Physical Therapy Courses

Physical Therapy

PT 101: Freshman Seminar in Physical Therapy (1)

This course is designed to introduce students to the physical therapy profession and to the professional phase of the physical therapy curriculum. Students will be introduced to the history of the physical therapy profession, scope of practice, professional organizations, roles of other health care professionals, and the importance of scientific research and its link to the concept of evidence-based practice. Concepts related to managed care and the changing health care environment will be explored as they relate to the health care professional and consumer. Additionally, issues of contemporary practice will be discussed and debated. Prerequisite: PT freshman status or permission of instructor or PT Department. Offered Each Fall and Spring Semester (As Needed). (UG)

PT 201: Sophomore Seminar in Physical Therapy (1)

This course is the second in a sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the professional phase of the physical therapy curriculum and the profession. Topics will include an introduction to medical terminology and documentation formats in physical therapy, principles of therapeutic communication, core values, sociocultural issues and cultural competence in health care delivery, issues in professional continuing education in a dynamic profession, and computer literacy in physical therapy. Prerequisite: PT 101 or permission of instructor or PT Department. Offered Each Fall and Spring Semester (As Needed). (UG)

PT 312: Principles of Teaching and Learning (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Together with CMP 315, Advanced Composition for Health Professionals, combination of both courses meets Research & Presentation requirement. The course focuses on educational principles associated with adult learning. Topics will include theoretical models of cognitive development, adult learning styles, and taxonomies of educational objectives. Principles of teaching and learning will be applied in the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains. The importance of designing educational experiences to meet the unique needs of the learner will be emphasized as they relate to individuals from different social, economic, and cultural backgrounds, as well as individuals with disabilities. Students will be required to design and orally present a learning activity to a selected audience. Prerequisites: PT 101, PT 201 or permission of instructor or PT Department.Offered Each Spring (As Needed). (UG)

PT 501: Applied Biostatistics (3)

Students will develop an understanding of the principles and applications of parametric and nonparametric statistics, particularly with respect to applications in physical therapy. Topics will include: probability, scales of measurement, reliability and validity, sampling techniques, experimental design and hypothesis development (statistical inference), descriptive statistics, parametric and nonparametric tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Selection of appropriate statistical procedures will be presented with reference to principles of experimental design presented in PT 553, Introduction to Clinical Research Design. Students will use both calculators and computer software (SPSS, Excel) for analyzing data and developing graphic representations. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 504: Clinical Functional Anatomy I (3)

This course will build upon the fundamental content taught in BIO 330, General Anatomy. This course, the first of a series of two clinically oriented functional anatomy courses, will focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. The specific anatomical content will be presented through a regional approach and will include the cervical, thoracic, and upper limb regions. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 504L: Clinical Functional Anatomy I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Clinical Functional Anatomy. Required corequisite: PT 504. (GR)

PT 505: Clinical Functional Anatomy II Lecture (2)

This course, the second of a series of two, will focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system of the lumbar and pelvic regions and the lower extremities. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Prerequisites: PT 504 and PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 505L: Clinical Functional Anatomy II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Clinical Functional Anatomy II. Corequisite: PT 505. (GR)

PT 506: Kinesiology and Biomechanics I (3)

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce and emphasize the principles of kinesiology, tissue mechanics and biomechanics of the cervical, temporomandibular, thoracic, and upper extremity joints and their related soft tissues. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through both static and dynamic analyses of regional human movement and posture. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as electromyography (EMG), dynamometry, and video motion analysis. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure and physiology presented in PT 504/L, Clinical Functional Anatomy I and PT 508/L, Physiology of Exercise. This integration of anatomical and physiological foundations will aid the learner in proper examination and evaluation of the quality, efficiency and safety of upperquarter movement patterns and functional task performance. An emphasis will be placed on the analysis and discussion of the mechanical properties of tissues and their respective responses to stress shielding and stress application. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the biomechanics of the cervical and thoracic spines, temporomandibular joint and upper extremities. The students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics and osteokinematics of these respective regions and relate those to whole body and regional mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Laboratories will promote development of skills in critical analysis and examination and evaluation of normal and abnormal movement. The student will then develop skill in the application of both kinetic and kinematic biomechanical analysis and begin to foster consideration of biomechanical principles in the design of reliable and valid upper quarter examination procedures and efficacious intervention strategies and parameters.Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 506L: Kinesiology and Biomechanics I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Kinesiology & Biomechanics I. Required corequisite: PT 506. (GR)

PT 507: Kinesiology & Biomechanics II Lecture (2)

This lecture/laboratory course will focus on the principles of kinesiology, tissue mechanics and biomechanics as they relate to the lower extremity, pelvis and lumbar spine. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through both static and dynamic analyses of regional human movement and posture. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as EMG, dynamometry, and video motion analysis. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure, physiology and kinesiology presented in PT 504 & 505 Clinical Functional Anatomy I & II and PT 508 Physiology of Exercise; and PT 506 Kinesiology and Biomechanics. This integration of anatomical, physiological and kinesiological foundations will aid the learner in proper evaluation of the quality, efficiency and safety of lower quarter movement patterns and functional task performance. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the biomechanics of the lumbar spine, pelvis and lower extremities. The students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics and osteokinematics of the respective regions and relate those to whole body and regional mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Laboratories will promote further development of skills in critical analysis and evaluation of normal and abnormal movement, the application of both kinetic and kinematic biomechanical analysis and will begin to foster consideration of biomechanical principles in the design of reliable and valid lower quarter examination procedures and efficacious intervention strategies and parameters. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 507L: Kinesiology and Biomechanics II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Kinesiology & Biomechanics II. Corequisite: PT 507. (GR)

PT 508: Physiology of Exercise (3)

This foundational science course introduces and emphasizes the concepts and knowledge of the body's physiological response to exercise, overuse, and disuse. Lectures and laboratory experiences focus on the structural and physiological effects of exercise and establish a knowledge base for the future clinician to develop and critically assess neuromusculoskeletal exercise prescription and cardiopulmonary intervention programs. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 508L: Physiology of Exercise Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Physiology of Exercise. Corequisite: PT 508. (GR)

PT 509: Principles and Applications of Physical Agents Lecture (4)

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce and emphasize the physiologic effects of electromagnetic and acoustic energy on human tissue. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through laboratory practical experiences as well as clinical case studies. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure and physiology presented in PT 504 and PT 514. This integration of anatomic and physiological foundations will aid the learner in decision making with regard to application of appropriate physical agents. An emphasis will be placed on the physiologic response of tissues to therapeutic modalities that emit electromagnetic and acoustic energy. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the science of therapeutic modalities. Students will differentiate between the thermal, acoustic, mechanical, and electrical modalities commonly utilized in the clinic. Laboratories will promote development of psychomotor skills and demonstrate mastery in the safe application of therapeutic modalities. Students will develop consideration of the application of physical agents within treatment strategies that are based upon evidence in practice. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 509L: Principles and Applications of Physical Agents Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Principles and Applications of Physical Agents. Corequisite: PT 509. (GR)

PT 514: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I (5)

This lecture/laboratory course is the first in a three part series, which will introduce the concepts of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation, and intervention strategies of the cervical spine, thoracic spine, upper extremities, and associated structures. This course will further promote development of knowledge in differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders in those regions noted. Students will further develop and synthesize the concepts of decision making and critical thinking in evidence based practice and professionalism with topics including communication, ethical behavior, professional organization, collaborative/team practice and scope of practice. Additionally, the utilization of disablement models will be included as a conceptual framework for examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, outcome assessment, delivery models, and documentation with clinical applications including behavioral objectives. Treatment concepts and techniques will be presented and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to build differential diagnosing and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 514L: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I. Corequisite: PT 514. (GR)

PT 515: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II Lecture (5)

This lecture/laboratory course is the second in a three part series, which will further investigate concepts of musculoskeletal examination and evaluation and will promote development of knowledge in differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders of the lumbar spine, pelvis, hip, knee, ankle, foot, and their associated structures. Treatment philosophies and techniques (e.g. structure mobilization and stabilization) will be explored and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration. Basic care procedures will be presented including wheel chair parts and propulsion, transfer training, gait training, and environmental assessment and modification. In addition, a specialty area of aquatic therapy will be explored. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be presented and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to build differential diagnosing and problem solving skills. Students will participate in clinical observations and patient demonstrations in Clinical Exposure II to continue their hands-on experience with patients and to further develop patient-therapist and professional communication skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 515L: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II. Corequisite: PT 515. (GR)

PT 516: Clinical Problem Solving in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation (2)

This course is the third course in a three part series,which will provide students an opportunity to further explore topics in musculoskeletal rehabilitation through a problem based learning format. A faculty mentor will present a selected case and the goals and expectations of each learning experience. A small group of students will then proceed in designing and implementing an action plan aimed at achievement of these goals. The students will be required to: interpret and analyze the information provided; gather additional information as necessary from reading and discussions of current scientific professional literature; and to synthesize and present a coherent, evidence-based argument addressing the specific goals of each case study learning experience. Students will also peer review analyses of selected cases. The faculty member will serve as a facilitator for directing student discussions and psychomotor activities including thrust and non-thrust manipulation technique. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 517: Clinical Medicine I (1 - 3)

This course is the first in a three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with musculoskeletal pathology as a foundation for direct patient/client care and research. Key topics characteristic of common orthopedic pathologies will be addressed including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis, diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological, surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to musculoskeletal pathology will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 521: Prosthetics and Orthotics (2)

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to increase the student's understanding of prosthetics and orthotics. Principles of prosthetic and orthotic design, function, and fabrication will be discussed. Clinical problem solving for prosthetic or orthotic prescription will be addressed based on examination findings in order to optimize function for the patient/client. Pre-prosthetic as well as prosthetic training will be emphasized. Use of orthosis in management of individuals receiving physical therapy will be integrated with knowledge from previous courses in orthopedics and neurorehabilitation. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 521L: Prosthetics and Orthotics Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Prosthetics and Orthotics. Corequisite: PT 521. (GR)

PT 530: Psychosocial Aspects of Health and Disability (3)

This course applies biopsychosocial models of health, illness, and disability, including psychosocial aspects of disability; social attitudes and perceptions; adjustment to and secondary effects of disability. This course will develop student competence in responding to individuals who are experiencing physical and psychiatric problems. This course is designed for Physical Therapy students to be taken in the professional phase of the curriculum. Students will have had exposure to patients with musculoskeletal and neurological disorders and will therefore be able to consider the issues addressed in the course in the context of specific illnesses and/or disabilities relating to these body systems. Through readings, guest speakers, video, and community experiences, and in class discussions, this course is intended to challenge one?s paradigm of how one has perceived both physical and psychiatric disability. Discussions on quality of life, self-help, and recovery are intended to help one develop and sustain one?s professional relationships with the individuals with whom one may assist in their recovery. t As this course is intended to help one understand and respond with comfort to individuals who are experiencing physical and mental health problems, the student will have the opportunity to discuss various psychosocial issues that he/she has experienced personally, in his/her clinical exposure courses, internships and/or other settings, and using case studies towards a better understanding of how one might more effectively communicate and manage various challenges in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: PSY103; PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PT 532: Motor Control and Motor Learning (2)

The first half of this course explores theories of motor control and motor learning that form an important theoretical foundation for the practice of evidence-based physical therapy. This course will explore contemporary theories of motor control and the contributions of individuals like Bernstein, Schmidt, the Bobaths, Nashner, Horak, Shumway-Cook, Thelen and others. Typical and atypical postural motor control across the lifespan from an information processing perspective, focusing on peripheral (e.g. sensory and musculoskeletal) and central (e.g. reaction time, motor planning, attention, cognition, motivation, etc.) aspects of motor control will be investigated. Environmental task demands will be analyzed using Gentile's taxonomy as part of the process of motor control. Several theoretical approaches to motor learning will be covered, Schmit's Schema Theory, and stage theories of Fitts and Gentile. In the second half of the course, students will search the literature for peer-reviewed research papers that have examined the application of motor control and motor learning variables (e.g. prepractice and practice variables, intrinsic and extrinsic feedback) across the lifespan in typical and atypical populations. Each student will present data from one or more articles to the class using PowerPoint presentation software. Students will design and execute an evidence-based practice project in which they perform a literature review, design a motor learning experiment, execute and analyze the results, and present their results to the class. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 539: Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation (2)

This lecture/laboratory course will address the diversified issues of clinical management of patient/client with primary and/or secondary cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction within the context of physical therapy. Topics will include practice setting specific management principles and therapeutic techniques to address primary and secondary impairments of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, as well as prevention of dysfunction in individuals across their life span. Topics to be discussed include chronic obstructive lung dysfunction, restrictive lung dysfunction, cardiac muscle dysfunction, the post-surgical patient, the patient post-trauma, and the patient with cancer. Prerequisites: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 539L: Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation. Corequisite: PT 539. (GR)

PT 544: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I Lecture (4)

This course is the first in a three part series, which will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients with neuromuscular rehabilitative needs. Operational theories of nervous system organization including systems theories, models of central nervous system reorganization, and recovery models will be introduced and emphasized. Enablement/Disablement models, the Guide toPhysical Therapist Practice, Guidelines for Content in Physical Therapy Education, and other conceptual frameworks that aid the physical therapist in evidence-based clinical decision-making will be explored. This course will begin with an in-depth study of human development from the life span perspective, with an emphasis on development of postural control and movement and their interrelationship to skill acquisition. Neuromuscular- based pediatric movement disorders will be introduced and emphasized within the context of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management. Developmental anatomy, functional neuronanatomy, and physiology will be linked to discussions of disorders of posture and movement. Historical and contemporary theories of intervention including therapeutic handling will be presented. Medical management options including pharmacology and surgery will be discussed. Course content will include applications of assistive technology including adaptive and therapeutic equipment as it relates to the pediatric patient/client population. Course content will reinforce the development of professional and ethical behaviors, the scope of physical therapy practice, collaborative practice models, therapeutic communication skills, and documentation. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 544L: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I. Corequisite: PT 544. (GR)

PT 545: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II (4)

This course is the second in a three part series, which will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients with neuromuscular rehabilitative needs. This course will utilize the conceptual models/frameworks and reinforce foundational principles and theories presented in PT 544. This course will continue the study of human development, from the life span perspective, with an emphasis on age related changes of postural control and movement and their interrelationship to functional capabilities. Adult onset neuromuscular-based movement disorders will be introduced and emphasized within the context of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management. Anatomy, functional neuronanatomy, and physiology will be linked to discussions of disorders of posture and movement. Historical and contemporary theories of intervention, including therapeutic handling, will be presented. Medical management options including pharmacology and surgery will be discussed. Course content will include issues on aging, vestibular rehabilitation, and an expanded discussion of assistive technology including adaptive and therapeutic equipment as it relates to the adult patient/client population. Course content will reinforce development of professional and ethical behaviors, the scope of physical therapy practice, collaborative practice models, therapeutic communication skills, and documentation. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 545L: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II. Corequisite: PT 545. (GR)

PT 546: Clinical Medicine II (3)

This course is the second in a three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with neuromuscular pathology as a foundation for direct patient/client care and research. Key topics characteristic of common neurologic pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to neuromuscular pathology will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 548: Integumentary Care (3)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the skin and its appendages as they relate to wound etiology, management, and prevention. The student will explore the anatomical and physiological processes associated with tissue destruction, repair, and remodeling as they relate to specific cause and effect using the wound healing model as the principle pillar of exploration. This course will address the diversified issues of clinical management of patients/clients with a primary and/or secondary integumentary disorder as they relate to the practice of physical therapy. Topics will include practice setting specific management principles and techniques as they relate to individuals across their life span, with disorders of the integumentary system including, but not limited to: burns, pressure ulcers, arterial and venous stasis disorders, neuropathic lesions, dermatitis, and cellulitis. The student will acquire skills within a theoretical and practical spectrum as it relates to patient/client clinical management, environmental constraints, and critical pathways. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 549: Clinical Medicine III (2)

This course is the final in the three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, as well as general medicine topics including gastrointestinal, urogenital, metabolic, and oncologic pathologies, as a foundation for direct patient care and research. Key topics characteristic of the pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to these pathologies will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 551: Integrative Seminar in Physical Therapy (0)

PT 551 (I-IV) and PT 651 (V) Integrative Seminars focus on the integration of all corresponding courses within each semester of the curriculum. These sessions will act as forums within which the student learner will have the opportunity to conceptualize each aspect of rehabilitation and build them into an overall framework of patient/client care. Each session will generally have a theme of interest such that students can build upon their level of understanding of that material as well as experience, appreciate and value the complexity of the entire process. These forums are designed to act as learning communities to promote independent critical thinking and independent thought while assisting in preparing each student for all lecture, laboratory and clinical exposure components of the semester coursework. Prerequisite: PT professional status (corresponding Fall/Spring semesters) in First through Third years. (GR)

PT 553: Introduction to Clinical Research Design (1)

In this course, students will explore the varieties of research design commonly used in clinical research, further developing the analytical skills needed to support professional evidence-based practice. Students will explore the continuum of research methodologies and designs commonly used in clinical research (i.e., descriptive to randomized controlled trials); and they will evaluate the merit and relevance of published research to the practice of physical therapy. Ethical issues in clinical research will be considered including the role of institutional review boards and the requirements of informed consent. Students will lead discussions of research papers, considering key concepts such as sampling, experimental controls, levels of measurement, sensitivity, specificity, reliability and validity. As the semester progresses, students will be linked with a faculty research advisor who will guide them through the process of clinical research in PT 554 and PT 555. Students will write a research question (or questions) that may form the basis of their research project. They will search the published literature and write a preliminary literature review relative to their research question. The culmination of the student's research will be an evidence-based practice poster that summarizes our current state of knowledge/evidence with respect to the research question or questions the student has posed. The posters will be presented at Academic Festival during the spring semester. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 554: Clinical Research I (2)

This is the first semester of a two-semester clinical research course that culminates in the submission of an evidence based project and participation in research symposium. This course continues the work begun in PT 553 in which small groups of students identified an area of interest, were assigned a faculty mentor, articulated a research question, and carried out a preliminary evidence-based literature review. Student groups will refine the poster developed in PT 553 and present it at a college-wide poster session during the Daemen College Academic Festival. This semester each group of students will work as participants in the mentoring faculty member's research. Each group will meet regularly throughout the semester with a faculty mentor for discussion of key issues related to the research literature (i.e. experimental design, methodology, data analysis, etc.). Each group will write a research proposal meeting all the criteria for submission to the Daemen College Human Subjects Research Review Committee. Finally, each group will complete a comprehensive evidence-based literature review. Working collaboratively with a faculty mentor, group members will be expected to participate in data collection and analysis. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 555: Clinical Research II (2)

During this semester the student will execute the investigation designed in PT 554. It is expected that the student will have completed a research proposal and will have submitted that proposal to the Daemen College Human Subjects Research Review Committee. Working closely with the research advisor, the student will collect and analyze his/her data. Students will collaborate with one another in group discussions to facilitate the process of writing the evidence based project and preparation of presentation for the research symposium. A final project will be completed and submitted to the student's research advisor and committee. Students will also participate in a presentation/symposium describing their research to the Daemen College community, as well as to interested individuals from the broader professional community. Prerequisites: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 563: Clinical Exposure I (Musculoskeletal I) (1)

This course is the first in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. Small student teams will visit a group of local physical therapy facilities that provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including musculoskeletal rehabilitation. This experience is designed to permit the student to become acclimated to the clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 564: Clinical Exposure II (Musculoskeletal II) (1)

This course is the second in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will discuss and consider issues of resource management, individual and cultural differences, and delegation of services, referral to other services, and documentation and presentation of case findings to peers. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 565: Clinical Exposure III (Neuromuscular I) (1)

This course is the third in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will observe physical therapy services at a variety of pediatric settings and participate in supervised group sessions to provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including children and adolescents with neuromuscular disorders. These experiences are designed to permit the student to become acclimated to this unique clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills with this special population. Students will discuss and consider issues of best practice, issues of individual differences in patient management, professional responsibility, social/cultural diversity, documentation of examination and outcome measure assessment results, and ongoing intervention. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 566: Clinical Exposure IV (Neuromuscular II/ Prosthetics and Orthotics) (1)

This course is the fourth in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will observe physical therapy services at a variety of settings that provide care to adults with a variety of neuromuscular and age related disorders including sessions on design and fabrication of orthotic and prosthetic devices, and participate in supervised group sessions to provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including adults with neuromuscular disorders. These experiences are designed to permit the student to become acclimated to this unique clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills with this patient population. Students will discuss and consider issues of best practice, issues of individual differences in patient management, professional responsibility, social/cultural diversity, documentation of examination and outcome measure assessment results, and ongoing intervention. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 567: Clinical Exposure V (Cardiopulmonary/ Integumentary) (1)

This course is the last in the series of clinic-based experiential learning sessions that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy and other related fields, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. Small student teams will visit a group of local clinical facilities and community-based wellness programs that provide care to a variety of patient/clients including cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, integumentary wound care, trauma unit, women's health, wellness and health promotion, and holistic health. These experiences are designed to permit the student to further develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills. Students will discuss and consider issues of quality of care, scope of practice, clinical guidelines, documentation, and reimbursement. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 575: Pre-Clinical Seminar (1)

This seminar format course is designed to prepare the student for his/her clinical internship experiences. Professional aspects of physical therapy will be stressed in this seminar. The design and implementation of the student's clinical education experiences at Daemen are also incorporated into this seminar course. The student will be introduced to essential information pertaining to clinical performance. The evaluation tool, the "Clinical Performance Instrument," will be thoroughly examined. Emphasis will be placed on reinforcement of communication skills essential to professionals in the health care environment. Learning experiences will also focus on the following professional areas: professional and educational expectations; professional behavior, ethical and legal standards; HIPAA regulations; communication; cultural considerations in patient management; alternative models in clinical education; infection control and blood borne pathogens; universal precautions; OSHA regulations. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 577: Clinical Internship I (3)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to develop skills deemed appropriate for entry-level physical therapy practice. Those skills include but are not limited to examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. To accomplish this, students will participate in direct patient care that may include gait training, transfer training, assessment and measurement, intervention and patient education. Integration of the previous semester's academic curriculum will be the focus of the clinical internship. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on orthopedic or general hospital patient care. Prerequisites: PT Second Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all PT course work. Offered Each Summer. (GR)

PT 582: Clinical Internship II (3)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to further enhance the student's patient/client management skills. The focus of this internship will be the management of patients/clients with neuromuscular disorders, incorporating information and skills acquired in the previous academic semesters. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on neurorehabilitation of any age group. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Summer. (GR)

PT 600: Clinical Problem Solving in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (2)

This course is the third in a three part series which will explore special topics in neuromuscular rehabilitation through a tutorial problem based learning format to promote the development of clinical reasoning, clinical problem solving, collaborative skills, skills in self-assessment and independent learning. Students will work independently or collaboratively in a small group with a faculty mentor/tutor. Selected topics involving patients with neuromuscular diagnoses with specific goals will be presented by a faculty mentor/tutor to small groups in the form of directed learning experiences and patient/client case studies. Working independently or as a small group, students will then proceed in designing and implementing an action plan aimed at achievement of these goals. Students will be required to: interpret and analyze the information provided; gather additional information as necessary from reading and discussions of current scientific professional literature; and synthesize and present coherent, evidence based argument addressing the specific goals of each learning experience or case study. The faculty mentor/tutor will serve as a facilitator for directing the students' discussions and psychomotor activities. Learning objectives associated with each case study will focus on knowledge and skills associated with examination and intervention, as well as integration of published literature into clinical practice and contemporary practice issues including but not limited to social/cultural/psychosocial issues; legal and ethical aspects of professional behavior; discharge planning (including home/environmental needs, HEP); prognosis; practice issues (i.e. management of a collaborative care plan, supervision, constraints to practice); wellness and prevention; and accessing resources to facilitate patient care. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 606: Rehabilitation of the Patient With Spinal Cord Injury (1)

This lecture/laboratory course will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients who have spinal cord injury during the acute, sub acute and long-term phases of care. Comprehensive exploration of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management for patients/clients of all ages will be emphasized. Students are required to integrate and apply all previous academic/clinical knowledge with regard to musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary, and integumentary management, as well as application of environmental assessment/modification and assistive technology to enhance function, physical agents, and patient/caregiver education. Current scientific professional literature, integration of other systems, as well as critical thinking and decision making experiences for problem solving in all steps of patient/client management will be used. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 606L: Rehabilitation of the Patient With Spinal Cord Injury Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Rehabilitation of the Patient with Spinal Core Injury. Corequisite: PT 606. (GR)

PT 610: Management and Administrative Issues in Physical Therapy (4)

A broad survey of topics essential to the administration and management of physical therapy services. Topics covered will include: strategic planning, organizational structure, reimbursement and income management, budgeting, marketing, personnel management, quality assurance, ethical dilemmas and problem solving, professional regulation and the legislative process, various forms of liability and risk management, health care policy and systems of health care service delivery, contract issues and the negotiation process, documentation issues, and appropriate delegation, supervision and collaboration in the provision of physical therapy services. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 612: Health Promotion, Fitness and Wellness (2)

This course will provide the student with the conceptual framework for individual and community health promotion, as well as injury/disease prevention across the life span. Course content includes examination of concepts of health, health promotion, wellness and prevention, and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Basic epidemiological principles will be discussed and applied to specific diseases related to the practice of physical therapy including examination of best evidence for screening and prevention. Current theories of health behavior change will be discussed, as well as issues of adherence, locus of control, motivation, and the influence of culture and cultural issues on health promotion. To demonstrate understanding and application of the key concepts of health behavior change, students will assess their own level of wellness, implement a personal plan to address a particular health behavior, and analyze the outcome of the intervention. Community based health promotion will also be addressed including needs assessment, planning, resources, and process and outcome assessment. Students will apply their knowledge by creating a community based health promotion or disease/injury prevention program and present their project to their peers. Issues related to women's health will also be addressed including osteoporosis management, incontinence, pregnancy related issues, as well as pelvic floor dysfunction. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 651: Integrative Seminar in Physical Therapy V (0)

PT 551 (I-IV) and PT 651 (V) Integrative Seminars focus on the integration of all corresponding courses within each semester of the curriculum. These sessions will act as forums within which the student learner will have the opportunity to conceptualize each aspect of rehabilitation and build them into an overall framework of patient/client care. Each session will generally have a theme of interest such that students can build upon their level of understanding of that material as well as experience, appreciate and value the complexity of the entire process. These forums are designed to act as learning communities to promote independent critical thinking and independent thought while assisting in preparing each student for all lecture, laboratory and clinical exposure components of the semester coursework. Prerequisite: PT professional status (corresponding Fall/Spring semesters) in First through Third years. (GR)

PT 680: Clinical Internship III (4)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to integrate all the academic knowledge gained as well as incorporate the previous clinical experiences to attain skills and behaviors of an entry-level physical therapist. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on in-patient care of any age group and any setting. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 690: Clinical Internship IV (4)

This is the final nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to enhance the student's entry- level skills in a special interest area of physical therapy. The facilities utilized for this internship will incorporate any setting appropriate for the delivery of physical therapy patient/client care. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 704: Musculoskeletal System (4)

Differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders of the spine and upper and lower extremities, and their associated structures is the emphasis of this course. Students will further develop the concepts of decision-making and critical thinking in evidence-based clinical practice. Musculoskeletal examination and treatment techniques, including spinal and extremity thrust and nonthrust manipulation, will be presented and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration, health, and wellness. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in a lecture format. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to further build differential diagnosing and problem-solving skills as they relate to current practice standards. Contemporary perspectives to surgical management will be presented and explored by regional experts in the field. Algorithms for examination and intervention supported by the literature will be presented and discussed. (GR)

PT 705: Evidence Based Practice (2)

The use of evidence to guide practice is essential in today's healthcare environment. This course will define evidence-based practice including its advantages and disadvantages. Students will learn the fundamental skills necessary to make patient management decisions based on data and best evidence and implement them into practice. Learning experiences will provide students with opportunities to conduct searches of relevant clinical and scientific literature, to review that literature efficiently and critically, and to utilize principles of research methods to design a patient centered research initiative relevant to their practice setting. This course is offered online Fall, Spring and Summer terms. (GR)

PT 720: Thrust Manipulation (3)

This lecture and laboratory course is designed to teach the theory, rationale, and evidence supporting thrust manipulation. The course is designed to enhance psychomotor skill in utilizing mobilization and manipulation for the management of musculoskeletal disorders. The main focus of the program will be on determining the indications and contraindications of applying the techniques to assure both safety and treatment effectiveness. The areas emphasized will be based on evidence from recent clinical trials using manipulation to treat the spine and extremities. (GR)

PT 721: Neuromuscular Mobilization (2)

This course presents examination and treatment strategies for patients who require an integration of neurological and orthopaedic (musculoskeletal) manual therapy procedures. Lab experiences will include skill development in spinal and extremity neuromuscular mobilization. (GR)

PT 722: Spinal Exercise Strategies (2)

This course is designed to guide clinicians in the analysis of movement dysfunction and in the diagnosis and prescription of corrective exercise programs for spinal disorders. The course will involve both lecture and laboratory sessions and will integrate spinal exercise theories of McKenzie and Sahrmann as well as Australian and Nordic approaches. (GR)

PT 723: Integrated Management of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction (2)

This course is intended to provide the participant with basic examination and treatment approaches to the sacroiliac joint. A rationale for this approach will be provided by a review of the available evidence for examination and treatment. (GR)

PT 724: OMPT Residency (Mentorship) (3)

A post-professional planned learning experience in a focused area of clinical practice. The clinical residency (fellowship) combines opportunities for ongoing clinical supervision and mentoring with a theoretical basis for advanced practice and scientific inquiry in a defined area of sub-specialization beyond the generally-accepted Description of Specialty Practice. (GR)

PT 725: Problem Solving in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (2)

A planned program of post professional clinical education for physical therapists that is designed to advance significantly the physical therapist resident's problem solving abilities in orthopaedic manual physical therapy. The experience combines opportunities for ongoing clinical supervision and mentoring, with theoretical questioning regarding advanced practice, patient questions, and case analysis. This experience may be conducted at the clinical site or through distance learning opportunities. (GR)

PT 726: Research Project (2)

This course will involve the collection, interpretation, and analysis of data related to a clinical research question addressed during the residency (Fellowship) experience. The student will complete a written paper pertaining to this research that is suitable for publication. (GR)

PT 727: Review-Objective Structured Clinical Exam (1)

This course will involve a review of the psychomotor skills learned throughout the Fellowship program. The course will meet on an as needed basis to prepare the student for the Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE). The OSCE is a practical examination involving several stations that assesses the student's ability to problem solve simulated cases and apply analytical and psychomotor skills in the area of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy. (GR)

PT 728: Lab in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (1)

This course is a distance learning laboratory offering which is designed such that the student will be able to view OMPT techniques via a computer live while at home or at work. The professor for this course will demonstrate examination and intervention procedures pertaining to OMPT while the student is provided the opportunity to interact with the professor by asking questions. To access the lab. the student will be given a link to Daemen College OMPT lab session. (GR)

PT 729: McKenzie Part A (3)

An introduction to the concepts and applications of the McKenzie Method to Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy focusing on the lumbar spine. As the name implies, this course focuses on the lumbar spine and the application of the McKenzie theory and techniques in the mechanical diagnosis of problems and the therapeutic approaches to resolve these problems. The course also includes patient demonstration, analysis and discussion. The principle format is lecture, discussion and live patient demonstrations. (GR)

PT 730: McKenzie Part B (3)

Following Part A, how the McKenzie Method applies to the cervical and thoracic spines will be examined utilizing the same teaching format. This course focuses on the cervical and thoracic spine and the application of the McKenzie theory and techniques in the mechanical diagnosis of problems and the therapeutic approaches to resolve these problems. The course also includes patient demonstration, analysis and discussion. The principle format is lecture, discussion and live patient demonstrations (GR)