Education Courses

Adolescence Education

AE 500: Dimensions of Learning and Teaching -Content Specific (6)

This course provides a thorough review of the principles, concepts and theories used in teaching adolescents. The main focus will be on the five Dimensions of Learning that facilitate learning for adolescents. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 503: Assessment and Evaluation in Adolescence Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current trends in normative, summative and criterion based, and informal methods of educational assessment and evaluation. The course will examine the considerations necessary for effective measurement of academic performance of students. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 511: Adolescent Psychology (3)

This course discusses the psychological changes between childhood and adulthood, including the psychological correlation of physical maturation, cognitive changes and social challenges facing adolescents. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 513: Foundations of Education (3)

This course provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations upon which pedagogical practice in the United States rests. In addition, educational statutes, legislation, and judicial decisions will be addressed. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 515: Specific Methods of Teaching Secondary Subjects (6)

The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of general and specific methods used in teaching students in secondary schools. Instruction will focus on the New York State Learning Standards/ Common Core Learning Standards and include: policy curriculum requirements; assessment, evaluation and reporting; literacy and technology across the curriculum; and an observation module. Particular emphasis will be placed on the characteristics, definitions, standards, and trends in effective schools and the developments of relevant and meaningful teaching-learning experiences. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 524: Management Strategies for the Inclusive Secondary Classroom (3)

This course focuses on the development and the implementation of differentiated instruction, the skills necessary to prevent classroom misconduct, and the methods to improve classroom climate. In addition, this course provides information on the strategies necessary for working with students with disabilities in a mainstream classroom. Issues will include effective communication, management of an IEP, and understanding inclusive adolescents. The course will also include observations of some actual secondary classrooms. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 525: Literacy Theory at the Secondary Level (3)

This course focuses on the foundational concepts of reading and writing at the adolescent level. Reading instruction, literacy enrichment, and remediation will be explored. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 536: Literacy in the Content Areas (3)

This course connects English Language Arts standards to the content presented in a secondary core classroom. The main focus is on designing lessons which infuse reading, writing, speaking and listening into lessons and units. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 579: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Intermediate Education Secondary Level (7-9) (3)

Students will have one professional laboratory experience at the middle school level (grades 7-9) and one at the high school level (grades 10-12). This includes observations of classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with a college supervisor. Prerequisites: AE 500, 503, 511, 513, 515, 524, 525, 536, 600 and 610. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 580: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Senior Secondary Level (10-12) (3)

Students will have one professional laboratory experience at the middle school level (grades 7-9) and one at the high school level (grades 10-12). This includes observations of classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with a college supervisor. Prerequisites: AE 500, 503, 511, 513, 515, 524, 525, 536, 600 and 610.Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 600: Research Methods in Education (3)

This course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in education. The course will survey the various types of research that can be conducted and discuss the collection, analysis and reporting of findings based on sound methodological procedures. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 610: Seminar in Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (AE 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

AE 699: Research Project in Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in adolescent education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (AE 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of adolescent education. Prerequisites: AE 600 and AE 610. (GR)

Childhood Education

CE 500: Dimensions of Learning and Teaching at the Primary Level (3 - 6)

The purpose of this course is to provide a thorough review of the principles, concepts and theories used in teaching children. The course also focuses on the five Dimensions of Learning that facilitate instruction for children. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 502: Language Arts Methods (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of Language Arts and how to design, plan, and implement teaching-learning experiences in English/Language Arts that meet state goals/outcomes. The course will focus on methods of teaching, speaking, listening, reading, and writing at the elementary level and various techniques for teaching these skills to young children. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 503: Assessment and Evaluation in Childhood Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current trends in normative, criteria, and informal methods of educational evaluation and assessment. The course will examine the validity, reliability and ethical considerations important for effective measurement of academic performance of students. These assessment materials will be aligned with state and district assessments that meet academic standards. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 504: The Reading Process for Students with Disabilities (3)

This course presents the fundamentals of reading theory, instruction and assessment. Teaching strategies based on current special education methods and materials will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster reading literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to children with disabilities are addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials are included. Prerequisites: CE 502. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 505: Elementary Classroom Management (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an extensive review of theories of classroom management at the elementary grade levels. The course will examine the development of classroom procedures, rules and consequences that allow a teacher to maintain effective control of his/her classroom. The course will also provide instruction in working with children with behavior problems and conducting functional behavior assessments and referrals as required by law for students with disabilities. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 507: Methods & Content Instruction at the Junior Level (6)

This course offers a comprehensive study of teaching methods for the areas of Mathematics, Science, and Technology/Social Studies with a focus on integrating the subject areas. Current issues and trends in instruction will be investigated. Attention will be given to state and national standards and assessments in Mathematics, Science and Technology/Social Studies. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 512: Collaborative Approaches with Inclusive Programs/Special Education (3)

This course is designed for the study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication. Specific emphasis will be given to the development of interpersonal skills required for various team members both in special and regular education. Issues explored will include: interpersonal relationships - the roles played by one's self-concept, perceptions, emotions; language, non-verbal communication, and listening versus hearing; intimacy and distance in relationships, improving communication climates, and managing interpersonal conflicts. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 515: Diagnosis and Remediation of Students with Difficulties in Math (3)

This course is designed to explore assessment instruments and methods for use with students experiencing difficulty with mathematics. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies for developing skills and understanding of mathematics. Also discussed will be current research on attitudes and equity issues in mathematics. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 520: Mathematics for the Teacher (3)

This course allows teachers of mathematics at the elementary level the opportunity to explore the mathematics they teach. The emphasis is on building content knowledge. In the process, participants will also explore various theories of learning, approaches to curriculum, standards-based instruction, instructional strategies, technology, and methods of assessment. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 530: Children's Literature (3)

Extensive survey of children's literature with special attention to standards of evaluation, principles of selections, and analysis of the reading interests of children. The student will also participate in a reading clinic working with young children experiencing reading delays. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 531: Practicum in Teaching Mathematics, Science and Technology (3)

The purpose of this course is participation in a professional teaching situation for the content areas of Mathematics, Science and Technology that includes 50 clock hours. The college instructor will supervise this practicum. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 534: Reading in the Content Areas (3)

The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the development of a competent, professional classroom teacher who is sensitive to the interdisciplinary, cohesive nature of learning through speech, language and communication. In this regard, the participants will be able to: (1) list the major components of a language arts program across the grade levels; (2) utilize all content areas to develop and reinforce language skills; (3) explore multiple strategies and a variety of instructional materials utilized to teach language arts in a cross-disciplinary approach; (4) critique innovations in teaching the language arts; (5) evaluate commercially-prepared language arts and language arts related programs and materials. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 575: Student Teaching and Seminar in Childhood Education (6)

Professional practicum experience at the elementary grade level that includes observations of regular classroom activities with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision of a master teacher. Student teachers are also required to attend periodic seminars with the college supervisor during the semester. Prerequisites: CE 500, 502, 503, 505, 507, 512, 600, 610, and either the literacy concentration courses (504, 530, 534) or the numeracy concentration courses (515, 520, 531). (GR)

CE 600: Research Methods in Education (3)

The course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in education. It will examine the various types of research that can be and are conducted and the collection, analysis and reporting of finding based on sound methodological procedures. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 610: Seminar in Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. (GR)

CE 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (CE 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

CE 699: Research Project in Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in childhood education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (CE 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of childhood education. Prerequisites: CE600 and CE610. (GR)

Early Childhood Special Education

ECSE 521: Language/Communication Development of Children with Special Needs (3)

This course will focus on the language and communication development of young children. Attention will focus on teaching students to design learning environments for infants and preschoolers that will enable, accommodate, and enhance the unique receptive and expressive modes of communication of children with special needs. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 522: Infant Development and Intervention with Assistive Technology (3)

This course will prepare students to understand and appreciate the complex developmental issues and comprehensive interdisciplinary service needs of infants who are disabled or are at risk for a disability, and their families. From an educational perspective, it is impossible to view the needs and goals for the young child apart from those of the family. Early intervention (EI) services are now found throughout the United States, and recent research on brain development highlights the unique characteristics and needs of infants and the critical role of their caregivers in fostering optimal growth and development. The transactional model of EI emphasizes the importance of the continual and progressive interactions between the infant and the environment. Current research on the use of assistive technology in facilitating the infant's interactions with the environment will also be explored and incorporated into class discussions and assignments. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 524: Transdisciplinary Intervention and Family Involvement (3)

With the implementation of family-centered services and the inclusion of young children with special needs in naturalistic environments, personnel need to be able to work collaboratively as members of teams with family members, with others in their own disciplines, and with individuals from an array of other disciplines. The early childhood special educator must be knowledgeable about the philosophical base, methodological approaches, and terminologies of the discipline with which collaboration/consultation occurs. In transdisciplinary team approaches, all team members share their expertise, become sensitive to understanding boundaries of their professional disciplines to maximize what they can offer to the child and his or her family. Students will receive instruction from a parent of a child with a disability and a team of professionals who will model transdisciplinary service delivery and instruct students in a cross-disciplinary model of intervention. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 570: Student Teaching and Seminar in Early Childhood Special Education (B-Gr2) (3)

One professional laboratory experience covers observation of special education classroom situation with gradual increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic seminars with the ECSE 570 college supervisor. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 610: Seminar in Early Childhood/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

Education

EDU 518: Teaching to the Standards (3)

This course is intended to provide an advance level of training to students regarding the use of the Common Core learning standards and how specifically children with disabilities will meet these seven standards. The course will also examine methods of instruction, evaluation and content related to assisting the learner. Students will also participate in a PEER review process using Academy of Learning protocol. Offered As Needed. (GR)

Special Education

SED 500: Educational Psychology (3)

This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of psychological concepts, principles and theories central to the teaching-learning process, including classroom problems encountered by educators. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 501: Introduction to Special Education (3)

The course is a comprehensive survey of factors related to individuals with disabilities, including those who have learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavioral disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, physical handicaps, multiple handicaps, or who are gifted. Topics addressed in the course include definitions, prevalence, identification, characteristics, related vocabulary, educational implications, ancillary services, relevant legislation and litigation, and current issues and trends in special education. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 502: Special Education: Laws and Trends (3)

This course provides an in-depth review of trends and legislation which impact on the disabled, the families of children with disabilities, and the professional people who serve the disabled. Identification, evaluation, and implementation of service delivery models will be included. The course will examine research implications and social movements for future trends in prevention, services, legislation, litigation and personnel preparation in special education. Co-requisite: SED 501. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 503: Assessment & Evaluation of Students with Disabilities (3)

The purpose of this course is to offer an advance set of skills in assessment as it applies to the characteristics and needs of the student who is disabled (e.g. mentally retarded, learning disabled, or emotionally/behaviorally disordered). The course will emphasize the basic considerations of assessment and measurement, as well as the actual assessment instruments, techniques, and decisions which lead to appropriate educational programming for these target groups. The course will also examine the use of informal methods used in special education classrooms; portfolio assessment, authentic assessment, observation, anecdotal and various recording methods will also be covered. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 504: The Reading Process for Students with Disabilities (3)

This course presents the fundamentals of reading theory, instruction and assessment. Teaching strategies based on current special education methods and materials will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster reading literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to the child with disabilities are addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials is included. Prerequisite: SED 502. Field Experience Required. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 505: Classroom and Behavior Management for Students with Disabilities (3)

The competencies, knowledge and skills necessary to conduct effective behavior management programs for the benefit of students with disabilities in a variety of special education settings and inclusive programs will be emphasized. The course will also examine the principles of applied behavior analysis, cognitive behavior modification, and other approaches used in assisting students with special needs to monitor and manage their own behavior. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 506: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Learners with Special Needs (3)

The skills and competencies needed to effectively organize instructional programs and environments will be covered. Techniques for organizing instruction will include such skills as: designing educational goals, instructional objectives, task analysis, lesson planning, curriculum design, environmental arrangements, scheduling, developing IEPs and use of informal assessment/evaluation methods in the classroom. Other skills addressed include classroom management and working with mildly disabled learners within an inclusive setting. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 512: Collaborative Approaches within Inclusive Programs (3)

A course designed for the study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication and interaction with parents, students, ancillary personnel, peers, paraprofessionals, and volunteers. Specific emphasis will be given to the development of interpersonal skills required for various team members both in special and regular education. Issues explored will include: interpersonal relationships - the roles played by one's self-concept, perceptions, emotions; language, nonverbal communication, and listening versus hearing; intimacy and distance in relationships, improving communication climates, and managing interpersonal conflicts. Field Experience Required. Prerequisites: SED 502, 506. Offered Summer and Fall. (GR)

SED 513: Survey of Learning Disabilities (3)

This course provides an historical overview of services, assessment, theories of intervention strategies, and classroom models for children with learning disorders. The etiology of learning disabilities and its' prolific growth will be presented and what schools and teachers must do to accommodate these learners. This course will also examine national organizations, definitions, discrepancy of potential and achievement and other identification issues for these learners. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 515: Introduction to Theories of Learning, Child Development and Cognitive Studies (3)

The course will provide a thorough understanding of child development, psychological concepts, principles and theories involved in the teaching-learning process. This course will also cover current cognitive theories of learning and brain-based learning studies used in today's classroom. Offered As Needed. (GR)

SED 516: Introduction to Special Education, Educational Policies, Community Education, and Working with Families (3)

The course is a comprehensive survey of factors related to individuals with disabilities, including those who have learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavioral disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, physical handicaps, multiple handicaps, or who are gifted. Topics addressed in the course include definitions, prevalence, identification, characteristics, related vocabulary, educational implications, ancillary services, relevant legislation and litigation. The course will also provide an advance understanding of the historical, philosophical and sociological practices in education, an analysis of the social structure of the community and suggestions on how to involve community members and families in the education of children. Focus will also be given to collaboration with family members as a part of the educational team. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 517: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Effective Classroom Management for Learners with Special Needs (3)

The skills and competencies needed to effectively organize instructional programs and environments will be covered. Techniques for organizing instruction will include such skills as: designing educational goals, instructional objectives, task analysis, lesson planning, curriculum design, environmental arrangements, scheduling, developing IEPs and use of informal assessment/evaluation methods in the classroom. Other skills addressed include classroom management and working with mildly disabled learners within an inclusive setting. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 519: Literacy Instruction and Students with Learning Disabilities (3)

Offered in the Alternative TRANS-B program; not available at Main Campus. This course presents a variety of research-based methods and curricula currently used for teaching literacy skills for students with special needs. Emphasis will be placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to the child with disabilities will be addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts materials/programs is included. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 522: Curriculum Adaptations/ Modifications In the Content Areas of Math, Science, Social Studies, and Technology (3)

IDEA (1997) affords students with learning disabilities special services within the least restrictive environment. These services include accommodations and modifications as documented by the child's IEP. This course will cover mandated modifications in the areas of environmental/management, materials, content, instructional and testing/evaluation modifications across content areas in order to maintain the child with special needs in the regular education classroom and curriculum. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 523: Survey of Learning Disabilities and Instructional Methods (3)

This course provides an historical overview of services, assessment, theories of intervention strategies, and classroom models for children with learning disorders. The etiology of learning disabilities and its prolific growth will be presented and what schools and teachers must do to accommodate these learners. This course will also examine national organizations, definitions, discrepancy of potential and achievement and other identification issues for these learners. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 535: Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3)

This course provides for advance skill development of competencies for successful assessment and instruction for problem readers. The course will cover specific informal and formal assessment methods used in reading. The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the development of a competent classroom teacher who can successfully assess and design instructional plans for problem readers. In this course, the participants will develop competence in assessing and evaluating readers. They will explore and critique various informal and formal assessments. They will also have the opportunity to implement assessments, and analyze and interpret results, determine an instructional focus based on the data gathered, and address materials and methods that can be used with atypical readers. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 540: Survey of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (3)

This course provides a historical overview of services, assessment, theories of and intervention strategies for children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Etiological concerns will cover the roles of biology, sociological phenomena, family, and the school. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 553: Assessment, Evaluation, and Intervention Strategies for Young Children with Special Needs (3)

This course provides a look at issues, the legal basis, and the functions of assessment of infants, toddlers and preschoolers with special needs. Assessment is an important and ongoing responsibility of professionals who work with young children with special needs and is necessary, not only to meet federal and state mandates, but also to plan appropriate intervention strategies and to monitor the effectiveness of services provided. Special emphasis will be placed on incorporating current research into the course objectives, including a recognition of the high priority now placed on family-centered assessment and intervention, on assessment in the natural environment, and on the importance afforded to the role of interdisciplinary assessment strategies. After reviewing assessment issues and instruments in class, students will select one or more authentic and performance-based assessment tools; conduct an assessment of a young child in a natural environment, using both informal and formal assessment methods; review the child's records; interview with significant caregivers; and then, based on the findings, develop and implement an intervention strategy and record the results. All phases of the process will be monitored and supervised by college and professional personnel. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 559: Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)

The course will provide participants with a framework for understanding the definition and history of autism. The medical and educational knowledge of treatment efforts to promote the appropriate education and services for young children, adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) will be discussed. The course will also focus on the social and communication needs of children with ASD. This course is intended as a general overview of autism. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 570: Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar at the Primary Level for Children with Disabilities (3)

Two professional laboratory experiences cover observation of special education classroom situation with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the college supervisor. Students seeking initial certification will complete this experience. Prerequisites: 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 512. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 580: Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar at the Intermediate Level for Children with Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to provide candidates with comprehensive classroom teaching experiences, which serve to culminate the professional sequence of teacher preparation and other related courses. Student teachers will be presented with the opportunity to observe, practice, discuss, evaluate, and modify teaching strategies and methods in intermediate childhood special education classroom settings (grades 4-6). Within the professional laboratory experience, candidates will be provided with gradually increasing lesson presentation and teaching responsibilities with the ultimate outcome of attending to all of the details that comprise a full day and week(s) of teaching. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 600: Research Methods in Special Education (3)

The course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in special education. It will examine the various types of research that can be and are conducted and the collection, analysis and reporting of findings based on sound methodological procedures. Prerequisites: SED 502, 503, 506. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 602: Special Education: Laws and Trends (3)

An in-depth review of legislation which impacts on the disabled, the families of children with disabilities, and the professional people who serve the disabled. Research implications and social trends in prevention, service, legislation, litigation and personnel preparation in special education. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 603: Standards Based Assessment and Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)

The course will emphasize the use of standards-based instruction and learning with assessment and measurement, as well as assessment instruments and decisions which lead to appropriate educational programming. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 606: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)

The course will focus on understanding and facilitating the learning process to support students with mild to moderate disabilities who are within regular and special education settings to become independent and life-long learners. The components of effective curricular and instructional design, including outcomes, assessment, goal setting, learning activities and measurement of outcomes will be related to NYS Standards. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 610: Seminar in Special Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for candidates to investigate and research the literature in a designated and/or variety of specializations(s) and integrate the results of this research with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. Candidates will have opportunities to 1) evaluate published research utilizing their existing SED 600 knowledge base, 2) expand their analytical abilities by learning about additional quantitative, as well as qualitative, research designs (e.g. correlational, single-subject, ethnographic, etc.), and 3) synthesize findings in designated research areas in the form of at least one well-crafted literature review. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 612: Quality Inclusion/Collaboration Methods (3)

The study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication and interaction with parents, students, ancillary personnel, peers, paraprofessionals, and volunteers. The focus will be on mastery of how inclusion and the various service models allow for the team teaching of students with disabilities in the regular education setting. The course will examine collaboration, reciprocal teaching methods and strategies for academic and social inclusion of students. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 615: Issues, Trends, and Research in Special Education (3)

This course is designed as a seminar for the discussion of current issues and trends in special education. The role of research in educational reform will be highly emphasized. Topics may include, but are not limited to, inclusive education, collaborating with parents and professionals, assessment, early intervention, transition, and categories of disability. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 635: Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3)

This course provides for advanced skill development of competencies for successful assessment and instruction for problem readers. The course will cover specific informal and formal assessment methods used in reading. A 10 hour practicum is required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 639: The Writing Process and Students with Disabilities (3)

This course will investigate all stages of the writing process from both a student and teacher perspective. The focus will be on how to apply this information with students with disabilities in the regular and special education classroom. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 642: Curriculum Modifications in the Content Areas of Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Technology (3)

This course examines specific content and instructional strategies for teaching Math, Science, Technology and Social Studies to students with disabilities in the regular and special education classroom. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (SED 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

SED 699: Research Project in Special Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in special education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (SED 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of special education. Prerequisites: Core courses and specialization courses. (GR)