Daemen CLOSED for Inclement Weather

Daemen College will be closed Friday, 11/21/14. The Dining Hall will be open following a normal schedule. Limited shuttle operations starting at 8:50am til approximately 6:00pm.

Natural Sciences Courses

Biochemistry

BCH 313: General Biochemistry (3)

An introduction to the chemistry and metabolism of bio-molecules. Topics include structure, properties, biosynthesis, and catabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and porphyrins. Also discussed are the roles of enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes in biocatalysis. Science credit may not be earned for both BCH 313 and BCH 317. Prerequisites: BIO 110; CHE 301. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

BCH 313L: Biochemistry Laboratory (1)

Fundamental techniques in general biochemistry. Corequisite: BCH 313. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

BCH 317: Bioorganic Chemistry (3)

An introduction to basic organic chemistry with biochemistry. Intended for Physician Assistant and Physical Therapy majors. Prerequisites: CHE 111/L; BIO 110/L. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

BCH 317L: Bioorganic Chemistry Lab (1)

Lab techniques in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Corequisite: BCH 317. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

BCH 401: Biological Organic Chemistry (3)

An exploration of the chemical structures, stereo- chemistry and reactions of organic molecules of biological importance such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Prerequisites: CHE 302 and BCH 313. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BCH 440: Molecular Biology (3)

Cross-listed as BIO 440. A detailed presentation of the structure and function of biological molecules and macromolecular complexes. The experimental approaches used in modern laboratories are emphasized. Prerequisites: BCH 313 and 313L. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

BCH 440L: Molecular Biology Lab (1)

Cross-listed as BIO 440L. Laboratory techniques and experimentation involving proteins and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BCH 440. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

Biology

BIO 100: Introduction to Biological Science (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An introduction to the concepts of biology through the study of the structure, function and evolution of living organisms. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 103: Human Biology (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A survey of the major aspects of human biology. Emphasis is placed on structure and function of the human body. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 103L: Human Biology Laboratory (1)

This science laboratory will introduce the students to techniques and experimentation in the study of the human body in health and illness. Co- or prerequisite: BIO103 (UG)

BIO 105: Survey of Biology (3)

(UG)

BIO 109: General Biology I (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A study of the basic principles of biology. Part I focuses on the molecular and cellular aspects of living systems and evolution. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry, minimum mathematics competency of MTH 124 or equivalent course or math placement. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). (UG)

BIO 109L: General Biology I Lab (1)

Lab techniques and experimentation in biological processes with emphasis on cellular level processes. Co or prerequisite: BIO 109. Laboratory, 2 hours. (UG)

BIO 110: General Biology II (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A study of the basic principles of biology. Part II deals with systematic organization and function of living organisms and ecology. Prerequisite: BIO 109. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). (UG)

BIO 110L: General Biology II Lab (1)

Laboratory examination of the structure, function and classification of organisms. Co or prerequisite: BIO 110. Laboratory, 2 hours. (UG)

BIO 117: Human Nutrition (3)

An introduction to human nutrition and dietary needs with relevant discussion of basic structure and function of the human body. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 118: Anatomy of Movement (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Discusses the principles and physical movements of Yoga and Tai Chi. Students will learn to analyze movements and understand the role of muscles, tendon and joints in a posture. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 200: Science and Contemporary Social Issues (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Contextual Integration; Information Literacy. Provides the basic scientific background requisite to understanding the science behind important contemporary issues such as genetic engineering, stem cell research, cloning, reproductive technologies, the genetic basis of behavior (e.g., violence), and pressing environmental concerns. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 207: Anatomy and Physiology I (4)

An introduction to the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 207L: Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques and study in Anatomy and Physiology I. Co-requisite: BIO 207. (UG)

BIO 208: Anatomy and Physiology II (4)

An introduction to the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Prerequisite: BIO 207. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 208L: Anatomy and Physiology Lab II (0)

Laboratory techniques and study in Anatomy and Physiology II. Co-requisite: BIO 208. (UG)

BIO 219: Introduction to Microbiology (4)

This course is an overview of the fundamental principles of microbiology, including morphology, activities and distribution of microbes, culture methods, diseases of microbial etiology and some aspects of applied microbiology for the health sciences. Laboratory emphasis is on bacterial culturing, aseptic technique, identification of organisms, and the exploration of conditions necessary for microbial growth as well as microbial control. Pre-requisite: High school biology; limited to students at Manhattan site. Corequisite: BIO 219L. (UG)

BIO 219L: Introduction to Microbiology Lab (0)

Laboratory emphasis is on bacterial culturing, aseptic technique, identification of organisms, and the exploration of conditions necessary for microbial growth as well as microbial control. Corequisite: BIO 219. (UG)

BIO 302: General Ecology (3)

An introduction to the study of populations, communities and ecosystems with emphasis on theory and experimentation. Prerequisites: BIO-109 and BIO 110; MTH 134 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Fall). (UG)

BIO 302L: General Ecology Lab (1)

Lab includes field and laboratory experimentation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, with emphasis on experimental design, data analysis and scientific writing. Laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: BIO 302. Offered Alternate Years (Fall). (UG)

BIO 303: Plant Biology (4)

An overview of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of the plant kingdom. Lab includes field identification, plant structure, and physiological experimentation. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Fall). (UG)

BIO 303L: Plant Biology Lab (0)

Laboratory, 3 hours, in Plant Biology. Co-requisite: BIO 303. (UG)

BIO 304: Conservation Biology (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as SUST 304. An interdisciplinary science course that combines theory and applied research to address the problems of widespread loss of biological and genetic diversity. Prerequisite: BIO 110, and CMP 101. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

BIO 308: Genetics (3)

A study of the fundamental principles of genetics from viruses through humans, focusing on transmission and molecular genetics. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110; CHE 101 or CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

BIO 308L: Genetics Lab (1)

Laboratory techniques and experimentation in genetics. Co or prerequisite: BIO 308. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

BIO 315: General Microbiology (3)

A study of the structure, classification, physiology, ecology, genetics and economic importance of viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotic microorganisms. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110 and CHE 111. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

BIO 315L: General Microbiology Lab (1)

A study of the structure, classification, physiology, genetics and economic importance of viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotic microroganisms. Pre or corequisite: BIO 315. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

BIO 316: Anatomy and Physiology (4)

A survey of the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology and dissection and experimentation to enhance the understanding of human systems. Intended for health care studies students and other non-majors. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 109. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 316L: Anatomy and Physiology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Anatomy & Physiology. Co-requisite: BIO 316. (UG)

BIO 319: Costa Rica Natural History/Conservation (3)

This field-based study-abroad course will provide students with both an international and interdisciplinary environmental experience in Costa Rica. Students will be exposed to the biodiversity of multiple ecosystems and the issues related to conservation and ecotourism in Costa Rica. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and permission of instructor. Offered as needed. (UG)

BIO 322: Invertebrate Biology (4)

A comprehensive study of the anatomy, physiology and classification of invertebrates. Lab includes field identification. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 322L: Invertebrate Biology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Intertebrate Biology. Corequisite: BIO 322. (UG)

BIO 323: Animal Biology (4)

An overview of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of the animal kingdom. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 324: Vertebrate Biology (4)

A comprehensive study of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of vertebrates. Lab includes field identification. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Fall). (UG)

BIO 324L: Vertebrate Biology (0)

Laboratory techniques for Vertebrate Biology. Corequisite: BIO 324. (UG)

BIO 325: Cell Biology (3)

A study of structure/function relationships in cells. Topics include cell theory, research techniques, nuclear and cell division, cytoplasmic organelles and biological membranes. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Offered Alternate Years (Fall). (UG)

BIO 325L: Cell Biology Lab Laboratory (1)

This course is designed to complement and expand on topics of cellular biology covered in the accompanying lecture, Bio 325: Cell Biology. The course deepens student understanding of lecture topics by providing supplemental instruction and practical, hands-on manipulation of cellular material. The course is designed to introduce students to many commonly used biological laboratory techniques and provide a foundation for the use of these methods in subsequent upper-division courses. Pre/corequisite: BIO-325. (UG)

BIO 330: General Anatomy (4)

A course in systemic anatomy covering the morphology of the human body along with the functional potential of its parts. (Not open to those who have taken BIO 207 BIO 208.) Prerequisite: BIO 100, BIO 103, or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

BIO 330L: General Anatomy Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Anatomy. Corequisite: BIO 330. (UG)

BIO 333: Developmental Biology (4)

A study of the reproductive mechanisms and development of multi-cellular organisms. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

BIO 333L: Developmental Biology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Developmental Biology. Corequisite: BIO 333. (UG)

BIO 334: Forensic Entomology (4)

Cross-listed as FOR 334. A study of insects important in forensic science. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 334L: Forensic Entomology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Forensic Entomology. Co-requisite: BIO 334. (UG)

BIO 335: Animal Behavior (4)

An evolutionary and ecological approach to ethology including study of neuronal, hormonal and physiological mechanisms underlying adaptive behavior of animals. Laboratory includes observations and quantification of behavior in zoo, field and lab settings. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

BIO 335L: Animal Behavior Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Animal Behavior. Corequisite: BIO 335. (UG)

BIO 340: General Physiology (4)

An introduction to general physiology. Emphasis placed on cellular physiology, biological control mechanisms and coordinated body functions. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and CHE 101 or CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

BIO 340L: General Physiology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Physiology. Corequisite: BIO 340. (UG)

BIO 343: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology (3)

Lecture only fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Why do certain animals only live in certain environments? Students will be able to answer this question by evaluating the roles of each major organ system within vertebrates and, through student-chosen examples, explaining how each system has evolved to address specific environmental challenges. By doing this, students will develop a more holistic understanding for how these organ systems work in combination with each other. This class requires students to deliver 5 in-class presentations throughout the term. Offered as Needed. (UG)

BIO 343L: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology Laboratory (1)

Laboratory techniques and study in vertebrate physiology; 3 experimental topics and a field trip (and completion of a project) to the zoo are included in this lab. Laboratory, 3 hours. (UG)

BIO 350: Vertebrate Paleontology (3)

An introduction to the study of the origin and evolution of the vertebrates using the fossil record. Dinosaurs and the American mastodon will serve as examples of how we reconstruct organisms and environments from the remote past. Prerequisite: BIO 110. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 407: Pathophysiology (3)

This course is designed to present information to the professional RN regarding alterations in the physiology of adult patients with common acute chronic disease specifically related to the pulmonary, renal, cardiovascular, endocrine, hematologic, immune, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and neurologic systems. It is based on a systems approach and is intended to promote an understanding of how and why symptoms appear, so that the student has a reasonable explanation for the finding he/she elicits on assessment. This course also assists the student in developing a comprehensive approach to the management of patient problems associated with the aforementioned problems. Emphasis is placed on decision making that utilizes a complete data base consisting of physical, psychological, environmental, social and economic findings. Prerequisite: Nursing majors only or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 417: Immunology (3)

A detailed study of the principles of immunology. The course focuses on the details of the nonspecific and specific dfenses of the body, immunological dysfunction and immunodiagnostics. Prerequisite: BIO 315 and CHE 101 or CHE 111. Offered As Needed. (UG)

BIO 436: Evolutionary Biology (4)

A study of the development and current state of evolutionary biology. Critical discussion of important writings in the field is emphasized. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110 plus two 300- level biology courses, MTH 134. Lecture, 3 hours; Seminar, 2 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring). (UG)

BIO 436L: Evolutionary Biology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques in Evolutionary Biology. Co-requisite: BIO 436. (UG)

BIO 440: Molecular Biology (3)

Cross-listed as BCH 440. A detailed presentation of the structure and function of biological molecules and macromolecular complexes. The experimental approaches used in modern laboratories are emphasized. Prerequisite: BCH 313 and 313L. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

BIO 440L: Molecular Biology Lab (1)

Cross-listed as BCH 440L. Laboratory techniques and experimentation involving proteins and nucleic acids. Co-requisite: BIO 440. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

BIO 541: Neurobiology I (4)

An integrated study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Topics include surface anatomy and blood supply of the brain, meninges, sensory receptors and the electrical properties of neuronal membranes. Prerequisites: BIO 340 and professional phase status in Physical Therapy, or by permission of Natural Science Dept. Chair. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

BIO 541L: Neurobiology I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neurobiology I. Corequisite: BIO 541. (GR)

BIO 542: Neurobiology II (4)

A continuation of the study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Topics include neuroanatomical pathways, motor control systems, and physiology of synapses. Prerequisite: BIO 541. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

BIO 542L: Neurobiology II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neurobiology II. Corequisite: BIO 542. (GR)

Chemistry

CHE 100: Chemistry for a Changing World (3)

An introduction to the major concepts of chemistry with a focus on the application of chemical principles to everyday life. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

CHE 101: General Chemistry (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Topics include bonding, equations, reactivity, solutions, and equilibrium. This course cannot be used as science elective credit for science majors. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or MTH 97 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

CHE 101L: General Chemistry Lab (1)

An introduction to laboratory techniques in chemistry required of students in the Environmental Studies program who do not take CHE 110L. Corequisite:CHE 101. Offered As Needed. (UG)

CHE 102: Preparation for Chemistry I (3)

This is a preparatory course for the study of general chemistry for science majors (CHE110) and is offered ONLY to students who choose to leave CHE110 due to anticipated unacceptable performance in CHE 110. The course will focus on major areas of problem solving needed for introductory chemistry and the appropriate manipulation of numbers. Topics covered: mass and unit conversions to and from the metric system; atomic structure and nomenclature for compounds; balancing chemical reactions and making chemical conversions through stoichiometric relationships; correctly writing and interpreting various types of reactions to aqueous solutions and balancing redox reactions; using the gas laws to predict properties of the gases, and to predict the reacted or expected amounts within chemical reactions of reactant or product gases. Successful completion of the course allows students to proceed to CHE 110. Pre-requisite: Prior enrollment but non-completion of CHE 110/L. (UG)

CHE 102L: Prep for Chemistry I Lab (1)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 102. The focus of these experiments will be on major areas of problem solving. Prerequisite: Prior enrollment but non-completion of CHE 110L. (UG)

CHE 104: General Chemistry (4)

This course is a continuation of CHE 101. The focus of the course is the fundamental structure and properties of the major classes of organic compounds with particular reference to organic molecules and biopolymers that are important in pharmacology, nutrition and medicine such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course is primarily intended for those who are interested in nursing or health care studies majors. May not be taken for science elective credit by science majors. Course cannot be used in place of CHE 301 or BCH 317. Not offered at Main campus. (UG)

CHE 104L: General Chemistry Laboratory (0)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 104 in which the different properties, preparation of, and detection of organic molecules and biopolymers that are important in pharmacology and nutrition and health will be investigated. Prerequisite: CHE 101L; Co-requisite: CHE 104. Not offered at Main campus. (UG)

CHE 110: Chemistry I (4)

An introduction to the basic principles, theories and techniques of chemistry. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, states of matter, equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry; mathematics competency of MTH 124 or higher. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring). (UG)

CHE 110L: Chemistry I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Chemistry I. Corequisite: CHE 110. (UG)

CHE 111: Chemistry II (4)

A continuation of the study of the basic principles, theories and techniques of chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring). (UG)

CHE 111L: Chemistry II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Chemistry II. Corequisite: CHE 111. (UG)

CHE 112: Introduction to Forensic Chemistry (3)

A fundamental exploration of forensic chemical techniques, data analysis, and formal presentation of data collected. Chemical techniques for this course include fingerprinting techniques, chromatography, density gradients, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHE 101 or CHE 110. (UG)

CHE 112L: Introduction to Forensic Chemistry Lab (1)

Laboratory techniques for general forensic chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 112. (UG)

CHE 301: Organic Chemistry I (3)

An introduction to organic functional groups. Bonding, reaction mechanisms, synthetic chemistry, isomers (position, functional and stereo), oxidation-reduction and the chemistry of organic molecules are covered. Science credit may not be earned for both BCH 317 and CHE 301. Prerequisites: CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

CHE 301L: Organic Chemistry I Lab (1)

An introduction to organic techniques and synthesis. Pre/corequisite: CHE 301. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

CHE 302: Organic Chemistry II (3)

An expanded view of reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. The development of a more complete synthetic correlation chart. Special topics include spectroscopy and molecular rearrangements. Prerequisite: CHE 301. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

CHE 302L: Organic Chemistry II Lab (1)

Organic synthesis and spectroscopy. Pre/corequisite: CHE 302. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

CHE 303: Introduction to Physical Chemistry (4)

An introduction to physical chemistry including thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics and quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: MTH 144, PHY 102 or PHY 152, CHE 302. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

CHE 303L: Introduction to Physical Chemistry Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Intro to Physical Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 303. (UG)

CHE 304: Advanced Physical Chemistry (4)

A continuation of the study of the basic principles of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 303. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

CHE 304L: Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 304. (UG)

CHE 309: Chemistry III (3)

A discussion of bonding theories, chemistry of the elements, coordination compounds and stereochemistry of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHE 302/L. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

CHE 311: Contemporary Chemical Analysis (4)

The principles and techniques of quantitative analytical chemistry. The topics include gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical and instrumental techniques. Prerequisite: CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year. (UG)

CHE 311L: Contemporary Chemical Analysis Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Contemporary Chemical Analysis. Corequisite: CHE 311. (UG)

CHE 312: Modern Instrumental Analysis (4)

An introduction to the use of modern analytical instruments. Theory of operation and hands-on practical applications are covered. Prerequisite: CHE 301 or BCH 317. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

CHE 312L: Modern Instrumental Analysis Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Modern Instrumental Analysis. Corequisite: CHE 312. (UG)

CHE 337: Forensic Chemistry (3)

An advanced approach to application of modern qualitative and quantitative techniques used in a forensic laboratory. The emphasis is on investigating common interferences that exist in forensic evidence along with how to work with unknown materials. Prerequisites: CHE 110, CHE 111 and BCH 317 or CHE 301. (UG)

CHE 337L: Forensic Chemistry Lab (1)

Laboratory techniques for Forensic Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 337. (UG)

CHE 410: Organic Chemistry III (3)

A detailed study of reaction mechanisms, molecular rearrangements, stereochemistry and instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: CHE 302/L. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

Cytotechnology

CYT 501: Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of using the microscope to perform Pap smear screening. This lecture, coupled with computer-based learning and presentation formats, will allow the student to cognitively learn the nuances of picking-up neoplastic lesions of the gynecologic tract and know the mimics of cervical carcinoma. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in cervical Cytopathology, and pass the ThinPrep validation examination for examining liquid-based ThinPrep Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT503, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 501: Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of using the microscope to perform Pap smear screening. This lecture, coupled with computer-based learning and presentation formats, will allow the student to cognitively learn the nuances of picking-up neoplastic lesions of the gynecologic tract and know the mimics of cervical carcinoma. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in cervical Cytopathology, and pass the ThinPrep validation examination for examining liquid-based ThinPrep Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT503, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 503: Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills to locate and isolate the cell of interest in a gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least a 90% accuracy rate. Additionally, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to screen GYN specimens with sufficient competence to issue a final report of negative for intraepithelial lesion (NIL). The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 503: Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills to locate and isolate the cell of interest in a gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least a 90% accuracy rate. Additionally, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to screen GYN specimens with sufficient competence to issue a final report of negative for intraepithelial lesion (NIL). The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 505L: Gynecologic Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare and assist in the basic laboratory techniques as applies to cytology and learn to perform molecular HPV testing. Additionally, students will learn and manage a computer-based assisted screening device in the performance of Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Students will rotate through the Department of Pathology at Buffalo General Hospital in order to work with this device. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT503. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 505L: Gynecologic Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare and assist in the basic laboratory techniques as applies to cytology and learn to perform molecular HPV testing. Additionally, students will learn and manage a computer-based assisted screening device in the performance of Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Students will rotate through the Department of Pathology at Buffalo General Hospital in order to work with this device. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT503. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 521: Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to locate and interpret benign and malignant lesions of the lung (bronchial brush/wash), pericardial and peritoneal effusions, urine, CSF, gastrointestinal, mediastinal, salivary glands and pediatric lesions. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in non-GYN Cytopathology. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT523, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 521: Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to locate and interpret benign and malignant lesions of the lung (bronchial brush/wash), pericardial and peritoneal effusions, urine, CSF, gastrointestinal, mediastinal, salivary glands and pediatric lesions. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in non-GYN Cytopathology. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT523, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 523: Non-Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills of the cell of interest in a non-gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides an hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 523: Non-Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills of the cell of interest in a non-gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides an hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 525: Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Rotation And Immunohistochemistry Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to assist in the preparation of fine needle aspiration specimens including, smearing techniques and rapid fixation. They will also learn to stain with both the Papanicolaou and Diff Quik stain any specimen coming from the FNA service. In addition, students will be able to assist in the performance of immunohistochemical (IP) test in conjunction with any specimens sent for IP staining, The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT523. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 525: Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Rotation And Immunohistochemistry Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to assist in the preparation of fine needle aspiration specimens including, smearing techniques and rapid fixation. They will also learn to stain with both the Papanicolaou and Diff Quik stain any specimen coming from the FNA service. In addition, students will be able to assist in the performance of immunohistochemical (IP) test in conjunction with any specimens sent for IP staining, The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT523. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 541: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the detection and interpretation of malignancies of various organ sites. Most common tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, lymph nodes, breast, lung, soft tissue including melanoma, kidney, adrenals, mesothelium, pancreas and liver will be covered. Microbiological entities and their associated cytomorphology will also be covered for each organ system. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT543, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 541: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the detection and interpretation of malignancies of various organ sites. Most common tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, lymph nodes, breast, lung, soft tissue including melanoma, kidney, adrenals, mesothelium, pancreas and liver will be covered. Microbiological entities and their associated cytomorphology will also be covered for each organ system. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT543, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 543: Fine Needle Aspiration Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills in locating and isolating the cell of interest in any fine needle aspiration specimen for proper diagnostic interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. he course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 543: Fine Needle Aspiration Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills in locating and isolating the cell of interest in any fine needle aspiration specimen for proper diagnostic interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. he course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 545: Cytogenetics and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare specimens for FISH testing, learn procurement techniques for molecular analysis of EGFR, B-raf, and ALK testing. Students also learn to perform EGFR, B-raf and ALK testing. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT543. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 545: Cytogenetics and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare specimens for FISH testing, learn procurement techniques for molecular analysis of EGFR, B-raf, and ALK testing. Students also learn to perform EGFR, B-raf and ALK testing. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT543. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 650: Cytology Research and Professional Development (1 - 3)

The Cytotechnology program culminates with completion of the research component of the program. The research project will be completed over multiple terms (one credit per term for a total of 3 credits). Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate published professional literature and explain the basic principles of the scientific method. Students will perform a cytology related project for presentation and potential publication of their research findings. Offered Each Term (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

CYT 650: Cytology Research and Professional Development (1 - 3)

The Cytotechnology program culminates with completion of the research component of the program. The research project will be completed over multiple terms (one credit per term for a total of 3 credits). Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate published professional literature and explain the basic principles of the scientific method. Students will perform a cytology related project for presentation and potential publication of their research findings. Offered Each Term (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

Environmental Studies

ENS 201: Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A survey of ecological principles, human modifications of environment, population dynamics, environmental pollutants and the effects on ecological systems. Intended for non-science majors, cannot be used for major credit for science majors. Offered As Needed. (UG)

ENS 205: Planet Earth I: Physical Features (3)

Cross-listed as NSC 205. An introduction to physical aspects of geology, hydrology, the atmosphere and oceanography of the Earth and the application of these principles from a scientific perspective to land use and planning. Cannot receive credit for both ESC 107 and ENS/NSC 205. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

ENS 206: Planet Earth II: Geographical Features (3)

Cross-listed as NSC 206. An examination of the features that distinguish the different ecosystems. Topics include the use of spatial statistics, remote sensing and interpretation of land/satellite data as a means of distinguishing the features. This course cannot be used as credit in the major for science majors. Offered As Needed. (UG)

ENS 211: Environmental and Energy Policies I (3)

Cross-listed as PSC 211. A survey of major environmental and energy policies and the intergovernmental administrative system established to implement them. Topics include a history of the environmental movement, green politics, international environmental issues and the contrasts between scientific and political decision-making. If taken as ENS 211, this course cannot be used as a science elective. Offered as Needed. (UG)

ENS 212: Environmental and Energy Policies II (3)

A continuation of ENS/PSC 211. Prerequisite: GVT/ENS 211. Offered As Needed. (UG)

ENS 219: Politics, Planning and Land Use (3)

Cross-listed as PSC 219. Principles and practice of land management policies at the state and local levels of government. Topics include zoning power of local government, preparation of master plans, variance procedures, federal mandates and Environmental Impact Statements. Offered As Needed. (UG)

ENS 303: Environmental Toxicology (3)

Cross-listed as NSC 303. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of different types of toxins, their routes into organisms, environmental fates and roles in metabolic pathways. Applications to environmental and occupational health as well as detection and risk assessment are included. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110/L and CHE 111/L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

ENS 304: Environmental Chemistry (3)

An examination of the chemical aspects of pollution (water, air and land) including detection and remediation methods. Chemistry for the sustainable use of natural resources is discussed. Prerequisite: CHE 110. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

ENS 304L: Environmental Chemistry Lab (1)

Employs the practical application of chemical analysis for detection and remediation methods of pollution in water, air and land. The chemistry of some alternative energy sources are also explored. Corequisite: ENS 304. (UG)

ENS 309: Population Dynamics (3)

An examination of the relationships between human and animal populations and their environment. Topics include demography, population growth and relevant models, population genetics and environmental stresses on populations. Prerequisite: BIO 302. Offered As Needed. (UG)

ENS 310: Global Water Issues (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Information Literacy; Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as SUST 310. This course investigates the environmental, technological and health-related issues associated with the availability and quality of water worldwide. Case studies of global water problems will highlight these water problems in the context of socioeconomic and politicial issues. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110 or ENS 201, or Permission of Instructor. Offered as Needed. (UG)

Environmental Science

ESC 107: Introduction to Earth Science (3)

An introduction to the earth sciences with emphasis on geology, oceanography and meteorology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

Forensic Science

FOR 101: Introduction to Forensic Science (3)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing-Intensive. An introduction to the fascinating world of how science solves crimes. The topics for this course include and are not limited to: the history of forensic science, crime scene investigation, trace analysis, drugs, arson, fingerprints, firearms, tool mark analysis and document analysis. Lecture, 3 hours. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered Each Year. (UG)

FOR 210: Criminalistics (3)

An introductory course in the use of science for evaluation of physical evidence. Offered As Needed. (UG)

FOR 334: Forensic Entomology (4)

Cross-listed as BIO 334. A study of insects important in forensic science. Offered As Needed. (UG)

FOR 334L: Forensic Entomology Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Forensic Entomology. Co-requisite: FOR 334. (UG)

Natural Science

NSC 130: Scientific Excavation as a Window on the Past (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Two Western New York scientific excavation projects will be used to demonstrate the application of the scientific method to real-life situations in complex and sometimes misleading field situations. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 201: Comprehensive Science I (3)

An integrated approach to the sciences, covering physics, chemistry, earth science, astronomy and biology. Interconnections of these disciplines is emphasized to promote a basic science literacy and informed civic involvement. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 202: Comprehensive Science II (3)

Continuation of NSC 201. Cannot be used for science credit for science majors. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 205: Planet Earth I: Physical Features (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 205. An introduction to physical aspects of geology, hydrology, the atmosphere and oceanography of the Earth and the application of these principles from a scientific perspective to land use and planning. Cannot receive credit for both ESC 107 and ENS/NSC 205. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

NSC 206: Planet Earth II: Geographical Features (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 206. An examination of the features that distinguish the different ecosystems. Topics include the use of spatial statistics, remote sensing and interpretation of land/satellite data as a means of distinguishing the features. This course cannot be used as credit in the major for science majors. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 209: Service Learning in the Natural Sciences (3)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning requirement. A course that involves students working together to use their scientific knowledge to benefit the community. Project topics will vary each semester, but will involve students in identifying relevant community problems, developing proposed solutions and helping to implement these in the community. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 231: Natural Science: Scientific Language & Literacy Seminar (3)

A seminar on research problems and recent advances in natural science. Emphasis is placed on using different forms of media and presentation to communicate scientific ideas. Prerequisites: Biology, Biochemistry or Natural Science major; Sophomore status = min. grade C in CHE 111, BIO 110, and 3 credits in an additional 300/400 level BIO or CHE. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

NSC 244: Scientific Techniques and Data Interpretation (3)

A survey of basic methods of data collection and analysis. Students will learn about the theory and practice of basic laboratory skills that are considered necessary for entry-level laboratory positions or beginning graduate studies in the sciences. Methods of data collection and analysis for different techniques and instrumentation will be reviewed. Prerequisite: BIO 110, CHE 111. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 303: Environmental Toxicology (3)

Cross-listed as ENS 303. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of different types of toxins, their routes into organisms, environmental fates and roles in metabolic pathways. Applications to environmental and occupational health as well as detection and risk assessment are included. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110/L and CHE 111/L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

NSC 306: Teaching Science in Middle and High School (3)

An investigation of the diverse methods for presenting science material in the middle and high school classroom to meet the national and state standards for science education. Classroom visitation will be required outside of course time. Prerequisites: Upper division status in biology, EDU 313 and EDU 327. Offered Alternate Years (Fall) or As Needed. (UG)

NSC 307: Pharmacotherapeutics (3)

Cross-listed as NUR 307. (Not open to Biology, Biochemistry or Natural Science majors). This elective course presents the latest information about the newest medications and up-to-the minute information about traditional drugs in a manner that is relevant to the needs of the professional nurse caring for patients in a variety of clinical settings. Through a nursing process approach, the course stresses pharmacological principles that will aid the nurse in the administration of medications. The course is designed for the nurse who already has a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Problem-solving sessions throughout the course focus on therapeutic usages and monitoring of each of the classes of agents. Prerequisites: BIO 207-208 or BIO 330-340. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered as Needed. (UG)

NSC 310: Biostatistics (3)

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on applications in biological and health sciences. Prerequisite: MTH 134, BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Computer Lab, 1 hour. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

NSC 331: Natural Science Literature Survey (2)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with NSC 443, combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. An introduction to the general principles and procedures of scientific research with emphasis on the use of scientific literature and methods of research. Prerequisite: Upper division status in Biochemistry, Biology or Natural Science and successful completion of BCH 317 or CHE 302 and 3 additional courses in BIO or CHE at the 300/400 level. Seminar, 1 hour; Literature work, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

NSC 342: Biomaterials (3)

An examination of the range of biomaterials available for orthopedics, cardiology, plastic surgery, dentistry, and other applications. The selection of materials and their manufacture for implantation in the body are discussed. Issues surrounding safety of biomaterials in the body, as well as the FDA processes governing implants and clinical trials are examined. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and CHE 111. Offered As Needed. (UG)

NSC 401: Research Problems in Cell Biology (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in cell biology under supervision. Prerequisites: BIO 325; NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 404: Research Problems in Mammalian Physiology (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in mammalian physiology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 405: Research Problems in Genetics and Microbiology (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in Genetics and/or Microbiology. Prerequisites: NSC 331, permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 406: Research Problems in Organic and Environmental Chemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in organic or environmental chemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 407: Research Problems in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in molecular biology and/or biochemistry. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 408: Research Problems in Biochemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in molecular biology and/or biochemistry. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 409: Research Problems in Analytical and Physical Chemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in analytical or physical chemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester (UG)

NSC 410: Research Problems in Ecology and Environmental Biology (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in ecology and evolutionary biology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 412: Research Problems in Zoology and Natural History (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in zoology and/or natural history under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 413: Research Problems in Organic & Biochemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in organic chemistry and/or biochemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 414: Research Problems in Developmental Biology (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in developmental biology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 415: Research Problems: Bioengineering and Wound Healing (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in bioengineering and/or wound healing under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 416: Research Problems: Inorganic Biochemistry (1 - 3)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in inorganic biochemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NCS 331; permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

NSC 443: Natural Science Research Seminar (2)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy; Writing Intensive. Together with NSC 331, combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. A capstone seminar focusing on research conducted by seniors and faculty. Prerequisites: NSC 331, with a grade of C or better; Senior status in Biochemistry, Biology or Natural Science. Seminar, 1 hour; Literature and/or Laboratory Work, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

NSC 458: Natural Science Directed Study (1 - 3)

Independent study or project in a natural science discipline under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Senior status in a natural science discipline and permission of the department chairperson. Offered As Needed. (UG)

Physics

PHY 101: Physics I (3)

A study of the elements of physics. Part I covers mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisite: MTH 134 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

PHY 101L: Physics I Lab (1)

Experimental analysis of concepts discussed in Part I lecture. Co or prerequisite: PHY 101. Laboratory, 3 hours. (UG)

PHY 102: Physics II (3)

A continuation of the study of the elements of physics. Part II covers electricity, magnetism, light and radioactivity. Prerequisite: PHY 101. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

PHY 102L: Physics II Lab (1)

Experimental analysis of concepts discussed in Part II lecture. Co or prerequisite: PHY 102. Laboratory, 3 hours. (UG)

PHY 125: Forensic Physics (4)

An overview of how many concepts in physics can be used to solve crimes. Topics for this course include: blood spatter analysis, ballistics, and auto accident recreation. (UG)

PHY 125L: Forensic Physics Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Forensic Physics. Co-requisite: PHY 125. (UG)

PHY 151: General Physics I Lecture (4)

A typical course in general physics intended for students in Biochemistry and Mathematics. Emphasis is placed on fundamental principles and theories. Prerequisite: MTH 144 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed (Fall). (UG)

PHY 151L: General Physics I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Physics I. Corequisite: PHY 151. (UG)

PHY 152: General Physics II Lecture (4)

A continuation of General Physics I. Prerequisite: PHY 151. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered As Needed (Spring). (UG)

PHY 152L: General Physics II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for General Physics II. Corequisite: PHY 152. (UG)