical Therapy
Mary Fox - Education Off-Campus Programs and CIEL
John Frederick - Executive Leadership & Change
Sherrie Gustas - Office of the President /Board of Trustees
Colleen Kashino - Psychology
Felice Koenig - Visual & Performing Arts
Chris Malik - Acting Dean, Student Affairs/ Student Activities
Margaret Mazzone - Physical Therapy
Yolanda Morris - Enrollment Management
Doris Murphy - Academic Affairs
Laura Sommer - Visual & Performing Art
Joyce Strobel - Publications
John Suckow & Ryan Richardson
- Daemen Dining Services
Robert Waterhouse - Visual & Performing Arts
Tom Wojciechowski - Web Communications
Brenda Young - Global/Local Sustainability, Natural Sciences
John Zaepfel - Academic Computing

Academic Festival Committee Chair

Margene Weiss, Conferences & Events

Student Editor Program Book

Ann Marie Rose, B.A. in Adolescent English Education, 2016

Student Proposal Logistics Review

Amanda Smith, B.S./R.N. in Nursing, 2016

Publications Design for Program Book & Poster

Mike Morgan, Joyce Strobel, Elise Wright, Publications

Program Book Editor

Gloria Nobleza Wise

Poster Session

Yolanda Morris, Kim Kerrigan, Jillian Covert, Carol Renner, Amanda Smith ’16, Brenda Rosen

Special Thanks To

Brenda Rosen, Conferences & Events, and Liz VanDuesen, B.S. in Business Administration, 2015, and Thomas Wilkie, B.A. in English and Spanish, 2014; Classroom Technology Services; and Daemen Dining Staff and Maintenance Staff.

World of Opportunity Wizard

Wow! Daemen students & faculty travel abroad during the inter-semester break!

Faculty accompanied students to Mexico City and Cuernavaca for the January inter-semester term.

Start Your Journey Now

Front Cover

2014 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

UNTITLED, acrylic paint and newspaper (matted with gloss medium) on canvas
Gabrielle Dereu, B.F.A. in Animation, 2017

Back Cover

2014 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

FOREST FIRE, wood sculpture
Joseph T. Gasiecki III, B.F.A. in Graphic Design, 2015

Student Workers

STUDENT EDITOR PROGRAM BOOK For 2012 and 2013

Ann Marie Rose
B.A. in Adolescent English Education, 2016

STUDENT PROPOSAL LOGISTICS REVIEW

Amanda Smith
B.S./R.N. in Nursing, 2016

FESTIVAL T-SHIRT DESIGN

GLACIAL SERENITY, Photoshop
Constance Cartwright

B.F.A. in Animation, 2015

THANKS TO

Liz VanDuesen
B.S. in Business Administration, 2015

Thomas Wilkie
B.A. in English and Spanish, 2014