All Courses

Accounting

ACC 618: Advanced Taxation (3)

This course focuses on the basic principles of federal income taxation of corporations, partnerships, trusts, gifts, and estates. It reinforces the use of tax research tools, and provides an overview of administrative and procedural aspects of tax practice. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program and completion of ACC 318. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ACC 618: Advanced Taxation (3)

This course focuses on the basic principles of federal income taxation of corporations, partnerships, trusts, gifts, and estates. It reinforces the use of tax research tools, and provides an overview of administrative and procedural aspects of tax practice. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program and completion of ACC 318. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ACC 620: Advanced Auditing (3)

An advanced study of auditing standards, principles, theory, and practice. Current trends in auditing and assurance services will be emphasized. The class offers an in-depth examination of auditor legal liability, ethics, audit procedures, statistical sampling, and audit research using electronic databases and the Internet. The class will also be focused on the Information Technology Audit function, the use of technology in audits, auditing through computer systems and auditing around computer systems. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisites: ACC 420 and acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ACC 620: Advanced Auditing (3)

An advanced study of auditing standards, principles, theory, and practice. Current trends in auditing and assurance services will be emphasized. The class offers an in-depth examination of auditor legal liability, ethics, audit procedures, statistical sampling, and audit research using electronic databases and the Internet. The class will also be focused on the Information Technology Audit function, the use of technology in audits, auditing through computer systems and auditing around computer systems. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisites: ACC 420 and acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ACC 630: Global Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis (3)

This course presents a five step framework for effective financial statement analysis. It begins with an understanding of the industry economic characteristics and current conditions of the firm's businesses and the particular strategies the firm selects to compete in each of these businesses. It then assesses how well the firm's financial statements reflect the economic effects of the firm's decisions and actions. With the use of financial statement ratios and other analytical tools, it assesses the profitability and risk of the firm in the recent past and, by incorporating information about expected changes, forecasts expected profitability and risk. Finally, the analyst values the firm using various valuation tools and models. The framework will be applied to both domestic and international companies. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ACC 630: Global Financial Reporting and Statement Analysis (3)

This course presents a five step framework for effective financial statement analysis. It begins with an understanding of the industry economic characteristics and current conditions of the firm's businesses and the particular strategies the firm selects to compete in each of these businesses. It then assesses how well the firm's financial statements reflect the economic effects of the firm's decisions and actions. With the use of financial statement ratios and other analytical tools, it assesses the profitability and risk of the firm in the recent past and, by incorporating information about expected changes, forecasts expected profitability and risk. Finally, the analyst values the firm using various valuation tools and models. The framework will be applied to both domestic and international companies. Accounting Majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the 5-year B.S./M.S. program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ACC 650: Directed Research in Accounting (3)

This course is the capstone course for the 150-hour accounting program. The student, under the guidance of a mentor, will prepare a research study in the field of accounting. The topic of the study must be approved by the graduate committee and defended in a public forum when complete. Details of the process will be provided to the student by their faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

ACC 650: Directed Research in Accounting (3)

This course is the capstone course for the 150-hour accounting program. The student, under the guidance of a mentor, will prepare a research study in the field of accounting. The topic of the study must be approved by the graduate committee and defended in a public forum when complete. Details of the process will be provided to the student by their faculty mentor. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

Adolescence Education

AE 500: Dimensions of Learning and Teaching -Content Specific (6)

This course provides a thorough review of the principles, concepts and theories used in teaching adolescents. The main focus will be on the five Dimensions of Learning that facilitate learning for adolescents. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 503: Assessment and Evaluation in Adolescence Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current trends in normative, summative and criterion based, and informal methods of educational assessment and evaluation. The course will examine the considerations necessary for effective measurement of academic performance of students. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 511: Adolescent Psychology (3)

This course discusses the psychological changes between childhood and adulthood, including the psychological correlation of physical maturation, cognitive changes and social challenges facing adolescents. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 513: Foundations of Education (3)

This course provides an overview of the historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations upon which pedagogical practice in the United States rests. In addition, educational statutes, legislation, and judicial decisions will be addressed. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 515: Specific Methods of Teaching Secondary Subjects (6)

The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview of general and specific methods used in teaching students in secondary schools. Instruction will focus on the New York State Learning Standards/ Common Core Learning Standards and include: policy curriculum requirements; assessment, evaluation and reporting; literacy and technology across the curriculum; and an observation module. Particular emphasis will be placed on the characteristics, definitions, standards, and trends in effective schools and the developments of relevant and meaningful teaching-learning experiences. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 524: Management Strategies for the Inclusive Secondary Classroom (3)

This course focuses on the development and the implementation of differentiated instruction, the skills necessary to prevent classroom misconduct, and the methods to improve classroom climate. In addition, this course provides information on the strategies necessary for working with students with disabilities in a mainstream classroom. Issues will include effective communication, management of an IEP, and understanding inclusive adolescents. The course will also include observations of some actual secondary classrooms. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 525: Literacy Theory at the Secondary Level (3)

This course focuses on the foundational concepts of reading and writing at the adolescent level. Reading instruction, literacy enrichment, and remediation will be explored. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 536: Literacy in the Content Areas (3)

This course connects English Language Arts standards to the content presented in a secondary core classroom. The main focus is on designing lessons which infuse reading, writing, speaking and listening into lessons and units. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

AE 579: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Intermediate Education Secondary Level (7-9) (3)

Students will have one professional laboratory experience at the middle school level (grades 7-9) and one at the high school level (grades 10-12). This includes observations of classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with a college supervisor. Prerequisites: AE 500, 503, 511, 513, 515, 524, 525, 536, 600 and 610. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 580: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Senior Secondary Level (10-12) (3)

Students will have one professional laboratory experience at the middle school level (grades 7-9) and one at the high school level (grades 10-12). This includes observations of classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with a college supervisor. Prerequisites: AE 500, 503, 511, 513, 515, 524, 525, 536, 600 and 610.Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

AE 600: Research Methods in Education (3)

This course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in education. The course will survey the various types of research that can be conducted and discuss the collection, analysis and reporting of findings based on sound methodological procedures. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 610: Seminar in Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

AE 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (AE 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

AE 699: Research Project in Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in adolescent education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (AE 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of adolescent education. Prerequisites: AE 600 and AE 610. (GR)

Arts Administration

ARTA 501: Arts Administration Overview (3)

This course provides an overview of most aspects of not-for-profit arts administration through site visits to leading professional organizations (theatre, galleries, etc) in Buffalo. Students will also gain hands-on experience in gallery administration, curating, public relations and marketing. Prerequisite: Graduate Status. (GR)

ARTA 535: Professional Seminar in Arts Administration: Visiting Lecturer Series (3)

This course will utilize the expertise of area arts professionals who will interact with students over the course of one five week session. This format allows for in-depth discussions about a particular arts environment, and will allow student to see first-hand how area professionals approach planning, research, and problem solving. Prerequisites: Graduate Status and ARTA-501 or Permission of Instructor. (GR)

ARTA 550: Practicum Seminar in Arts Administration and Management (3)

Students participating in this seminar will intern at one of Buffalo's leading arts organizations, where they will gain experience by working on a special project or by assisting a key arts manager or executive. Prerequisites: Graduate Status and ARTA-535 or Permission of Instructor. (GR)

ARTA 640: Arts Administration Thesis Project (3)

A semi-independent study that entails research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member, and that builds directly on an internship or administrative assistantship with a participating not-for-profit cultural organization, this course will be geared towards the development, completion, and acceptance (by the participating cultural organization) of a fully realized project, proposal, or portfolio. Examples of completed projects might include (but are not limited to) strategic plans, project grants or funding proposals, marketing, fundraising, subscription or audience development plans, arts-in-education programs, print campaigns, audio or video guides for patrons, websites, etc. Prerequisites: Graduate Status and ARTA-535 or Permission of Instructor. (GR)

ARTA 650: Capstone in Arts Administration (3)

This course seeks to synthesize the content of previous Arts Administration and Leadership courses and prepare students for public presentation of their research. Prerequisites: Graduate Status and ARTA-535 or Permission of Instructor. (GR)

Athletic Training

ATH 500: Introduction to Emergency Athletic Care (3)

This lecture/lab course will present the roles and responsibilities of the Athletic Trainer and Sports Medicine Team and the basic principles in the prevention, recognition, and care of acute, traumatic and exertional athletic injuries/illnesses. Topics will include: risk management, blood-borne pathogen training, life-threatening conditions, CPR/AED certification, head and spine injury management (stabilization and equipment removal), musculoskeletal injury, selected taping/wrapping techniques, environmental considerations, and sudden medical illnesses. Students will be expected to recognize unsafe environments and develop critical thinking strategies to act appropriately during athletic emergencies. Students will also demonstrate emergency care skill consistent with National Athletic Trainers' Association position statements. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

ATH 500L: Intro to Emergency Athletic Care Lab (0)

This lecture/lab course will present the roles and responsibilities of the Athletic Trainer and Sports Medicine Team and the basic principles in the prevention, recognition, and care of acute, traumatic and exertional athletic injuries/illnesses. Topics will include: risk management, blood-borne pathogen training, life-threatening conditions, CPR/AED certification, head and spine injury management (stabilization and equipment removal), musculoskeletal injury, selected taping/wrapping techniques, environmental considerations, and sudden medical illnesses. Students will be expected to recognize unsafe environments and develop critical thinking strategies to act appropriately during athletic emergencies. Students will also demonstrate emergency care skill consistent with National Athletic Trainers' Association position statements. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

ATH 501: Foundations of Athletic Training (2)

This lecture/lab course is designed to prepare students to critically evaluate the association between physical activity and musculoskeletal injury and use clinical decision-making skills to appropriately apply a variety of supportive and protective devices for the head, torso, upper and lower extremity. Students will develop the necessary skills to appropriately choose and properly fit protective athletic equipment (e.g. helmet and shoulder pads) and properly apply preventative taping, wrapping, splinting, bracing and orthoses. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 501L: Foundations/Athletic Training Lab (0)

This lecture/lab course is designed to build upon the knowledge from the previous course work and experience of the athletic training students. Topics will include, injury documentation and management systems, protective equipment, taping, wrapping, splinting, bracing, orthoses, rehabilitation phases of injury and psychosocial and emotional response to injury. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Education Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 502: Foundations of Athletic Training II (2)

This course addresses a variety of topics to further develop the students' understanding of the scope of the Athletic Trainer's duties and the complexities involved in the daily operations of an Athletic Training facility. A combination of lecture, case studies and reflection of clinical educational experiences will allow for insightful peer engaged discussions. Topics will include: legal practice, professional ethics, cross-cultural awareness, inter-professional relationships, facility principles, budgeting process, integrated injury management, imaging, rehabilitation phases, psychosocial/emotional response to injury, and injury documentation and the use of electronic medical records. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 501 AND ATH-501L. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 509: Gross Anatomy (6)

This lecture/lab course is designed to focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Specific anatomical content will be presented on a regional basis, and will include the back, head, neck, shoulder girdle, upper extremity, and thorax. Laboratory sessions will allow students to acquire a three-dimensional macroscopic appreciation of anatomical structure through human cadaver dissection guided by iPad video demonstrations. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

ATH 509L: Gross Anatomy Lab (0)

This lecture/lab course is designed to focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Specific anatomical content will be presented on a regional basis, and will include the back, head, neck, shoulder girdle, upper extremity, and thorax. Laboratory sessions will allow students to acquire a three-dimensional macroscopic appreciation of anatomical structure through human cadaver dissection guided by iPad video demonstrations. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

ATH 510: Pathology and Clinical Examination I (4)

This lecture/lab course is the first in the sequence of two courses designed to give the athletic training student the necessary information to identify specific injuries and illnesses associated with the low back, lower extremities, reproductive organs, and abdominal region. Topics include mechanism of injury/etiology, pathology, tests and measures, and referred pain patterns of the low back and lower extremities. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills regarding palpation, range of motion, gait analysis, manual muscle testing, neurological and special tests. Students will develop clinical decision making skills through the integration of evidence-based medicine. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 510L: Pathology and Clinical Examination Lab I (0)

This lecture/lab course is the first in the sequence of two courses designed to give the athletic training student the necessary information to identify specific injuries and illnesses associated with the low back, lower extremities, reproductive organs, and abdominal region. Topics include mechanism of injury/etiology, pathology, tests and measures, and referred pain patterns of the low back and lower extremities. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills regarding palpation, range of motion, gait analysis, manual muscle testing, neurological and special tests. Students will develop clinical decision making skills through the integration of evidence-based medicine. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 511: Pathology and Clinical Examination II (4)

This lecture/lab course is the second in the sequence of two courses designed to give the athletic training student the necessary information to identify specific injuries and illnesses associated with the head, neck, upper back, and upper extremities. Topics include mechanism of injury/etiology, pathology, tests and measures, and referred pain patterns of the head, neck, upper back, and upper extremities. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills regarding palpation, range of motion, posture analysis, manual muscle testing, neurological and special tests. Students will develop clinical decision making skills through the integration of evidence-based medicine. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 510 and ATH 510L. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 511L: Pathology and Clinical Examination II Lab (0)

This lecture/lab course is the second in the sequence of two courses designed to give the athletic training student the necessary information to identify specific injuries and illnesses associated with the head, neck, upper back, and upper extremities. Topics include mechanism of injury/etiology, pathology, tests and measures, and referred pain patterns of the head, neck, upper back, and upper extremities. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills regarding palpation, range of motion, posture analysis, manual muscle testing, neurological and special tests. Students will develop clinical decision making skills through the integration of evidence-based medicine. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 510 and ATH 510L. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 512: Neuroscience (2)

In this course, students will examine the structure and function of the central and peripheral nervous systems through a combination of lecture, discussion of case studies and examination of cadaveric brain specimens. Students will use the neurologic examination as a systematic framework for organizing their understanding of the functional anatomy of the nervous system. We will consider the following topics: development of the central nervous system; voluntary movement and postural controL; sensory pathways; motor pathways; neurodegenerative disease and trauma. Students will develop basic familiarity with electrodiagnostic tests (i.e., nerve conduction velocity, EMG). Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 515: Musculoskeletal Fitness Assessment And Training (3)

This lecture/lab course is designed to prepare the future athletic trainer to critically evaluate patient/client physical fitness, nutritional habits, and body composition to appropriately design fitness prescription for maintaining a healthy lifestyle and prevent chronic disease. Students will develop skills in performing measurements of body composition, posture, flexibility, muscular strength, power, speed, agility, and endurance. These skills will be enhanced when learning how to develop and adjust fitness routines based on patient/client specificity. Students will also learn nutritional principles relative to strength training and in recognition of disordered eating. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Summer). Direct Entry MSAT students only. (GR)

ATH 515L: Musculoskeletal Fitness Assessment Lab And Training (0)

Lab practice and co-requisite for ATH 515.Direct Entry MSAT students only. (GR)

ATH 520: Therapeutic Agents (4)

This lecture/lab course is designed to prepare the future athletic trainer to critically select, provide rationale for, and skillfully apply therapeutic agents including massage, cold, superficial heat, infrared, hydrotherapy, short wave diathermy, ultrasound, iontophoresis, traction, and electrotherapy for inducing muscle contractions, reducing pain, enhancing wound healing, and curbing edema formation. Indications and contraindications relative to the selection and use of each modality are emphasized. Theory, principles, and methods of direct interventions will be discussed in lecture; associated psychomotor skills will be practiced and evaluated in lab. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 520L: Therapeutic Agents Lab (0)

This lecture/lab course is designed to prepare the future athletic trainer to critically select, provide rationale for, and skillfully apply therapeutic agents including massage, cold, superficial heat, infrared, hydrotherapy, short wave diathermy, ultrasound, iontophoresis, traction, and electrotherapy for inducing muscle contractions, reducing pain, enhancing wound healing, and curbing edema formation. Indications and contraindications relative to the selection and use of each modality are emphasized. Theory, principles, and methods of direct interventions will be discussed in lecture; associated psychomotor skills will be practiced and evaluated in lab. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 521: Pharmacology in Sports Medicine (2)

This course focuses on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs commonly encountered in the practice of athletic training. Topics include patient education, federal, state, and local regulations for proper storage and dispensing, and poison control protocols. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 522: General Medical Conditions (3)

This course is designed to prepare the future athletic trainer to recognize the signs and symptoms of diseases and illnesses of the body systems and to know when to refer to other medical professions. Topics include etiology, pathology, assessment, and risks associated with common diseases, impairments, and physical disabilities. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 523: Therapeutic Intervention (4)

This lecture/lab course is designed to enhance the student's assessment skills and to provide a foundation of appropriate exercise principles and rehabilitation techniques specific to athletic participation and the physically active. Topics will include planning, implementing, and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation programs. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 523L: Therapeutic Intervention Laboratory (0)

This lecture/lab course is designed to enhance the student's assessment skills and to provide a foundation of appropriate exercise principles and rehabilitation techniques specific to athletic participation and the physically active. Topics will include planning, implementing, and evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic exercise and rehabilitation programs. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 524: Sports Nutrition (2)

This course discusses the physiological processes of digestion, absorption, and assimilation of food, fluids, nutritional supplements, herbs, and ergogenic aids specific to the energy needs for sports participation and the physically active. Topics include weight loss/gain, body composition, performance, illness, injury, and eating disorders. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 525: Organization and Administration in Athletic Training (3)

This course focuses on management, administration, leadership, and professional responsibilities associated with providing health care in an athletic training room, health care facility, and related venues that provide health care to athletes and others involved in physical activities. Topics include athletic training room design, budget, organization and administration of pre-participation physical exams, components of a medical record, regulations, insurance, personnel management, athletic training practice acts and registration, professional responsibility, continuing education, governing bodies, scope of practice, community awareness, and preparation for the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 530: Psychosocial Aspects in Athletic Training (3)

Psychosocial Aspects in Athletic Training (3) This course addresses a variety of integrated psychosocial topics involving the patient, the health care professional, and response to injury. Topics include motivation, self confidence, personality traits, emotional response to injury, interpersonal and cross-cultural communication. This course is designed for professional phase Athletic Training students. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 580: Research Methods (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy; Writing Intensive. Meets Research and Presentation requirements. This course will explore the variety in research design and statistics commonly used in clinical research, further developing student analytical skills needed to support professional evidence-based practice in athletic training. Students will evaluate the merit and relevance of published research to the practice of athletic training from the perspective of experimental methodology and design. Students will select a topic of interest related to athletic training, conduct a review of the literature, define a research question, and prepare and present a report to their peers. Students will complete Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI training). Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 581: Research Seminar I (1)

This course is a continuation of ATH 580 and the first of a sequence of two research seminar courses. Students will refine their literature review to develop and write the introduction and methods sections of their athletic training research project. Students will present their proposals to their peers. This is directed study under the supervision of faculty research mentor. Additionally, students will learn how to efficiently and effectively use the IBM SPSS Software. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 580. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 582: Research Seminar II (2)

This is the second in the sequence of two research seminar courses. Students will collect data, perform data analysis, and write the results, and discussion sections for their athletic training research projects. Students will revise and refine their final research project, develop a presentation, and present their findings. This is directed study under the supervision of a faculty research mentor. Additionally, students will demonstrate evidence based medicine through problem based learning scenarios in class. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 581. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 590: Athletic Training: Practical Application I (3)

This course is the first of four clinical experience courses. Athletic training students will be evaluated on clinical integration proficiencies of skills taught the previous semesters including: general health and fitness assessment; environmental conditions; recognition of emergencies and acute injury care; professional communication and documentation strategies. Additionally students will be expected to build upon their acquired knowledge and practice those skills and techniques previously covered in the curriculum. Students will be assigned to clinical education experiences under the direct supervision of a preceptor. Students will explore evidence-based practice and reflect upon their clinical experiences to facilitate critical thinking and clinical decision making skills development. Students must complete 200 clinical hours. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 592: Athletic Training: Practical Application II (3)

This course is the second of four athletic training clinical experience courses. Students will be evaluated on clinical integration proficiencies of psychomotor skills taught the previous semester including: taping, wrapping, bracing, and protective equipment fitting; clinical assessment, diagnosis, and therapeutic intervention of the lower extremity and spine; psychosocial motivational techniques; and professional communication and documentation strategies. Additionally students will be expected to build upon their acquired knowledge and practice those skills and techniques previously covered in the curriculum. Students will be assigned to clinical education experiences under the direct supervision of a preceptor. Students will explore evidence-based practice and reflect upon their clinical experiences to facilitate critical thinking and clinical decision making skills development. Students must complete 200 clinical hours. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 590. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

ATH 593: Athletic Training: Practical Application III (3)

This course is the third of four athletic training clinical experience courses. Athletic training students will be evaluated on clinical integration proficiencies of skills taught the previous semester including: clinical assessment, diagnosis, and therapeutic intervention of the upper extremity, head, neck, thorax, and patients with common illnesses. Additionally students will be expected to build upon their acquired knowledge and practice those skills and techniques previously covered in the curriculum. Students will be assigned to clinical education experiences under the direct supervision of a preceptor. Students will explore evidence-based practice and reflect upon their clinical experiences to facilitate critical thinking and clinical decision making skills development. Students must complete 200 clinical hours. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 592. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

ATH 594: Athletic Training: Practical Application IV (3)

This course is the fourth of four athletic training clinical experience courses. Athletic training students will be evaluated on clinical integration proficiencies taught the previous semester including: comprehensive therapeutic intervention, clinical examination, and diagnosis of musculoskeletal injury; common illnesses and conditions; psychosocial strategies and referral; professional communication and documentation strategies. Additionally students will be expected to build upon their acquired knowledge and practice those skills and techniques previously covered in the curriculum. Students will be assigned to clinical education experiences under the direct supervision of a preceptor. Students will explore evidence-based practice and reflect upon their clinical experiences to facilitate critical thinking and clinical decision making skills development. Students must complete 200 clinical hours. Prerequisite: Admission into the Athletic Training Program and ATH 593. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

Biology

BIO 541: Neurobiology I (4)

An integrated study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Topics include surface anatomy and blood supply of the brain, meninges, sensory receptors and the electrical properties of neuronal membranes. Prerequisites: BIO 340 and professional phase status in Physical Therapy, or by permission of Natural Science Dept. Chair. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

BIO 541L: Neurobiology I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neurobiology I. Corequisite: BIO 541. (GR)

BIO 542: Neurobiology II (4)

A continuation of the study of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology. Topics include neuroanatomical pathways, motor control systems, and physiology of synapses. Prerequisite: BIO 541. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

BIO 542L: Neurobiology II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neurobiology II. Corequisite: BIO 542. (GR)

Childhood Education

CE 500: Dimensions of Learning and Teaching at the Primary Level (3 - 6)

The purpose of this course is to provide a thorough review of the principles, concepts and theories used in teaching children. The course also focuses on the five Dimensions of Learning that facilitate instruction for children. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 502: Language Arts Methods (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of Language Arts and how to design, plan, and implement teaching-learning experiences in English/Language Arts that meet state goals/outcomes. The course will focus on methods of teaching, speaking, listening, reading, and writing at the elementary level and various techniques for teaching these skills to young children. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 503: Assessment and Evaluation in Childhood Education (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current trends in normative, criteria, and informal methods of educational evaluation and assessment. The course will examine the validity, reliability and ethical considerations important for effective measurement of academic performance of students. These assessment materials will be aligned with state and district assessments that meet academic standards. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

CE 504: The Reading Process for Students with Disabilities (3)

This course presents the fundamentals of reading theory, instruction and assessment. Teaching strategies based on current special education methods and materials will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster reading literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to children with disabilities are addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials are included. Prerequisites: CE 502. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 505: Elementary Classroom Management (3)

The purpose of this course is to provide an extensive review of theories of classroom management at the elementary grade levels. The course will examine the development of classroom procedures, rules and consequences that allow a teacher to maintain effective control of his/her classroom. The course will also provide instruction in working with children with behavior problems and conducting functional behavior assessments and referrals as required by law for students with disabilities. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 507: Methods & Content Instruction at the Junior Level (6)

This course offers a comprehensive study of teaching methods for the areas of Mathematics, Science, and Technology/Social Studies with a focus on integrating the subject areas. Current issues and trends in instruction will be investigated. Attention will be given to state and national standards and assessments in Mathematics, Science and Technology/Social Studies. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 512: Collaborative Approaches with Inclusive Programs/Special Education (3)

This course is designed for the study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication. Specific emphasis will be given to the development of interpersonal skills required for various team members both in special and regular education. Issues explored will include: interpersonal relationships - the roles played by one's self-concept, perceptions, emotions; language, non-verbal communication, and listening versus hearing; intimacy and distance in relationships, improving communication climates, and managing interpersonal conflicts. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 515: Diagnosis and Remediation of Students with Difficulties in Math (3)

This course is designed to explore assessment instruments and methods for use with students experiencing difficulty with mathematics. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies for developing skills and understanding of mathematics. Also discussed will be current research on attitudes and equity issues in mathematics. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 520: Mathematics for the Teacher (3)

This course allows teachers of mathematics at the elementary level the opportunity to explore the mathematics they teach. The emphasis is on building content knowledge. In the process, participants will also explore various theories of learning, approaches to curriculum, standards-based instruction, instructional strategies, technology, and methods of assessment. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 530: Children's Literature (3)

Extensive survey of children's literature with special attention to standards of evaluation, principles of selections, and analysis of the reading interests of children. The student will also participate in a reading clinic working with young children experiencing reading delays. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 531: Practicum in Teaching Mathematics, Science and Technology (3)

The purpose of this course is participation in a professional teaching situation for the content areas of Mathematics, Science and Technology that includes 50 clock hours. The college instructor will supervise this practicum. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 534: Reading in the Content Areas (3)

The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the development of a competent, professional classroom teacher who is sensitive to the interdisciplinary, cohesive nature of learning through speech, language and communication. In this regard, the participants will be able to: (1) list the major components of a language arts program across the grade levels; (2) utilize all content areas to develop and reinforce language skills; (3) explore multiple strategies and a variety of instructional materials utilized to teach language arts in a cross-disciplinary approach; (4) critique innovations in teaching the language arts; (5) evaluate commercially-prepared language arts and language arts related programs and materials. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

CE 575: Student Teaching and Seminar in Childhood Education (6)

Professional practicum experience at the elementary grade level that includes observations of regular classroom activities with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision of a master teacher. Student teachers are also required to attend periodic seminars with the college supervisor during the semester. Prerequisites: CE 500, 502, 503, 505, 507, 512, 600, 610, and either the literacy concentration courses (504, 530, 534) or the numeracy concentration courses (515, 520, 531). (GR)

CE 600: Research Methods in Education (3)

The course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in education. It will examine the various types of research that can be and are conducted and the collection, analysis and reporting of finding based on sound methodological procedures. Offered Fall and Summer. (GR)

CE 610: Seminar in Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. (GR)

CE 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (CE 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

CE 699: Research Project in Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in childhood education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (CE 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of childhood education. Prerequisites: CE600 and CE610. (GR)

Cytotechnology

CYT 501: Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of using the microscope to perform Pap smear screening. This lecture, coupled with computer-based learning and presentation formats, will allow the student to cognitively learn the nuances of picking-up neoplastic lesions of the gynecologic tract and know the mimics of cervical carcinoma. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in cervical Cytopathology, and pass the ThinPrep validation examination for examining liquid-based ThinPrep Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT503, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 501: Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of using the microscope to perform Pap smear screening. This lecture, coupled with computer-based learning and presentation formats, will allow the student to cognitively learn the nuances of picking-up neoplastic lesions of the gynecologic tract and know the mimics of cervical carcinoma. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in cervical Cytopathology, and pass the ThinPrep validation examination for examining liquid-based ThinPrep Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT503, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 503: Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills to locate and isolate the cell of interest in a gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least a 90% accuracy rate. Additionally, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to screen GYN specimens with sufficient competence to issue a final report of negative for intraepithelial lesion (NIL). The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 503: Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills to locate and isolate the cell of interest in a gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least a 90% accuracy rate. Additionally, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to screen GYN specimens with sufficient competence to issue a final report of negative for intraepithelial lesion (NIL). The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT505. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 505L: Gynecologic Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare and assist in the basic laboratory techniques as applies to cytology and learn to perform molecular HPV testing. Additionally, students will learn and manage a computer-based assisted screening device in the performance of Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Students will rotate through the Department of Pathology at Buffalo General Hospital in order to work with this device. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT503. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 505L: Gynecologic Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare and assist in the basic laboratory techniques as applies to cytology and learn to perform molecular HPV testing. Additionally, students will learn and manage a computer-based assisted screening device in the performance of Pap smears. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Students will rotate through the Department of Pathology at Buffalo General Hospital in order to work with this device. Corequisite: CYT501, CYT503. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

CYT 521: Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to locate and interpret benign and malignant lesions of the lung (bronchial brush/wash), pericardial and peritoneal effusions, urine, CSF, gastrointestinal, mediastinal, salivary glands and pediatric lesions. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in non-GYN Cytopathology. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT523, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 521: Non-Gynecologic Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce students to locate and interpret benign and malignant lesions of the lung (bronchial brush/wash), pericardial and peritoneal effusions, urine, CSF, gastrointestinal, mediastinal, salivary glands and pediatric lesions. After completion of this course, students should be able to identify, provide discourse and present to his/her colleagues on any topic in non-GYN Cytopathology. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT523, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 523: Non-Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills of the cell of interest in a non-gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides an hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 523: Non-Gynecologic Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills of the cell of interest in a non-gynecologic specimen for proper interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides an hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT525. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 525: Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Rotation And Immunohistochemistry Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to assist in the preparation of fine needle aspiration specimens including, smearing techniques and rapid fixation. They will also learn to stain with both the Papanicolaou and Diff Quik stain any specimen coming from the FNA service. In addition, students will be able to assist in the performance of immunohistochemical (IP) test in conjunction with any specimens sent for IP staining, The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT523. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 525: Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Rotation And Immunohistochemistry Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to assist in the preparation of fine needle aspiration specimens including, smearing techniques and rapid fixation. They will also learn to stain with both the Papanicolaou and Diff Quik stain any specimen coming from the FNA service. In addition, students will be able to assist in the performance of immunohistochemical (IP) test in conjunction with any specimens sent for IP staining, The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT521, CYT523. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

CYT 541: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the detection and interpretation of malignancies of various organ sites. Most common tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, lymph nodes, breast, lung, soft tissue including melanoma, kidney, adrenals, mesothelium, pancreas and liver will be covered. Microbiological entities and their associated cytomorphology will also be covered for each organ system. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT543, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 541: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytopathology (4)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the detection and interpretation of malignancies of various organ sites. Most common tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, lymph nodes, breast, lung, soft tissue including melanoma, kidney, adrenals, mesothelium, pancreas and liver will be covered. Microbiological entities and their associated cytomorphology will also be covered for each organ system. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT543, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 543: Fine Needle Aspiration Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills in locating and isolating the cell of interest in any fine needle aspiration specimen for proper diagnostic interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. he course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 543: Fine Needle Aspiration Screening (4)

This course allows for the development of the cytotechnologist's locator or detector skills in locating and isolating the cell of interest in any fine needle aspiration specimen for proper diagnostic interpretation. This course will also enable students to screen a slide at a minimum rate of 7 slides/hour with at least an 80% accuracy rate. he course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT545. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 545: Cytogenetics and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare specimens for FISH testing, learn procurement techniques for molecular analysis of EGFR, B-raf, and ALK testing. Students also learn to perform EGFR, B-raf and ALK testing. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT543. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 545: Cytogenetics and Molecular Pathology Laboratory (3)

This course develops the cytotechnology students' ability to prepare specimens for FISH testing, learn procurement techniques for molecular analysis of EGFR, B-raf, and ALK testing. Students also learn to perform EGFR, B-raf and ALK testing. The course is offered off-site at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Corequisite: CYT541, CYT543. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

CYT 650: Cytology Research and Professional Development (1 - 3)

The Cytotechnology program culminates with completion of the research component of the program. The research project will be completed over multiple terms (one credit per term for a total of 3 credits). Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate published professional literature and explain the basic principles of the scientific method. Students will perform a cytology related project for presentation and potential publication of their research findings. Offered Each Term (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

CYT 650: Cytology Research and Professional Development (1 - 3)

The Cytotechnology program culminates with completion of the research component of the program. The research project will be completed over multiple terms (one credit per term for a total of 3 credits). Students will demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate published professional literature and explain the basic principles of the scientific method. Students will perform a cytology related project for presentation and potential publication of their research findings. Offered Each Term (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

Early Childhood Special Education

ECSE 521: Language/Communication Development of Children with Special Needs (3)

This course will focus on the language and communication development of young children. Attention will focus on teaching students to design learning environments for infants and preschoolers that will enable, accommodate, and enhance the unique receptive and expressive modes of communication of children with special needs. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 522: Infant Development and Intervention with Assistive Technology (3)

This course will prepare students to understand and appreciate the complex developmental issues and comprehensive interdisciplinary service needs of infants who are disabled or are at risk for a disability, and their families. From an educational perspective, it is impossible to view the needs and goals for the young child apart from those of the family. Early intervention (EI) services are now found throughout the United States, and recent research on brain development highlights the unique characteristics and needs of infants and the critical role of their caregivers in fostering optimal growth and development. The transactional model of EI emphasizes the importance of the continual and progressive interactions between the infant and the environment. Current research on the use of assistive technology in facilitating the infant's interactions with the environment will also be explored and incorporated into class discussions and assignments. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 524: Transdisciplinary Intervention and Family Involvement (3)

With the implementation of family-centered services and the inclusion of young children with special needs in naturalistic environments, personnel need to be able to work collaboratively as members of teams with family members, with others in their own disciplines, and with individuals from an array of other disciplines. The early childhood special educator must be knowledgeable about the philosophical base, methodological approaches, and terminologies of the discipline with which collaboration/consultation occurs. In transdisciplinary team approaches, all team members share their expertise, become sensitive to understanding boundaries of their professional disciplines to maximize what they can offer to the child and his or her family. Students will receive instruction from a parent of a child with a disability and a team of professionals who will model transdisciplinary service delivery and instruct students in a cross-disciplinary model of intervention. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 570: Student Teaching and Seminar in Early Childhood Special Education (B-Gr2) (3)

One professional laboratory experience covers observation of special education classroom situation with gradual increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic seminars with the ECSE 570 college supervisor. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

ECSE 610: Seminar in Early Childhood/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to investigate and research the literature in their respective specializations and integrate this with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. The course is designed to promote an interdisciplinary perspective by insuring that students within different specializations comprise each seminar group. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

Education

EDU 518: Teaching to the Standards (3)

This course is intended to provide an advance level of training to students regarding the use of the Common Core learning standards and how specifically children with disabilities will meet these seven standards. The course will also examine methods of instruction, evaluation and content related to assisting the learner. Students will also participate in a PEER review process using Academy of Learning protocol. Offered As Needed. (GR)

Finance

FIN 601: Global Monetary System and Capital Markets (3)

This course is devoted to in-depth discussion and practical application of business finance as practiced in a borderless world. The major topics covered include the international monetary system, the balance of payments, foreign exchange, the management of foreign exchange risk, the role of banks in international finance, and a discussion and analysis of the non-bank financial institutions and international financial markets that represent an inventory of financial resources for the global company. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

FIN 601: Global Monetary System and Capital Markets (3)

This course is devoted to in-depth discussion and practical application of business finance as practiced in a borderless world. The major topics covered include the international monetary system, the balance of payments, foreign exchange, the management of foreign exchange risk, the role of banks in international finance, and a discussion and analysis of the non-bank financial institutions and international financial markets that represent an inventory of financial resources for the global company. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

Health Science

HSC 515: Legal and Ethical Implications for Caregivers of Indiciduals With Disabilities (1)

This course is an introductory course designed to expand knowledge and sensitivity about the legal and ethical issues surrounding care for individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. The purpose of this course is to improve health care provider students' understanding of the fundamentals related to the legal needs affecting individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. Accessing benefits, services and resources for individuals with developmental disabilities and their caregivers will be explored as a basis for further development in clinical and professional practice. Prerequisite or Corequisite: NUR 505/L or PAS517/L or equivalent. Offered Each Intersession. (GR)

HSC 530: Caring for Children With Developmental Disabilities (1)

This course is one in a series designed to educate health care provider students about caring for individuals with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of assessing, supporting and intervening with children and families affected by developmental disabilities. Application of knowledge will be explored in classroom and external learning portions of the class which will include clinic and home visit experiences with children and families affected by developmental disabilities. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Acceptance in the PHEPD Certificate program or permission from the instructor. Offered Each Semester. (GR)

HSC 532: Caring for Adults With Developmental Disabilities (1)

This course is one in a series designed to educate health care provider students about caring for individuals with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the fundamentals of assessing, supporting and intervening with adults with developmental disabilities. Application of knowledge will be explored in classroom and external learning portions of the class which will include clinic and home visit experiences. Prerequisite or Corequisite: Acceptance in the PHEPD Certificate program or permission from the instructor. Offered Each Semester. (GR)

HSC 560: Community Care for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (3)

This course is one in a series designed to educate health care provider students about caring for individuals with developmental disabilities. The purpose of this course is further explore the role of the health care provider as a leader in planning, implementing and evaluating patient and family-centered care for individual with developmental disabilities. Emphasis is placed on developing collaborative relationships in the community setting. The course includes a didactic component and structured external learning experiences. Prerequisite: HSC 515 and HSC 530 or HSC 532. Offered Each Summer. (GR)

Leadership

LEAF 500: Organizational Leadership and Self Development (3)

Drawing on material from various social science disciplines, this integrative course focuses on the research and models of leadership relevant to defining and achieving collective goals in a variety of organizational settings.Students explore the relationship between personality style and effective behaviors of the socially responsible leader. This course follows the historical development of leadership theory and examines multiple leadership models with their associated strengths and criticisms. Personal assessments are used to promote a broad understanding of leadership in an ethical context. Topics include personality theory, leadership style, including transactional leadership, path goal, contingency and trait approach theories, transformational leadership, leader-member exchange, holistic, servant, and social change models. Also covered are theories of group development, motivation, power, authority, disclosure and feedback. Approaches include diagnostic instruments for self and others, role-plays, case studies, writing projects to establish a personal mission statement, use of a reflective "leadership log" and formulating strategies for balancing work and personal goals. The Leadership Portfolio is introduced. Prerequisite: Majors only or permission of instructor. Offered Fall (Wednesday nights) and Spring (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 501: Critical Thinking, Creative Problem Solving, and Decision Making: Methods of Organization Research (3)

The main goal of this course is to provide students with balanced, differentiated thinking skills and facilitation tools necessary for effective problem solving and decision-making. The course is based on the Osborn-Parnes model of creative problem solving and decision-making, originating in Buffalo, which unites a firm understanding of various problem solving methodologies with deliberate creative and critical thinking skills. The course includes the study of the inquiry process appropriate to investigation of organizational climate and group behavior. Topics include divergent, convergent and systems thinking, facilitation, collecting and processing information, clarifying core issues, weighing multiple potential solutions, developing and implementing an action plan. The organizational processes and skills practiced include identifying complex challenges, data collection, ideation, forecasting, decision-making under uncertainty, and communicating or implementing results. Teaching methods include lecture,experiential activities, case studies, and projects. Also, "scientific" ways of knowing will be contrasted with more intuitively based decision-making processes, demonstrating the importance of both in making ethical and personal leadership decisions. During this course, students will be encouraged to apply methodologies to their own experiences, and will engage in facilitation projects designed to allow them to use various methods to aid in the discovery of their own leadership decision-making processes. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Fall (Wednesday nights) and Spring (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 502: Leadership and Organizational Ethics, Values and Social Environment (3)

Effective leadership encompasses the ability to understand, rationalize and apply ethical principles in the decision making process. This course focuses on the influence that sound moral reasoning has in achieving appropriate parameters of conduct that benefits the individual, the institution as well as the larger community. Class lectures are forged around a participatory process wherein each student is required to present an in depth analysis of ethical issues common in everyday activities. Through the use of selective material and reading, core ethical dilemmas are explored for the purpose of assisting the student in recognizing the pervasiveness of ethics in our quest for effective leadership. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Wednesday nights) and Summer (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 513: Developing Leadership Skills: One-on- One Leadership, Conflict Management, and Team Building (3)

This course explores challenges and possibilities for effective leadership at three levels - the individual (both self and those being engaged in one-on-one interactions), the group or team, and the organization or system as a whole. Topics include systems thinking, coaching and feedback, the use and application of standardized assessment tools (including a 360 degree instrument), organizational theory, conflict management, emotional intelligence, leadership styles and team development. The emphasis throughout the course is on the practical application of leadership theories and models; participants are encouraged and supported in making connections with their real worlds of work, past, present and future. Significant in-class time of the course is used as a learning laboratory to explore various concepts around the self and team leadership. This includes collaboratively setting up a self-directing team and delivering a product to a defined customer. The context for the exploration of leadership at the three levels in LEAF 513 is the inherent complexity of organizations and organizational life, and the critical role of the leader in the organization's achievement of results and long-term sustainability. Learning methodologies include personal reflection and sharing of experiences, action learning, a written paper and presentation, completion of leadership/learning log and extensive reading and dialogue. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Wednesday nights) and Summer (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 514: Leadership and Community: Empowerment, Collaboration, and Dialogue (3)

Through leadership immersion, an appreciation for and an understanding of the leadership processes of empowerment, collaboration, strategy, and dialogue in the context of creating and transforming organizational community, internally, externally and or globally are obtained. Emphasis is given to understanding the processes of leadership focusing on individual and group development, social capital, strategy, organizational mission, vision, and values, structures of collaboration, problem solving and dialogue. For this course, the student may work individually or within a small group to become knowledgeable about an agency, business, or community group (identified below as practice setting). The student will apply action research methods to become knowledgeable about the practice setting. By spending time with various leaders within the practice setting, the student will become increasingly sensitive to the culture of the practice setting. Collaborating with their organizational host the student will identify a goal/problem within the practice setting and develop a mini-project. Drawing on foundational theories relating to organizational behavior, leadership style, decision-making, and problem solving, the student will become familiar with the communication and decision making mechanisms already in place at the practice setting to develop and or enhance competitive advantage. The remainder of the course will be spent on activating appropriate resources to meet mutually agreed upon goals. Upon completion of this course, students will be well prepared based on "best practices" and theoretical leadership foundation knowledge acquired in the program to undertake leadership roles/positions in various organizations, agencies, communities, businesses/international corporations, or Non-Governmental Organizations. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Summer (Wednesday nights) and Fall (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 515: The Business of Leadership: Financial, Organizational and Cultural (3)

This course examines financial administrative tools and leadership techniques as they apply to a variety of organizations. Financial accounting and financial reporting concepts will be introduced as important analysis and planning tools. The course covers the basic financial statements including the balance sheet, income statement, cash flow statement and notes to financial statements. Analytical procedures, budgeting cost concepts and ratio analysis will also be examined to evaluate profitability, liquidity and solvency of organizations. An additional component of the course will address the changing nature of the market place and explore the implications and ramifications for leadership. Cultural considerations are woven through the managerial topics of planning and organizing for domestic and global organizations. This course includes common business processes and skills, such as innovative problem solving, negotiation, and effective presentations. Teaching methods include role-plays, discussions, case studies, readings statistical analysis and financial modeling. Prerequisites: Majors only. Offered Spring (Tuesday nights) and Fall (Wednesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 525: Leadership in Higher Education (3)

This course will offer a critical examination of leadership within the context of 21st century higher education, with a focus on trends, issues, challenges, and competencies influencing the effective practice of leadership in local, regional and U.S. colleges and universities. Beginning with a brief history and the theoretical foundations of higher education in the United States, the course will further explore leadership models and approaches, as well as content in a variety of topic areas related to the leadership and management of higher education institutions including: organizational administration and governance; finance; strategic planning; community and government relations; student affairs; and ethics and diversity. The course will be presented in seminar format and involve a variety of written, Web-enhanced (Blackboard), oral assignments, and classroom activities. These will include individual and group work, presentations, discussions, lecture, and guest speakers. For the final project, students will develop a leadership plan for the effective administration and management of a college/ university division or department. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Tuesday and/or Wednesday nights combined cohorts). (GR)

LEAF 526: Leadership in Business (3)

This course focuses on synthesizing the study of ethical and creative leadership into the context of business organizations. The course encourages examination of the leadership demands specific to the business environment as well as personal application of these concepts. Common business process and skills studied are financial statement analysis, segment analysis, strategic business units, balance scorecard, budgeting, enterprise resource planning and acquisition analysis. Demonstrated application of these approaches will be assessed through a strategic business and leadership plan. Special attention is given to the legal and ethical context in the practice of interviewing, selecting, training, promoting, and terminating employees. Teaching methods include lecture, computer assignments, case studies, research and projects illuminating the different and often-conflicting factors involved in incorporating financial data in visionary decision-making. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Tuesday and/or Wednesday nights combined cohorts). (GR)

LEAF 527: Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations and Community-Based Change (3)

This course expands on the student's understanding of Leadership Theory by applying the theories within the context of Not-for-Profit (NFP) organizations. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the unique aspects of leadership within the NFP sector through "Guest Speakers" from the sector. Within the course students will engage in the exploration of complex system issues such as the role and impact of the Non-profit Board of Directors, budgetary constraints and the impact of governmental regulation and funding guidelines. Students will be challenged to study these complex issues within the context of the over-arching responsibility of the Non-profit leader to deliver on the organizational mission while maintaining fiscal viability and sustainability. The course will also explore the theory and practice of community-based change. Within this exploration, students will consider the level of community engagement necessary for a successful change strategy, the decision-making processes that ensure buy-in and engagement and the strategies to ensure that the different priorities of various stakeholders are considered in the final decision. Teaching methods will include: lecture; guest speaker presentations; case studies; interviews with Non-profit leaders and small group projects. Prerequisites: Majors only. Offered spring (Tuesday and/or Wednesday combined cohorts). (GR)

LEAF 528: Leadership in Health Care Organizations (3)

This course focuses on the integration of new knowledge, professional leadership practices, critical thinking and experiential reflection to promote an understanding of the role of leadership in healthcare environments. This course also focuses on the integration of course content from preceding LEAF classes. It promotes discussions of leadership challenges in healthcare and the implementation of evidence-based approaches to developing leadership capacity. The course explores leadership theories, and competencies that promote authentic behavior at all leadership levels. Emphasis is placed on the unique, complex systems within healthcare and those forces (both internal and external) that impact the decisions of healthcare leaders. The course examines healthy work environments, labor/management relationships, risk management practices, budgetary analysis, regulatory influences and diversity in the workplace. The course is designed for students preparing to assume the role and duties of a leader, manager, supervisor, officer or governing board member of a healthcare organization. Teaching methods include lecture, computer-based assignments, case studies, discourse on current events, special projects and presentations. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Tuesday and/or Wednesday nights combined cohorts). (GR)

LEAF 529: Transformational Leadership and Organizational Change (3)

This course examines, in both theoretical and practical terms, the process of organizational change and the critical role that effective self leadership plays in successfully bringing it about and delivering the results required for long-term sustainability. Change is examined at two levels, that of the organizational and also from the perspective of the individuals who are leading or impacted by the change. Topics include the organization as a system, patterns of relationships in a hierarchical organization, how individuals create reality through personal frames of reference, Appreciative Inquiry, resistance to change, change as transition, transformational leadership, the change leader's habits and tactics, and change as a structured process. Throughout the course the participants will be encouraged to translate the course content to their work experience, both past and future, and to bring their work experience to the course. Learning methodologies include personal reflection and sharing of experiences, case studies, a written project and presentation, completion of leadership/learning log and extensive reading and dialogue. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Spring (Tuesday nights) and Fall (Wednesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 530: Customers, Stakeholders and Markets (3)

This course focuses on the individual as a leader and helps build understanding of the value the individual leader brings to his/her professional and personal arenas including how the leader is perceived by stakeholders and customers. Students examine the key elements of positioning, branding and marketing as well as the economic and motivational drivers in markets. Students refine their vision and mission statements and explore their uniqueness as leaders. They determine the market position of themselves as leaders and how their value proposition supports effective leadership and can serve as a leadership tool. Students develop their individual leadership brands and models and use the principles and practices of marketing to develop their individual leadership marketing plan. Learning methodologies include action learning, case and article analysis, personal reflection, and presentation. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Fall (Tuesday nights) Summer (Wednesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 540: Research Project/Thesis in Executive Leadership and Change I (3)

This course is the first of two courses that focus on research. This course prefaces LEAF 541. In this course, students will develop a project or thesis through independent study that entails research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of mutual interest to the student and the faculty member. Student assignments incorporate the collecting and processing of information, statistical inference, risk analysis, qualitative methodologies, and information technology. The course affords an opportunity to study a specific organizational problem or to institute an organizational change. In the second course, LEAF 541, students will design a new project or complete their thesis. Both courses afford students an opportunity to study and approach a specific organizational problem or to institute an organizational change. Both courses are offered in seminar fashion with an opportunity to not only explore your projects/thesis topics, but also to examine practical and timely leadership issues. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Summer (Wednesday nights) and Fall (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 541: Research Project/Thesis in Executive Leadership and Change II (3)

The second section of the research project/thesis consists of completing the thesis or identifying an independent project that entails research and leadership conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of mutual interest to the student and the faculty member. Research support includes collecting and processing information, statistical inference, risk analysis, and information technology. The course affords an opportunity to study and approach a specific organizational problem or to institute an organizational change. While it is expected that LEAF 541 will be completed within the term of enrollment, the course automatically extends one semester to allow completion of the project/thesis. Prerequisite: LEAF 540.Offered Spring (Wednesday nights) and Summer (Tuesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 545: Research Guidance (1)

This research guidance course is intended for students finishing their research projects or thesis. Guidance will be provided in the final writing and analysis of student's research activity. This course may be taken up to three times for credit. Prerequisites: Prior enrollment in LEAF540 and LEAF541. Offered as Needed. (GR)

LEAF 560: Capstone Course in Leadership (3)

This is the concluding integrative course of the leadership program. There are three important components of this capstone experience. First is the finalization and testing of each student's personalized model for their on-going leadership. Secondly, peer evaluation and discussion of the thesis or research projects under the direction of the seminar leader takes place. Finally, students present their leadership portfolio reflecting on their development and growth as a leader of change. The course helps individuals develop a renewed sense of self and learn how to foster the development of self-confidence and leadership competence. Individuals assess their core values and finalize a strategic personal leadership plan including a vision and mission statement, to be included in their leadership portfolio. The course helps participants focus attention on the creative potential of within them, in their colleagues and organizations. Appreciation for and understanding of different strategies and tools for fostering such developments in others is explored. Teaching methods include student presentation and simulations. As part of the second part of the course, students will be exposed to the concepts of leadership development, personal growth, leading with soul, managing stress and self-management, working effectively with people, organizational and personal change. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered Fall (Tuesday nights) Summer (Wednesday nights). (GR)

LEAF 597: Independent Study in Executive Leadership Studies (1 - 6)

This independent study entails research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in an area of mutual interest to the student and faculty member. The course affords an opportunity to study a specific organizational problem or area of interest. Prerequisite: Majors only. Offered by special arrangement. (GR)

Management

MGT 501: The Global Competitive Framework (3)

Success in the global marketplace depends first upon understanding international economic and business developments, and then applying this knowledge to the process of gaining a global competitive advantage. This course examines the evolving competitive characteristics of the global economy, including the new World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, technological development, the globalization of business activities, the advent of specific regional trading blocs, the rise of newly industrializing nations as major competitors in selected industries, and the various ways industries develop and sustain international competitiveness. Students examine these issues by exploring the effects on business decision making of key economic and business concerns in the United States, the European Union, the Centrally Planned Economies, and Japan and the Pacific Basin region (including China). Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

MGT 501: The Global Competitive Framework (3)

Success in the global marketplace depends first upon understanding international economic and business developments, and then applying this knowledge to the process of gaining a global competitive advantage. This course examines the evolving competitive characteristics of the global economy, including the new World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, technological development, the globalization of business activities, the advent of specific regional trading blocs, the rise of newly industrializing nations as major competitors in selected industries, and the various ways industries develop and sustain international competitiveness. Students examine these issues by exploring the effects on business decision making of key economic and business concerns in the United States, the European Union, the Centrally Planned Economies, and Japan and the Pacific Basin region (including China). Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

MGT 502: Ethics for Professionals in a Multicultural World (3)

As business becomes increasingly internationalized and a global economy further develops, ethical issues that affect business in the international arena have also become of increasing importance. This course specifically addresses the following moral and ethical issues: employment practices and policies, consumer protection, environmental protection, political payments and involvement, and basic human rights and fundamental freedoms. Case study analysis, videos and guest speakers will provide the student with an increased understanding and sensitivity to these issues. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

MGT 502: Ethics for Professionals in a Multicultural World (3)

As business becomes increasingly internationalized and a global economy further develops, ethical issues that affect business in the international arena have also become of increasing importance. This course specifically addresses the following moral and ethical issues: employment practices and policies, consumer protection, environmental protection, political payments and involvement, and basic human rights and fundamental freedoms. Case study analysis, videos and guest speakers will provide the student with an increased understanding and sensitivity to these issues. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

MGT 503: Comparative Management (3)

This course serves as an introduction to the field of international organizational behavior and management. It presents the material from a global rather than from a North American or Western European perspective. It views culture not only as important for understanding other societies and managing organizations, but as a major cause of much behavior in organizations, specifically addressing how technology, strategy, size and goals of an organization relate to culture. Finally, it attempts to improve a student's interpersonal behavior concerning the cultural variations found in international organizations. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

MGT 503: Comparative Management (3)

This course serves as an introduction to the field of international organizational behavior and management. It presents the material from a global rather than from a North American or Western European perspective. It views culture not only as important for understanding other societies and managing organizations, but as a major cause of much behavior in organizations, specifically addressing how technology, strategy, size and goals of an organization relate to culture. Finally, it attempts to improve a student's interpersonal behavior concerning the cultural variations found in international organizations. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

MGT 504: Operational and Technology Issues in Global Business (3)

This course instructs students on how manufacturing and service operations can support a global strategy. Course topics will include supply chain network design and management from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Capacity planning, inventory, outsourcing, information technology, sustainability, risk management and recent trends will be discussed. (GR)

MGT 504: Operational and Technology Issues in Global Business (3)

This course instructs students on how manufacturing and service operations can support a global strategy. Course topics will include supply chain network design and management from incoming raw materials to final product delivery. Capacity planning, inventory, outsourcing, information technology, sustainability, risk management and recent trends will be discussed. (GR)

MGT 650: Directed Research (3)

This course is the last course taken by the student in the MS - Global Business program. All other course work must be complete. The student will be assigned a faculty mentor by the director of the program based upon the specific area of study the student wishes to undertake. In close consultation with the faculty mentor, the student will develop a thesis in the form of a case study, a management consulting report, or a theoretical research study. The work generated in this course needs to be approved by graduate program faculty at various stages. The student will be provided more detail on this process by the faculty mentor. (GR)

MGT 650: Directed Research (3)

This course is the last course taken by the student in the MS - Global Business program. All other course work must be complete. The student will be assigned a faculty mentor by the director of the program based upon the specific area of study the student wishes to undertake. In close consultation with the faculty mentor, the student will develop a thesis in the form of a case study, a management consulting report, or a theoretical research study. The work generated in this course needs to be approved by graduate program faculty at various stages. The student will be provided more detail on this process by the faculty mentor. (GR)

Marketing

MKT 507: Strategic Planning for the Global Market (3)

This course lays out the competitive orientation and strategies for initial entry, market expansion, and integration of international marketing operations. The course reviews current market opportunities and competitive conditions at the global, regional, and national levels. The student learns how to successfully participate in both emerging markets and regional economic blocs such as APEC, ASEAN, EU, EFTA, NAFTA, MERCOSUR. Participants use case study analysis to develop their skills in analyzing and formulating international marketing initiatives. Offered Each Year (Spring and Summer). (GR)

MKT 507: Strategic Planning for the Global Market (3)

This course lays out the competitive orientation and strategies for initial entry, market expansion, and integration of international marketing operations. The course reviews current market opportunities and competitive conditions at the global, regional, and national levels. The student learns how to successfully participate in both emerging markets and regional economic blocs such as APEC, ASEAN, EU, EFTA, NAFTA, MERCOSUR. Participants use case study analysis to develop their skills in analyzing and formulating international marketing initiatives. Offered Each Year (Spring and Summer). (GR)

MKT 611: Regional Business in Latin American Countries (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 611: Regional Business in Latin American Countries (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 612: Regional Business in Canada (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 612: Regional Business in Canada (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 613: Regional Business in the Pacific Rim (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 613: Regional Business in the Pacific Rim (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 614: Regional Business in the European Union (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

MKT 614: Regional Business in the European Union (3)

These courses (MKT 611, MKT 612, MKT 613, MKT 614) are designed to concentrate on the issues and needs of a specific geographic region in relation to the student's own involvement in global business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic business. Each course is devoted to discussing various topics relevant to a specific geographic region, including trade and business environments, political stability, and case analysis of selected business ventures in the region. In addition to course work, participants produce an independent research project designed to be applied in some facet of their current or future work in a specific region. Students are encouraged to look at global business issues in new and innovative ways. Offered As Needed. (GR)

Nursing

NUR 504: Strategies and Theories in Education (3)

This course focuses on the development and implementation of effective communication skills and strategies in the teaching/learning process to foster the development of the nurse educator as a leader within the nursing profession. The course explores contextual environments, advances in technology, diversity in learner backgrounds and experiences, and covers both traditional and innovative pedagogies in nursing education. Emphasis is placed on building collegial relationships, critical thinking, reflective thinking, and communication skills through evidenced based practice. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. This course requires a three-hour classroom lecture session. Prerequisite or Co-requisites: None. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 505: Advanced Health Assessment For the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (4)

This course is designed to provide the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a comprehensive health and physical assessment on clients from young adulthood through senescence. This course is designed to build on knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and health assessment skills previously attained in undergraduate nurse education. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic reasoning skills needed for clinical reasoning in the advanced practice nursing role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program. This course must be taken in the semester immediately preceding NUR561/L. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: NUR 509, completed no more than five years prior to registering for Advanced Health Assessment for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. Offered Each Year (Fall). Students will be required to purchase special examination equipment by the onset of the semester in which this course is taken. Lecture 3 hours/week. (GR)

NUR 505L: Advanced Health Assessment for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (0)

This course is designed to provide the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a comprehensive health and physical assessment on clients from young adulthood through senescence. This course is designed to build on knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and health assessment skills previously attained in undergraduate nurse education. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic reasoning skills needed for clinical reasoning in the advanced practice nursing role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program. This course must be taken in the semester immediately preceding NUR561/L. Prerequisites or Co-requisites: NUR 509, completed no more than five years prior to registering for Advanced Health Assessment for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner. Offered Each Year (Fall). Students will be required to purchase special examination equipment by the onset of the semester in which this course is taken. Lecture 3 hours/week. (GR)

NUR 509: Advanced Physiology/Pathophysiology for The Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (3)

This course examines concepts and theories related to disorders of physiological processes, which result in health alterations and disease in the adult and geriatric patient in a primary care setting. Fundamental concepts from cellular to clinical manifestations of altered health and disease are presented. Critical thinking/reasoning, evidence based research and problem-based learning are implemented to support the application of theoretical knowledge about physiology and altered physiology (pathophysiology) to actual adult and geriatric patient situations in the primary care setting. Offered Each Year (Fall) and as needed. (GR)

NUR 511: Conceptual Basis for Advanced Practice Nursing (2)

This course explores topics essential to conceptualizing advanced nursing practice. Evolution, advancement and regulation of nursing practice are explored. Emphasis is placed on developing a high level of professionalism, including effective communication, leadership competencies, political advocacy and advanced use of knowledge, in nursing. The importance of understanding evidence based practice, the health care delivery system and factors affecting advanced nursing practice are addressed. This course is offered on campus in a web-enhanced format. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 513: Issues in Advanced Practice Nursing (2)

This course is designed to familiarize students with contemporary issues pertaining to advanced nursing practice. Issues related to economics, ethics, culture and global perspectives of advanced nursing care, quality improvement, system change strategies, and models of care delivery and coordination will be explored. This course will prepare students to practice as leaders in an advanced nursing role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Daemen Nursing Department, Graduate Division. This course is offered on campus and in a web-enhanced format. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

NUR 515: Theoretical Perspectives in Advanced Practice Nursing (2)

This course explores theoretical frameworks as the foundation for advanced nursing practice. The origins and structure of nursing knowledge are identified and examined and selected theories/conceptual models of nursing and other disciplines are analyzed. The relationship among theory, research and practice is explored. Emphasis is placed on applying theoretical perspectives in advanced nursing practice. This course is offered on campus and in a web-enhanced format. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

NUR 517: Pharmacology for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (1)

This course provides a foundation for the understanding of pharmacological principles that will assist the adult gerontology nurse practitioner in prescribing medications. An introduction to general principles of pharmacology that are essential for an understanding of individual drug actions will be presented. Special considerations of physiological changes with the geriatric client will be addressed in respect to prescribing of medications. Select groups of medications will be explored focusing on drug actions, therapeutic usage, side effects, drug interactions, and monitoring in adult and geriatric clients. Ethical and legal principles related to safe prescription writing will be detailed. This course is a companion course to NUR 519, and together with NUR 519, fulfills the pharmacology requirement for the graduate adult-gerontology nurse practitioner program. This course includes 15 instructional hours, incorporating face-to-face and online learning. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 519: Selected Topics in Pharmacology for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (2)

This course focuses on selected categories of medications that are commonly used in primary care management of adult and geriatric clients. Information about select medications will be presented in a manner that is relevant to the needs of the adult health nurse practitioner who cares for patients in a variety of clinical settings. Discussion and class content regarding these medications will focus on drug actions, therapeutic usage, side effects, drug interactions, physiologic implications and monitoring in adult and geriatric clients. This course is a companion course to NUR 517, and together with NUR 517, fulfills the pharmacology requirement for the graduate adult-gerontology nurse practitioner program. This course includes 30 instructional hours, incorporating face-to-face and online learning. Lecture: 2 hours. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 520: Advanced Health Assessment for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Competency Challenge (1)

This course is designed for the graduate nursing student who has successfully completed NUR505 and NUR505L at Daemen College within 2 academic years. Advanced Health Assessment Competency Challenge (NUR520) objectives and competencies are the same as NUR505/NUR505L. Re-demonstration of these objectives and competencies are met by success in all written examinations including a comprehensive final examination, and 2 laboratory re-demonstration components. This course is designed to provide the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a comprehensive health and physical assessment on clients from young adulthood through senescence. This course is designed to build on knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and health assessment skills previously attained in undergraduate nurse education. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic reasoning skills needed for clinical reasoning in the advanced practice nursing role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program; successful completion of NUR505/L taken at Daemen College within 2 academic years; successful completion of NUR509 taken within 5 academic years of NUR505/L. NUR520 must be taken in the semester immediately preceding NUR561/L. Offered as Needed. (GR)

NUR 520L: Advanced Health Assessment for the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Competency Challenge Lab (0)

This course is designed for the graduate nursing student who has successfully completed NUR505 and NUR505L at Daemen College within 2 academic years. Advanced Health Assessment Competency Challenge (NUR520) objectives and competencies are the same as NUR505/NUR505L. Re-demonstration of these objectives and competencies are met by success in all written examinations including a comprehensive final examination, and 2 laboratory re-demonstration components. This course is designed to provide the adult-gerontology primary care nurse practitioner student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a comprehensive health and physical assessment on clients from young adulthood through senescence. This course is designed to build on knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and health assessment skills previously attained in undergraduate nurse education. Emphasis is placed on diagnostic reasoning skills needed for clinical reasoning in the advanced practice nursing role. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program; successful completion of NUR505/L taken at Daemen College within 2 academic years; successful completion of NUR509 taken within 5 academic years of NUR505/L. NUR520 must be taken in the semester immediately preceding NUR561/L. Offered as Needed. (GR)

NUR 528: Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education (3)

This graduate level course focuses on methodologies to assess the learner's level of learning, evaluation of course and program objectives, as well as evaluation of clinical practicum settings. The course will also familiarize the graduate student with accreditation models and provide content related to the development of nursing program standards and policies regarding admission, progression, and graduation. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Prerequisite or Co-requisites: None. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 561: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Practice I (6)

The first clinical practicum focuses on the role of the nurse practitioner in providing basic primary care for adult clients from young adulthood through senescence. Students apply concepts, theories, and skills from core and prerequisite courses along with a functional, life span orientation. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive assessment of the health status of adult clients, health promotion and disease prevention, and differential diagnosis and treatment of common acute and chronic illnesses. Supervised clinical experiences emphasize clinical decision-making and implementation of evidence-based practice, integrating clinical assessment, management skills, and client teaching. This course involves four hours of in-class course delivery and 20 hours of clinical practice weekly for a total of 250 clock hours for the semester. Additional clinical seminars/laboratories are scheduled during the semester to allow for skills review and discussion of clinical issues. Students are individually supervised in the clinical setting by either a physician or a nurse practitioner preceptor. Ongoing interaction between Daemen College faculty and clinical preceptors is maintained throughout the semester. Prerequisites:NUR 505 (in the semester immediately preceding NUR561),NUR 509 and NUR 517. Co-requisites: NUR-561L and NUR-519. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 561L: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Practice Practice I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques in Adult Primary Health Care. Co-requisite: NUR-561. 250 Clock hours of clinical practice. (GR)

NUR 562: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Practice Practice II (6)

This second clinical practicum focuses on the role of the nurse practitioner in providing care for adult clients with complex health problems from young adulthood through senescence. Students apply concepts and theories from the core courses along with a functional life-span orientation toward research and nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on comprehensive assessment of the health status of adult clients with multiple and complex problems, case management, health promotion, preventative health care, differential diagnosis, and application of appropriate management protocols. Supervised clinical experiences include an emphasis on decision-making and implementation of evidence-based practice, which integrates advanced assessment and management skills and client teaching. This practicum involves four hours of in-class course delivery and 20 hours of clinical practice weekly for a total of 250 clock hours for the semester. Clinical seminars are scheduled throughout the semester to discuss clinical issues. Ongoing interaction between Daemen College faculty and clinical preceptors is maintained throughout the semester. Prerequisite: NUR 561; co-requisite: NUR-562L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 562L: Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Practice Practice II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques in Adult Primary Health Care. Required prerequisite: NUR561 and NUR561L; Co-requisite: NUR-562. 250 clock hours of clinical practice. (GR)

NUR 600: Curriculum Design and Implementation (3)

This course focuses on the development, implementation, and evaluation of nursing curricula. Emphasis is placed on designing nursing curricula based on evidence based education and practice, program outcomes, institutional philosophy and mission, societal and healthcare trends and needs, and community and clinical partnerships. The course explores educational principles, change theories and strategies, and philosophical and theoretical frameworks in curricula development. Methods for analyzing curricula and formulation of evaluation strategies and curricular revisions will also be investigated. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. This course requires a three-hour classroom lecture session. Prerequisite: NUR 504: Strategies and Theories in Education, or permission from the course instructor. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 602: Qualitative Research (2)

This course addresses the process of the inductive mode of research. The history, methods, and outcomes of qualitative research are examined in detail. A number of qualitative research methodologies including phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography and action research are differentiated. Criteria for maintaining rigor in qualitative research are analyzed. The application of informatics to qualitative research is explored. An emphasis is placed on synthesizing qualitative research as a basis for practice. Lecture: two hours per week. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 603: Quantitative Nursing Research (2)

This course addresses the deductive mode of research. Steps in the design, implementation and analysis of various quantitative methods will be explored. Criteria for establishing reliability and validity and quantitative research will be appraised. Quantitative methods as applied to informatics, trends in healthcare, and the relationship between quality and safety in practice will be discussed. Data management and statistical analysis will be reviewed Emphasis will be placed on synthesizing research as a basis for practice. Offered each year (Fall) and as needed. (GR)

NUR 604: Thesis (1 - 6)

The thesis option provides the student with an opportunity to consider a theoretical question in relation to advanced practice nursing and to attempt to answer this question through the research process. The thesis is geared towards the development of a research proposal and the implementation of a pilot study that addresses an issue related to the student's graduate nursing program. For the thesis option, the student is expected to identify a research question, choose a theoretical framework or a conceptual model, select an appropriate methodology, collect, analyze, and discuss data. Students registering for Thesis for the first time are required to successfully complete NUR604S Thesis Introductory Seminar (1 credit; web-enhanced format). Prior to enrollment in NUR604. At least two (2) members should be on each thesis committee, with the committee chairperson being a doctorate-prepared full-time faculty member from the Nursing Department. After a successful thesis defense, two hard-bound copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Nursing Department. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). Note: The number of credits that must be completed for the thesis is dependent on the program in which the student is enrolled. Credit may be distributed over several terms. The final thesis credit should be taken in the semester that the student defends. A student who has registered for the 6th credit of thesis/project (including the 1 credit earned in NUR604S) and who does not complete the thesis/project in that semester will receive a grade of Incomplete. In such a case, the student will have one additional semester to complete the thesis/project and the grade of "Incomplete" will be changed to Pass Complete. In the event that the student does not complete the thesis/project in the additional semester, the grade of Incomplete will revert to a grade of F. The student will then need to register for one credit hour of 604 in order to complete the thesis requirement. (GR)

NUR 604S: Thesis Intro Seminar (1)

This introductory seminar is designed to introduce the graduate student to the thesis/project process. The course addresses the similarities and differences between the thesis and project options. Ethical issues in research, the human subjects research approval process, and the application of research to practice are explored. Throughout the course, students work to focus and develop a topic that is related to their program of study. By the end of the course, the student is encouraged to choose a particular topical area he/she wishes to focus on as he/she moves forward with the thesis or project. Students registering for a thesis or project credit for the first time are required to take the introductory seminar. After they have successfully completed the introductory seminar, students will continue their work on the thesis or project by working directly with their thesis chair and thesis committee The thesis option provides the student with an opportunity to consider a theoretical question that relates to their graduate program of study and to attempt to answer this question through the research process. For the thesis option, the student is expected to identify a research question, choose a theoretical framework or a conceptual model, select an appropriate methodology, collect, analyze, and discuss data. The project option is a demonstration of expertise in a field of interest related to the graduate student?s program of study, which serves to either contribute new knowledge to the field or to apply advanced knowledge in a creative manner. Students who are practice oriented, with the goal of developing advanced skills and knowledge, may choose to complete a project. The project method will vary depending on the subject matter chosen. Some examples of appropriate projects include: development of a health teaching module, use of media to promote health teaching, application of existing research to a particular clinical setting, and evaluation of existing health services. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). (GR)

NUR 605: Project (1 - 6)

The project option is a demonstration of expertise in a field of interest to advanced nursing practice, which serves either to contribute new knowledge to the field or to apply advanced knowledge in a creative manner. Students who are practice oriented, with the goal of developing advanced skills and knowledge, may choose to complete a project focusing on a clinical nursing practice issue. The purpose of the project is to allow the student a concentrated learning experience with graduate nursing faculty guidance. The project is designed to promote creative and unique approaches to advanced nursing care. The project method will vary depending on the subject matter chosen. Some examples of appropriate projects include: development of a health teaching module, use of media to promote health teaching, application of existing research to a particular clinical setting, and evaluation of existing health services. The way in which the project may contribute to the student's professional nursing expertise would be delineated in the proposal Students registering for Thesis for the first time are required to successfully complete NUR605S Project Introductory Seminar (1 credit) on campus. At least two (2) members should be on each project committee, with the committee chairperson being a doctorate-prepared full-time faculty member from the Nursing Department. When the project is completed, the student is expected to submit a detailed report of the findings or outcome. Further, upon completion of the project, two-hard bound copies of the project or if in a media format, one high quality media copy along with supporting documentation, must be submitted to the Nursing Department. Prerequisite: NUR605S. Prerequisite and/or Co-requisite: NUR 602 and 603. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). Note: The number of credits needed for the project is dependent on the student's nursing program. Credit may be distributed over several terms. The final project credit should be taken in the semester that the student defends. A student who has registered for the 6th credit of project (including the 1 credit earned in NUR605S) and who does not complete the thesis/project in that semester will receive a grade of Incomplete. In such a case, the student will have one additional semester to complete the thesis/project and the grade of Incomplete will be changed to Pass Complete. In the event that the student does not complete the thesis/project in the additional semester, the grade of Incomplete will revert to a grade of F. The student will then need to register for one credit hour of 604/605 to complete the thesis requirement. (GR)

NUR 605S: Project Introductory Seminar (1)

This introductory seminar is designed to introduce the graduate student to the thesis/project process. The course addresses the similarities and differences between the thesis and project options. Ethical issues in research, the human subjects research approval process, and the application of research to practice are explored. Throughout the course, students work to focus and develop a topic that is related to their program of study. By the end of the course, the student is encouraged to choose a particular topical area he/she wishes to focus on as he/she moves forward with the thesis or project. Students registering for a thesis or project credit for the first time are required to take the introductory seminar. After they have successfully completed the introductory seminar, students will continue their work on the thesis or project by working directly with their thesis chair and thesis committee The thesis option provides the student with an opportunity to consider a theoretical question that relates to their graduate program of study and to attempt to answer this question through the research process. For the thesis option, the student is expected to identify a research question, choose a theoretical framework or a conceptual model, select an appropriate methodology, collect, analyze, and discuss data. The project option is a demonstration of expertise in a field of interest related to the graduate student?s program of study, which serves to either contribute new knowledge to the field or to apply advanced knowledge in a creative manner. Students who are practice oriented, with the goal of developing advanced skills and knowledge, may choose to complete a project. The project method will vary depending on the subject matter chosen. Some examples of appropriate projects include: development of a health teaching module, use of media to promote health teaching, application of existing research to a particular clinical setting, and evaluation of existing health services. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring, Summer). (GR)

NUR 606: Applied Statistics for Evidence-Based Practice (3)

This is the first of two courses designed to give the DNP student practical experience in applying statistical findings to the patient, family, populations, clinical unit, systems, and community levels. This course is intended to strengthen skills which are requisite to critically interpreting and analyzing quantitative nursing and health related research data. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of statistical concepts rather than computation. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 608: Practice Theories (2)

This course is designed to explore practice model theories appropriate to the DNP role, integrating knowledge from the arts and sciences. Content will include theory, premise and historical foundations, details of the theory models, and exemplars of how these theories apply for the DPN in interdisciplinary practice. Theory review will involve translation and integration of model elements as they apply to the demands of the national health care agenda. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered every other year (Summer) and as needed. (GR)

NUR 610: Organizational Theory and Health Care Management (2)

This course focuses on organizational theory, organizational behavior, and health care systems management. The course emphasizes organizational and systems principles, theories, and models that guide leadership in quality healthcare improvement and critical systems thinking. The course also emphasizes methods that promote health care systems management and effective interprofessional team leadership. Students will be asked to analyze a particular healthcare organization and related organizational theories. This course will include 2 hours of lecture weekly. Offered Every Other Year (Spring). (GR)

NUR 612: Environmental and Genetic Influences on Health (2)

This course focuses on environmental and genetic influences and determinants of health for individuals, populations, and communities. This course works within a paradigm that considers genomics to be the interaction of genetics, environment, and the influence of psychosocial, behavioral, and cultural factors. It thus assists the DNP student to holistically integrate genetic, genomics, environmental, epidemiological and scientific underpinnings and concepts in the interpretation of clinical findings and in planning and evaluation of clinical management. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. (GR)

NUR 614: Ethical Issues in Advanced Nursing Practice (2)

This course examines the ethical and philosophical foundations that have shaped the development of the current health care system. Course discussions will include critical analyses of the legal, regulatory and ethical issues that impact DNP practice. Case studies and narratives will be used to examine how ethics can guide the DNP's decision making in clinical practice and research situations. Class discussions will also focus on ethical dilemmas that may be encountered in the current health care environment. This course is offered in a Web-enhanced format. Offered every other year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 616: Leadership Development (2)

This course is designed to explore leadership through an examination of research leading to the development of leadership study and decision-making models, in order to understand that leadership, in practice, is an on-going process requiring self, situational, motivation and follower analysis. Through this lens, students will learn to analyze leadership challenges and their application to the DNP role. Inter- and intra-professional collaboration models including team leadership will be discussed. By providing a background of leadership and change theories stressing self awareness and personal leadership, critical and reflective thinking, an understanding of the role of organizational culture in shaping leadership styles, and interpersonal skill to achieve relational leadership and systems competence, students will better understand leadership actions which foster positive institutional and organizational change. An emphasis on analysis and experiential learning via assignments and involvement in projects will link course content to real challenges in the system. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 618: Informatics and Related Technology For Advanced Practice (1)

Informatics for advanced practice focuses on developing proficiency in the utilization of information systems to implement initiatives for quality improvement that supports practice and administrative decision-making. Emphasis is also placed on presenting standards and principles for selecting and evaluating practice and consumer information systems. Related ethical, regulatory, and legal issues will be included. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Summer). (GR)

NUR 620: Nursing Education Practicum (3 - 5)

The course emphasizes development of the nurse educator as leader in the practice environment. Focus is placed on functioning in the role of nurse educator and applying the core competencies of nursing faculty which include: facilitation of learning, facilitation of learner development and socialization, use of assessment and evaluation strategies, functioning as a change agent and leader, pursuing continuous quality improvement in the nurse educator role, and functioning within the educational environment. The course includes seminar discussions and nursing education practice: 150 clock hours. Prerequisites: NUR 504: Strategies and Theories in Education, NUR 528: Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education, or permission from the course instructor. Offered Each Year (Fall, Spring). Note: Post MS certificate students will register for 3 credits and complete 90 hours of nursing education practice. (GR)

NUR 621: Scholarly Writing in Health Care (2)

The course prepares the DNP student to synthesize knowledge through engagement in professional writing scholarship. Advanced instruction focuses on several forms of expository writing common in the health professions while emphasizing effective communication between the writer and different audiences. Emphasis is placed on cultivating critical thinking skills to prepare exemplars of scholarly writing. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered as needed. (GR)

NUR 623: Research for Evidence-Based Practice (3)

This is the second of two courses designed to give the DNP student practical experience in applying statistical findings to the patient, family, populations, clinical unit, systems, and community levels. It builds on those skills developed in NUR606 Applied Statistics, by integrating principles of evidence-based practice and policy. Integration and translation of research to risk assessment, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and health care outcomes is the central focus of this course. Further, consideration of qualitative and other evidence for clinical practice is appraised. Prerequisite: NUR606. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Fall). (GR)

NUR 625: Public Policy and Health Care Financing (3)

This course provides an overview of public policy decisions that impact the organization, financing and delivery of health care within the United States Health Care System. The impact of global health issues on public policy and health status will also be discussed. The course will include critical analyses of the social, cultural, financial and political issues that impact the delivery of health care by the DNP. The course will cover basic health care reimbursement mechanisms and will provide students with the skills necessary for navigating within the current health care financing system to promote optimal patient outcomes. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Summer). (GR)

NUR 627: Clinical Theories (2)

This course is designed to present the content and application of theories that have implications for the independent clinical practice of the DNP as part of the interdisciplinary venue of care. These theories have application to the clinical area, with implication for health behaviors and outcomes at the patient, family, population, clinical unit, systems and community levels. Methods to evaluate current established theories that guide DNP practice will be examined. Models for utilization of theories in DNP practice will be presented. Exemplars of how health-related theories apply to the clinical setting and various patient populations will be explored and critiqued. Technological applications will be incorporated to theory implementation. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Other Year (Summer). (GR)

NUR 702: Clinical Internship (1 - 8)

This course is designed to prepare DNP students to demonstrate practice expertise, specialized knowledge, and expanded responsibility and accountability in the holistic care and management of diverse individuals and families through immersion in clinical settings. Emphasis is placed on appraisal of the practice context to document practice trends, identify potential systematic changes, and formulate improvements in care for patient populations in the systems within their practice. Additionally, the DNP student will develop competence in practice at the aggregate/systems/organizational level. Clinical experiences will be designed to provide the student with the opportunity to work in depth with clinical experts in selected specialty areas. This course will include selected seminar activities and scheduled meetings with course intructor(s) and clinical preceptors. Students are required to complete 500 post-Master's supervised clinical hours by the completion of the program. Pre-/Co-requisites: NUR 606, NUR 608, NUR610, NUR621, NUR623, NUR627, or permission of the Graduate Program Director. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Semester. (GR)

NUR 704: Scholarly Project (1 - 4)

This course is designed to afford the DNP student the opportunity to demonstrate mastery of an advanced specialty in nursing practice. Focus is on the development of a tangible and deliverable academic product that is derived from the practice immersion. The product of the DNP project in the course links scholarly experiences and evidence based health care to the improvement of practice and/or patient outcomes. This course will include selected seminar activities and scheduled meetings with project advisor(s) throughout each semester in which the student is enrolled. Pre-/Co-requisites: NUR 606, NUR 608, NUR 610, NUR 621, NUR623, NUR627. This course is offered in a web-enhanced format. Offered Every Semester. (GR)

Physician Assistant Studies

PAS 510: Advanced Human Anatomy I (2)

Functional and applied human anatomy presented on a systemic basis. The course is divided into sections - general anatomical concepts, thorax, abdomen, perineum, and pelvis. This advanced course will go beyond basic anatomical concepts and emphasize in both lecture and laboratory sessions the functional anatomical relationship to pathological conditions commonly encountered in the primary care setting. The relationship between embryology and the study of pediatrics will be taught. Laboratory sessions will be organized using models and prosection cadavers. Small group interactions will be used to demonstrate problem-solving abilities related to clinical findings and physical examination. Prerequisites: Three year program acceptance; Corequisites:PAS 510L, 511, 513, 514, 516, 516L, 535. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 510L: Advanced Human Anatomy Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Advanced Human Anatomy I. Corequisite: PAS 510. (GR)

PAS 511: Clinical Microbiology/Immunology (3)

This course focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and relationships of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and rickettsiae and helminths. Included are the systemic diseases caused by these organisms, control of microorganisms, the host-parasite relationship, and the establishment of disease. The immune system and genetics will be discussed in detail including resistance to disease, immunity and serology, and immune disorders. Corequisites: PAS 510, 510L, 513, 514, 516, 516L, 535. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 512: Medical Informatics (2)

This course provides the PA student with a comprehensive and practical introduction to the utilization of electronic health records and emerging technologies used in clinical practice to document patient care and facilitate communication with patients and between health care professionals. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PAS 510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L Corequisites: PAS512, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 513: Clinical Laboratory Medicine (2)

This course focuses on basic laboratory procedures and physiology used to investigate clinical problems encountered in the primary care setting. In addition to office procedures, laboratory tests conducted in the hospital setting useful in making a diagnosis and evaluating treatment effectiveness will be emphasized. Tests relevant to hematology, chemistry, bacteriology, urinalysis, and immunology will be discussed, demonstrated, and performed. In addition to the laboratory experience, students will be exposed to interpreting case studies and laboratory reports. Prerequisite: Three year program acceptance; Corequisites: PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 516, 516L, 535. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 514: Pathophysiology (3)

General concepts of disease are covered including degeneration and necrosis, inflammation and repair, fluid and coagulation disturbances, and general aspects of neoplasia. Disease entities in each organ system are studied with regard to causation, evaluation, and morphology of pathological changes. Prerequisite: Three year program acceptance; Corequisites: PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 516, 516L, 535. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 515: Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I (5)

This course provides an introduction to the study of the disease process. Emphasis has been placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the primary care setting. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each system is discussed. Topics to include problems of the respiratory tract, cardiology, hematology, endocrinology, nephrology, urology, and gastroenterology. The course will use both lecture and seminar formats. The student learns the general principles of diagnostic imaging and electrocardiography. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in PAS 510, 511, 512, 513 and 514; Corequisites: PAS 517, 518 and 531. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 516: Advanced Human Anatomy II (2)

This course is a continuation of PAS 510, Advanced Human Anatomy. Functional and applied human anatomy presented on a systemic basis. The course is divided into sections: head and neck, back, extremities, and neuroanatomy. This advanced course will go beyond basic anatomical concepts and emphasize in both lecture and laboratory sessions the functional anatomical relationship to pathological conditions commonly encountered in the primary care setting. The relationship between embryology and the study of pediatrics will be taught. Laboratory sessions will be organized using models and prosection cadavers. Small group interactions will be used to demonstrate problem-solving abilities related to clinical findings and physical examination. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514; Corequisites: PAS 515, 516L, 517 and 518. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 516L: Advanced Human Anatomy II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Advanced Human Anatomy II. Corequisite: PAS 516. (GR)

PAS 517: Physical Diagnosis I (3)

Physical Diagnosis I is the first module of a dual semester course. It is presented in the spring semester of the first year of the PA program and is complemented in the following fall semester by PAS 520 Physical Diagnosis II. PAS 517 is comprised of a 3 hour per week class lecture. The overall course objective is for the student to learn to perform and document a complete physical examination. Students will be expected to integrate the knowledge learned in anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to some of the most common medical problems. Using appropriate medical terminology, students will demonstrate their ability to describe their clinical findings and assessments in both verbal and written formats. Students must keep in mind that clinical competency encompasses many factors including a solid fund of medical knowledge, proficiency in clinical skills, appropriate attitudes, behaviors and critical thinking skills in their approach to the patient's medical concerns. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in PAS510, 511, 513, 514; Corequisites: PAS 515, 517L and 518. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 517L: Physical Diagnosis I Laboratory (1)

Physical Diagnosis I Lab is a 2 hour per week lab which allows for students to learn, practice, and demonstrate the ability to perform an organ specific physical examination as well as a comprehensive head to toe physical examination by completion of the semester. Each week of the laboratory experience covers a different organ system's appropriate physical examination. Corequisite: PAS 517. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 518: Pharmacology I (2)

This course is designed in sequence with the topics presented in Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine I and focuses on practical pharmacotherapeutics. Mechanisms of drug action, therapeutic uses, specific effects and toxicity, effects on organ systems, contraindications and drug interactions will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the most commonly used categories of drugs. Prerequisites: PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 516, 516L, 535; Corequisites: PAS 515, 517, 517L. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 520: Physical Diagnosis II (2)

This course is a 2 credit hour course (a continuation of Physical Diagnosis I) consisting of two hours of physical diagnosis lecture weekly. This course will provide opportunities for the student to apply the pertinent physical examination findings in response to focused historical data and specific patient complaints. The classroom lectures will prepare students to complete organ system specific and specialty specific cases in the laboratory setting. Successful completion of PAS 510, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518; Corequisites: PAS 519, 520L, 521, 531, 536, 538/L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 520L: Physical Diagnosis II Laboratory (1)

The physical diagnosis laboratory meets for 2 hours weekly. The psychomotor skills necessary for performance of the entire physical exam were obtained in Physical Diagnosis I Lab. In this semester students will be able to obtain a problem focused history, perform the appropriate physical examination, and document a patient encounter note for each organ system. Each student will also complete one lab on the female pelvic examination and one lab on the male genitourinary examination. Corequisite: PAS 520. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 521: Pharmacology II (2)

This course is a continuation of PAS 518, Pharmacology I and designed in sequence with Fundamentals of Clinical Medicine II. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L,511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 535; Corequisites: PAS519, 520,520L, 531, 536, 538, 538L. Offered Each Year(Fall). (GR)

PAS 522: The Cultural and Psychosocial Dynamics of Medicine (3)

Topic areas will include clinical decision-making and problem solving, domestic violence, rape, death and dying, sexuality issues, substance abuse, HIV and other special topics. A critical review of selected readings will be required for seminar discussions. Students are introduced to concepts in health psychology and behavioral medicine which identify the cultural and psychosocial factors contributing to health, physical and emotional well being. Defenses and adaptations are discussed as related to the types of patients the students will work with. Other psychological responses to acute and chronic illness, disability, and death and dying, are discussed as they relate to the patient and the medical practitioner. Students are introduced to the techniques of modeling and role-playing and are required to participate in the roles of health care practitioner, patient and family member. Emphasis is placed on establishing a relationship, and understanding the effects of culture and personality types. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS 510, 511, 512, 513, 514, 515, 516, 517, 518 and 531. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 524: Clinical Pediatrics (2)

This course is an introduction to the study of pediatric and adolescent medicine. It is designed to provide the PA student with a functional understanding of the pediatric exam, growth, development, and disease processes as they relate to the infant and child. Through integration of the basic and clinical sciences, the PA student will become acquainted with neonatology, as well as pediatric cardiology, hematology, nephrology, urology, orthopedics, infectious diseases, gastroenterology, surgery, and psychiatry. Practical application of pharmacological priniciples to case studies is required.Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS 510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L; Corequisites: PAS512, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 525: Clinical Problem Solving (3)

This course consolidates all the topics of medicine by developing a logical methodology of assessment of disease processes or syndromes, and subsequent intervention. Students will master the ability to generate a differential diagnosis specific to the patients' presenting complaints, signs and symptoms and laboratory data. A case study format is used. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L; Corequisites: PAS512, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 526: Surgery (3)

This course encompasses general principles related to the management and care of patients with surgical conditions. Wound healing and surgical techniques, pre- and post-operative management are studied. Surgical diseases of the head and neck, gastrointestinal, endocrine, cardiovascular, pulmonary, and urogenital system are covered. Basic procedures will be presented, including basic suturing technique, wound care, casting, splinting, aseptic technique, gowning and gloving, and other procedures necessary to function in the surgical setting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L; Corequisites: PAS512, 524, 525, 527, 528, 529. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 527: Geriatrics (2)

This course deals with aging and long term care and continues building on the student's awareness of the social context in which health care is provided to the elderly and chronically ill. The course emphasizes the development of communication skills necessary to enhance the humanistic practice of geriatric medicine. Students are required to interview chronic and acute geriatric patients in nursing home and acute care hospital settings. Through required readings, lectures, field experience and group discussions, the students will learn the fundamentals of geriatric medicine and the multi-dimensional aspects of long term care. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L, 522, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L; Corequisites: PAS512, 524, 525, 526, 528, 529. Offered Each Year(Spring). (GR)

PAS 528: Emergency Medicine (3)

Initial, life-saving procedures on the critically ill and seriously injured are considered. Shock, trauma, burns, gastrointestinal, obstetrical, gynecologic, pulmonary, and cardiovascular emergencies are covered. Students are certified in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS). Students learn the principles of sterile technique and universal precautions. There are hands-on skill sessions. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L and BLS CPR certification; Corequisites: PAS512, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528, 529. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 529: Research Methodology (3)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Together with PAS 612 and PAS 613, combination of all three courses meet Research & Presentation requirement. Engaging in the process of clinical research design, students will develop skills that are necessary for reviewing objective data as a component of clinical practice. Students will identify a research question relevant to the practice of medicine and critically review the relevant clinical and scientific literature. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 519, 520, 520L, 521, 531, 535, 536, 538, 538L; CorequisiteS: PAS512, 524, 525, 526, 527, 528. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 530: Preliminary Writing for Research (1)

Writing Intensive. This course is a Corequisite to PAS 529. (GR)

PAS 531: Preventive Medicine (2)

This course has been designed to provide the PA student with a functional understanding of prevention strategies employed in the primary care setting. Emphasis has been placed on applying appropriate interventions and services that have been proven effective in preventing disease and improving the human condition as it relates to the quality of life and longevity. In addition, nutrition will be a major focus In this course. Students will review the epidemiological distribution of disease and its sociologic implications. Prerequisites: PAS510, 510L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516, 516L, 517, 517L, 518, 535; Corequisites: PAS519, 520, 520L, 521, 536, 538, 538L. Offered Each Year (Fall or Spring). (GR)

PAS 535: Medical Professional Issues I (1)

Medical Professional Issues is a two course series offered to all Daemen College Physician Assistant students. Part I establishes an introductory level of knowledge about the US healthcare system and the PA profession. Part II builds off this foundation and serves as the primary venue to examine, at great depth and breadth, the professional issues delineated in the 4th Edition of the ARC-PA Standards. Together, the courses allow students to gain the knowledge and skills to abide by the laws and regulations that govern the PA profession and the practice of medicine. But, perhaps more importantly, students will be prepared to be effective participants and leaders in the profession. Co-requisites: PS510/L, 511, 516/L, 513, 514, PHI321. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 536: Medical Professional Issues II (2)

Medical Professional Issues is a two course series offered to all Daemen College Physician Assistant students. Part I establishes an introductory level of knowledge about the US healthcare system and the PA profession. Part II builds off this foundation and serves as the primary venue to examine, at great depth and breadth, the professional issues delineated in the 4th Edition of the ARC-PA Standards. Together, the courses allow students to gain the knowledge and skills to abide by the laws and regulations that govern the PA profession and the practice of medicine. But, perhaps more importantly, students will be prepared to be effective participants and leaders in the profession. Prerequisites: PAS510/L, 511, 515, 516/L, 517/l, 513, 514, 518, 535, NSC310 or PSY333, PHI321. Co-requisites: PAS519, 520/L, 521, 531, 536, 538/L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 538: Orthopedic Medicine (1)

An introduction to the study of musculoskeletal injuries and disease processes. Emphasis has been placed on the integration of the essential anatomy, physiology, pathology, microbiology, pharmacology, and medical terminology relevant to medical problems encountered in the musculoskeletal system. The differential diagnosis of symptoms and physical findings along with interpretation of laboratory and radiographic tests appropriate to each region are discussed. This course includes the Orthopedic Skills Laboratory which focuses on the understanding of musculoskeletal special testing and physical examination skills by region. Prerequisites: PAS510/L, 511, 513, 514, 515, 516/L, 517/L, 518, 535, 536, NSC310 or PSY333, PHI321. Co-requisites: PAS519, 520/L, 521, 531, 536, 538L. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 538L: Orthopedic Medicine Lab (0)

Laboratory portion of PAS538. Co-requisites:538. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 601: Clerkship I (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 602: Clerkship II (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 603: Clerkship III (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 604: Clerkship IV (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 605: Clerkship V (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 606: Clerkship VI (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 607: Clerkship VII (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 608: Clerkship VIII (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 609: Clerkship IX (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 610: Clerkship X (3)

As part of a comprehensive and coordinated 40 week clinical schedule, each four (4) week full-time clinical clerkship is designed to offer the PA student supervised clinical practice experiences in one or more of the following areas: family medicine, internal medicine, medical specialties, pediatric and adolescent medicine, prenatal care, gynecology, surgery, surgical specialties, emergency medicine, psychiatry/behavioral medicine, and geriatrics.Prerequisites: All 500 level PAS courses. Co-requisites: PAS 614, 615, or 616. Offered Each Year (Summer, Fall, Spring). (GR)

PAS 612: Research I (1)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with PAS-529 and PAS-613, combination of all three courses meet Research & Presentation requirement. This is the first half of the final research and presentation requirement for students enrolled in the Physician Assistant curriculum. Students will refine the research, analytical, and writing skills they have gained at Daemen College required to research and write original documents based on source materials appropriate to the practice of medicine and approved by the faculty research advisor. During the summer of the student's final year in the program, the student will enroll in PAS 612. Working closely with a faculty research advisor, the student will identify a specific research question, conduct a thorough search of the relevant clinical research, critically analyze the publications and write the research paper. Students will collaborate through use of the electronic media and provide feedback on reviewed work in a constructive manner. Offered (Summer) (GR)

PAS 613: Research II (1)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with PAS-529 and PAS-612, combination of all three courses meet Research & Presentation requirement. Students utilize EBP (evidence-based practice) to present a clinical case to their peers in a Grand Rounds format. EBP is a widely accepted approach used by many medical professionals to encourage sound decision-making and ensure positive outcomes. EBP incorporates observation, research, clinical opinion/analysis and patient perspective into each case. Benefits of implementing EBP into clinical practice include improved patient outcomes, improved patient compliance and a commitment that a provider is up to date with the most recent guidelines and recommendations. This course will follow the completion of PAS 612 Research I. The student will choose a case that he/she participated in while on supervised clinical experiences and use EBP to present and facilitate discussion. The case will be presented to the student's peer research group and faculty advisor. Completion of this course will require students to demonstrate competency in critical thinking, creative problem solving, communication and information literacy. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PAS 614: Clinical Seminar I (2)

As a supplement to the experience and knowledge gained through the completion of approximately 2000 hours of supervised clinical practice experiences, students enrolled in the final year of the Daemen College PA Program prepare for clinical practice and the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE) through the use of computer tutorials, group "call back day," lectures, case presentations, and on-site faculty evaluation/mentoring. All students assigned to supervised clinical practice experiences will register for a two-credit seminar each semester. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

PAS 615: Clinical Seminar II (2)

As a supplement to the experience and knowledge gained through the completion of approximately 2000 hours of supervised clinical practice experiences, students enrolled in the final year of the Daemen College PA Program prepare for clinical practice and the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE) through the use of computer tutorials, group "call back day," lectures, case presentations, and on-site faculty evaluation/mentoring. All students assigned to supervised clinical practic experiences will register for a two-credit seminar each semester. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PAS 616: Clinical Seminar III (2)

As a supplement to the experience and knowledge gained through the completion of approximately 2000 hours of supervised clinical practice experiences, students enrolled in the final year of the Daemen College PA Program prepare for clinical practice and the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE) through the use of computer tutorials, group "call back day," lectures, case presentations, and on-site faculty evaluation/mentoring. All students assigned to supervised clinical practive experiences will register for a two-credit seminar each semester. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

Public Health

PH 500: Epidemiology (3)

This course will provide an introduction to the basic concepts of epidemiology. Concepts for both chronic and infectious disease epidemiology will be taught. Course content will include an overview of the history of epidemiology, disease etiology, outbreak investigation, disease surveillance, and screening. Epidemiological research design concepts will be taught and include experimental and non-experimental designs, attributable, absolute and relative risk, odds ratios, random and systematic error, bias and confounding. Discussions of current public health issues will be illustrated and presented by faculty and students. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 510: Psychosocial and Behavioral Foundations of Public Health (3)

The course will focus on psychosocial theories of health, community change concepts and theories, economics and marketing in decision making, and policies shaped by social and behavioral science. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 520: Research Methods in Health Promotion (3)

Review and critical analysis of components of research design, including collection of data. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies will be taught. Emphasis is on the health education professional as producer and consumer of research. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 530: Environmental Health (3)

This course will provide an introduction to the public health function of environmental and community health. This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of how environmental factors impact the health of people and the community, and of the efforts made to prevent or minimize the effects of negative impacts. The emphasis of this course is to explore the relationship of people to their environment -- how the environment affects their physical well-being, and what they can do to protect and enhance their health, and to influence the quality of the environment. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 540: Public Health Biostatistics (3)

This course focuses on the application of research methods for public health. Themes include the application of statistical methods using statistical software and the interpretation of the results. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 540L: Public Health Biostatistics Laboratory (2)

Laboratory techniques for Public Health Biostatistics. (GR)

PH 550: Public Health Policy, Administration, and Management (3)

This course examines public health care systems and policy with integration of concepts for administration and management. Specific areas of study will include finance, ethics/law, need/demand and quality/effectiveness. Policy issues will be utilized and include medical care and public health preparedness. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 560: Community Health Education (3)

This course provides an overview of community health education. The history, theory, and settings for public health education will be discussed. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 562: Assessment and Planning in Community Health Education (3)

This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to assess health resources and needs, and to develop health education and promotion programs to meet specific needs in particular populations. The course further examines the program planning and development process, including both planning and program models, strategy/intervention selection, setting goals and objectives, and performing both primary and secondary needs assessments. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 564: Implementation and Evaluation in Community Health Education (3)

Students will explore the methods and techniques used by health educators to deliver a health education and health promotion program in the community. This course will review health education theories, program designs, and program implementation. Emphasis will be placed on the methodology of the health education program including: communication techniques; presentation channels and delivery; social marketing concepts; measuring outcomes and data collection. Students will design, implement and evaluate a health education program in the community. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 566: Communication, Advocacy and Consultation in Community Health Education (3)

This course is designed to advance communication skills and explore advocacy and consultative roles within the context of community health education. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 568: Advanced Epidemiology (3)

This course presents epidemiology in greater depth and detail than an introductory course. The intent of this course is to provide advanced level training for public health students interested in pursuing careers in public health research and need additional expertise in advanced epidemiology. An additional aim is to explore advocacy roles within the context of public health epidemiology. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 570: Advanced Biostatistics (3)

This course presents advanced topics in biostatistics to provide advanced level training for public health students interested in pursuing careers in public health research and need additional expertise in advanced biostatistics. Topics will include formulating scientific questions in terms of a statistical model, multivariate logistic and linear regression modeling, measures of association, stratification, matched pairs, mixed-effects modeling, analysis of rates, and survival analysis using proportional hazards models. Coursework will include the use of data analysis software for analysis of data. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 572: Chronic Diseases, a Lifecourse Approach (3)

This seminar course presents topics in chronic disease using a lifespan approach. Contemporary chronic health diseases across the life span, which are prevalent in both developed and developing countries, will be discussed including cardiovascular disease, obesity, cancer, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and others. Offered As Needed (GR)

PH 574: Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

This course covers concepts in the prevention and control of infectious disease. Pathogenesis, epidemiology, and control of infectious diseases affecting global health will be explored. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 577: Global Health and Comparative Global Public Health Systems (3)

The course introduces the many contexts of global health. Critical issues to be explored include: the multiple determinants of health; the disparities and burden of disease experienced around the globe, particularly by such populations as women and children; the ethical dimensions related to such disparities; current health priorities, and the importance of global health in the terms of development. The Millennium Development Goals will be referred to as a standard for future goals on a global scale. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 579: Contemporary Issues in Community Health Education (3)

Using examples from contemporary and emerging topics in public health, students are presented with strategies for effective community health education. This course will include discussions on contemporary health problems, the use of health education tools for treatment and prevention of health problems, and obstacles to health education. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 581: Community-Based Participatory Research for Community Health (3)

Community-based participatory research is an approach that combines evidence-based research strategies with collaborative community based strategies to bridge the gap between research and community health practice. Establishing effective societal behavioral change for improving community health is a primary outcome for measuring success of community-based participatory research. This approach recognizes that community partnerships are essential in the development, implementation, and evaluation of community health programs. Students will be exposed to definitions and principles for this approach. Through lectures, readings, and discussion they will also be exposed to various research designs, ranging from those that emanate from the community, community-academic partnerships, and academic research projects that depend on community participation. Students will also discuss implementation of such research and evaluation strategies. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 589: Grant Writing and Scholarship Dissemination in Community Health (3)

Through lectures, readings, and discussion students will learn grant writing and reviewing skills and methods for disseminating scholarship outcomes in public health. As part of this course, students will identify potential funding agencies for public health interventions, develop a grant proposal and gain experience in understanding how to disseminate public health outcomes. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 591: Global Public Health Policy and Development (3)

Through lectures, readings, and discussion, students will understand the factors influencing global health, and the interdependence between developed and developing countries in improving global health. Epidemiologic, nutrition, socioeconomic, and cultural factors that affect global health efforts will be discussed. Considerations when working in a developing country, including potential problems and barriers, will be reviewed. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 593: Professional Medical Writing (3)

Public health professionals must be able to write clearly and effectively. This course prepares the student to synthesize knowledge through the engagement of professional medical writing and scholarship. Students will learn the fundamental skills of professional writing: clarity, accuracy, precision, and brevity. Advanced instruction focuses on several forms of expository writing common in the health professions while emphasizing effective communication between the writer and different audiences. Additionally, a capacity to critically analyze and to accurately evaluate research (information and evidence) is integral to the professional writer. Emphasis is placed on cultivating critical thinking skills to prepare exemplars of scholarly medical writing. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 595: Cultural Competency and Health Disparities in Public Health (3)

Through lectures, readings, and discussion, students will come to understand health disparities and factors that influence race-, ethnic-, and class-based health disparities among various community groups and individuals. The role of health disparities in public health will be discussed, and strategies will be presented to help protect and promote health in the most vulnerable and underrepresented U.S. populations. Offered As Needed. (GR)

PH 600: Practicum-Community Health Education (3)

Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the student completes a practicum in his/her specialty track in order to apply and to further develop their academic skills. Each practicum requires a minimum of 240 hours of work at the practicum site. Students selecting a focus in global health will complete the practicum in an international setting. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

PH 601: Practicum-Epidemiology (3)

Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the student completes a practicum in his/her specialty track in order to apply and to further develop their academic skills. Each practicum requires a minimum of 240 hours of work at the practicum site. Students selecting a focus in global health will complete the practicum in an international setting. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

PH 602: Practicum (3)

This practicum will be taken by students in pursuit of the Generalist track of the MPH program. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the student completes a practicum in order to apply and to further develop their academic skills. Each practicum requires a minimum of 240 hours of work at the practicum site. Students selecting a focus in global health will complete the practicum in an international setting. Offered Each Year (Summer). (GR)

PH 610: Capstone Seminar (1)

This seminar provides an opportunity for students to reflect on and discuss their practicum experience with other students. It also provides a supportive setting to help prepare students to identify and plan for their capstone project in their specialty track. Offered Each Year (Fall). (GR)

PH 620: Capstone Project in Community Health (3)

The capstone project will be completed on a topic pertinent to the student's specialty track. If completing a focus in global health, the project must also have global health relevance. Offered Each Year (Spring) (GR)

PH 621: Capstone Project in Epidemiology (3)

The capstone project will be completed on a topic pertinent to the student's specialty track. If completing a focus in global health, the project must also have global health relevance. Offered Each Year (Spring) (GR)

PH 622: Capstone Project (3)

This capstone project will be taken by students in pursuit of the Generalist track of the MPH program. The capstone project will be completed on a topic pertinent to Public Health . If completing a focus in global health, the project must also have global health relevance. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

Physical Therapy

PT 501: Applied Biostatistics (3)

Students will develop an understanding of the principles and applications of parametric and nonparametric statistics, particularly with respect to applications in physical therapy. Topics will include: probability, scales of measurement, reliability and validity, sampling techniques, experimental design and hypothesis development (statistical inference), descriptive statistics, parametric and nonparametric tests of significance, correlation, and regression. Selection of appropriate statistical procedures will be presented with reference to principles of experimental design presented in PT 553, Introduction to Clinical Research Design. Students will use both calculators and computer software (SPSS, Excel) for analyzing data and developing graphic representations. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 504: Clinical Functional Anatomy I (3)

This course will build upon the fundamental content taught in BIO 330, General Anatomy. This course, the first of a series of two clinically oriented functional anatomy courses, will focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. The specific anatomical content will be presented through a regional approach and will include the cervical, thoracic, and upper limb regions. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 504L: Clinical Functional Anatomy I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Clinical Functional Anatomy. Required corequisite: PT 504. (GR)

PT 505: Clinical Functional Anatomy II Lecture (2)

This course, the second of a series of two, will focus on the detailed structure and function of the human neuromusculoskeletal system of the lumbar and pelvic regions and the lower extremities. The relationships of normal and abnormal embryological and developmental processes to gross anatomical structure and to movement and function across the life span will be presented. Lecture and laboratory sessions will include human cadaver dissection and prosections, models, and clinically oriented peer presentations and problem solving experiences. Prerequisites: PT 504 and PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 505L: Clinical Functional Anatomy II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Clinical Functional Anatomy II. Corequisite: PT 505. (GR)

PT 506: Kinesiology and Biomechanics I (3)

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce and emphasize the principles of kinesiology, tissue mechanics and biomechanics of the cervical, temporomandibular, thoracic, and upper extremity joints and their related soft tissues. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through both static and dynamic analyses of regional human movement and posture. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as electromyography (EMG), dynamometry, and video motion analysis. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure and physiology presented in PT 504/L, Clinical Functional Anatomy I and PT 508/L, Physiology of Exercise. This integration of anatomical and physiological foundations will aid the learner in proper examination and evaluation of the quality, efficiency and safety of upperquarter movement patterns and functional task performance. An emphasis will be placed on the analysis and discussion of the mechanical properties of tissues and their respective responses to stress shielding and stress application. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the biomechanics of the cervical and thoracic spines, temporomandibular joint and upper extremities. The students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics and osteokinematics of these respective regions and relate those to whole body and regional mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Laboratories will promote development of skills in critical analysis and examination and evaluation of normal and abnormal movement. The student will then develop skill in the application of both kinetic and kinematic biomechanical analysis and begin to foster consideration of biomechanical principles in the design of reliable and valid upper quarter examination procedures and efficacious intervention strategies and parameters.Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 506L: Kinesiology and Biomechanics I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Kinesiology & Biomechanics I. Required corequisite: PT 506. (GR)

PT 507: Kinesiology & Biomechanics II Lecture (2)

This lecture/laboratory course will focus on the principles of kinesiology, tissue mechanics and biomechanics as they relate to the lower extremity, pelvis and lumbar spine. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through both static and dynamic analyses of regional human movement and posture. Kinetic and kinematic analysis of movement of these regions will be explored using such tools as EMG, dynamometry, and video motion analysis. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure, physiology and kinesiology presented in PT 504 & 505 Clinical Functional Anatomy I & II and PT 508 Physiology of Exercise; and PT 506 Kinesiology and Biomechanics. This integration of anatomical, physiological and kinesiological foundations will aid the learner in proper evaluation of the quality, efficiency and safety of lower quarter movement patterns and functional task performance. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the biomechanics of the lumbar spine, pelvis and lower extremities. The students will analyze forces affecting arthrokinematics and osteokinematics of the respective regions and relate those to whole body and regional mobility and stability by way of clinical application. Laboratories will promote further development of skills in critical analysis and evaluation of normal and abnormal movement, the application of both kinetic and kinematic biomechanical analysis and will begin to foster consideration of biomechanical principles in the design of reliable and valid lower quarter examination procedures and efficacious intervention strategies and parameters. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 507L: Kinesiology and Biomechanics II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Kinesiology & Biomechanics II. Corequisite: PT 507. (GR)

PT 508: Physiology of Exercise (3)

This foundational science course introduces and emphasizes the concepts and knowledge of the body's physiological response to exercise, overuse, and disuse. Lectures and laboratory experiences focus on the structural and physiological effects of exercise and establish a knowledge base for the future clinician to develop and critically assess neuromusculoskeletal exercise prescription and cardiopulmonary intervention programs. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 508L: Physiology of Exercise Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Physiology of Exercise. Corequisite: PT 508. (GR)

PT 509: Principles and Applications of Physical Agents Lecture (4)

This lecture/laboratory course will introduce and emphasize the physiologic effects of electromagnetic and acoustic energy on human tissue. The clinical application of these principles will be reinforced through laboratory practical experiences as well as clinical case studies. This course content will be synthesized with the foundations of anatomical structure and physiology presented in PT 504 and PT 514. This integration of anatomic and physiological foundations will aid the learner in decision making with regard to application of appropriate physical agents. An emphasis will be placed on the physiologic response of tissues to therapeutic modalities that emit electromagnetic and acoustic energy. Lectures will provide an in-depth study of the science of therapeutic modalities. Students will differentiate between the thermal, acoustic, mechanical, and electrical modalities commonly utilized in the clinic. Laboratories will promote development of psychomotor skills and demonstrate mastery in the safe application of therapeutic modalities. Students will develop consideration of the application of physical agents within treatment strategies that are based upon evidence in practice. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 509L: Principles and Applications of Physical Agents Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Principles and Applications of Physical Agents. Corequisite: PT 509. (GR)

PT 514: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I (5)

This lecture/laboratory course is the first in a three part series, which will introduce the concepts of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation, and intervention strategies of the cervical spine, thoracic spine, upper extremities, and associated structures. This course will further promote development of knowledge in differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders in those regions noted. Students will further develop and synthesize the concepts of decision making and critical thinking in evidence based practice and professionalism with topics including communication, ethical behavior, professional organization, collaborative/team practice and scope of practice. Additionally, the utilization of disablement models will be included as a conceptual framework for examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, outcome assessment, delivery models, and documentation with clinical applications including behavioral objectives. Treatment concepts and techniques will be presented and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to build differential diagnosing and problem solving skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 514L: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation I. Corequisite: PT 514. (GR)

PT 515: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II Lecture (5)

This lecture/laboratory course is the second in a three part series, which will further investigate concepts of musculoskeletal examination and evaluation and will promote development of knowledge in differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders of the lumbar spine, pelvis, hip, knee, ankle, foot, and their associated structures. Treatment philosophies and techniques (e.g. structure mobilization and stabilization) will be explored and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration. Basic care procedures will be presented including wheel chair parts and propulsion, transfer training, gait training, and environmental assessment and modification. In addition, a specialty area of aquatic therapy will be explored. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Techniques will be presented and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to build differential diagnosing and problem solving skills. Students will participate in clinical observations and patient demonstrations in Clinical Exposure II to continue their hands-on experience with patients and to further develop patient-therapist and professional communication skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 515L: Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation II. Corequisite: PT 515. (GR)

PT 516: Clinical Problem Solving in Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation (2)

This course is the third course in a three part series,which will provide students an opportunity to further explore topics in musculoskeletal rehabilitation through a problem based learning format. A faculty mentor will present a selected case and the goals and expectations of each learning experience. A small group of students will then proceed in designing and implementing an action plan aimed at achievement of these goals. The students will be required to: interpret and analyze the information provided; gather additional information as necessary from reading and discussions of current scientific professional literature; and to synthesize and present a coherent, evidence-based argument addressing the specific goals of each case study learning experience. Students will also peer review analyses of selected cases. The faculty member will serve as a facilitator for directing student discussions and psychomotor activities including thrust and non-thrust manipulation technique. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 517: Clinical Medicine I (1 - 3)

This course is the first in a three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with musculoskeletal pathology as a foundation for direct patient/client care and research. Key topics characteristic of common orthopedic pathologies will be addressed including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis, diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological, surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to musculoskeletal pathology will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 521: Prosthetics and Orthotics (2)

This lecture/laboratory course is designed to increase the student's understanding of prosthetics and orthotics. Principles of prosthetic and orthotic design, function, and fabrication will be discussed. Clinical problem solving for prosthetic or orthotic prescription will be addressed based on examination findings in order to optimize function for the patient/client. Pre-prosthetic as well as prosthetic training will be emphasized. Use of orthosis in management of individuals receiving physical therapy will be integrated with knowledge from previous courses in orthopedics and neurorehabilitation. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 521L: Prosthetics and Orthotics Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Prosthetics and Orthotics. Corequisite: PT 521. (GR)

PT 530: Psychosocial Aspects of Health and Disability (3)

This course applies biopsychosocial models of health, illness, and disability, including psychosocial aspects of disability; social attitudes and perceptions; adjustment to and secondary effects of disability. This course will develop student competence in responding to individuals who are experiencing physical and psychiatric problems. This course is designed for Physical Therapy students to be taken in the professional phase of the curriculum. Students will have had exposure to patients with musculoskeletal and neurological disorders and will therefore be able to consider the issues addressed in the course in the context of specific illnesses and/or disabilities relating to these body systems. Through readings, guest speakers, video, and community experiences, and in class discussions, this course is intended to challenge one?s paradigm of how one has perceived both physical and psychiatric disability. Discussions on quality of life, self-help, and recovery are intended to help one develop and sustain one?s professional relationships with the individuals with whom one may assist in their recovery. t As this course is intended to help one understand and respond with comfort to individuals who are experiencing physical and mental health problems, the student will have the opportunity to discuss various psychosocial issues that he/she has experienced personally, in his/her clinical exposure courses, internships and/or other settings, and using case studies towards a better understanding of how one might more effectively communicate and manage various challenges in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: PSY103; PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Year (Spring). (GR)

PT 532: Motor Control and Motor Learning (2)

The first half of this course explores theories of motor control and motor learning that form an important theoretical foundation for the practice of evidence-based physical therapy. This course will explore contemporary theories of motor control and the contributions of individuals like Bernstein, Schmidt, the Bobaths, Nashner, Horak, Shumway-Cook, Thelen and others. Typical and atypical postural motor control across the lifespan from an information processing perspective, focusing on peripheral (e.g. sensory and musculoskeletal) and central (e.g. reaction time, motor planning, attention, cognition, motivation, etc.) aspects of motor control will be investigated. Environmental task demands will be analyzed using Gentile's taxonomy as part of the process of motor control. Several theoretical approaches to motor learning will be covered, Schmit's Schema Theory, and stage theories of Fitts and Gentile. In the second half of the course, students will search the literature for peer-reviewed research papers that have examined the application of motor control and motor learning variables (e.g. prepractice and practice variables, intrinsic and extrinsic feedback) across the lifespan in typical and atypical populations. Each student will present data from one or more articles to the class using PowerPoint presentation software. Students will design and execute an evidence-based practice project in which they perform a literature review, design a motor learning experiment, execute and analyze the results, and present their results to the class. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 539: Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation (2)

This lecture/laboratory course will address the diversified issues of clinical management of patient/client with primary and/or secondary cardiovascular and pulmonary dysfunction within the context of physical therapy. Topics will include practice setting specific management principles and therapeutic techniques to address primary and secondary impairments of the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, as well as prevention of dysfunction in individuals across their life span. Topics to be discussed include chronic obstructive lung dysfunction, restrictive lung dysfunction, cardiac muscle dysfunction, the post-surgical patient, the patient post-trauma, and the patient with cancer. Prerequisites: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 539L: Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation. Corequisite: PT 539. (GR)

PT 544: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I Lecture (4)

This course is the first in a three part series, which will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients with neuromuscular rehabilitative needs. Operational theories of nervous system organization including systems theories, models of central nervous system reorganization, and recovery models will be introduced and emphasized. Enablement/Disablement models, the Guide toPhysical Therapist Practice, Guidelines for Content in Physical Therapy Education, and other conceptual frameworks that aid the physical therapist in evidence-based clinical decision-making will be explored. This course will begin with an in-depth study of human development from the life span perspective, with an emphasis on development of postural control and movement and their interrelationship to skill acquisition. Neuromuscular- based pediatric movement disorders will be introduced and emphasized within the context of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management. Developmental anatomy, functional neuronanatomy, and physiology will be linked to discussions of disorders of posture and movement. Historical and contemporary theories of intervention including therapeutic handling will be presented. Medical management options including pharmacology and surgery will be discussed. Course content will include applications of assistive technology including adaptive and therapeutic equipment as it relates to the pediatric patient/client population. Course content will reinforce the development of professional and ethical behaviors, the scope of physical therapy practice, collaborative practice models, therapeutic communication skills, and documentation. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 544L: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I Laboratory (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neuromuscular Rehabilitation I. Corequisite: PT 544. (GR)

PT 545: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II (4)

This course is the second in a three part series, which will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients with neuromuscular rehabilitative needs. This course will utilize the conceptual models/frameworks and reinforce foundational principles and theories presented in PT 544. This course will continue the study of human development, from the life span perspective, with an emphasis on age related changes of postural control and movement and their interrelationship to functional capabilities. Adult onset neuromuscular-based movement disorders will be introduced and emphasized within the context of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management. Anatomy, functional neuronanatomy, and physiology will be linked to discussions of disorders of posture and movement. Historical and contemporary theories of intervention, including therapeutic handling, will be presented. Medical management options including pharmacology and surgery will be discussed. Course content will include issues on aging, vestibular rehabilitation, and an expanded discussion of assistive technology including adaptive and therapeutic equipment as it relates to the adult patient/client population. Course content will reinforce development of professional and ethical behaviors, the scope of physical therapy practice, collaborative practice models, therapeutic communication skills, and documentation. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in lecture. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 545L: Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Neuromuscular Rehabilitation II. Corequisite: PT 545. (GR)

PT 546: Clinical Medicine II (3)

This course is the second in a three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with neuromuscular pathology as a foundation for direct patient/client care and research. Key topics characteristic of common neurologic pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to neuromuscular pathology will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 548: Integumentary Care (3)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the skin and its appendages as they relate to wound etiology, management, and prevention. The student will explore the anatomical and physiological processes associated with tissue destruction, repair, and remodeling as they relate to specific cause and effect using the wound healing model as the principle pillar of exploration. This course will address the diversified issues of clinical management of patients/clients with a primary and/or secondary integumentary disorder as they relate to the practice of physical therapy. Topics will include practice setting specific management principles and techniques as they relate to individuals across their life span, with disorders of the integumentary system including, but not limited to: burns, pressure ulcers, arterial and venous stasis disorders, neuropathic lesions, dermatitis, and cellulitis. The student will acquire skills within a theoretical and practical spectrum as it relates to patient/client clinical management, environmental constraints, and critical pathways. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 549: Clinical Medicine III (2)

This course is the final in the three part clinical medicine series. It is designed to challenge the student to evaluate the knowledge of clinical presentations associated with cardiovascular and pulmonary systems, as well as general medicine topics including gastrointestinal, urogenital, metabolic, and oncologic pathologies, as a foundation for direct patient care and research. Key topics characteristic of the pathologies will be addressed, including etiology; epidemiology; underlying pathophysiology and histology; clinical signs and symptoms related to impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities; natural history and prognosis; diagnostic medical procedures; differential diagnosis; medical, pharmacological and surgical management; and expected outcomes. Differential diagnosis related to these pathologies will be emphasized and applied to determine appropriateness of physical therapy intervention. Content presented will encompass pathologies observed across the life span. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 551: Integrative Seminar in Physical Therapy (0)

PT 551 (I-IV) and PT 651 (V) Integrative Seminars focus on the integration of all corresponding courses within each semester of the curriculum. These sessions will act as forums within which the student learner will have the opportunity to conceptualize each aspect of rehabilitation and build them into an overall framework of patient/client care. Each session will generally have a theme of interest such that students can build upon their level of understanding of that material as well as experience, appreciate and value the complexity of the entire process. These forums are designed to act as learning communities to promote independent critical thinking and independent thought while assisting in preparing each student for all lecture, laboratory and clinical exposure components of the semester coursework. Prerequisite: PT professional status (corresponding Fall/Spring semesters) in First through Third years. (GR)

PT 553: Introduction to Clinical Research Design (1)

In this course, students will explore the varieties of research design commonly used in clinical research, further developing the analytical skills needed to support professional evidence-based practice. Students will explore the continuum of research methodologies and designs commonly used in clinical research (i.e., descriptive to randomized controlled trials); and they will evaluate the merit and relevance of published research to the practice of physical therapy. Ethical issues in clinical research will be considered including the role of institutional review boards and the requirements of informed consent. Students will lead discussions of research papers, considering key concepts such as sampling, experimental controls, levels of measurement, sensitivity, specificity, reliability and validity. As the semester progresses, students will be linked with a faculty research advisor who will guide them through the process of clinical research in PT 554 and PT 555. Students will write a research question (or questions) that may form the basis of their research project. They will search the published literature and write a preliminary literature review relative to their research question. The culmination of the student's research will be an evidence-based practice poster that summarizes our current state of knowledge/evidence with respect to the research question or questions the student has posed. The posters will be presented at Academic Festival during the spring semester. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 554: Clinical Research I (2)

This is the first semester of a two-semester clinical research course that culminates in the submission of an evidence based project and participation in research symposium. This course continues the work begun in PT 553 in which small groups of students identified an area of interest, were assigned a faculty mentor, articulated a research question, and carried out a preliminary evidence-based literature review. Student groups will refine the poster developed in PT 553 and present it at a college-wide poster session during the Daemen College Academic Festival. This semester each group of students will work as participants in the mentoring faculty member's research. Each group will meet regularly throughout the semester with a faculty mentor for discussion of key issues related to the research literature (i.e. experimental design, methodology, data analysis, etc.). Each group will write a research proposal meeting all the criteria for submission to the Daemen College Human Subjects Research Review Committee. Finally, each group will complete a comprehensive evidence-based literature review. Working collaboratively with a faculty mentor, group members will be expected to participate in data collection and analysis. Prerequisites: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 555: Clinical Research II (2)

During this semester the student will execute the investigation designed in PT 554. It is expected that the student will have completed a research proposal and will have submitted that proposal to the Daemen College Human Subjects Research Review Committee. Working closely with the research advisor, the student will collect and analyze his/her data. Students will collaborate with one another in group discussions to facilitate the process of writing the evidence based project and preparation of presentation for the research symposium. A final project will be completed and submitted to the student's research advisor and committee. Students will also participate in a presentation/symposium describing their research to the Daemen College community, as well as to interested individuals from the broader professional community. Prerequisites: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 563: Clinical Exposure I (Musculoskeletal I) (1)

This course is the first in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. Small student teams will visit a group of local physical therapy facilities that provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including musculoskeletal rehabilitation. This experience is designed to permit the student to become acclimated to the clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 564: Clinical Exposure II (Musculoskeletal II) (1)

This course is the second in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will discuss and consider issues of resource management, individual and cultural differences, and delegation of services, referral to other services, and documentation and presentation of case findings to peers. Prerequisite: PT First Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 565: Clinical Exposure III (Neuromuscular I) (1)

This course is the third in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will observe physical therapy services at a variety of pediatric settings and participate in supervised group sessions to provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including children and adolescents with neuromuscular disorders. These experiences are designed to permit the student to become acclimated to this unique clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills with this special population. Students will discuss and consider issues of best practice, issues of individual differences in patient management, professional responsibility, social/cultural diversity, documentation of examination and outcome measure assessment results, and ongoing intervention. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 566: Clinical Exposure IV (Neuromuscular II/ Prosthetics and Orthotics) (1)

This course is the fourth in the series of clinical exposures that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty concurrently teaching the specialty content in the campus-based didactic coursework. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. During these regular exposures to clinical practice, students will observe physical therapy services at a variety of settings that provide care to adults with a variety of neuromuscular and age related disorders including sessions on design and fabrication of orthotic and prosthetic devices, and participate in supervised group sessions to provide care to a variety of patient/client profiles including adults with neuromuscular disorders. These experiences are designed to permit the student to become acclimated to this unique clinical environment and develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills with this patient population. Students will discuss and consider issues of best practice, issues of individual differences in patient management, professional responsibility, social/cultural diversity, documentation of examination and outcome measure assessment results, and ongoing intervention. Prerequisite: PT Second Year Spring professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 567: Clinical Exposure V (Cardiopulmonary/ Integumentary) (1)

This course is the last in the series of clinic-based experiential learning sessions that are coordinated and mentored by academic faculty. These regular exposures to clinical practice allow the student to observe and engage in the practice of physical therapy and other related fields, further developing cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills acquired in lecture and laboratory experiences. Small student teams will visit a group of local clinical facilities and community-based wellness programs that provide care to a variety of patient/clients including cardiopulmonary rehabilitation, integumentary wound care, trauma unit, women's health, wellness and health promotion, and holistic health. These experiences are designed to permit the student to further develop effective patient/client-therapist communication skills. Students will discuss and consider issues of quality of care, scope of practice, clinical guidelines, documentation, and reimbursement. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 575: Pre-Clinical Seminar (1)

This seminar format course is designed to prepare the student for his/her clinical internship experiences. Professional aspects of physical therapy will be stressed in this seminar. The design and implementation of the student's clinical education experiences at Daemen are also incorporated into this seminar course. The student will be introduced to essential information pertaining to clinical performance. The evaluation tool, the "Clinical Performance Instrument," will be thoroughly examined. Emphasis will be placed on reinforcement of communication skills essential to professionals in the health care environment. Learning experiences will also focus on the following professional areas: professional and educational expectations; professional behavior, ethical and legal standards; HIPAA regulations; communication; cultural considerations in patient management; alternative models in clinical education; infection control and blood borne pathogens; universal precautions; OSHA regulations. Prerequisite: PT First Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 577: Clinical Internship I (3)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to develop skills deemed appropriate for entry-level physical therapy practice. Those skills include but are not limited to examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. To accomplish this, students will participate in direct patient care that may include gait training, transfer training, assessment and measurement, intervention and patient education. Integration of the previous semester's academic curriculum will be the focus of the clinical internship. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on orthopedic or general hospital patient care. Prerequisites: PT Second Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all PT course work. Offered Each Summer. (GR)

PT 582: Clinical Internship II (3)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to further enhance the student's patient/client management skills. The focus of this internship will be the management of patients/clients with neuromuscular disorders, incorporating information and skills acquired in the previous academic semesters. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on neurorehabilitation of any age group. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Summer. (GR)

PT 600: Clinical Problem Solving in Neuromuscular Rehabilitation (2)

This course is the third in a three part series which will explore special topics in neuromuscular rehabilitation through a tutorial problem based learning format to promote the development of clinical reasoning, clinical problem solving, collaborative skills, skills in self-assessment and independent learning. Students will work independently or collaboratively in a small group with a faculty mentor/tutor. Selected topics involving patients with neuromuscular diagnoses with specific goals will be presented by a faculty mentor/tutor to small groups in the form of directed learning experiences and patient/client case studies. Working independently or as a small group, students will then proceed in designing and implementing an action plan aimed at achievement of these goals. Students will be required to: interpret and analyze the information provided; gather additional information as necessary from reading and discussions of current scientific professional literature; and synthesize and present coherent, evidence based argument addressing the specific goals of each learning experience or case study. The faculty mentor/tutor will serve as a facilitator for directing the students' discussions and psychomotor activities. Learning objectives associated with each case study will focus on knowledge and skills associated with examination and intervention, as well as integration of published literature into clinical practice and contemporary practice issues including but not limited to social/cultural/psychosocial issues; legal and ethical aspects of professional behavior; discharge planning (including home/environmental needs, HEP); prognosis; practice issues (i.e. management of a collaborative care plan, supervision, constraints to practice); wellness and prevention; and accessing resources to facilitate patient care. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 606: Rehabilitation of the Patient With Spinal Cord Injury (1)

This lecture/laboratory course will apply the conceptual framework of physical therapy management to patients/clients who have spinal cord injury during the acute, sub acute and long-term phases of care. Comprehensive exploration of the elements of physical therapy practice and patient/client management for patients/clients of all ages will be emphasized. Students are required to integrate and apply all previous academic/clinical knowledge with regard to musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, cardiopulmonary, and integumentary management, as well as application of environmental assessment/modification and assistive technology to enhance function, physical agents, and patient/caregiver education. Current scientific professional literature, integration of other systems, as well as critical thinking and decision making experiences for problem solving in all steps of patient/client management will be used. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 606L: Rehabilitation of the Patient With Spinal Cord Injury Lab (0)

Laboratory techniques for Rehabilitation of the Patient with Spinal Core Injury. Corequisite: PT 606. (GR)

PT 610: Management and Administrative Issues in Physical Therapy (4)

A broad survey of topics essential to the administration and management of physical therapy services. Topics covered will include: strategic planning, organizational structure, reimbursement and income management, budgeting, marketing, personnel management, quality assurance, ethical dilemmas and problem solving, professional regulation and the legislative process, various forms of liability and risk management, health care policy and systems of health care service delivery, contract issues and the negotiation process, documentation issues, and appropriate delegation, supervision and collaboration in the provision of physical therapy services. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 612: Health Promotion, Fitness and Wellness (2)

This course will provide the student with the conceptual framework for individual and community health promotion, as well as injury/disease prevention across the life span. Course content includes examination of concepts of health, health promotion, wellness and prevention, and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Basic epidemiological principles will be discussed and applied to specific diseases related to the practice of physical therapy including examination of best evidence for screening and prevention. Current theories of health behavior change will be discussed, as well as issues of adherence, locus of control, motivation, and the influence of culture and cultural issues on health promotion. To demonstrate understanding and application of the key concepts of health behavior change, students will assess their own level of wellness, implement a personal plan to address a particular health behavior, and analyze the outcome of the intervention. Community based health promotion will also be addressed including needs assessment, planning, resources, and process and outcome assessment. Students will apply their knowledge by creating a community based health promotion or disease/injury prevention program and present their project to their peers. Issues related to women's health will also be addressed including osteoporosis management, incontinence, pregnancy related issues, as well as pelvic floor dysfunction. Prerequisite: PT Third Year Fall professional status or permission of PT Department. Offered Each Fall. (GR)

PT 651: Integrative Seminar in Physical Therapy V (0)

PT 551 (I-IV) and PT 651 (V) Integrative Seminars focus on the integration of all corresponding courses within each semester of the curriculum. These sessions will act as forums within which the student learner will have the opportunity to conceptualize each aspect of rehabilitation and build them into an overall framework of patient/client care. Each session will generally have a theme of interest such that students can build upon their level of understanding of that material as well as experience, appreciate and value the complexity of the entire process. These forums are designed to act as learning communities to promote independent critical thinking and independent thought while assisting in preparing each student for all lecture, laboratory and clinical exposure components of the semester coursework. Prerequisite: PT professional status (corresponding Fall/Spring semesters) in First through Third years. (GR)

PT 680: Clinical Internship III (4)

This is a nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to integrate all the academic knowledge gained as well as incorporate the previous clinical experiences to attain skills and behaviors of an entry-level physical therapist. The facilities utilized for the internship will focus on in-patient care of any age group and any setting. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 690: Clinical Internship IV (4)

This is the final nine (9) week full-time clinical internship designed to enhance the student's entry- level skills in a special interest area of physical therapy. The facilities utilized for this internship will incorporate any setting appropriate for the delivery of physical therapy patient/client care. Prerequisites: PT Third Year professional status and Grade of C or better in all required PT course work. Offered Each Spring. (GR)

PT 704: Musculoskeletal System (4)

Differentiating musculoskeletal dysfunctions/disorders of the spine and upper and lower extremities, and their associated structures is the emphasis of this course. Students will further develop the concepts of decision-making and critical thinking in evidence-based clinical practice. Musculoskeletal examination and treatment techniques, including spinal and extremity thrust and nonthrust manipulation, will be presented and applied in a conceptual framework emphasizing functional restoration, health, and wellness. Laboratories will promote development of skill in the application of examination and intervention techniques discussed in a lecture format. Techniques will be discussed and practiced in the context of clinical problems. Students will have the opportunity to critically evaluate examination findings via paper cases to further build differential diagnosing and problem-solving skills as they relate to current practice standards. Contemporary perspectives to surgical management will be presented and explored by regional experts in the field. Algorithms for examination and intervention supported by the literature will be presented and discussed. (GR)

PT 705: Evidence Based Practice (2)

The use of evidence to guide practice is essential in today's healthcare environment. This course will define evidence-based practice including its advantages and disadvantages. Students will learn the fundamental skills necessary to make patient management decisions based on data and best evidence and implement them into practice. Learning experiences will provide students with opportunities to conduct searches of relevant clinical and scientific literature, to review that literature efficiently and critically, and to utilize principles of research methods to design a patient centered research initiative relevant to their practice setting. This course is offered online Fall, Spring and Summer terms. (GR)

PT 720: Thrust Manipulation (3)

This lecture and laboratory course is designed to teach the theory, rationale, and evidence supporting thrust manipulation. The course is designed to enhance psychomotor skill in utilizing mobilization and manipulation for the management of musculoskeletal disorders. The main focus of the program will be on determining the indications and contraindications of applying the techniques to assure both safety and treatment effectiveness. The areas emphasized will be based on evidence from recent clinical trials using manipulation to treat the spine and extremities. (GR)

PT 721: Neuromuscular Mobilization (2)

This course presents examination and treatment strategies for patients who require an integration of neurological and orthopaedic (musculoskeletal) manual therapy procedures. Lab experiences will include skill development in spinal and extremity neuromuscular mobilization. (GR)

PT 722: Spinal Exercise Strategies (2)

This course is designed to guide clinicians in the analysis of movement dysfunction and in the diagnosis and prescription of corrective exercise programs for spinal disorders. The course will involve both lecture and laboratory sessions and will integrate spinal exercise theories of McKenzie and Sahrmann as well as Australian and Nordic approaches. (GR)

PT 723: Integrated Management of Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction (2)

This course is intended to provide the participant with basic examination and treatment approaches to the sacroiliac joint. A rationale for this approach will be provided by a review of the available evidence for examination and treatment. (GR)

PT 724: OMPT Residency (Mentorship) (3)

A post-professional planned learning experience in a focused area of clinical practice. The clinical residency (fellowship) combines opportunities for ongoing clinical supervision and mentoring with a theoretical basis for advanced practice and scientific inquiry in a defined area of sub-specialization beyond the generally-accepted Description of Specialty Practice. (GR)

PT 725: Problem Solving in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (2)

A planned program of post professional clinical education for physical therapists that is designed to advance significantly the physical therapist resident's problem solving abilities in orthopaedic manual physical therapy. The experience combines opportunities for ongoing clinical supervision and mentoring, with theoretical questioning regarding advanced practice, patient questions, and case analysis. This experience may be conducted at the clinical site or through distance learning opportunities. (GR)

PT 726: Research Project (2)

This course will involve the collection, interpretation, and analysis of data related to a clinical research question addressed during the residency (Fellowship) experience. The student will complete a written paper pertaining to this research that is suitable for publication. (GR)

PT 727: Review-Objective Structured Clinical Exam (1)

This course will involve a review of the psychomotor skills learned throughout the Fellowship program. The course will meet on an as needed basis to prepare the student for the Objective Structured Clinical Exam (OSCE). The OSCE is a practical examination involving several stations that assesses the student's ability to problem solve simulated cases and apply analytical and psychomotor skills in the area of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy. (GR)

PT 728: Lab in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (1)

This course is a distance learning laboratory offering which is designed such that the student will be able to view OMPT techniques via a computer live while at home or at work. The professor for this course will demonstrate examination and intervention procedures pertaining to OMPT while the student is provided the opportunity to interact with the professor by asking questions. To access the lab. the student will be given a link to Daemen College OMPT lab session. (GR)

PT 729: McKenzie Part A (3)

An introduction to the concepts and applications of the McKenzie Method to Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy focusing on the lumbar spine. As the name implies, this course focuses on the lumbar spine and the application of the McKenzie theory and techniques in the mechanical diagnosis of problems and the therapeutic approaches to resolve these problems. The course also includes patient demonstration, analysis and discussion. The principle format is lecture, discussion and live patient demonstrations. (GR)

PT 730: McKenzie Part B (3)

Following Part A, how the McKenzie Method applies to the cervical and thoracic spines will be examined utilizing the same teaching format. This course focuses on the cervical and thoracic spine and the application of the McKenzie theory and techniques in the mechanical diagnosis of problems and the therapeutic approaches to resolve these problems. The course also includes patient demonstration, analysis and discussion. The principle format is lecture, discussion and live patient demonstrations (GR)

Special Education

SED 500: Educational Psychology (3)

This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of psychological concepts, principles and theories central to the teaching-learning process, including classroom problems encountered by educators. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 501: Introduction to Special Education (3)

The course is a comprehensive survey of factors related to individuals with disabilities, including those who have learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavioral disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, physical handicaps, multiple handicaps, or who are gifted. Topics addressed in the course include definitions, prevalence, identification, characteristics, related vocabulary, educational implications, ancillary services, relevant legislation and litigation, and current issues and trends in special education. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 502: Special Education: Laws and Trends (3)

This course provides an in-depth review of trends and legislation which impact on the disabled, the families of children with disabilities, and the professional people who serve the disabled. Identification, evaluation, and implementation of service delivery models will be included. The course will examine research implications and social movements for future trends in prevention, services, legislation, litigation and personnel preparation in special education. Co-requisite: SED 501. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 503: Assessment & Evaluation of Students with Disabilities (3)

The purpose of this course is to offer an advance set of skills in assessment as it applies to the characteristics and needs of the student who is disabled (e.g. mentally retarded, learning disabled, or emotionally/behaviorally disordered). The course will emphasize the basic considerations of assessment and measurement, as well as the actual assessment instruments, techniques, and decisions which lead to appropriate educational programming for these target groups. The course will also examine the use of informal methods used in special education classrooms; portfolio assessment, authentic assessment, observation, anecdotal and various recording methods will also be covered. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 504: The Reading Process for Students with Disabilities (3)

This course presents the fundamentals of reading theory, instruction and assessment. Teaching strategies based on current special education methods and materials will be presented. Emphasis is placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster reading literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to the child with disabilities are addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials is included. Prerequisite: SED 502. Field Experience Required. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 505: Classroom and Behavior Management for Students with Disabilities (3)

The competencies, knowledge and skills necessary to conduct effective behavior management programs for the benefit of students with disabilities in a variety of special education settings and inclusive programs will be emphasized. The course will also examine the principles of applied behavior analysis, cognitive behavior modification, and other approaches used in assisting students with special needs to monitor and manage their own behavior. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 506: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Learners with Special Needs (3)

The skills and competencies needed to effectively organize instructional programs and environments will be covered. Techniques for organizing instruction will include such skills as: designing educational goals, instructional objectives, task analysis, lesson planning, curriculum design, environmental arrangements, scheduling, developing IEPs and use of informal assessment/evaluation methods in the classroom. Other skills addressed include classroom management and working with mildly disabled learners within an inclusive setting. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 512: Collaborative Approaches within Inclusive Programs (3)

A course designed for the study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication and interaction with parents, students, ancillary personnel, peers, paraprofessionals, and volunteers. Specific emphasis will be given to the development of interpersonal skills required for various team members both in special and regular education. Issues explored will include: interpersonal relationships - the roles played by one's self-concept, perceptions, emotions; language, nonverbal communication, and listening versus hearing; intimacy and distance in relationships, improving communication climates, and managing interpersonal conflicts. Field Experience Required. Prerequisites: SED 502, 506. Offered Summer and Fall. (GR)

SED 513: Survey of Learning Disabilities (3)

This course provides an historical overview of services, assessment, theories of intervention strategies, and classroom models for children with learning disorders. The etiology of learning disabilities and its' prolific growth will be presented and what schools and teachers must do to accommodate these learners. This course will also examine national organizations, definitions, discrepancy of potential and achievement and other identification issues for these learners. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 515: Introduction to Theories of Learning, Child Development and Cognitive Studies (3)

The course will provide a thorough understanding of child development, psychological concepts, principles and theories involved in the teaching-learning process. This course will also cover current cognitive theories of learning and brain-based learning studies used in today's classroom. Offered As Needed. (GR)

SED 516: Introduction to Special Education, Educational Policies, Community Education, and Working with Families (3)

The course is a comprehensive survey of factors related to individuals with disabilities, including those who have learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavioral disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, physical handicaps, multiple handicaps, or who are gifted. Topics addressed in the course include definitions, prevalence, identification, characteristics, related vocabulary, educational implications, ancillary services, relevant legislation and litigation. The course will also provide an advance understanding of the historical, philosophical and sociological practices in education, an analysis of the social structure of the community and suggestions on how to involve community members and families in the education of children. Focus will also be given to collaboration with family members as a part of the educational team. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 517: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Effective Classroom Management for Learners with Special Needs (3)

The skills and competencies needed to effectively organize instructional programs and environments will be covered. Techniques for organizing instruction will include such skills as: designing educational goals, instructional objectives, task analysis, lesson planning, curriculum design, environmental arrangements, scheduling, developing IEPs and use of informal assessment/evaluation methods in the classroom. Other skills addressed include classroom management and working with mildly disabled learners within an inclusive setting. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 519: Literacy Instruction and Students with Learning Disabilities (3)

Offered in the Alternative TRANS-B program; not available at Main Campus. This course presents a variety of research-based methods and curricula currently used for teaching literacy skills for students with special needs. Emphasis will be placed on the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster literacy. Diagnostic, prescriptive and evaluative techniques appropriate to the child with disabilities will be addressed. Critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts materials/programs is included. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall, Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 522: Curriculum Adaptations/ Modifications In the Content Areas of Math, Science, Social Studies, and Technology (3)

IDEA (1997) affords students with learning disabilities special services within the least restrictive environment. These services include accommodations and modifications as documented by the child's IEP. This course will cover mandated modifications in the areas of environmental/management, materials, content, instructional and testing/evaluation modifications across content areas in order to maintain the child with special needs in the regular education classroom and curriculum. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 523: Survey of Learning Disabilities and Instructional Methods (3)

This course provides an historical overview of services, assessment, theories of intervention strategies, and classroom models for children with learning disorders. The etiology of learning disabilities and its prolific growth will be presented and what schools and teachers must do to accommodate these learners. This course will also examine national organizations, definitions, discrepancy of potential and achievement and other identification issues for these learners. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 535: Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3)

This course provides for advance skill development of competencies for successful assessment and instruction for problem readers. The course will cover specific informal and formal assessment methods used in reading. The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the development of a competent classroom teacher who can successfully assess and design instructional plans for problem readers. In this course, the participants will develop competence in assessing and evaluating readers. They will explore and critique various informal and formal assessments. They will also have the opportunity to implement assessments, and analyze and interpret results, determine an instructional focus based on the data gathered, and address materials and methods that can be used with atypical readers. Field Experience Required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 540: Survey of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (3)

This course provides a historical overview of services, assessment, theories of and intervention strategies for children with emotional/behavioral disorders. Etiological concerns will cover the roles of biology, sociological phenomena, family, and the school. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 553: Assessment, Evaluation, and Intervention Strategies for Young Children with Special Needs (3)

This course provides a look at issues, the legal basis, and the functions of assessment of infants, toddlers and preschoolers with special needs. Assessment is an important and ongoing responsibility of professionals who work with young children with special needs and is necessary, not only to meet federal and state mandates, but also to plan appropriate intervention strategies and to monitor the effectiveness of services provided. Special emphasis will be placed on incorporating current research into the course objectives, including a recognition of the high priority now placed on family-centered assessment and intervention, on assessment in the natural environment, and on the importance afforded to the role of interdisciplinary assessment strategies. After reviewing assessment issues and instruments in class, students will select one or more authentic and performance-based assessment tools; conduct an assessment of a young child in a natural environment, using both informal and formal assessment methods; review the child's records; interview with significant caregivers; and then, based on the findings, develop and implement an intervention strategy and record the results. All phases of the process will be monitored and supervised by college and professional personnel. Field Experience Required. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 559: Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)

The course will provide participants with a framework for understanding the definition and history of autism. The medical and educational knowledge of treatment efforts to promote the appropriate education and services for young children, adolescents and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) will be discussed. The course will also focus on the social and communication needs of children with ASD. This course is intended as a general overview of autism. Offered Spring and Summer. (GR)

SED 570: Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar at the Primary Level for Children with Disabilities (3)

Two professional laboratory experiences cover observation of special education classroom situation with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the college supervisor. Students seeking initial certification will complete this experience. Prerequisites: 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 512. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 580: Special Education Student Teaching and Seminar at the Intermediate Level for Children with Disabilities (3)

This course is designed to provide candidates with comprehensive classroom teaching experiences, which serve to culminate the professional sequence of teacher preparation and other related courses. Student teachers will be presented with the opportunity to observe, practice, discuss, evaluate, and modify teaching strategies and methods in intermediate childhood special education classroom settings (grades 4-6). Within the professional laboratory experience, candidates will be provided with gradually increasing lesson presentation and teaching responsibilities with the ultimate outcome of attending to all of the details that comprise a full day and week(s) of teaching. Offered Fall and Spring. (GR)

SED 600: Research Methods in Special Education (3)

The course will emphasize direct investigation, methods, procedures, and reviews of research in special education. It will examine the various types of research that can be and are conducted and the collection, analysis and reporting of findings based on sound methodological procedures. Prerequisites: SED 502, 503, 506. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 602: Special Education: Laws and Trends (3)

An in-depth review of legislation which impacts on the disabled, the families of children with disabilities, and the professional people who serve the disabled. Research implications and social trends in prevention, service, legislation, litigation and personnel preparation in special education. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 603: Standards Based Assessment and Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)

The course will emphasize the use of standards-based instruction and learning with assessment and measurement, as well as assessment instruments and decisions which lead to appropriate educational programming. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 606: Instructional Methods and Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)

The course will focus on understanding and facilitating the learning process to support students with mild to moderate disabilities who are within regular and special education settings to become independent and life-long learners. The components of effective curricular and instructional design, including outcomes, assessment, goal setting, learning activities and measurement of outcomes will be related to NYS Standards. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 610: Seminar in Special Education/Action Research (3)

This course will provide an opportunity for candidates to investigate and research the literature in a designated and/or variety of specializations(s) and integrate the results of this research with knowledge of best practices, current trends and controversial issues. Candidates will have opportunities to 1) evaluate published research utilizing their existing SED 600 knowledge base, 2) expand their analytical abilities by learning about additional quantitative, as well as qualitative, research designs (e.g. correlational, single-subject, ethnographic, etc.), and 3) synthesize findings in designated research areas in the form of at least one well-crafted literature review. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 612: Quality Inclusion/Collaboration Methods (3)

The study of the teaching process with special emphasis on competencies necessary for effective communication and interaction with parents, students, ancillary personnel, peers, paraprofessionals, and volunteers. The focus will be on mastery of how inclusion and the various service models allow for the team teaching of students with disabilities in the regular education setting. The course will examine collaboration, reciprocal teaching methods and strategies for academic and social inclusion of students. Offered Fall. (GR)

SED 615: Issues, Trends, and Research in Special Education (3)

This course is designed as a seminar for the discussion of current issues and trends in special education. The role of research in educational reform will be highly emphasized. Topics may include, but are not limited to, inclusive education, collaborating with parents and professionals, assessment, early intervention, transition, and categories of disability. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 635: Reading Diagnosis and Instruction (3)

This course provides for advanced skill development of competencies for successful assessment and instruction for problem readers. The course will cover specific informal and formal assessment methods used in reading. A 10 hour practicum is required. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 639: The Writing Process and Students with Disabilities (3)

This course will investigate all stages of the writing process from both a student and teacher perspective. The focus will be on how to apply this information with students with disabilities in the regular and special education classroom. Offered Summer. (GR)

SED 642: Curriculum Modifications in the Content Areas of Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Technology (3)

This course examines specific content and instructional strategies for teaching Math, Science, Technology and Social Studies to students with disabilities in the regular and special education classroom. Offered Spring. (GR)

SED 696: Comprehensive Examination (0)

Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project (SED 699). Exam questions will be based on courses and field experiences of the graduate programs. (GR)

SED 699: Research Project in Special Education (3)

This course is an alternative culminating project to the comprehensive exam, and is available, with the approval of the chair, to graduate candidates pursuing a Master's degree in special education. Candidates admitted to the graduate programs have the option to take a comprehensive exam (SED 696) at the end of their program of study or complete a thesis/research project. Under the direction of a faculty advisor, the candidate will demonstrate the capacity to complete independent research that he/she facilitates, organizes, and expresses in both oral and written form of an original thought or of questions that relate to his/her professional skills or interests in the field of special education. Prerequisites: Core courses and specialization courses. (GR)