History and Political Science Courses

History and Political Science Courses

Geography

GEO 117: World Geography (3)

This course will familiarize students with the spatial geography of the United States and other major regions of the world and will help them to understand the political and economic differences between nations, regions, and differently populated areas. Offered alternate years. (UG)

History & Political Science

HP 333: Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies (3)

Writing Intensive. Registration in this course is limited to History & Government Adolescence Education/Social Studies majors. This course is designed to prepare prospective teachers who will engage in teaching social studies at the secondary level. It is intended to invest them with an understanding of the skills of teaching as well as provide them with content knowledge. It is also intended to assist prospective teachers in generating and implementing ideas and then assessing how well these plans have worked in the classroom. Students must complete 50 hours of field experience as part of course requirements. Prerequisite: EDU 203, EDU 237, EDU 313, EDU 314, EDU 336, and SED 270 or permission of instructor. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HP 442: Thesis Research (2)

Registration in this course is limited to History, History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies and Environmental Studies) and Political Science majors. In this course, taken in the spring semester of the junior year, students select topics for their research projects and make substantial progress on researching the senior thesis under the direction of History and Political Science Department faculty members. Students are required to submit a polished research proposal and an annotated bibliography and to make an oral presentation of the research proposal to the class. Prerequisite: Upper division status in department and successful completion of either HST331 or PSC331. This course is a prerequisite for HP 443 Research Project. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HP 443: Research Project (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. Registration in this course is limited to History, History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies and Environmental Studies) and Political Science majors. In this capstone course for students majoring in the History & Political Science department, students research an approved topic under the direction of History & Political Science Department faculty members and write a thesis of approximately 30 pages that synthesizes research from appropriate primary and secondary sources. Students are required to present their research orally, in a forum selected by the course instructor(s). Prerequisite: HST 331 or PSC 331, and HP 442. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

History

HST 104: The Human Place in Nature: An Introduction to Global Environmental History (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as IND 104. In this course, we will focus on different patterns of human responses to environmental challenges and identify ways in which they have changed over time. Students will be challenged to understand individual and collective behaviors in their social, cultural, political, and economic contexts. This course highlights several key aspects of environmental history: 1) humankind's impact on the environment as we have attempted to alter our natural surroundings; 2) various moral and ethical perspectives about the environment and humankind's place in the natural world; 3) the role that nature has played in various aesthetic visions; 4) modern environmental crises and their political impact; and 5) the modern "green" movement as a grassroots call for social justice in response to environmental degradation. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department). Offered as Needed. (UG)

HST 105: Introduction to World History I: From Antiquity to 1500 (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The two-course world history sequence focuses on the peoples, forces and ideas that have shaped the way individuals have experienced (and still do experience) the world. The course's perspective is global and focuses on the origins and development, geographical context, and interactions of world cultures. In this course, we will focus on two key themes of early world history: 1) the ways in which different cultures emerged in response to the demands of their environmental surroundings; and 2) the ways in which different peoples began to increasingly interact with one another by 1500. Offered Each Year (Fall). . (UG)

HST 106: Introduction to World History II: From 1500 (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The two-course world history sequence focuses on the peoples, forces and ideas that have shaped the way individuals have experienced (and still do experience) the world. The course's perspective is global and focuses on the origins and development, geographical context, and interactions of world cultures. In this course, we will focus on two key themes of modern world history: 1) the ways in which global connections have developed; and 2) the ways in which different peoples at different times have resisted globalization, instead seeking to preserve their distinct cultural traditions. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HST 125: Historical Approaches to Contemporary Problems: Domestic Affairs (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course attempts to deepen understanding of contemporary issues in American society by studying their historical evolution. We will examine the events and impact of contested economic, political, social, and cultural issues in the U.S. since the 1960s. Major topics include the impact of foreign policy on domestic affairs; the civil rights movement; the women's movements; the New Left; liberation movements; Watergate; the rise of modern conservatism; and the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 137: African American History (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. A study of the African American experience in America. The course will explore African origins and cultural influences and examine the social and political significance of African Americans in American history. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HST 206: Twentieth Century Europe (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course deals with the story of Europe during the tumultuous 20th century. While we will focus much of our attention on political, economic and diplomatic developments; considerable time will be devoted to social and cultural phenomena as well. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 211: Introduction to Public History (3)

This survey course introduces students to the field of public history - how historians make history come alive for the general public. Among areas covered will be the role of historians in museums, historical societies, archives, historic preservation, government and business organizations, and other non-academic careers. Students will explore effective exhibit design and presentation of history to the public through museum visits and class projects. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

HST 215: Introduction to Women's Studies (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Cross-listed as WST 215. This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the language, concepts, and issues in the field of Women's Studies. We will explore the construction of gender by focusing upon the intersection of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion in shaping women's lives, and will look at women's efforts to define their identities through work, creative activity, and through feminism. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

HST 216: History of Medieval Europe: 300 - 1400 (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course will focus on five specific developments: 1) the transition from the Roman world to the medieval world; 2) the emergence of several distinct cultures within the territories of the old Roman empire; 3) the key role played by religion in the various medieval cultures; 4) the burst of creative energy and economic expansion associated with the High Middle Ages; and 5) the crises of the 14th century (church schism, the Black Death, etc.) that devastated medieval Europe. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 220: American History to 1877 (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course, an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction, focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American society and institutions by raising questions about human values, economic growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy in the American past. Major themes include: exploration and colonization; life in early America; the creation of a slave society; colonial America and the British empire; the establishment of representative government; the American Revolution; establishing a new nation; the era of Andrew Jackson; the first industrial revolution; social and cultural life in the early republic; expansion and sectional crisis; and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

HST 221: American History From 1877 to Present (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course seeks to have students gain a perspective on the position of the United States among the nations of the world and on the controversies and agreements among Americans concerning the desired attributes of their own culture, government, and ideals. Major themes include: conquest of the West; the Populist movement; the creation of the Jim Crow system; industrialization and its effects on the American society, economy, and political processes; immigration and urbanization; the American Empire; Progressivism and the struggle for social justice; World War I; social changes of the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the New Deal; World War II; post-war affluence and social change, the Cold War and anti-communism; the liberal state; minorities and civil rights; the Vietnam era; the New Right and neo-conservatism; and the recent past. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HST 224: History of the Byzantine Empire: 300 - 1453 (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the history of the Byzantine Empire. This course focuses on the following key features of Byzantine history: 1) the transformation of the Roman Empire into the Byzantine; 2) the role of the Byzantine church in political and cultural affairs; 3) the interaction of Byzantium with the other "heirs" of Rome: medieval Islam and medieval Western Christendom; and 4) the influence of Byzantium on neighboring states that interacted with Byzantium, especially "Kievan Rus." Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 225: The Indian Ocean in World History (3)

This course covers the history of the Indian Ocean world, from the East African Coast to Southeast Asia, from the beginning of ancient maritime trade to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to the Islamic period. (Offered We will look at how movement in and around the ocean for purposes of trade, travel, and pilgrimage created a rich multi-cultural environment. We will examine how trade and religious networks connected people, and at how people throughout the region adopted and adapted new religions and cultures. In addition to syntheses of Indian Ocean history and modern histories, we will read primary sources, including accounts of individuals who traveled in the Indian Ocean. Students are encouraged to think about major historical processes and to develop critical and analytical skills: evaluating evidence, analyzing written and visual documents, developing and presenting an argument and supporting evidence in writing. Offered as needed. (UG)

HST 229: History and Film: Democracy in the 20th Century (3)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course examines issues confronting societies around the world and the ways in which films portray them. Students should be prepared to write several papers based on films and readings. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 230: Problems of the Third World (3)

The growing consciousness of the developing nations (LDC's) and their relationship with the advanced capitalist nations (First World) has been a major development of the post World War II period. While the term "Third World" was originally a political designation, it now implies certain economic and cultural characteristics. This course is designed to acquaint the student with many of the economic, political, social and international problems faced by these nations, while exploring the historical roots of these problems. Offered Each Year. (UG)

HST 232: Migration & Diaspora in Us (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course examines the history of immigration, migration, and diaspora communities in the United States from 1800-the present. Three overarching themes guide this course: the movement of peoples to the US and some of the major migratory movements of peoples within the US; the relationship between American ideas concerning citizenship and immigration and the experiences of immigrants within the US in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries; the evolving governmental policies towards immigration from throughout this period. The course addresses what draws people to the United States as well as what pushes them to leave their countries of origin. Students will learn about the ways in which the United States has been shaped by immigrants and diaspora communities through a variety of weekly readings, writing assignments, exams, and a study of an immigrant experience project. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 237: History of Early Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the key elements of modern European society that began to emerge during the period from the Renaissance to the age of Napoleon. In this course, we will focus on the following key developments: 1) the Renaissance; 2) the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Reformation; 3) the rise of the modern system of European states; 4) the creation of the Atlantic economy; 5) the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; 6) the global rivalries of the European colonial powers; and 7) the French Revolution and its legacy. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 248: Ancient Mediterranean World (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the various cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world. The course is divided into four sections: 1) the origins of Mediterranean civilizations, including the history of ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt; 2) the Greek cultural expansion from the classical period through the Hellenistic age; 3) the history of Rome from the foundations of the republic to the fall of the empire; and 4) the rise of Christianity as a cultural phenomenon in the Mediterranean world. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 304: Modern China (3)

This course focuses primarily on twentieth century China and will include the Revolution of 1911, the rise of the Kuomintang or Nationalist Party, and China since the Communist victory in 1949. Students will be encouraged to make their own evaluations regarding the Maoist regime, U.S.-Chinese relations in the twentieth century and the Chinese relationship with Third World nations. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 308: Modern Latin America (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. A course to acquaint the student with significant historical and cultural developments in Latin America since independence (political instability, economic underdevelopment, class conflict, anti-clericalism, militarism, and the relationship with the United States). Select countries such as Brazil, Argentina and Cuba will be emphasized; however, a topical rather than a country-by-country approach will generally be followed. Offered as needed. (UG)

HST 309: Introduction to the History of American Women (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as WST 309. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of American women from the colonial era to the present. The class places particular emphasis on the ways in which women's experiences have been shaped by such factors as race, class, and ethnicity, as well as by gender. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status, or foundational coursework in history or women's studies, is highly recommended. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

HST 312: Sub-Saharan Africa (3)

A study of essential historical and cultural background necessary for understanding contemporary problems of Sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis is placed on pre-selected countries: Nigeria, Zaire, Ghana and the Republic of South Africa. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 315: Modern Political Thought (3)

Students will analyze key problems in political philosophy by reading original works by thinkers who have influenced our own political discourse today. Offered As Needed. (UG)

HST 317: The Middle East (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is a survey of the history of the Middle East. Includes discussions of Islam, the growth of nationalism, Pan Arabism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and Gulf War. Offered Each Year. (UG)

HST 319: 20th Century Russia and Eastern Europe (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the nature of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe, the reasons for the collapse of communist regimes, and the transition to the post-communist era. We begin by examining how communist governments gained control in Russia and Eastern Europe, the nature of communist rule, and the crisis confronted by various regimes. In addition, we explore the nature of the Cold War and the ideological struggle between state and society, the "democratization" of politics, the problems of ethnic conflict, and changing relations with the West. Offered As Needed (UG)

HST 324: Global Environmental History (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course deals with several key aspects of environmental history: 1) humankind's impact on the environment as we attempt to alter our natural surroundings; 2) various philosophical and religious concepts of the environment and humankind's place in the natural world; 3) European global expansion and the impact of this ecological imperialism on indigenous peoples and ecologies; 4) the modern "green" movement; and 5) global environment crises and their impact on domestic affairs and international relations. Offered each Fall. (UG)

HST 325: Introduction to Polish Culture (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as IND 325. Students are introduced to the history of Polish culture. This survey course will focus primarily on cultural developments, but students will also learn about key political, economic, and social developments in Polish history. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

HST 326: Culture Wars: Social and Political Conflict in Recent Us History (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course explores the influence of the culture wars both historically and in contemporary American society and politics during the 20th and early 21st centuries. We will trace the historical roots of recent debates over culture while also analyzing and evaluating historical claims about past events. The course heavily emphasizes events and developments since the 1960s, although we also examine issues and themes from early American history and the early 20th through such topics as religion, science, urbanization, immigration and assimilation, race relations, changing gender roles, and sexual behavior as represented in cultural and political history. Offered as Needed. (UG)

HST 328: Multicultural Poland: History and Public Memory (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment; Affective Awareness; Writing Intensive. This study abroad course provides students with a unique firsthand approach to studying history. Readings, lectures, and site visits focus on the multicultural legacy in Poland, especially the historic region of Galicia that includes the cities of Krak w and Przemysl in Poland, and the city of Lviv in Ukraine. This course also requires students to consider the complex interplay of history and memory in Poland, especially as it relates to World War I, the interwar period, and World War II. Offered Annually (Summer). (UG)

HST 331: Introduction to Historiography (3)

Writing Intensive. Students will learn about how historians conduct research and write history. Classes are conducted in seminar format. Class discussions focus on research skills and strategies and the intensive study of a wide variety of historical writings. This course is part of a capstone requirement for History majors and History & Political Science majors (including Adolescent Ed and Environmental Specialization); non-majors may also enroll. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

HST 345: Introduction to Russian Culture (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as IND 345. This course introduces students to select themes in the Russian cultural tradition. The peoples of Russia have engaged actively with other cultures in Europe and Asia for over a millennium. We will explore how a distinct Russian culture has emerged, with special emphases on the following developments: the introduction of Christianity; the "Mongol Yoke;" the "Europeanization" of Muscovite Russia; the cultural splendor of the Russian empire during the reign of Catherine II; the flourishing of Russian literary culture under an absolutist regime during the "Golden Age" of the mid-19th century; and Russia's role in the birth of Modernism at the end of the tsarist era. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

HST 416: Internship in Public History (3)

Encouraged for students who are pursuing a public history minor. Prerequisite: HST 211. (UG)

Political Science

PSC 101: Comparative Politics (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is a general introduction to the field of comparative politics. The course's main objective is to enable students to analyze the political systems of countries outside the U.S.. The course covers countries selected from established democracies, transitional political systems, and developing societies. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

PSC 113: Introduction to American Politics (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This is an introductory course focusing on the basic structure and processes of the American political system, the institutions of the federal government, and the processes of decision making. The course is also a foundation for the American Politics subfield of the political science discipline. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

PSC 114: State and Local Government (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. A survey of the development, structure and functions of state and local government in the United States. Specific reference is made to the politics and problems of New York State and the Buffalo Metropolitan Area. Offered Alternate Years (fall). (UG)

PSC 117: Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The case-based approach used in this course requires students to analyze criminal procedure rulings of the United States Supreme Court. Students will be exposed to the logical and legal arguments of a series of cases which comprise the evolving corpus of the Court's criminal rights jurisprudence. Offered Yearly (spring) (UG)

PSC 121: International Relations (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. An introduction to international politics. Covers the transformation of world politics since the late medieval era. Examines major international events such as the two world wars, the Cold War, and the end of the Cold War. Exploration of the origins and causes of wars and conflicts, the roles of international organizations and international law in achieving lasting peace, and key issues of post-Cold War international politics. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

PSC 125: Introduction to Public Policy (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving. This course is an introduction to the policy making process and the subfield of Public Policy and covers the evolution of the field of public policy, and the policy making process from agenda setting to policy termination and change; select substantive policy areas and current events are used as illustrative examples. Students will learn the basic social science research approach and its critical uses in policy-making and analysis. Offered each Year (Spring). (UG)

PSC 210: The Politics of Globalization (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course focuses on the politics of globalization in the new world order and its impact on international relations and on developing nations. Topics include international terrorism, issues of justice and poverty, the role of multinational corporations, environmental issues, and the role of international organizations such as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 211: Environmental and Energy Policies I (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 211. A survey of major environmental and energy policies and the intergovernmental administrative system established to implement them. Topics include a history of the environmental movement, green politics, international environmental issues and the contrasts between scientific and political decision-making. If taken as ENS 211, this course cannot be used as a science elective. Offered as Needed. (UG)

PSC 212: Environmental and Energy Policies II (3)

A continuation of ENS/PSC 211. Prerequisite: PSC/ENS 211. Offered As Needed. EFFEC F13 REPLACES GVT 212, RUBRIC CHGE (UG)

PSC 213: Sustainability and Third World Development (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course examines the process of development in the Third World. Topics include HIV/AIDS, overpopulation, the role of women, the environment, socio-cultural barriers, and responses to inequality and poverty. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 214: Introduction to Refugee Studies (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration. This course will introduce students to the basic theories, concepts, and vocabulary of Refugee Studies. It will primarily focus on the political, historical, economic, socio-cultural, and global processes that have impacted refugees and Refugee Studies in our world today. Why are there refugees? How does local, national, and international communities address refugee crises? How can the academic study of refugees lead to policy changes in national and international political and economic systems? To the extent that forced migration of refugees is an integral part of the relationship between poor and rich nations, the issues facing refugee communities are not just a product of internal/civil wars and local impoverishment, but are closely linked to the fundamental political and economic structures and processes of our globalized world. As such, students, organizations, policy advocates interested in working with refugees need to take the holistic approach to refugee studies in order to have a better understanding and in-depth knowledge of the issues. This course will provide students with foundational knowledge of refugee populations and the field of Refugee Studies. The course will involve intensive reading and writing, the use of theoretical analyses, critical discussions, and in-depth examination of displacement and forced migration of refugees globally. Offered as needed. (UG)

PSC 215: Issues in Public Policy (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of the various analytical models employed by political scientists in the study of political life and the application of these models to specific domestic policy areas, with a focus on environmental policy. Offered as Needed. (UG)

PSC 217: American Political Parties and Pressure Groups (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. An examination of the principles, development and organization of American political parties as well as the electorate and the electoral process. The nature and role of political interest groups will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on environmental activism at national, state and local levels. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 219: Politics, Planning and Land Use (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 219. Principles and practice of land management policies at the state and local levels of government. Topics include zoning power of local government, preparation of master plans, variance procedures, federal mandates and Environmental Impact Statements. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 221: Political Economy of East Asia (3)

Cross-listed as ECO 221. An analysis of the successful industrialization of East Asia. Topics include the roles of development strategies, political institutions, industrial policy, culture, financial and monetary policies and China's recent transition toward a market economy. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 222: Polling and Public Opinion: Following The Will of the People (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Information Literacy. This course focuses on why public opinion and polling are important to American democracy and how political scientists go about measuring public opinion. The course explores where public opinion comes from, how people form opinions, how well informed people are about political objects, and how public officials use public opinion. Offered as needed. (UG)

PSC 223: Political and Civil Rights in the United States (3)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course will examine the development and current state of political and civil rights in the U.S., through the use of texts, court cases and the U.S. Constitution. Areas covered will include prohibitions against discrimination, voting rights and elections, freedom of expression and the right to privacy. While emphasis is placed on the role of the Supreme Court, discussion will address the interplay of the other branches of government as well as other factors (historical, economic, societal, etc.) in the evolution of political and civil rights. Students will be asked to consider whether these rights exist primarily to serve the interests of individuals, or to promote communitarian values. Offered Each Year. (UG)

PSC 224: Influencing Politics: The American Voter in Campaigns and Elections (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsiblity; Contextual Integration. This course is designed to present students with an understanding of why elections are important to American democracy and how political scientists go about measuring campaign effects. Further, we begin to explore how individuals come to a decision on which candidate to support in an election, if they choose to participate at all. We will explore a number of different aspects of campaigns and elections in American politics, including campaign finance, strategy, the media, and the different stages of various elections. We also tackle the "big" questions: Should you vote? Why do people vote the way they do? How can we get people to vote? The goal is for you to have a broad understanding of how American elections work and why they are important. Offered as needed. (UG)

PSC 225: Politics of China (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is an introduction to Chinese politics. We will study the history, institutions, and processes of Chinese politics. We will critically examine the economic and political reforms that have transformed China since the late 1970's. We will also compare China's reforms with other countries that have undergone similar transitions. Finally, this course will examine the strategic and economic impact of China's rise as a great power. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 227: Introduction to Public Administration (3)

This is a general survey course designed to familiarize students with the role and function of government agencies. This course will introduce students to the field of public administration through an examination of both theory and practice. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 228: Community Planning and Sustainability (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course focuses on neighborhood planning for both citizens and professionals. Students will learn how to pinpoint key issues, set clear goals, and devise strategies to achieve these goals. In addition, they will learn what type of information to collect, where to get it, and how to assess it. Finally they will be able to package the information, implement the plan and update it periodically. This will be achieved both through classroom work and actual development and implementation of a neighborhood plan. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department). (UG)

PSC 230: United States Judicial Process (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course will examine the basic elements of the United States judicial system. Among the topics to be discussed will be the functions of the courts within a federal system of government, different roles of different state and federal courts, roles of attorneys and judges within the system, distinctions between different areas of the law, different methods of dispute resolution and the difference between the trial and appellate process, judicial selection and philosophy, and judicial policymaking. Students will also address the effect of the judicial process on citizens and ways in which citizens can either support or oppose the current functioning of the judicial system. Offered Each Year. (UG)

PSC 231: Global Governance (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the growing importance of global governance. This course studies how recent trends have generated greater international cooperation in various issue areas, such as proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, trade and investment, environment, and workers' rights. Students will be required to design their own plans to resolve selected policy problems through global cooperation. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 232: International Political Economy (3)

Cross-listed as ECO 232. Study of the globalization of the world economy, why nations trade with each other and why they sometimes practice trade protectionism. Examines the growing importance of regional economic blocs, such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Agreement. Other topics include the rise and decline of American economic hegemony, the rise of Japan's economic power, global trade conflicts, economic reforms in the former Soviet Union and China, and causes of development and underdevelopment in the third world. Offered as Needed. (UG)

PSC 233: Democracy in America (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Students will gain comprehension of the democratic process and participatory rights in the United States. This knowledge will be geared toward helping students better understand myriad forms of civic engagement and encouraging greater political efficacy. The manifestation of democratic ideals in America will be analyzed against the backdrop of historical developments and worldwide trends in democratization. Thus, while the primary focus will be on democracy in America, students will study how the development of the American political system compares to broader conceptions of democracy and democratic theory. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 238: Dictatorship and Democracy in World Politics (3)

This course examines the global resurgence of democracy in recent decades, analyzing the causes and dynamics of this recent wave of democratization as well as the different paths of democratic transitions in Southern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Eastern Europe. Exploration of strategies for achieving successful democratic consolidation. Study of factors that influence successful democratic consolidation, such as ethnic conflicts, economic reform, constitutional choice, and the role of culture. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 242: African Politics, Culture & Society (3)

This course examines African politics, culture, and society from pre-colonial era to present. It will primarily focus on the political, historical, and developmental processes that have shaped contemporary African societies as we know them today. It will involve intensive readings, theoretical analyses, critique, discussions, and in- depth examination of this unique continent and its impact on our contemporary world historically. Some of the themes addressed include, an examination of the culture of traditional Africa, cultural barriers to development, change and continuity in African politics and society, European colonization, African nationalism, impact of modernization, impact of today's globalization, impact of transatlantic slave trade, and why Africa is the richest continent in world (in terms of natural resources), but the poorest in per capital income. The course will also address post independence problems, quality of life, corruption, and diseases, among other topics. In addition, students will engage in cross cultural education experience off-campus in select humanitarian groups and organizations that serve African people; such as refugees, agencies, the African community. (UG)

PSC 305: American Constitutional Law (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course offers an in-depth examination of major constitutional doctrines, including judicial review, separation of powers, and federalism and theories of constitutional interpretation. This course is excellent preparation for pre-law students and for those who want familiarity with the foundations of American constitutional government. Upper Division or PSC 117 or PSC 230 highly recommended. Offered each Year (Fall). (UG)

PSC 310: Seminar in Black Political Leadership, Consciousness and Change (3)

This course will examine the role of Black political leadership and consciousness in American political system. What is the impact of Black political leadership in changing American society? What are the current and future prospects for Black leadership in America? This course will attempt to answer these and other questions. It will involve intensive readings, analyses, critique, discussions, reports, interviews, and in-depth research by students in the issue area of Black political leadership and consciousness in American political system. In addition, students will be asked to select a Black leader and/or problem area in Black political leadership for class presentations. Offered as Needed. (UG)

PSC 311: Congress and the Chaos of Democracy (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsiblity; Contextual Integration. This course will explore Congress, how it fits into our system of government, how it interacts with the other branches of government, and how the legislative process works. The course is designed to look at the organization of Congress, its membership, the various procedures used, and the policy outputs. In this course, we also explore why Congress is often seen as "broken." Political parties, interest groups, the president, and the courts are just a few groups that often affect policy outputs and are a major obstacle to Congress passing the policies it wants. Congress is integral to U.S. politics and this course explores why that is the case and how Congress works. (UG)

PSC 312: Judical Politics & Behavior (3)

This class addresses the role of law in the political process. We explore several central questions: "What is law, what role does law play in the political process, and how does the political process impact the law?" We will examine the critical role which judges and courts play in the interpretation, creation and evolution of law by focusing on judicial review, constitutional and statutory interpretation and judicial decision-making. We will explore the major classifications of the law, including administrative, contract, criminal, property, and tort law, with an emphasis on constitutional and statutory interpretation. We will also focus on the competing theories of judicial decision making (attitudinal model, legal model and strategic model) as identified in political science research: how and why do judges make their decision? Are they mere "oracles" of the law as Blackstonian conceptions would argue, or are they politicians wearing robes? What factors influence judicial choices - what role does political ideology, political bargaining, and role theory play in judicial rulings? (UG)

PSC 313: Politics and the Media: Watchdogs Or Lapdogs (3)

The media are called many things: governmental watch dogs, the fourth branch of government, and partisan lapdogs. No matter what you call the media, it is impossible to dispute their importance in the US system of government. In this course, we will examine the role the media plays in politics. The media report on what the government is doing as well as on how the public reacts to what the government is doing. We will examine how the media landscape has changed over time. We look at the advent of cable news reporting as well as the rise of the new media--Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, for example--and how these new media sources have changed the role of candidates and campaigns are able to use the media for their benefit. The United States has a unique media system and we will compare it to other countries. Partisanship and bias in the media will also be discussed extensively, as these are issues that have plagued media outlets since the founding of our country. (UG)

PSC 315: Politics of Western Europe (3)

An examination of the politics and governments of selected nations of Western Europe including Britain, France and Germany. Special emphasis on comparative and contemporary policymaking and on progress toward European unification. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 320: Gender and Policy in the US (3)

Cross-listed as WST 320. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving; Writing Intensive. This course will be a survey of the development of, and current issues involving, legal rights as they are impacted by gender in the U.S. Among the topics that will be covered are interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and gender concerns regarding equal protection, reproductive rights, political participation, education law, labor issues, and family law. The course will also address the role of feminism in the development of civil rights, including the diversity of approaches and concerns among different branches of feminism. Also addressed will be examples of ways in which males have been negatively affected by protective legislation and rigid policy approaches to gender roles. Offered as Needed. (UG)

PSC 321: Politics and Popular Culture in America (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contectual Integration; Civic Responsibility. Writing Intensive. This course is designed to provide students with an examination of cultural change in American politics using film, television, music, and literature. We explore a number of different aspects of American politics, including the presidency, elections, protests, and issue evolution. While this is not an exhaustive list, the course should help students gain deeper insight into these aspects of American government. Further, this course should help students begin to think more critically about different aspects of popular culture and how American politics permeates film, television, music, and literature. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 325: Local Government Reform and Community Renewal (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course provides an examination of local government in New York State, including counties, towns and villages, with emphasis on structure, function and duties of each municipality, and the rise of local government reform. Students will research the origin, purpose and principles of local governments in providing service delivery, representation in local and state policy-making, and as a pass-through entity for state and federal funding. Particular emphasis will be given to citizen engagement and coalition-building in local governance and the rise of citizen-led efforts for reform. Offered as needed. (UG)

PSC 326: Politics of East Asia (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principal events and interactions in East Asia. Various political, social, and economic aspects of China, Japan, and the two Koreas will be closely examined within the regional context of the past and present, carefully discerning the similarities and differences among those East Asian countries. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 327: Politics of South Asia (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the governments and politics of South Asia. We will begin the course with an overview of South Asian civilization and its unique development for over several millennia. We then look at the British colonialism and independence movement. Since the independence and the partition that soon followed, the countries in the Indian subcontinent have taken different paths to modernity and national development. The politics, society, and economy of each country - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka - will then be carefully examined. In doing so, students will gain a better understanding of such questions as how and why these countries have adopted different ways; what are the sources of social and religious tensions in each country; how these countries have accommodated social diversity, etc. We will complete the course by paying special attention to the conflict between India and Pakistan, two nuclear-armed states. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed (UG)

PSC 331: Political Science Research Methods (3)

Registration in this course is limited to Political Science and History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies) majors. This course addresses the different ways in which political scientists formulate and attempt to answer questions about politics and political behavior. We will begin by considering fundamental issues in the philosophy of science, including the process of inquiry, the limits to knowledge, and the extent to which the study of politics can be scientific. We will address issues central to the discipline of Political Science: methodological approaches, the literature review, research designs, and data collection as they pertain to both qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: junior status in the department; majors only. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

PSC 350: Political Argumentation and Debate (3)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will be an introduction to the skills of persuasive speaking and argumentation. Students will develop the ability to advocate a position persuasively, in an enthusiastic yet dignified manner, using current political controversies as subjects. In the process, students will also gain a deeper understanding of the multiple points of view inherent in current political controversies which they have selected to discuss. Among the topics that will be covered are the role of argumentation in society, structure and process of debate, development of arguments, researching and analyzing subjects for debate, use of evidence, use of logic and rhetorical devices, refutation and the role of emotion in advocacy. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status or PSC 113 or PSC 125 or PSC 223 highly recommended. Offered as needed. (UG)

PSC 401: American Foreign Policy (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course examines the content of American foreign policy and the processes by which it is made. Students will be introduced to the theories and grand strategies that guide US foreign policy. Students will also be introduced to the actors, including individuals and institutions that shape foreign policy decisions. We will study the historical context of current foreign policy choices made by the United States, while giving emphasis the post WW2 and Cold War period. Finally, we will debate the direction future of US foreign policy given the current engagements of the United States. Prerequisite: PSC 121. (UG)

PSC 411: Environmental Law (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 411. Case method approach to judicial interpretations of environmental laws. Additional topics may include litigation as a political tactic, expansion of standing to sue and intervener funding strategies. Prerequisite: PSC/ENS 211. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 415: Seminar on the Presidency (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. This seminar focuses on the institutional powers of the modern executive, the presidential selection process, presidential campaigns and elections, presidential character and performance an presidential/congressional relations. Discussion and analysis will follow current events in presidential politics and practice. Offered As Needed. (UG)

PSC 416: Internship in Public Administration (3)

Available to students who have declared a minor in Public Administration. Prequisite: PSC 227. (UG)

Women's Studies

WST 215: Introduction to Women's Studies (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Cross-listed as HST 215. This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the language, concepts, and issues in the field of Women's Studies. We will explore the construction of gender by focusing upon the intersection of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion in shaping women's lives, and will look at women's efforts to define their identities through work, creative activity, and through feminism. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

WST 216: Women's Worlds: Global Issues in Women's Studies (3)

Cross-listed as IND 216. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course examines the impact of global and transnational issues in shaping women's lives, historically and currently. While centering our analysis on the lives of women, we will study traditional roles in families and communities, reproductive rights, sexuality, capitalist economic development and poverty, the world of work, women's place in the environment, education, political participation, transnational movements of people and ideas, feminism, and human rights policies related to women. Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department. Offered as Needed. (UG)

WST 217: Women and Girls in Literatre and Film (3)

Cross-listed as IND 217. Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course will introduce short stories, poetry, biographical work and film by and/or about women in various cultures. We will look at how geography, religion, class, education, political events and family roles affect the lives and destinies of women in the world today. While we will see great challenges throughout the world we will also focus on the great progress being made toward gender equality. Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages. Offered as Needed. (UG)

WST 224: Women and Religion (3)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as REL 224. This course will explore the place of women in the three Western monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). The course will explore the views of women found in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, the non-canonical Gospels, and the Koran. It will also explore modern attempts to rework the biblical tradition (e.g., in the novel "The Red Tent") and to confront the Islamic revolution (e.g., in the graphic novels "Persepolis I & II"). The class will also explore a number of contentious gender related issues (e.g., birth control, women clergy, traditional marriage, homosexuality). Offered As Needed. (UG)

WST 309: Introduction to the History of American Women (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as HST 309. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of American women from the colonial era to the present. The class places particular emphasis on the ways in which women's experiences have been shaped by such factors as race, class, and ethnicity, as well as by gender. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status, or foundational coursework in history or women's studies, is highly recommended. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

WST 317: Gender Trouble: Literature and Film (3)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as LIT 317. Do the gender roles represented in literary works reflect a "reality" based on biological differences between the sexes? Or are gender roles simply a product of a culture's religious, economic, and political agendas? This course examines works from various genres and historical periods in order to understand how they reinforce or subvert gender stereotypes that inform and condition people's lives. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. (UG)

WST 320: Gender and Policy in the US (3)

Cross-listed as PSC 320. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving; Writing Intensive. This course will be a survey of the development of, and current issues involving, legal rights as they are impacted by gender in the U.S. Among the topics that will be covered are interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and gender concerns regarding equal protection, reproductive rights, political participation, education law, labor issues, and family law. The course will also address the role of feminism in the development of civil rights, including the diversity of approaches and concerns among different branches of feminism. Also addressed will be examples of ways in which males have been negatively affected by protective legislation and rigid policy approaches to gender roles. Offered as Needed. (UG)

WST 328: The Image of Women in Art and Media (3)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as IND 328. This course addresses the ways in which women have been represented visually (painting, sculpture, film, advertising). The examination will examine both historical prototypes and contemporary examples. Among the issues we will discuss in an open forum are: the depiction of women from both a masculine and feminine vantage point, how the feminist agenda has been perceived in contemporary culture to condone sexualization and objectification, and how the image conveys assumptions and knowledge. Offered As Needed. (UG)

WST 336: Sex, Love and God (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 336 or REL 336. This course is about human sexuality and religion, specifically, how religious people have read and interpreted biblical texts and traditions in relation to sex, human sexuality, and expressions of love. Students are encouraged to investigate how their own religious beliefs inform their bodily lives and attitudes regarding sexual, romantic, and erotic expressions. The main focus of this course is concerned with Christianity, though depending on student interest, Jewish and Muslim interpretations may be covered briefly as well. Students will learn about concepts of the human body and related concerns of sexuality in ancient and medieval times, and investigate religious perspectives and prescriptions as they relate to specific understandings. Students will distinguish between historical ideas of erotic love and the modern construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality. The politicization of sexuality by religious groups and the use of religious ideas about sexuality by secular groups will be discussed. (UG)