Social Work Courses

Anthropology

ANT 210: Contemporary Native America (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course introduces students to the current conditions of American Indians/First Nations/ indigenous peoples of North America. A foundation will be laid in ethnography, which will cover the anthropological culture area concept and culture areas. Emphasis will be placed on the Southwest, Prairie/Plains, Northwest Coast, Arctic, and Northeast (including the Great Lakes) areas. Aspects of culture change, assimilation, and acculturation will be discussed as models for viewing historical culture contact. With this, the effects of important legislative influences will be introduced. The post-World War II environment of termination and urbanization will introduce a discussion of sustainability of traditional cultures, which characterize the struggles of native communities as evidenced in movements such as A.I.M. and others. Offered As Needed. (UG)

Sociology

SOC 110: Individual, College and Society: Introduction to the Sociological Imagination (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. The purpose of this course is to introduce beginning Daemen students to some of the core concepts drawn from sociology while at the same time giving them an opportunity to see the relationship between themselves, colleges and universities, and the social world. In addition, a significant amount of attention will be devoted to orienting students to a competency-based core curriculum, in general, and critical thinking, in particular. Further, students will be introduced to the current literature on what it means to be educated, the purposes of colleges and universities, the meaning of an undergraduate degree, the purposes of liberal education, and what society needs from higher education. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

SOC 201: Introductory Sociology (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. The systematic study of social behavior and human groups. Examination of the influence of social relationships upon people's attitudes and behavior and on how societies are established and changed. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

SOC 202: Individual and Society (3)

Focus on social interaction, the emergence of mind and the development of the self. Examines the symbolic aspect of the individual and the constructed nature of his or her mental world environment. Offered As Needed. (UG)

SOC 209: Social Problems (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Major social problems, e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism, militarism, crime, substance abuse, poverty and their effect on the individual and society, will be examined. Theories will be evaluated relative to the role that existing social arrangements play in perpetuating social problems. Offered As Needed. (UG)

SOC 217: Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Other Addictions (3)

Cross-listed as SW 217. Examines the broad range of important facts and information about AOD use and abuse. The major legal and illegal drugs, patterns and trends in drug usage, the history of drug usage in our culture, public policy and treatment issues will be the focus of the course. Students will also explore the concept of addictions as the framework for analysis of AOD use and abuse. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or 209 or permission of instructor. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SOC 218: Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as SW 218. This course introduces students to the history of social welfare as a social institution and to the profession of social work. The course provides an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values that are necessary for effective generalist social work practice. Attention is given to learning about key factors that led to the development of social work as a profession, social welfare policies that govern the delivery of social welfare services and the evolution of social work practice with specific client populations. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SOC 224: Ethnicity, Race and Cultural Diversity (3)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. Explores the dynamics of human diversity and social differentiation. Differentiation based upon race, ethnic identification, sex, and sexual orientation, majority and minority groups, lifestyle and life chances; social class and caste will be examined. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. Offered Each Semester. (UG)

SOC 232: The Aging Process: An Introduction to Gerontology (3)

Cross-listed as SW 232. Examines a profile of aged Americans; major biological, psychological and sociocultural paradigms of aging; societal and individual response to the aged and the aging process. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SOC 243: Child Welfare Policy and Services (3)

Cross-listed as SW 243. Presents concepts, policy and practices in the field of child welfare. The needs of children and their families as well as programs designed to meet these needs are examined. Content also includes the child welfare service system, historical and current developments, child abuse and neglect, and the legal system relative to child welfare services. Prerequisite: SOC 201, or PSY 302, or permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester and Summer. (UG)

SOC 303: Sociology of the Family (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. A study of the family as a distinctive social world; emphasis on the structuring and dynamics of the family; cross-cultural comparisons; analysis of contemporary family systems. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SOC 304: Social Class and Inequality (3)

Examination of the existence of different types of inequality and the various explanations for them. Historical and structural interconnections with various forms of inequality will also be explored. Prerequisite: SOC 201. Offered As Needed. (UG)

SOC 305: Sociology of Sport (3)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. This course provides an in-depth sociological examination of sport in American society in an effort to create a better understanding of sport as both a positive and negative social force on people's lives. Offered As Needed. (UG)

SOC 307: The Juvenile Justice System (3)

Cross-listed as SW 307. This course will present concepts, policies and practices regarding Juvenile Justice in our country. The subject is examined in relation to the needs of children, their families, the major programs and social services that have been designed for them, and the issues which emerge for future planning. The intent of the course is to instill in students a desire to advocate for children in our society and to provide students with a basis for more proficient practice in their chosen field. Prerequisite: PSY103 or SOC201. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SOC 327: Death, Dying and Bereavement (3)

Cross-listed as SW 327. Students are guided through an examination of death as a universal human experience. The psychological and sociocultural impact of dying will be explored as well as a brief history of thanatology, the process of grief, mourning and bereavement, ethical issues concerning death, legal aspects of death, euthanasia and funeral and last rites. Prerequisites: SOC 201, PSY 103. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SOC 328: Basic Training in Military Culture (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross- listed as SW 328. The United States has been engaged in some form of combat across the world for almost a hundred years. Understanding military culture and the environmental and political nature of the military is crucial for all service providers. The current war on terror presents its own challenges and stressors due to the total force concept of the military, long deployments and redeployments, signature injuries of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), anxiety, depression, and suicide. This course will engage students in researching information regarding the historical and contemporary aspects of military culture; the physical and mental wounds combat veterans suffer from, including the signature injuries of the current conflicts, and their impact on military families. Students will examine the structure, policies and services of the Veterans Administration, and local veteran community providers. Students will also engage in field research as they spend some time with a service provider in the Veteran community and engage in conversation with guest speakers from the military community. Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 201 or PSY 103. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SOC 411: Contemporary Issues in Mental Health (3)

Cross-listed as SW 411. This course is structured with a glance to the past and a view of the future of mental health and the mental health system. Themes that will be explored are the history of mental health, the mental health system, governmental roles in the mental health system, mental health services, the mental health exam, assessment of lethality and crisis intervention, children and the mental health system, dual diagnosis, the elderly and the mental health system, religion, race, ethnicity and gender and mental health, consumer rights and the mental health system and mental health services in the managed care environment. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SOC 432: Contemporary Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)

Cross-listed as SW 432. This course focuses on the functional analysis of contemporary social welfare policies. It emphasizes the political and economic implications of major social welfare legislation as well as the linkage between social problems and social policies, programs, and services. Students are also introduced to the legislative process and engage in projects to develop their advocacy skills. Prerequisites: SW 311 and senior status in Social Work program. Offered Each Year (Fall) (UG)

Social Work

SW 217: Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Other Addictions (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 217. Examines the broad range of important facts and information about AOD use and abuse. The major legal and illegal drugs, patterns and trends in drug usage, the history of drug usage in our culture, public policy and treatment issues will be the focus of the course. Students will also explore the concept of addictions as the framework for analysis of AOD use and abuse. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or 209 or permission of instructor. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 218: Introduction to Social Work & Social Welfare (3)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration.Cross-listed as SOC 218. This course introduces students to the history of social welfare as a social institution and to the profession of social work. The course provides an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values that are necessary for effective generalist social work practice. Attention is given to learning about key factors that led to the development of social work as a profession, social welfare policies that govern the delivery of social welfare services and the evolution of social work practice with specific client populations. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SW 226: Adolescence: Interdisciplinary Approach To the Understanding and Treatment of Adolescents (3)

A course designed to provide students with both theoretical understanding and practical skills for dealing with adolescent behavior. Primary emphasis will be on working more effectively with adolescents. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 232: The Aging Process: An Introduction to Gerontology (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 232. Examines a profile of aged Americans; major biological, psychological and sociocultural paradigms of aging; societal and individual response to the aged and the aging process. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 243: Child Welfare Policy and Services (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 243. Presents concepts, policy and practices in the field of child welfare. The needs of children and their families as well as programs designed to meet these needs are examined. Content also includes the child welfare service system, historical and current developments, child abuse and neglect, and the legal system relative to child welfare services. Prerequisite: SOC 201, or PSY 302, or permission of instructor. Offered Each Semester and Summer. (UG)

SW 307: The Juvenile Justice System (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 307. This course will present concepts, policies and practices regarding Juvenile Justice in our country. The subject is examined in relation to the needs of children, their families, the major programs and social services that have been designed for them, and the issues which emerge for future planning. The intent of the course is to instill in students a desire to advocate for children in our society and to provide students with a basis for more proficient practice in their chosen field. Prerequisite: PSY103 or SOC201. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SW 311: Methods of Social Work Research I (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Together with SW 312 - combination of both meets Research and Presentation requirement. Engages students in an exploration of research focusing on scientific inquiry, problem formation, use of scholarly literature, research design, measurement, sampling, research ethics, culturally sensitive research, data analysis, and evaluation of research. Introduces students to major research techniques used to observe and interpret the social world including experimental design; single subject design; surveys; qualitative research; and applied social work research. Prerequisite: SW 214. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

SW 312: Methods of Social Work Research II (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with SW 311 - combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. Building on SW 311, students participate in the design and implementation of a real world research project. Students gain experience using data analysis software (qualitative and/or quantitative) and present their research findings as part of a conference. Students complete a full research paper including introduction, literature review, methodology, and results sections. Prerequisite: SW 311. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SW 315: Professional Communication in Social Work (3)

This course offers students an opportunity to learn techniques for enhancing their interpersonal interactions and listening skills, basic writing and problem solving skills, and the ability to present information to various audiences. It focuses on the development of communication skills which focus on self (technology-based communication tools, resume writing), as well as interaction-based and organizational communications. Students will also research an issue of concern to a high need population group and engage in various persuasive writing techniques to educate and engage others. Prerequisite: SW218; Limited to Social Work majors. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SW 325: Foundations of Generalist Practice I (3)

This is the first course in a four-course practice sequence. This course introduces the generalist practice model of professional social work. It emphasizes use of the problem solving approach and examines core theories of social work practice with various client systems. Content focuses on the ethical use of value-based, culturally sensitive techniques for effective engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Prerequisites: SW 214 and upper division status in Social Work program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

SW 326: Foundations of Generalist Practice II (3)

This is the second course in a four-course practice sequence. In this course, students continue to apply the principles that guide professional social work practice with particular emphasis placed on micro-level practice.The course focuses on the interactional skills necessary for work with individuals and families (both voluntary and involuntary). Students are required to spend 2 hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 325 and upper division status in Social Work program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SW 327: Death, Dying and Bereavement (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 327. Students are guided through an examination of death as a universal human experience. The psychological and sociocultural impact of dying will be explored as well as a brief history of thanatology, the process of grief, mourning and bereavement, ethical issues concerning death, legal aspects of death, euthanasia and funeral and last rites. Prerequisites: SOC 201, PSY 103. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 328: Basic Training in Military Culture (3)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross- listed as SOC 328. The United States has been engaged in some form of combat across the world for almost a hundred years. Understanding military culture and the environmental and political nature of the military is crucial for all service providers. The current war on terror presents its own challenges and stressors due to the total force concept of the military, long deployments and redeployments, signature injuries of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), anxiety, depression, and suicide. This course will engage students in researching information regarding the historical and contemporary aspects of military culture; the physical and mental wounds combat veterans suffer from, including the signature injuries of the current conflicts, and their impact on military families. Students will examine the structure, policies and services of the Veterans Administration, and local veteran community providers. Students will also engage in field research as they spend some time with a service provider in the Veteran community and engage in conversation with guest speakers from the military community. Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 201 or PSY 103. Offered as Needed. (UG)

SW 333: Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3)

This course engages students in analysis of the behavior of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities in their bio-psycho-socio-cultural milieu. The theoretical paradigms that impact the development of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities are examined with special emphasis on evaluating the impact of social class, gender, sexual orientation, and racial/ethnic group membership. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 214, SOC 224, BIO 103 and upper division status in Social Work program, or permission of instructor. Offered Each Year (Fall and Spring). (UG)

SW 334: Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3)

This course engages students in analysis of the behavior of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities in their bio-psycho-socio-cultural milieu. The theoretical paradigms that impact the development of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities are examined with special emphasis on evaluating the impact of social class, gender, sexual orientation, and racial/ethnic group membership. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 333 and upper division status in Social Work program, or permission of instructor. Offered Each Year (Fall and Spring). (UG)

SW 351: Intervention in Marriage and Family Problems (3)

The course introduces students to the area of marital and family dynamics with particular focus on the major areas of dysfunction. Through both analysis of the essential elements of these relationships as well as introspective looks at their own families, students learn to identify the primary reasons for marital and family discord. Prerequisite: Junior status. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 409: Social Work With Groups (3)

This course examines the various types of groups used in contemporary social work practice for the purpose of acquainting students with the process of assessing for therapeutic need for a group. In addition, students will acquire a basic understanding of all the stages required for proposing, developing, and leading a group. Prerequisites: SW 214, SW 325 and upper division status in Social Work. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SW 411: Contemporary Issues in Mental Health (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 411. This course is structured with a glance to the past and a view of the future of mental health and the mental health system. Themes that will be explored are the history of mental health, the mental health system, governmental roles in the mental health system, mental health services, the mental health exam, assessment of lethality and crisis intervention, children and the mental health system, dual diagnosis, the elderly and the mental health system, religion, race, ethnicity and gender and mental health, consumer rights and the mental health system and mental health services in the managed care environment. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor. Offered Alternate Years. (UG)

SW 424: Foundations of Generalist Practice III (3)

This is the third course in a four-course practice sequence.This course explores the nature of social work interventions with groups - focusing on history; theoretical phases of group development; typical group settings; various types of groups (task; psycho-social or educational; mutual aid, support, or self-help; family; treatment); and key ethical standards to be applied when working within groups. Students will also learn about group processes and dynamics by assessing and evaluating the activities of a group currently operating in the community. They will also engage in group faciltiation. Special attention will be paid to diversity and the factors that may limit or oppress specific group members or populations. Offered concurrently with the first semester of field placement. Prerequisites: SW 326, 334, senior status in Social Work program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (UG)

SW 432: Contemporary Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)

Cross-listed as SOC 432. This course focuses on the functional analysis of contemporary social welfare policies. It emphasizes the political and economic implications of major social welfare legislation as well as the linkage between social problems and social policies, programs, and services. Students are also introduced to the legislative process and engage in projects to develop their advocacy skills. Prerequisites: SW 311 and senior status in Social Work program. Offered Each Year (Fall) (UG)

SW 451: Field Experience in Social Work I (5)

Requires students to complete a 420-hour, supervised field placement experience (210 hours per semester). Field Education affords students the opportunity to maximize the integration of social work knowledge, values, and skills in a community setting. Students are given the opportunity to work with diverse clients including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students are also encouraged to grow their professional network by engaging with other social work practitioners. Prerequisite: SW 325, SW 326 and senior status in social work program. Offered each fall semester. Corequisite: SW 451S (UG)

SW 451S: Field Experience in Social Work I Seminar (1)

This is the first course in a two-course sequence.This course focuses on the enhancement of generalist practice professional social work skills and the integration of theory and practice concurrently with the student's field placement. The course offers students an opportunity to process their field placement experiences in a safe, confidential, and educationally enriching environment. The role of diversity in social work practice will also be addressed. Offered Each Year (Fall). Corequisite: SW 451 (UG)

SW 452: Field Experience in Social Work II (5)

Requires students to complete a 420-hour, supervised field placement experience (210 hours per semester). Field Education affords students the opportunity to maximize the integration of social work knowledge, values, and skills in a community setting. Students are given the opportunity to work with diverse clients including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students are also encouraged to grow their professional network by engaging with other social work practitioners. Prerequisite: SW 451 and senior status in Social Work program. Offered each spring semester. Corequisite:SW 452S. (UG)

SW 452S: Field Experience in Social Work II Seminar (1)

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course builds on issues raised in SW 451S with increased emphasis on student knowledge. In this second semester of Field Education, students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of social work methods by engaging and assessing a client, designing and implementing an intervention for the client, and evaluating their practice. Offered Each Year (Fall). Corequisite: SW 452. (UG)

SW 454: Foundations of Generalist Practice IV (3)

This is the fourth course in a four-course practice sequence. This course focuses on macro-level social work practice. Students will learn how to engage organizational and community-based assessments in order to create structures and processes that reduce the vulnerability of at risk populations; enhance access to needed resources; and/or foster social and economic justice.The course will also examine the important role of leadership related to service delivery and social policy. Prerequisite: SW 424. Offered Each Year (Spring). (UG)

SW 457: Independent Study Or Research (1 - 6)

Individually guided research in social work. Prerequisite: Senior status in Social Work program. Offered As Needed. (UG)