All Courses

All Courses

Accounting

ACC 225: Financial Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Fundamentals of financial accounting, the accounting cycle with emphasis on analysis of financial statements for service, merchandising, and manufacturing operations. Problems supplement the theory, principles and management applications. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Pre-req: MGQ-121, MTH 124 or equivalent.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 225: Financial Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Fundamentals of financial accounting, the accounting cycle with emphasis on analysis of financial statements for service, merchandising, and manufacturing operations. Problems supplement the theory, principles and management applications. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Pre-req: MGQ-121, MTH 124 or equivalent.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 226: Managerial Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ACC 225 with emphasis on the application of the accounting model to corporations. In addition, there is an introduction to the use of accounting information in management decision-making settings. Problems supplement the theory, principles, and management application. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 225; MTH 124 or equivalent.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 226: Managerial Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ACC 225 with emphasis on the application of the accounting model to corporations. In addition, there is an introduction to the use of accounting information in management decision-making settings. Problems supplement the theory, principles, and management application. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 225; MTH 124 or equivalent.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 311: Intermediate Accounting I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of generally accepted accounting principles, emphasizing financial statement presentation and an in-depth study of accounting for current assets and liabilities. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 311: Intermediate Accounting I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of generally accepted accounting principles, emphasizing financial statement presentation and an in-depth study of accounting for current assets and liabilities. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 312: Intermediate Accounting II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ACC 311, focusing on liabilities, stockholder's equity and analytical procedures. Theoretical discussion of generally accepted accounting principles. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 311.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 312: Intermediate Accounting II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ACC 311, focusing on liabilities, stockholder's equity and analytical procedures. Theoretical discussion of generally accepted accounting principles. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 311.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 315: Cost Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Analysis of costs and their use in the managerial functions of an enterprise. Topics include principles of cost accounting for inventory valuation and income determination, standard costs and budgets. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: Acceptance to upper division in Accounting; ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 315: Cost Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Analysis of costs and their use in the managerial functions of an enterprise. Topics include principles of cost accounting for inventory valuation and income determination, standard costs and budgets. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: Acceptance to upper division in Accounting; ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 318: Income Tax Theory

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of professional accountants in the preparation of tax returns for individuals and provides primary content for the professional accounting component of the degree program. Coursework also addresses ethics, finance, economics, computer information systems, and the legal environment of business. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 318: Income Tax Theory

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of professional accountants in the preparation of tax returns for individuals and provides primary content for the professional accounting component of the degree program. Coursework also addresses ethics, finance, economics, computer information systems, and the legal environment of business. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 325: Introduction to Forensic Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fraud examination will begin with the study of various types of fraud as well as factors that contribute to fraudulent activity. Ethics are a key concept in this course, and will be analyzed within the context of various business activities, and students will study both preventive and detective strategies to mitigate risk of fraud. Fraud examination methods will comprise a significant portion of the course and will include investigating fraud, investigating concealment, inquiry methods, and fraud reporting. Students will also study the impact of fraud on financial statements, organizations, financial transactions, and legal proceedings. Prerequisites: ACC 311; Junior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

ACC 325: Introduction to Forensic Accounting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fraud examination will begin with the study of various types of fraud as well as factors that contribute to fraudulent activity. Ethics are a key concept in this course, and will be analyzed within the context of various business activities, and students will study both preventive and detective strategies to mitigate risk of fraud. Fraud examination methods will comprise a significant portion of the course and will include investigating fraud, investigating concealment, inquiry methods, and fraud reporting. Students will also study the impact of fraud on financial statements, organizations, financial transactions, and legal proceedings. Prerequisites: ACC 311; Junior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

ACC 332: Effective Communication and Research Methods for Accountants

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. This course is designed to improve the student's oral and written communication skills in the field of Accounting. Students will be introduced to major accounting research tools in such areas as compliance, tax planning, assurance services, and auditing. Fraud and other investigative techniques are also explored. The student will use the research process to write and orally present an Accounting paper. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 332: Effective Communication and Research Methods for Accountants

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. This course is designed to improve the student's oral and written communication skills in the field of Accounting. Students will be introduced to major accounting research tools in such areas as compliance, tax planning, assurance services, and auditing. Fraud and other investigative techniques are also explored. The student will use the research process to write and orally present an Accounting paper. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 415: Advanced Accounting Problems

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced approach to generally accepted accounting principles applied to business activities. Problem-solving techniques and discussions of opinions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board as they relate to topical matters. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisites: ACC 312.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 415: Advanced Accounting Problems

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced approach to generally accepted accounting principles applied to business activities. Problem-solving techniques and discussions of opinions of the Financial Accounting Standards Board as they relate to topical matters. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisites: ACC 312.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 420: Auditing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of professional accountants in the conduct of independent audits and provides primary content (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) and Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB)) for the professional accounting component of the degree program. Coursework also addresses ethics, finance, business statistics in auditing, economics, computer information systems, and the legal environment of business. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisite: ACC 312.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 420: Auditing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of professional accountants in the conduct of independent audits and provides primary content (Generally Accepted Auditing Standards (GAAS) and Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB)) for the professional accounting component of the degree program. Coursework also addresses ethics, finance, business statistics in auditing, economics, computer information systems, and the legal environment of business. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisite: ACC 312.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 430: Forensic Investigations

3 Credit Hour(s)

Application of theory is an important aspect of forensic accounting. In this course, a number of case studies will be analyzed that require the application of skills learned in ACC 325 Introduction to Forensic Accounting and MIS 428 Forensic Accounting Data Analysis Techniques. The topics of these case studies will include what is commonly referred to as the fraud tree: asset misappropriation, corruption schemes, financial statement fraud schemes and other fraud schemes. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 325.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 430: Forensic Investigations

3 Credit Hour(s)

Application of theory is an important aspect of forensic accounting. In this course, a number of case studies will be analyzed that require the application of skills learned in ACC 325 Introduction to Forensic Accounting and MIS 428 Forensic Accounting Data Analysis Techniques. The topics of these case studies will include what is commonly referred to as the fraud tree: asset misappropriation, corruption schemes, financial statement fraud schemes and other fraud schemes. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade . Prerequisite: ACC 325.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 490: Accounting Theory and Professional Ethics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Fulfills Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This is the capstone course for the Accounting curriculum. This course integrates the practical applications and theoretical concepts covered in previous accounting courses with ethical issues facing the profession. Class discussions, textbook reading, outside reading, projects, case studies, and other educational experiences will be used to explore this complex area of study. This class provides a fundamental study and critical evaluation of 'business ethics' in light of recent developments in the accounting profession. A research paper is a major requirement of this course. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisites: ACC 312.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ACC 490: Accounting Theory and Professional Ethics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Fulfills Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This is the capstone course for the Accounting curriculum. This course integrates the practical applications and theoretical concepts covered in previous accounting courses with ethical issues facing the profession. Class discussions, textbook reading, outside reading, projects, case studies, and other educational experiences will be used to explore this complex area of study. This class provides a fundamental study and critical evaluation of 'business ethics' in light of recent developments in the accounting profession. A research paper is a major requirement of this course. Accounting majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisites: ACC 312.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

Animation

ANIM 201: History of Animation

3 Credit Hour(s)

History of Animation will introduce students to the context, culture and technology necessary for an understanding of the world of animation. In addition to a history of animation and its practitioners and development, the course also explores what happens to history when it is animated and how animation has been used during the twentieth century to interpret the past. The course also pays attention to the aesthetic of the animated image as well as the unique ability of the image to communicate. Finally, the offering will explore the tools, technology used in animation, and the various techniques: claymation, cel animation, CGI, and so forth. Participants will view animations from various studios, feature- length animated films, and experimental shorts.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 203: Editing and Sound Basics

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course will instruct students on how to create sound designs and audio recordings for later application to advanced Animation projects. Examples of tasks assigned and demonstrated include: audio recording, sound edition, sound transformation, and sound design. Students will create a variety of sound work using digital audio equipment to support their career track in animation.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 210: Introduction to Animation

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of traditional animation and computer animation through a series of exercises increasing in difficulty throughout the term. The course combines lectures with studio exercises to introduce students to the foundations of animation principles as well as more advanced concepts of body mechanics. The course will begin with simple exercises utilizing single objects such as bouncing balls and progress to slightly more complex animation.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 211: Animation Basics I

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to build upon the basic concepts discussed in ANIM 210. The student will gain a more in-depth understanding of the fundamentals of traditional animation and computer animation through a series of exercises increasing in difficulty throughout the term. The course combines lectures with studio exercises to further emphasize foundations of animation principles as well as a deeper understanding of body mechanics. The course will begin with simple exercises utilizing simplified characters and progress to full body character animation. Prerequisite: ANIM 210; restricted to Animation majors.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 212: Animation Basics II

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course builds on the preceding Animation Basics 1 course. A sound-sync exercise is animated to match an existing pre-recorded soundtrack. A preliminary animal walk is handled as well as bipedal 3/4 walk cycle (with a choice between two provided characters). More emphasis is stressed on conveying personality through action. More clean-up and inbetweening exercises will be incorporated in this course. Prerequisite: ANIM 211.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 215: Cartooning

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an introduction to the design of the basic cartoon character stressing a solid dimensional approach. Students will begin with basic stick figure exercises that will help to make the connection between life drawing and cartoon design. Visual arts literacy (or equivalent experience) is necessary in order to take this course, as many fundamental skills such as life drawing, perspective, object drawing and composition are vital to this course of study. Prerequisites: ART 106.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 217: Layout I and Storyboarding

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an introduction to the layout process as it relates to various types of animated filmmaking. The course utilizes the elements of perspective and composition, freehand drawing skills and the use of solid construction drawing to create actual background layouts and character poses for an animated film. By learning to analyze and deconstruct existing storyboard panels, students will become familiar with the layout process. Prerequisites: ART 106.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 218: Layout II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ANIM 217, this is an in-depth study of the layout process, its creative and technical focus, and how it reflects the realities of a true studio environment. Rendering for different styles, looks, moods; multi-level scenes and feature layouts; analyzing layout tests from major studios. Prerequisite: ANIM 217.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 250: Character Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Character Design, students will learn to create believable, complex, and multi-faceted 2D animated characters. Students will focus on facial expressions, animation design styles, personality, psychology and the context of the environment in creating a fully developed character. Prerequisite: ART-103, ART-104, ART-105, AND ART-106.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 274: Gesture Drawing: Drawing in Action

3 Credit Hour(s)

Drawing from life is the foundation for understanding motion. Shifts in pose, reflected in proportion, balance and articulation, create a believable sense of organic motion. Gestural Drawing will direct the student to observe motion in the physical world, and examine how motion can be individualized and determined by circumstance. Prerequiste: ART 204.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 311: Animation Basics III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will continue to build on their knowledge of classical animation principles with more complicated exercises featuring physical action. The class exercises lend themselves to exaggeration and comic invention. Timing and pre-production planning continue to be an absolute must in order to achieve the desired effects onscreen. Clean-up and inbetweening exercises will again be provided. Prerequisite: ANIM 212.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 317: Maya Animation I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Maya Animation I is designed to provide the student with initial experience in animating characters in 3D using Maya. Students have already learned the basics of Classical 2D animation in years one and two, and this course is intended to bridge the gap between Classical and 3D animation. The students will start animating simple shapes immediately on provided 3D rigs, starting with the bouncing ball and moving on to more complex bipedal characters, with the emphasis on acting rather than action and technology. The lessons are designed to introduce the students to the basic animator's toolbox in Maya, such as the Graph editor, function curves and the Outliner, focusing on the end usage (or "playing") rather than the technical inner workings of the program. Prerequisite: ANIM 211.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 318: Maya Animation II

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Maya Animation II, students will further their understanding of Maya by creating a short animation using modeling, rigging, animation, texturing, lighting, and rendering. Prerequisite: ANIM 317.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 320: Two-Dimensional Effects in Animation

3 Credit Hour(s)

Two-Dimensional Effects in Animation centers on the mastery of observable physical phenomenon in Animation, including fire, water, smoke, dust, running water, and bubbles popping. Students will recreate these effects in traditional pencil-drawing animation, as well as in Adobe After Effects. Prerequisite: ANIM 211.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 327: Background Painting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Background Painting will introduce the student to the practice of creating background environments for figurative images, including architecture, landscape, and surrounding objects. The student will explore color, value, perspective, theatrical composition, lighting and stylization. In addition, the student will explore how the background enhances the subject, whether it is an animated project, illustration, or comic art.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 333: Maya Modeling & Texturing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Maya Modeling and Texturing builds off the skill sets introduced in Maya Animation I and II to provide the student with a more complex understanding of computer geometry in order to examine the basic elements of computer models. Modeling, animation, lighting, texture mapping and rendering are explored within a production setting. Prerequisite: ANIM 318.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 341: Digital Compositing

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Digital Compositing, the animation student will learn how to combine two or more sources (from film, video, still sources, etc.), to make a new image. Students will gain the ability to manipulate frame composition, timing, and color by editing in Adobe After Effects, and in other post-production software tools. Prerequisite: ANIM 311.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 411: Animation Basics IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

This final course in Animation Basics builds on all the skills developed in previous courses and involves a 2-character performance piece with acting and lip sync. The final Inbetweening exercises will be dealt with in this course. Prerequisite: ANIM 311.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ANIM 421: Advanced Lighting

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Advanced Lighting, students will apply previous training in lighting to create realistic environments and objects. Prerequisite: ANIM 411.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 429: Dynamics & Particles

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Dynamics and Particles, students will explore Particle Systems and Paint Effects to create advanced images. Class projects will complete dynamic animations with the use of particle systems to integrate realistic motion with visual effects. This course will complete the sequence of 3D skill sets standard in the industry. Prerequisite: ANIM 318.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 432: Maya Character Modeling & Rigging

3 Credit Hour(s)

In Maya Character Modeling and Rigging, animation students will continue to explore Maya and learn how to customize Maya to speed up workflow. Advanced topics will be introduced, including squash and stretch, utility nodes, and scripting. Prerequisite: ANIM 333.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ANIM 450: Advanced Character Animation

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced Character Animation is a culmination of previous character modeling and animation courses. Students combine previously learned skill sets to produce character animations that demonstrate motivation and personality. Prerequisite: ANIM 318.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Anthropology

ANT 210: Contemporary Native America

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course introduces students to the current conditions of American Indians/First Nations/ indigenous peoples of North America. A foundation will be laid in ethnography, which will cover the anthropological culture area concept and culture areas. Emphasis will be placed on the Southwest, Prairie/Plains, Northwest Coast, Arctic, and Northeast (including the Great Lakes) areas. Aspects of culture change, assimilation, and acculturation will be discussed as models for viewing historical culture contact. With this, the effects of important legislative influences will be introduced. The post-World War II environment of termination and urbanization will introduce a discussion of sustainability of traditional cultures, which characterize the struggles of native communities as evidenced in movements such as A.I.M. and others.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Art

ART 101: Introduction to the Visual Arts

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. An exploration of the principles of design and the creative process in the plastic arts through a series of studio projects in a variety of media; periods of lecture and discussion devoted to aesthetics and the history of art. Non-majors only.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ART 103: Foundation Design I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An exploration of pictorial composition in two-dimensional representation with emphasis on the basic elements of design. Limited to BFA, BS Art and BS Art Ed majors only.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 104: Foundation Design II

3 Credit Hour(s)

The second of two courses in design fundamentals, ART104 studies space, light and color with emphasis on three-dimensional expression. Prerequisite: ART 103. Limited to BFA, BS Art and BS Art Ed majors only.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 105: Foundation Drawing I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Development of visual perception and organization through drawing from nature and life in a variety of drawing media. Limited to BFA, BS Art and BS Art Ed majors only.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 106: Foundation Drawing II

3 Credit Hour(s)

The second of two courses in drawing fundamentals, ART106 explores a variety of thematic drawing experiences emphasizing work in ink, color pencil and mixed media. Prerequisite: ART 105. Limited to BFA, BS Art and BS Art Ed majors only.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 107: Visual Experience

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. An investigation of the visual aspects of the world through artistic themes, techniques, and landmarks. Methods of analyzing form will aid students in experiencing aesthetic responses to historical artistic examples and the contemporary, immediate environment. Non-majors only.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ART 114: Creative Community Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as IND-114. This course is designed to engage students in meaningful learning about how the arts are an essential part of our everyday lives and communities. The instructor will engage students in activities that illustrate ways art can be used as a vehicle for community development that seeks to improve community members' well being. The instructor will introduce students to local, national, and international artists, programs, and organizations that are using the arts to positively promote community development and support community members. Students will learn how arts communities (1) are conceived, (2) identify community concerns, (2) plan and use the arts as a way to address those concerns, (3) are funded, and (4) assess their work. The course will connect the arts, healthcare, education, community/cultural development, and civic responsibility/engagement.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ART 155: Photography for Non-Majors

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduction to the essential principles of photography and its use as a creative tool. Non-majors only.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 204: Figure Drawing I

3 Credit Hour(s)

ART204 concentrates on drawing from the human figure to include experimentation in a variety of media. Prerequisite: ART 104 and ART 105.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 205: Figure Drawing II

3 Credit Hour(s)

The second of two courses in figure drawing, ART205 concentrates on drawing from the model with an emphasis on human anatomy. Prerequisite: ART 204.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 218: Creative Drawing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. The course will be simultaneously an introduction to basic drawing techniques and an exploration of how to work with imagery to express ideas. Students will develop drawing skills with a range of media and will learn how to use these skills to create meaningful, personal drawings that communicate with viewers. For non-majors.
Session: Each Year (UG)

ART 219: Graphic Design I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to traditional and contemporary production methods and practices used by Graphic Design professionals. Emphasis is placed on terminology and technical production practices. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 225: Watercolor Painting I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introductory course in painting using watercolor and casein painting techniques. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 226: Watercolor Painting II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced study of watercolor painting processes, materials and techniques, with emphasis on contemporary Western watercolor and Oriental watercolor painting. Prerequisite: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 229: Ceramics for Non-Majors

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Introduction to ceramics, the aesthetic possibilities of clay, basic construction techniques and a basic experience of glazing for those students not majoring in Art, Graphic Design, or Art Education. Non-majors only.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 230: Computer Rendering

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students are introduced to vector- and raster-based computer software as they explore drawing and painting/image processing applications. Emphasis is placed on the Macintosh computer as a tool for artists and graphic designers. Students examine the effects of digitally producing/altering graphic, photography-based, and typographic images. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 240: Woodcuts and Monoprints

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduction to these two basic forms of printmaking with attention to both aesthetics and processes. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Summer (UG)

ART 251: Ceramics I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduction to ceramics, the aesthetic possibilities of clay, basic construction techniques and a basic experience of glazing.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ART 267: Sculpture I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduction to sculpture process concentrating on working in the round and relief. Experiences in a wide variety of common materials and techniques. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 287: The History of Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of the history of design, especially the history of visual communication design, from the ancient world to the present. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 301: Motion Graphics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will learn about visual design as it relates to the moving image, specifically in the area of motion graphics. The course will include lectures, demonstrations of techniques and applications of motion graphics software, and studio production time to provide an overview of contemporary concerns in visual design using time-based media. Appropriate industry standard computer applications will be introduced and applied. The history of motion graphics will also be covered. Prerequisite: ART 219.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 306: Figure Drawing III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced work from the figure. Special focus based on student's major field of study. Required for Drawing/Illustration majors. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 319: Graphic Design II

3 Credit Hour(s)

The history of typography, the anatomy of the letterform, typeface classifications, typographic terminology and the effective usage of type to convey visual/verbal messages are explored in this course. Prerequisite: ART 219.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 320: Graphic Design III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Continued exploration of the role of typography in graphic visual communication as combined with graphic and pictorial elements in the production of screen-based interactive visual communication projects. Prerequisite: ART 319.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 325: Introductory Oil Painting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introductory course in painting using oil as the vehicle of expression. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 326: Introductory Acrylic Painting

3 Credit Hour(s)

A painting course emphasizing the use of the acrylic medium. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 331: Art Reading List

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of selected writings on art from Modernist periods. Prerequisite: ART 275 or ART 285.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 334: Digital Photography

3 Credit Hour(s)

This studio course is designed for students with either limited or no experience in photography. It will include a study grounded in the historical, conceptual and practical developments of the art of photography as embodied in the use of digital image making technologies. Students are given a set of basic experiences in the conceptual and practical use of this relatively new art form.
Session: Each Year (UG)

ART 344: Art in Space and Environment

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. A collaborative experience with THA 326, Performance in Space, that leads students to address issues relating to art and theater in a site-specific context.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 345: Advanced Drawing I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Emphasis on the development of an idea through a sequence of drawings. Prerequisites: ART 204, 205.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 346: Advanced Drawing II

3 Credit Hour(s)

As a follow-up to ART345, Advanced Drawing II provides the drawing major with a bridge between the high level of instructor participation characteristic of preceding drawing/illustration courses and the expected independence of the senior project semesters. Prerequisite: ART 345.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 348: Seminar and Practice in Graphic Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will focus on an inquiry of the traditional and expanded roles that graphic designers have filled. It will encompass investigation and research into current topics of sustainable practices, opportunities, and theories as applied to the professional practice of graphic design. Issues to be addressed include ethics, current events, and the role of the designer as problem seeker. Prerequisite: ART 319.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ART 351: Ceramics II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Ceramics II explores technical and creative experiences in throwing on the wheel and a creative exploration of glazing. Prerequisite: ART 251.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 355: History of Non-Western Art

3 Credit Hour(s)

An overview of artistic traditions outside the influence of Europe with particular emphasis on the arts of East Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa. Open to Non-majors.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 356: Women in Art

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Illustrated discussion of women in the arts, centering on the obstacles and reception of women in the artistic establishment, and the depiction of women by both male and female artists. Open to non-majors.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 367: Sculpture II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Theory and practice of sculptural composition utilizing modeling and carving with introductory welding and casting. Prerequisite: ART 267.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 368: Sculpture III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Continued exploration of sculptural techniques with emphasis on understanding the character and value of the material to the final work. Prerequisite: ART 367.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 381: Illustration I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Illustration I is an exploration of mostly black and white media, investigation of drawing aid apparatus, drawing techniques. An introduction to extensive conceptual problems will be given. Prerequisite: ART 204.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 382: Illustration II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A combined drawing and painting experience with specific directions toward narrative images. Media and technique to be compatible with photo/print production. Prerequisite: ART 381.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 383: Illustration III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced exploration of illustration in various media. Prerequisite: ART 382.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 420: Graphic Design IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

The role of the graphic visual communication designer in the field of advertising is addressed as students produce an advertising campaign. The history of advertising is explored in its relationship to the development of today's most popular forms of advertising including print, broadcast/video, out-of-home and screen-based and interactive media. Prerequisite: ART 319.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 425: Painting III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced painting problems in various media. Prerequisites: ART 325, 326.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 426: Painting IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced study in painting. Prerequisite: ART 425.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 427: Fibers II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Work in fibers emphasizing on-loom textile construction techniques. Prerequisite: ART 327.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 435: Advanced Typography

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced design projects which explore the expressive potential of type in a variety of conceptual applications. Additionally, projects focus on the design process as the central component in the development of solutions to visual communication problems. Prerequisite: ART 319.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 436: Overview of Aesthetics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Aesthetics studies the nature of reception and appreciation of the visual realm. Often described as "the philosophy of beauty," aesthetics encompasses the role of visual experience, beauty/ugliness, and visual and poetic expression. This course investigates the history of aesthetics, with a focus on the development of modern aesthetics. Prerequisite: ART 331.
Session: Each Year (UG)

ART 439: Serigraphy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Serigraphy, or screen-printing, is an exploration of printmaking processes using the photo-mechanically produced image. Prerequisites: ART 104 and ART 106.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ART 441: Advanced Printmaking

3 Credit Hour(s)

Opportunity for advanced students to continue exploration of and involvement with chosen printmaking processes and procedures. Prerequisites: ART 240, 340, 439.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 443: Issues and Methodologies in Contemporary Art

2 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with ART 498, Senior Exhibition, ART 443 satisfies the department's Research and Presentation requirement. Diverse exercises in criticism and analysis to broaden the art student's aesthetic awareness, judgment and sensitivity. Prerequisite: ART 331.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ART 445: Special Projects

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced study in a studio area with special authorization of a faculty member and approval of the department chairperson. May be repeated; two uses total, senior year only.
Session: Fall (UG)

ART 446: History of Contemporary Art:1940- Present

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of contemporary art history based on the visual and historical movements from the second half of the twentieth century to present day. Prerequisite: ART 285.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 455: Photography

3 Credit Hour(s)

An exploration of various film photography practices including photograms, pinhole and 120 film cameras, as well as developing and printing methods. This course is about film photography as an art form of conceptual expression and articulation. Recommended for Art Education majors. No previous darkroom experience is needed.
Session: Spring (UG)

ART 456: Advanced Photography

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced work in the creative use of film and papers. Prerequisites: ART 455 or approval of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 464: Sculpture IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced study in sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 368.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ART 490: Senior Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced study in a major discipline in preparation for and including an exhibition of completed works; supervision by a major instructor and a faculty review board. Normally elected in the final semester, and only after the completion of the entire numbered sequence of courses in the major discipline. Required of all BFA candidates. A BFA degree may not be earned without a grade of "C" or higher in this course. Prerequisite: ART 443.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ART 498: Senior Art Exhibit

1 Credit Hour(s)

With ART 443, fulfills Research and Presentation requirement. Required of all BFA Art, BFA Graphic Design, BS Art, and BS Visual Arts Education majors. Prerequisite: ART 443.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

Arts Administration

ARTA 450: Practicum Seminar in Arts Administration and Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will intern at a practicing arts organization, where they will gain experience in day-to-day operation and support procedures. Students will meet weekly with the faculty advisor to chart time, troubleshoot about organizational issues and discuss assignments. The faculty advisor will correspond closely with the cooperating organization to monitor student progress. Prerequisite: BA 211.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Athletic Training

ATH 101: Introduction to Athletic Training

1 Credit Hour(s)

This is the first in a sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the profession of athletic training. Topics will include the history of the athletic training profession, the sports medicine team, scope of practice, professional organizations, and roles of other health care professionals.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ATH 201: Seminar in Athletic Training

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course is the second in a sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the professional phase of the athletic training curriculum. Topics will include athletic training room policies and procedures, risks associated with physical activity, an introduction to medical terminology, principles of therapeutic communication, and sociocultural issues. Prerequisite: ATH 101.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ATH 300: Applied Physics for the Assessment of Human Movement and Therapeutic Agents

3 Credit Hour(s)

This lecture/lab course provides an overview of vector mechanics, linear and rotational kinematics and dynamics, work, energy, power, fluids, heat, sound, electricity, and magnetism. An introduction to these physical properties as they apply to the examination of human movement and intervention strategies to promote restoration of function through therapeutic agents or modalities will be explored. Prerequisite: BIO 330/L and BIO 340/L. Corequisite: ATH 300L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ATH 300L: Applied Physics for the Assessment of Human Movement and Therapeutic Agents Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for ATH 300.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Business Administration

BA 101: Introduction to Business Administration

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed as an introduction to business for first year business students, transfer students or other students considering a business major. Students will be introduced to the field of business which will include an overview of the functional specialization areas, industries within which business professionals are employed and the related career opportunities, industries and organization cultures by completing a number of relevant personality and interest assessments. Additionally, students will be introduced to faculty, coursework, learning modalities, and professional expectations and standards with the Business Administration department.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 201: Introduction to International Business

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course introduces students to key factors relevant to international management on both organizational and socioeconomic levels. Macroeconomic influences such as international politics, economics, culture, and foreign competition are described and analyzed to highlight their importance for globally operating organizations.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 211: Effective Business Communications

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. The ability to communicate effectively is ranked as one of the most important skills needed by employers. It has also been shown to have a high direct correlation with income. This course is a study of the analysis and practical application of effective communication in the business environment. The course will develop and reinforce written, oral and interpersonal communications skills necessary in a diverse and technological culture. Prerequisites: C or better in CMP 101.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 220: Diversity and Cross-Cultural Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course focuses on how cultural backgrounds affect a person's behavior during cross cultural communications. The student learns to identify how culture plays a role in the dynamics of a workplace, either domestic or foreign, as well as in other situations. Through readings, videos and class application activities the student learn how to effectively interact people of diverse cultural backgrounds. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in CMP 101.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 221: The Environment and the Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Through analyzing case studies about man-made disasters such as air, water pollution, deforestation and war, students will come to understand the synergistic affects of human's interaction with environments. The students will then look at various avenues for reaching a level of sustainability within this environment including a synopsized view of environmental laws such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, OSHA and RCRA. The course incorporates field trips and experiential learning.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

BA 304: Contract Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PAR 304. This course provides an introduction to the law of contracts, including analysis of the basic elements of contract formation, defenses to contract performance, breach of contract and remedies, drafting and interpretation of contracts. Students will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills through practical projects typically required in law offices. Writing projects will require legal research. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific legal scenarios. Prerequisites: PAR 201 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 305: Real Property Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PAR 305. This course is an introduction to real estate law and practice. Students will be required to not only learn the basic law but to problem-solve and draft documents that are typical to legal practice in this area, and will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills. The course covers New York Real Estate statutes and the areas of law include property rights, types of land ownership/estates, easements, agreements for sale and closings, financing, conveyancing. Students will do a real estate closing as their final project. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BA 350: Business Law I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the American legal system. Exploration of the law of personal and real property, contracts and the law of sales under the Uniform Commercial Code. Prerequisites: Junior status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 351: Business Law II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Emphasis will be placed on negotiable instruments, business organizations, agency and employment, and secured interests. Prerequisite: BA 350.
Session: Spring (UG)

BA 401: Business Professional and Personal Horizons

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed as the complement to BA101 for Business Administration seniors to assist in their transition to the world beyond the undergraduate college setting. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their past personal, academic and professional growth while a student. The focus will then shift to planning for life beyond the undergraduate academic environment. Many decisions must be made relative to long term career planning, job search and graduate study. Resume writing, identifying references, the graduate school application process, GREs GMATs and LSATs, professional certifications and future financial planning are topics to be covered to assist with this process. Work-life balance issues will also be presented to help students thoughtfully consider the choices and trade-offs working professionals must make. Prerequisites BA-101, limited to Business majors and must have Senior status.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 403: Business and Corporate Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PAR 403. This course is an introduction to the law of corporations and requires students to problem-solve and analyze the different types of corporate forms found in legal practice. Students will learn New York corporate law including statutes covering the formation, operation, and dissolution of various kinds of business organizations. The areas of law include sole proprietorships, corporations, partnerships, the law of agency and employment agreements. Students will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: Even Years (UG)

BA 405: Legal Issues in Sport Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.This course provides an understanding of the law as it applies to professional and amateur sport organizations, including analysis of contract law, administrative law, antitrust law, labor law, and tort liability. Prerequisites: BA 350 for business students, Junior status for all other students.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 406: Bankruptcy Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PAR 406. This course is an introduction to the law of bankruptcy and requires students to apply the bankruptcy statutes to a variety of factual situations. Students will learn the federal bankruptcy statutes, and topics include voluntary and involuntary liquidations, discharge of debts, exemptions, creditor claims, trustee functions, reorganizations, and Chapters 7, 11, 12 and 13 plans. Students will develop their legal analysis and writing skills. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: Even Years (UG)

BA 443: Proseminar

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Fulfills Research and Presentation requirement; Writing Intensive. This course includes an Introduction to both scholarly and original research through two individual projects: one with a thesis in the area of Business Administration which includes a significant ethical component. (This topic is selected by the student subject to approval by the instructor.); the second is a study of corporate strategic and financial analysis, ethics and social responsibility through an integrated project. Current literature on various business ethics topics is also examined. The course will develop written and oral research presentation skills. Business majors must earn a minimum of a "C" grade. If they do not earn the required final grade, they will be allowed to repeat the course only once to earn the minimum grade. Prerequisite: Senior status, having completed 15 credits 300/400 level Business courses.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

BA 457: Independent Study Or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)


Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Biochemistry

BCH 313: General Biochemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the chemistry and metabolism of bio-molecules. Topics include structure, properties, biosynthesis, and catabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids and porphyrins. Also discussed are the roles of enzymes, vitamins and coenzymes in biocatalysis. Science credit may not be earned for both BCH 313 and BCH 317. Prerequisites: BIO 110; CHE 301. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BCH 313L: Biochemistry Laboratory

1 Credit Hour(s)

Fundamental techniques in general biochemistry. Corequisite: BCH 313. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BCH 317: Bioorganic Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to basic organic chemistry with biochemistry. Intended for Physician Assistant and Physical Therapy majors. Prerequisites: CHE 111/L; BIO 110/L. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BCH 317L: Bioorganic Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Lab techniques in organic chemistry and biochemistry. Corequisite: BCH 317. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BCH 401: Biological Organic Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An exploration of the chemical structures, stereo- chemistry and reactions of organic molecules of biological importance such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Prerequisites: CHE 302 and BCH 313. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BCH 440: Molecular Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BIO 440. A detailed presentation of the structure and function of biological molecules and macromolecular complexes. The experimental approaches used in modern laboratories are emphasized. Prerequisites: BCH 313 and 313L. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BCH 440L: Molecular Biology Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BIO 440L. Laboratory techniques and experimentation involving proteins and nucleic acids. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BCH 440. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

Biology

BIO 100: Introduction to Biological Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An introduction to the concepts of biology through the study of the structure, function and evolution of living organisms. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 103: Human Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A survey of the major aspects of human biology. Emphasis is placed on structure and function of the human body. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 105: Survey of Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to help students develop the critical reading and reasoning skills that are required to be a successful science student. Topics covered in the course include improving study strategies, comprehension & reasoning, critical data interpretation, and examination techniques.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 109: General Biology I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A study of the basic principles of biology. Part I focuses on the molecular and cellular aspects of living systems and evolution. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry, minimum mathematics competency of MTH 124 or equivalent course or math placement. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 109L: General Biology I Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Lab techniques and experimentation in biological processes with emphasis on cellular level processes. Co or prerequisite: BIO 109. Laboratory, 2 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 110: General Biology II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A study of the basic principles of biology. Part II deals with systematic organization and function of living organisms and ecology. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in BIO 109. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 110L: General Biology II Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory examination of the structure, function and classification of organisms. Co or prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIO 109L. Laboratory, 2 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 117: Human Nutrition

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to human nutrition and dietary needs with relevant discussion of basic structure and function of the human body. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 118: Anatomy of Movement

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Discusses the principles and physical movements of Yoga and Tai Chi. Students will learn to analyze movements and understand the role of muscles, tendon and joints in a posture. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 200: Science and Contemporary Social Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Contextual Integration; Information Literacy. Provides the basic scientific background requisite to understanding the science behind important contemporary issues such as genetic engineering, stem cell research, cloning, reproductive technologies, the genetic basis of behavior (e.g., violence), and pressing environmental concerns. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 207: Anatomy and Physiology I

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 207L: Anatomy and Physiology I Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques and study in Anatomy and Physiology I. Co-requisite: BIO 207.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 208: Anatomy and Physiology II

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Prerequisite: BIO 207.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 208L: Anatomy and Physiology Lab II

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques and study in Anatomy and Physiology II. Co-requisite: BIO 208.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 219: Introduction to Microbiology

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an overview of the fundamental principles of microbiology, including morphology, activities and distribution of microbes, culture methods, diseases of microbial etiology and some aspects of applied microbiology for the health sciences. Laboratory emphasis is on bacterial culturing, aseptic technique, identification of organisms, and the exploration of conditions necessary for microbial growth as well as microbial control. Pre-requisite: High school biology; limited to students at Manhattan site. Corequisite: BIO 219L.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 219L: Introduction to Microbiology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory emphasis is on bacterial culturing, aseptic technique, identification of organisms, and the exploration of conditions necessary for microbial growth as well as microbial control. Corequisite: BIO 219.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 302: General Ecology

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the study of populations, communities and ecosystems with emphasis on theory and experimentation. Prerequisites: BIO-109 and BIO 110; MTH 134 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 302L: General Ecology Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Lab includes field and laboratory experimentation in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, with emphasis on experimental design, data analysis and scientific writing. Laboratory, 3 hours. Corequisite: BIO 302.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 303: Plant Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

An overview of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of the plant kingdom. Lab includes field identification, plant structure, and physiological experimentation. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 303L: Plant Biology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory, 3 hours, in Plant Biology. Co-requisite: BIO 303.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 304: Conservation Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as SUST 304. An interdisciplinary science course that combines theory and applied research to address the problems of widespread loss of biological and genetic diversity. Prerequisite: BIO 110, and CMP 101. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 308: Genetics

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the fundamental principles of genetics from viruses through humans, focusing on transmission and molecular genetics. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110; CHE 101 or CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring).
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 308L: Genetics Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques and experimentation in genetics. Co or prerequisite: BIO 308. Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years (Spring).
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 315: General Microbiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the structure, classification, physiology, ecology, genetics and economic importance of viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotic microorganisms. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110 and CHE 111.
Session: Fall and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 315L: General Microbiology Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the structure, classification, physiology, genetics and economic importance of viruses, prokaryotes and eukaryotic microorganisms. Pre or corequisite: BIO 315.
Session: Fall and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 316: Anatomy and Physiology

4 Credit Hour(s)

A survey of the fundamentals of anatomy and physiology and dissection and experimentation to enhance the understanding of human systems. Intended for healthcare studies students and other non-majors. Prerequisite: BIO 103 or 109. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 316L: Anatomy and Physiology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Anatomy & Physiology. Co-requisite: BIO 316.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 319: Costa Rica Natural History/Conservation

3 Credit Hour(s)

This field-based study-abroad course will provide students with both an international and interdisciplinary environmental experience in Costa Rica. Students will be exposed to the biodiversity of multiple ecosystems and the issues related to conservation and ecotourism in Costa Rica. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 322: Invertebrate Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

A comprehensive study of the anatomy, physiology and classification of invertebrates. Lab includes field identification. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 322L: Invertebrate Biology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Invertebrate Biology. Corequisite: BIO 322.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 323: Animal Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

An overview of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of the animal kingdom. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 324: Vertebrate Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

A comprehensive study of the anatomy, physiology and taxonomy of vertebrates. Lab includes field identification. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 324L: Vertebrate Biology

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Vertebrate Biology. Corequisite: BIO 324.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 325: Cell Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of structure/function relationships in cells. Topics include cell theory, research techniques, nuclear and cell division, cytoplasmic organelles and biological membranes. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Offered Alternate Years (Fall).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 325L: Cell Biology Lab Laboratory

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to complement and expand on topics of cellular biology covered in the accompanying lecture, Bio 325: Cell Biology. The course deepens student understanding of lecture topics by providing supplemental instruction and practical, hands-on manipulation of cellular material. The course is designed to introduce students to many commonly used biological laboratory techniques and provide a foundation for the use of these methods in subsequent upper-division courses. Pre/corequisite: BIO-325.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 330: General Anatomy

4 Credit Hour(s)

A course in systemic anatomy covering the morphology of the human body along with the functional potential of its parts. (Not open to those who have taken BIO 207 BIO 208.) Prerequisite: BIO 100, BIO 103, or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Each Year (Fall).
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 330L: General Anatomy Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Anatomy. Corequisite: BIO 330.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 333: Developmental Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the reproductive mechanisms and development of multi-cellular organisms. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours. Offered Alternate Years.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 333L: Developmental Biology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Developmental Biology. Corequisite: BIO 333.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 335: Animal Behavior

4 Credit Hour(s)

An evolutionary and ecological approach to ethology including study of neuronal, hormonal and physiological mechanisms underlying adaptive behavior of animals. Laboratory includes observations and quantification of behavior in zoo, field and lab settings. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 335L: Animal Behavior Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Animal Behavior. Corequisite: BIO 335.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 337: Dinosaur Paleobiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the Dinosauria; a clade of archosaurs that is now totally (or, depending on who you talk to, partially) extinct. Although this course will primarily be looking at this taxon, we will also be exploring greater topics based within historical science in general that must be understood in order to have a firm grasp of the more specific material. In addition, the dinosaurs are a charismatic group, and we will talk about their application outside of science. Prerequisite: BIO 110.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 340: General Physiology

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to general physiology. Emphasis placed on cellular physiology, biological control mechanisms and coordinated body functions. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and CHE 101 or CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 340L: General Physiology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Physiology. Corequisite: BIO 340.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 343: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology

4 Credit Hour(s)

Lecture only fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Why do certain animals only live in certain environments? Students will be able to answer this question by evaluating the roles of each major organ system within vertebrates and, through student-chosen examples, explaining how each system has evolved to address specific environmental challenges. By doing this, students will develop a more holistic understanding for how these organ systems work in combination with each other. This class requires students to deliver 5 in-class presentations throughout the term. Prerequisites: BIO 109/L and BIO 110/L.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 343L: Comparative Vertebrate Physiology Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques and study in vertebrate physiology; 3 experimental topics and a field trip (and completion of a project) to the zoo are included in this lab. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 344: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to establish a fundamental understanding of the functional significance of anatomical structures across vertebrates. The evolution of the entire group will be discussed, as the relationship between organisms is reflected within their anatomy. A "systems-approach" will be taken, and each organ system will be considered for the diversity of vertebrates. The structuring of anatomical features will be discussed in reference to its biomechanical and functional significance, as well as how it caters to the lifestyle of said organism. Although memorization is an essential part of any anatomy class, we will focus less on recall and identification and more on the "logic" behind the structure/function relationship of the anatomical features investigated. Pre requisite: BIO-110/L. Corequisite: BIO 344.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 344L: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. Corequisite: BIO 344.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 350: Vertebrate Paleontology

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the study of the origin and evolution of the vertebrates using the fossil record. Dinosaurs and the American mastodon will serve as examples of how we reconstruct organisms and environments from the remote past. Prerequisite: BIO 110.
Session: As Needed (UG)

BIO 407: Pathophysiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to present information to the professional RN regarding alterations in the physiology of adult patients with common acute chronic disease specifically related to the pulmonary, renal, cardiovascular, endocrine, hematologic, immune, gastrointestinal, gynecological, and neurologic systems. It is based on a systems approach and is intended to promote an understanding of how and why symptoms appear, so that the student has a reasonable explanation for the finding he/she elicits on assessment. This course also assists the student in developing a comprehensive approach to the management of patient problems associated with the aforementioned problems. Emphasis is placed on decision making that utilizes a complete data base consisting of physical, psychological, environmental, social and economic findings. Prerequisite: Nursing majors only or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

BIO 417: Immunology

3 Credit Hour(s)

A detailed study of the principles of immunology. The course focuses on the details of the nonspecific and specific defenses of the body, immunological dysfunction and immunodiagnostics. Prerequisite: BIO 315 and CHE 101 or CHE 111.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 436: Evolutionary Biology

4 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the development and current state of evolutionary biology. Critical discussion of important writings in the field is emphasized. Prerequisites: BIO 100 or BIO 109 and BIO 110 plus two 300- level biology courses, MTH 134. Lecture, 3 hours; Seminar, 2 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 436L: Evolutionary Biology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques in Evolutionary Biology. Co-requisite: BIO 436.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

BIO 440: Molecular Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BCH 440. A detailed presentation of the structure and function of biological molecules and macromolecular complexes. The experimental approaches used in modern laboratories are emphasized. Prerequisite: BCH 313 and 313L. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

BIO 440L: Molecular Biology Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BCH 440L. Laboratory techniques and experimentation involving proteins and nucleic acids. Co-requisite: BIO 440. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

Communication Arts

CA 102: American Sign Language, Level I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SED 102. An introductory course in the use of manual communication within the framework of everyday conversation. The course includes background on language, deafness, deaf Americans and their culture, communication modes, approximately 370 signs, the numbers 1-30, and the American Manual Alphabet. At the culmination of this course, the student will begin to develop functional proficiency in American Sign Language using everyday situations as context for communication, listen and speak effectively using ASL, gain a basic understanding of language, deaf Americans and their history and culture, and form reasons, values, and judgments about the larger culture we exist in, and the deaf culture.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

CA 106: American Sign Language, Level II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SED 106. This course is a continuation and extension of American Sign Language I for students who have completed the first level course SED 102 American Sign Language I. The course will further develop the communicative competencies of manual sign language beyond the basic level. Students will continue with the examination and understanding of deaf culture, history and language, along with exposure to ASL sentence types, time, and all aspects of grammar, syntax and pragmatic use of manual sign. Prerequisite: CA/SED 102.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CA 205: Oral & Visual Communication

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This course assists the student in understanding communication principles, both oral and visual, and mastering the techniques of speaking and presenting that are instrumental to the achievement of success in our society. It also raises the consciousness of the place of culture in human interaction and the ethics surrounding the role of the "speaker."
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

CA 206: Storytelling and Story Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

The goal of Storytelling and Story Development is to teach students the process of telling a story, or developing a story which achieves an emotional impact with the audience. Different goals in storytelling will be addressed, including attempts to educate, persuade, entertain, or provoke. Through a process of reflection, students will critically analyze and explore different types of stories, including historical accounts, myths, folk and fairy tales, journals, diaries, personal tales and tandem telling. Prerequisite: ANIM 217.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CA 207: Screenplay Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will provide the student with the necessary skills that are needed to write a full-length feature film screenplay. The course will examine format rules and specific screenplay structure, which will be broken down and analyzed using a minimum of five Oscar-winning screenplays. Upon course conclusion, the student will have a completed story treatment, detailing a three act story, a completed first act, and a specific outline for acts II and III. Prerequisite: CMP 101.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

CA 221: Human Communication

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introductory study of the fundamental concepts and theories of human communication, exploring and defining its nature from an anthropological/ cultural point of view. The course will examine such topics as animal vs. human communicative processes, the various elements of communication, a study of the nature of human interaction and the concept of audience, and representative types of communicative techniques.
Session: Each Year (UG)

CA 303: Communication in a Multi-Cultural Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the social and cultural implications of interaction among diverse cultures, both international and domestic; the problems inherent in such interaction; and the rewards and benefits which result.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Chemistry

CHE 100: Chemistry for a Changing World

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the major concepts of chemistry with a focus on the application of chemical principles to everyday life. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 101: General Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An introduction to inorganic chemistry. Topics include bonding, equations, reactivity, solutions, and equilibrium. This course cannot be used as science elective credit for science majors. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry or MTH 97 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 101L: General Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to laboratory techniques in chemistry required of students in the Environmental Studies program who do not take CHE 110L. Corequisite:CHE 101.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 102: Preparation for Chemistry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is a preparatory course for the study of general chemistry for science majors (CHE110) and is offered ONLY to students who choose to leave CHE110 due to anticipated unacceptable performance in CHE 110. The course will focus on major areas of problem solving needed for introductory chemistry and the appropriate manipulation of numbers. Topics covered: mass and unit conversions to and from the metric system; atomic structure and nomenclature for compounds; balancing chemical reactions and making chemical conversions through stoichiometric relationships; correctly writing and interpreting various types of reactions to aqueous solutions and balancing redox reactions; using the gas laws to predict properties of the gases, and to predict the reacted or expected amounts within chemical reactions of reactant or product gases. Successful completion of the course allows students to proceed to CHE 110. Pre-requisite: Prior enrollment but non-completion of CHE 110/L.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 102L: Prep for Chemistry I Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

A laboratory course to accompany CHE 102. The focus of these experiments will be on major areas of problem solving. Prerequisite: Prior enrollment but non-completion of CHE 110L.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 104: General Chemistry

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course is a continuation of CHE 101. The focus of the course is the fundamental structure and properties of the major classes of organic compounds with particular reference to organic molecules and biopolymers that are important in pharmacology, nutrition and medicine such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. The course is primarily intended for those who are interested in nursing or health care studies majors. May not be taken for science elective credit by science majors. Course cannot be used in place of CHE 301 or BCH 317. Not offered at Main campus.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 110: Chemistry I

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the basic principles, theories and techniques of chemistry. Topics include stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, states of matter, equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry; mathematics competency of MTH 124 or higher. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 110L: Chemistry I Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Chemistry I. Corequisite: CHE 110.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 111: Chemistry II

4 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of the study of the basic principles, theories and techniques of chemistry. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in CHE 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 111L: Chemistry II Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Chemistry II. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in CHE 110. Corequisite: CHE 111.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 112: Introduction to Forensic Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

A fundamental exploration of forensic chemical techniques, data analysis, and formal presentation of data collected. Chemical techniques for this course include fingerprinting techniques, chromatography, density gradients, and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: CHE 101 or CHE 110.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 112L: Introduction to Forensic Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for general forensic chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 112.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 301: Organic Chemistry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to organic functional groups. Bonding, reaction mechanisms, synthetic chemistry, isomers (position, functional and stereo), oxidation-reduction and the chemistry of organic molecules are covered. Science credit may not be earned for both BCH 317 and CHE 301. Prerequisites: CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 301L: Organic Chemistry I Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to organic techniques and synthesis. Pre/corequisite: CHE 301. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 302: Organic Chemistry II

3 Credit Hour(s)

An expanded view of reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry. The development of a more complete synthetic correlation chart. Special topics include spectroscopy and molecular rearrangements. Prerequisite: CHE 301. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 302L: Organic Chemistry II Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Organic synthesis and spectroscopy. Pre/corequisite: CHE 302. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 303: Introduction to Physical Chemistry

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to physical chemistry including thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, chemical kinetics and quantum mechanics. Prerequisites: MTH 144, PHY 102 or PHY 152, CHE 302. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

CHE 303L: Introduction to Physical Chemistry Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Intro to Physical Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 303.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

CHE 304: Advanced Physical Chemistry

4 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of the study of the basic principles of physical chemistry. Prerequisite: CHE 303. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 304L: Advanced Physical Chemistry Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 304.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 309: Chemistry III

3 Credit Hour(s)

A discussion of bonding theories, chemistry of the elements, coordination compounds and stereochemistry of inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHE 302/L.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

CHE 311: Contemporary Chemical Analysis

4 Credit Hour(s)

The principles and techniques of quantitative analytical chemistry. The topics include gravimetric, volumetric, electrochemical and instrumental techniques. Prerequisite: CHE 111. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 311L: Contemporary Chemical Analysis Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Contemporary Chemical Analysis. Corequisite: CHE 311.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHE 312: Modern Instrumental Analysis

4 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the use of modern analytical instruments. Theory of operation and hands-on practical applications are covered. Prerequisite: CHE 301 or BCH 317. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 312L: Modern Instrumental Analysis Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Modern Instrumental Analysis. Corequisite: CHE 312.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 314: Chemistry of Emotion

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies Critical Thinking; Communication Skills; This course provides students with an overview of the endocrine and nervous systems. It focuses on an understanding of neuropeptides and their relationship to emotion. This course also includes various ways of understanding the complex pathways in which our emotions are influenced by environment and the role our emotions play on our health and overall well-being. Students are introduced to various therapies, both traditional and complementary, which can alter the type and amount of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters in the body.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 337: Forensic Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An advanced approach to application of modern qualitative and quantitative techniques used in a forensic laboratory. The emphasis is on investigating common interferences that exist in forensic evidence along with how to work with unknown materials. Prerequisites: CHE 110, CHE 111 and BCH 317 or CHE 301.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 337L: Forensic Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for Forensic Chemistry. Corequisite: CHE 337.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CHE 410: Organic Chemistry III

3 Credit Hour(s)

A detailed study of reaction mechanisms, molecular rearrangements, stereochemistry and instrumental techniques. Prerequisites: CHE 302/L. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Chinese

CHI 100: Survival Chinese

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress two language skills (listening and speaking) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the novice low level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the novice-mid level. Over the course of the semester, the student will gradually acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to progress from simple repetition of memorized structures to creation and communication in the target language. To this end, great stress will be placed on the repetition, revision and pronunciation of vocabulary and grammatical items. By the end of CHI 100, the student will be competent in listening and speaking skills at the novice-mid level. This course is intended for students who have less than 2 years of High School Chinese.
Year: As Needed (UG)

CHI 101: Elementary Chinese I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress four language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the novice low level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the novice-mid level. Over the course of CHI 101 and CHI 102, the student will gradually acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to progress from simple repetition of memorized structures to creation and communication in the target language. To this end, great stress will be placed on the repetition, revision and pronunciation of vocabulary and grammatical items. By the end of CHI 101, the student will be competent in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the novice-mid level. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students who have less than 2 years of High School Chinese.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHI 102: Elementary Chinese II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress four language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the novice low level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the novice-high level. Over the course of CHI 101 and CHI 102, the student will gradually acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to progress from simple repetition of memorized structures to creation and communication in the target language. To this end, great stress will be placed on the repetition, revision and pronunciation of vocabulary and grammatical items. By the end of CHI 102, the student will be competent in reading,writing, listening and speaking skills at the novice-high level. Prerequisite: CHI 101.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHI 105: Intermediate Chinese I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress four language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the "novice-high" level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the "intermediate-low" level. Learners in 105 should be prepared to further develop speaking skills, proficiency, and accuracy in the L2. Learners move out of concrete concepts and into abstract concepts, they comprehend main ideas and details of authentic materials, both written and spoken. The L2 is used exclusively by both learner and instructor. The student will acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to begin communication in the target language in entry-level professional settings. By the end of CHI 105, the student will be competent in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the intermediate-low level. Prerequisites: Successful completion of CHI 102 or three years high school Chinese.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CHI 106: Intermediate Chinese II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress four language skills (reading, writing, listening and speaking) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the "intermediate-low" level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the "intermediate-mid" level. Learners in 106 should be prepared to further develop speaking skills, proficiency, and accuracy in the L2. Learners move out of concrete concepts and into abstract concepts, they comprehend main ideas and details of authentic materials, both written and spoken. The L2 is used exclusively by both learner and instructor. The student will acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to begin communication in the target language in entry-level professional settings. By the end of CHI 106, the student will be competent in reading, writing, listening and speaking skills at the intermediate-mid level. Prerequisites: CHI 105.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CHI 110: Chinese for Teachers

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will stress four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) as well as cultural awareness. The student will progress from the novice low level of language proficiency (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages: ACTFL) to the novice-mid level. Over the course of the semester, the student will gradually acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to progress from simple repetition of memorized structures to creation and communication in the target language. It also aims to provide teachers with the knowledge, skills, and tools that they need to bring basic Chinese language to their classrooms. To this end, great stress will be placed on the repetition, revision and pronunciation of vocabulary and grammatical items, as well as the development of student skills in teaching basic Chinese to the elementary and/or secondary level. By the end of CHI 110, the student will be competent in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the novice-mid level. Prerequisite: This course is intended for Education majors or those seeking secondary teacher certification who successfully complete CHI 100.
Year: As Needed (UG)

Composition

CMP 101: English Composition

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. The primary emphasis is on developing rhetorical awareness: an understanding of the contexts, purposes, and expectations that govern college-level writing. Course topics include: the technical and stylistic skills of expository writing; strategies for critical and purposeful reading, writing, and inquiry; and information literacy. These skills will be addressed through group and individual instruction and through assignments in expository writing and research. Prerequisite: college-level competence as determined by standardized test scores and high school GPA.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 202: Writing: Theory and Practice

3 Credit Hour(s)

This class introduces students to a range of approaches to understanding, analyzing, and theorizing writing. Its aim is to examine how relationships between writing and knowledge have been imagined within academic, professional, and interpersonal contexts, and it will equip students with vocabulary and a set of frameworks that can be utilized in the study of writing across courses. The class also provides students with extensive opportunities for writing practice based on four key concepts: purpose; invention; convention; and revision.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

CMP 212: News Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Information Literacy; Civic Responsibility; Writing Intensive. In this hands-on course, we will study the basics of news reporting and writing. We will investigate how to develop and research news stories, narrow the focus to create tightly written and compelling articles, and develop attention-grabbing leads. The course will also cover interviewing skills, research techniques, and different news writing styles, as well as a discussion on libel law and journalistic ethics. Through a combination of lecture, discussion, and writing assignments, we will learn how to write news stories that are accurate, fair, clear, and concise. Prerequisite: CMP 101.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 217: Principles of Rhetoric: Argument and Persuasion

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. In common use, the term "rhetoric" calls to mind the negative and the nefarious -a tool manipulated by slick politicians and shady dealers. In fact, rhetoric is an art with deep roots in some of the oldest and most revered educational traditions worldwide. This course is designed to help students become more informed, effective, and ethical practitioners of argument. While the class will focus primarily on written persuasive forms most common within academic settings, it will also require students to examine and/or compose forms of argument and persuasion common within public, interpersonal and digital forums. Through engaged class participation, collaborative work, and regular composing practice, the student should become more conscious of the central beliefs about persuasion that shape writing in academic, professional, and public settings. Further, the course will facilitate forms of analysis, critique, and composition that may help the student gain greater awareness of his/her own persuasive powers and practices. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or equivalent.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 301: Professional Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Writing Intensive and Research and Presentation. This is a cross-curricular course in which students study and practice the discourse of various disciplines: Business, Fine and Performing Arts, Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural and Health Sciences. Students learn to recognize and utilize the central conventions of writing in these disciplines by using techniques of rhetorical analysis. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

CMP 311: Advanced English Composition

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Fulfills Research & Presentation requirement. This advanced course in composition is designed to help students expand and refine their technical and stylistic writing skills. Through analysis of professional writing, the students will learn to identify structures and techniques of effective writing and research. Through extensive directed writing experience, the student will learn to emulate techniques of effective written communication and research. Prerequisite: CMP 101 and completion of 45 credits or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 312: Creative Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Fundamental principles in the writing of poetry, the short story, and drama. Individual and class criticism in a workshop format. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CMP 315: Advanced Composition for Health Professionals

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with PT 312, combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. This course in composition is designed to help students in the health and natural sciences expand and refine their technical and stylistic skills through an extensive directed writing experience based on professional models. Students will use medical and scientific terminology, write case-based reports and analysis, learn documentation methods and, and write standard research forms used in professional communications. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 317: Journalism

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as CA 317. An introductory course in the fundamentals of journalism, with an emphasis on writing news stories, reviews, interviews, and editorials. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

CMP 318: Writing for Media

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as CA 318. This course emphasizes non-fiction writing in such areas as in-depth reporting of public affairs, contemporary profiles, issue-related stories, magazine writing and criticism. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CMP 420: Promotional Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as PR 420. This course introduces students to a style of marketing writing commonly known as "copywriting." Students will learn to write text (copy) whose aim is to promote products and services. Among units focused on will be brochures, print advertisements, broadcast advertisements, public service announcements for radio and television, direct mail, and other elements of marketing communications. CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

CMP 92: Developmental English Language Skills

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to assist students in obtaining basic college-level proficiency in English grammar with direct application to paragraph and essay writing. Offered in HEOP Summer Program. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes.
Session: Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

CMP 97: Basic Rhetoric

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course emphasizes audience and purpose, invention, the main idea, focus, and coherence. Students will incorporate these concepts into their writing process while learning to use evidence to develop different modes of paragraphs. Offered Each Semester. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes. Please note: This is a developmental course. Students needing this course are required to register for it upon placement and to remain enrolled until satisfactory completion. Course withdrawal is not allowed except by permission of both the instructor and the student's advisor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Computer Science

CSC 100: Computer Literacy

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to provide students with the basic concepts of computing systems and information systems. Students gain knowledge of how computers are used in today's society and are introduced to applications packages.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 101: Introduction to Computer Programming

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Introduction to programming. Problems analysis and algorithms. Discussion of computer systems and use. A substantial amount of BASIC programming is included. Prerequisite: MTH 97 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 201: Introduction to Computer Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Introduction to the basic concepts of computer science. Covers fundamental computer science concepts and programming in C++. Includes these topics: computing system concepts, problem solving, algorithm design, top-down development, program testing and documentation, data types (built-in and enumerated), data manipulation, sequences, selection, loops, modules, parameters, arrays, records, strings, files, introduction to sorting and searching techniques and other basic algorithms. Requires extensive programming. Prerequisite: MTH 131 or MTH 144 or equivalent placement.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 212: Introduction to Computer Science II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of CSC 201. Covers abstract data structures and their operations, and software concepts. Includes these topics: program development (interpreting specifications, top-down development, information hiding, structured testing), implementation of built-in data types and structures, files, pointers, stacks, queues, linked lists, recursion, trees, graphs, searching and sorting algorithms, and an introduction to complexity analysis of algorithms. Requires extensive programming. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in CSC 201.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 310: Introduction to Computer Systems and Organization

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of the relationships between computer systems, software concepts and programming technologies. Computer architecture, language processors and systems resources are also studied. Prerequisite: CSC 212.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 350: Data Structures

3 Credit Hour(s)

Essentials of data structures and data structure algorithms. Includes lists, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, binary trees, sorting, hashing, etc. Programming in a modern language. Prerequisite: CSC 212.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 405: Operating Systems

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of some of the functions of the operating system, such as management of processes, storage and files. An operating system is studied in depth. The history and development of operations systems, process concepts, management and scheduling, real and virtual storage, file storage and access will also be covered. Prerequisites: CSC 310 and 350.
Session: As Needed (UG)

CSC 416: Numerical Analysis

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as MTH 416. Study of finite differences, interpolation, root finding algorithms, numerical differentiation and integration, linear systems and matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MTH 145.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Economics

ECO 201: Principles of Microeconomics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Introduction to fundamentals of supply and demand, elasticity, equilibrium and economic behavior under pure competition and monopoly.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ECO 202: Principles of Macroeconomics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A look at inflation and unemployment, the Keynesian Model, the determination of output and employment and fiscal policy within the context of the Keynesian Model. Prerequisite: ECO 201 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ECO 206: The Economics of Sustainable Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course applies economic concepts to current topics in sustainability. Economic growth and inter- and intra-regional trade are examined in terms of their short term and long-range environmental impacts. Critical analysis is applied to the viability of various growth strategies to economic development. The geographical context for this course examines sustainability at the local, regional, and global scales.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

ECO 209: Economics of Poverty

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. An understanding of basic issues in poverty-economics. Classes and groups which are characterized as impoverished are identified. Causes of poverty and anti-discrimination and anti-poverty socioeconomic policies are evaluated.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

ECO 213: Economics of Inequality

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course covers the full spectrum of the distribution of income from the disadvantaged to the advantaged. It discusses various ways to measure inequality and the distribution of income. It also investigates the theoretical explanations of the causes of inequality, and presents some techniques that may be used to overcome inequality.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

ECO 333: International Economics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course looks at the modern theory of international trade, its qualifications and possible alternatives. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

ECO 343: Global Economic Geography

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. An examination of the basic principles which determine the location of economic activities. Consideration of the impact of contemporary changes in resources and populations on the international economic order. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

Early Childhood Special Education

ECSE 222: Infant Development and Intervention with Assistive Technology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course prepares teacher candidates to understand and appreciate the complex developmental issues and comprehensive interdisciplinary service needs of infants who are disabled or are at risk for a disability, and their families. From an educational perspective, it is impossible to view the needs and goals for the young child apart from those of the family. Early intervention (EI) services are now found throughout the United States, and recent research on brain development highlights the unique characteristics and needs of infants and the critical role of their caregivers in fostering optimal growth and development. The transactional model of EI emphasizes the importance of the continual and progressive interactions between the infant and the environment and is an essential position of the course objectives. Current research on the use of assistive technology in facilitating the infant's interactions with the environment will also be explored and incorporated into class discussions and assignments. A 30-hour field experience (practicum) is required.
Session: Spring (UG)

ECSE 279: Typical and Atypical Child Development and Intervention Strategies for Preschoolers with Special Needs: Part I

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an overview of issues and strategies involved in providing appropriate educational-development programming to toddlers and preschoolers with disabilities. Recognizing the importance of linking an understanding of child development and learning to curriculum development and implementation, this course will integrate an exploration of the various domains of child development with the design and implementation of individual and developmentally appropriate intervention strategies. Part I will include an introduction to young children with special needs and the historical and legal mandates for providing for special needs in early education. Also addressed will be the developmental stages and factors affecting development, partnership with families, sensorimotor development, self-help skill development, and social and emotional development. Due to the unique instructional needs of young children with special needs, a field-based, college-supervised observational and teaching experience of two hours in an early childhood setting is required. A three (3) hour field experience (practicum) is required.
Session: Fall (UG)

ECSE 280: Typical and Atypical Child Development and Intervention Strategies for Preschoolers with Special Needs: Part II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Fulfils Research & Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This course will build on information covered in ECSE 279: Part 1, but will also expand to include a study of communication and literacy, cognitive development, a brief overview of assessment, Individual Education Plans, developing developmentally appropriate lesson plans, the role and use of technology, and effective use of paraprofessionals and volunteers in early intervention programs. Teacher candidates will be required to submit to the annual Academic Festival a proposal for a presentation or a poster on a topic related to course objectives. A 5-hour field experience (practicum) is required. A grade of "C" or better is required in this course for admission to upper division for ECSE teacher candidates. Prerequisites: SED 270 and ESCE 279 with a grade of C or better.
Session: Spring (UG)

ECSE 324: Transdisciplinary Intervention and Family Involvement

3 Credit Hour(s)

With the implementation of family-centered services and the inclusion of young children with special needs in naturalistic environments, personnel need to be able to work collaboratively as members of teams with family members, with others in their own disciplines, and with individuals from an array of other disciplines. The early childhood special educator must be knowledgeable about the philosophical base, methodological approaches, and terminology of the disciplines with which collaboration/consultation occurs. In transdisciplinary team approaches, all team members share their expertise, become sensitive to understanding perspectives of other team members, and cross boundaries of their professional disciplines to maximize what they can offer to the child and his or her family. Students will receive instruction from a parent of a child with a disability and a team of professionals who will model transdisciplinary service delivery and instruct students in a cross-disciplinary model of intervention. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better for ECSE 280, EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Spring (UG)

ECSE 325: Early Childhood Assessment Methods for Mild/Moderate Disabilities: A Practicum

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an overview of issues, the legal basis, and the functions of assessment of infants, toddlers and preschoolers with special needs. Assessment is an important and ongoing responsibility of professionals who work with young children with special needs and is necessary not only to meet federal and state mandates but also to plan appropriate intervention strategies and to monitor the effectiveness of services provided. Special emphasis will be placed on incorporating current research into the course objectives, including recognition of the high priority now placed on family-centered assessment and intervention, on assessment in the natural environment, and on the importance afforded to the role of interdisciplinary assessment strategies. After reviewing assessment issues and instruments in class, teacher candidates will select one or more authentic and performance-based assessment tools; conduct an assessment of a young child in a natural environment, using both informal and formal assessment methods; review the child's records; interview significant caregivers; and then, based on the findings, develop and implement an intervention strategy and record the results. All phases of the process will be monitored and supervised by college and professional personnel. A 25-hour field experience (practicum) is required. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better for ESCE 280, EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Fall (UG)

ECSE 473: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Preschool Level for Students with Disabilities (Birth-Pre K)

6 Credit Hour(s)

For students in the Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education program. One professional laboratory experience includes observations of young children with disabilities, birth through age five, with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327, EDU 471 or 472, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 Overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

ECSE 474: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Preschool Level for Students with Disabilities (Pre K-Grade 2)

6 Credit Hour(s)

For students in the Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education program. One professional laboratory experience includes observations of young children with disabilities, pre-school through second grade, with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327, EDU 471 or 472, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

Education

EDU 103: Arts, Movement and Music for the Young Child

3 Credit Hour(s)

Incorporating the theory of Multiple Intelligences and developmentally appropriate practices, this course prepares students to develop and implement meaningful, integrated learning experiences that focus on children's needs and interests to interact with their environment through music, art, and movement. Teacher candidates will be taught to incorporate into their daily instructional planning activities and strategies which encourage young children's physical, social, emotional, aesthetic and cognitive development across a wide variety of sensory and physical experiences, utilizing an array of materials, equipment, and environmental adaptations.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 203: Learning Theory

3 Credit Hour(s)

Designed to provide a thorough understanding of psychological concepts, principles, and theories central to the teaching-learning process, including classroom problems encountered by teachers. A one(1)-hour field experience (practicum) is required. This course requires a grade of B or better for admission to upper division.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 217: Facilitating Reading Literacy for Regular and Special Needs Learners at the Primary Level

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the natural, integrative, developmental processes by which young, primary level children (Grades K-3) continue to acquire speech, language, and communication from the early childhood years. Emphasized are the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical strategies designed to foster a continuing competence and confidence in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. All major methods of teaching reading and the related language arts are explored in depth. Diagnostic, prescriptive, and evaluative techniques are addressed, including major modifications which must be made to accommodate the needs of children with disabilities. The critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials/ strategies designed for the emergent and early reader is also a major intended course outcome. This course will provide the ELA underpinnings for the requirements of the edTPA. Prerequisites: EDU 203 and EDU 237 with a "C" or better. A student must earn a "C" or better in this course to continue in the certification program. Required for admission to Upper Division. A field experience (practicum) of 45 hours is required. For morning sections only, teacher candidates should not register for any courses immediately preceding this course. The next course for which teacher candidates can register should not begin before 12:00 noon. For evening sections, teacher candidates should reserve time on Wednesday and Friday mornings, from 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 218: Facilitating Reading Literacy for Regular and Special Needs Learners at the Intermediate Level

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course extends the study completed in EDU 217 by exploring in depth alterations/ modifications/ extensions of strategies which further facilitate language development and reading acumen for intermediate level and middle school children and youths. Emphasized are the development and utilization of a broad spectrum of pedagogical methodologies designed to foster reading literacy and confidence and competence in writing, speaking, and listening. Diagnostic, prescriptive, and evaluative techniques appropriate to the intermediate child and middle school youth are addressed, including major modifications which must be made to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities. The critical assessment of commercial reading and other language arts programs/materials/strategies, designed for the fluent reader, is also a major intended course outcome. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 217. A teacher candidate must earn a C or better in this course to continue in the Childhood(1-6) & Special Education(1-6) certification program.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 237: Instructional Design: Theory and Practice

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the instructional process. The primary focus is on the introduction and examination of instructional design, with special emphasis on the utilization of behavioral objectives in planning instruction. Also addressed are the personal and professional characteristics and competencies necessary for effecting educationally meaningful teaching-learning experiences for ALL STUDENTS. The relationship between theory and instructional design is covered in depth. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in EDU 203 or first time repeating or concurrent enrollment in EDU 203 and permission of instructor. A grade of C or better is required in this course for admission to upper division. Teacher candidates are dismissed from the program if they fail to receive a C or better on the second attempt.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 237L: Instructional Design: Technology Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)


Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

EDU 267: Practicum in Teaching Language Arts at the Elementary School Level

3 Credit Hour(s)

The primary purpose of this course is to assist in the development of a competent, professional classroom teacher who is aware of and can demonstrate those personal and professional competencies necessary for producing effective teaching-learning experiences. In this regard, the course will provide elementary and special education majors with: 1) a foundation in the aspects of an elementary school classroom; 2) field experiences and opportunities to work with children on a teacher-pupil basis; and 3) opportunities for students to apply the fundamentals learned in EDU 237/EDU 217/EDU 218 by planning,preparing, and presenting teaching-learning experiences in the area of language arts within a classroom setting. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in EDU 217 and EDU 237. A field experience (practicum) of 40 hours is required.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 301: Methods and Materials: Art (Elementary)

3 Credit Hour(s)

The focus of this course is on art instruction as it applies to the Childhood Level Art Educator. Emphasis will be placed on elementary level lesson and unit planning, instructional strategies for diverse learners, understanding characteristics of child and artistic development, and multiple instructional strategies that encourage students' critical and creative thinking and art skills. Teacher candidates will be required to observe, assist, and/or teach elementary students in a variety of settings. A field experience (practicum) of 30 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better for EDU 203, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 302: Methods and Materials: Art (Secondary)

3 Credit Hour(s)

The focus of this course is on art instruction as it applies to the Adolescence Level Art Educator. Emphasis will be placed on high school lesson and unit planning, communicating with students, administrators, and community members, assessment of student learning and artwork, and school/community involvement. Teacher candidates will be required to observe, assist, and/or teach high school students in a variety of settings. A field experience (practicum) of 30 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better for EDU 203, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 303: Children's Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Extensive survey of children's literature with special attention to standards of evaluation, principles of selection, and analysis of the reading interests of young children. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 217. A field experience (practicum) of 25 hours is required.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 311: Methods & Materials: Art (Middle School)

3 Credit Hour(s)

The focus of this course is on art instruction as it applies to the Middle Level Art Educator. Emphasis will be placed on middle level lesson and unit planning, the contextual aspect of learners, understanding characteristics of adolescent and artistic development, classroom management and motivation, and professional development. Teacher candidates will be required to observe, assist, and/or teach middle school students in a variety of settings. A field experience (practicum) of 30 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better for EDU 203, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 313: Foundations of Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

The purposes of this course are: 1) to provide an overview of the historical, philosophical, curricular, and sociological foundations upon which pedagogical practice in the United States rests; 2) to analyze education as a social institution; 3) to discuss contemporary educational issues from an historical perspective; and 4) to discuss educational statutes, legislation, and judicial decisions as they pertain to classroom teachers. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 314: Promoting English Language Arts Across the Content Areas

3 Credit Hour(s)

The primary purpose of this course is to provide Adolescence Education students with the tools necessary to infuse English Language Arts skills into their content specific courses. Teacher candidates will participate in classroom discussions, prepare and present demonstrations, and create original projects. Background information will be presented in short lectures. A field experience (practicum) of 20 hours is required. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in EDU 203 and EDU 237.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 316: Elementary Education Methods: Social Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on understanding the structure and concepts of a multi-disciplinary social studies curriculum. Emphasis is given to the examination of a variety of methods and materials utilized in social studies instruction. A field experience (practicum) of 25 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper division course.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 319: Assessment Methods in Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with EDU 327, combination of both courses meets Research and Presentation requirement. Assessment methods in education are intended to provide teacher candidates with the knowledge and skills necessary to examine the relationship between assessment methodology and its utilization in the classroom. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to articulate the nature of assessment, compare and contrast the concepts of validity and reliability, outline appropriate testing procedures and practices, integrate standardized test results in planning classroom instruction, appraise different types of classroom assessment tools, and critique factors used to grade student performance. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 320: Elementary Education Methods: Math, Science and Technology

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an in-depth study of the major elements of an elementary level mathematics program, as well as an in-depth study of the major knowledge, concepts, and processes related to elementary level science instruction. Primary attention is directed toward an examination of the multiple/alternative methods and materials utilized in mathematics and science instruction. A field experience (practicum) of 30 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Spring (UG)

EDU 321: Foundations in Early Childhood Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

This introductory/survey course examines the role of infant stimulation, nursery school and kindergarten programming in the early formal education process. Stressed are the professional responsibilities of the teacher/educator, with special emphasis on planning and organizing skills. Experiences are designed to help the teacher candidate understand the philosophical foundations of early childhood education and formulate a personal educational philosophy and approach consistent with the best educational theory and practice in our present day culture. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 326: Planning and Managing the Teaching and Learning Environment with Assistive Technology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will prepare students to establish and maintain physically and psychologically safe and healthy learning environments for young children that focus on children's needs and interests and takes into account culturally valued content and children's home experiences. Course objectives and assignments will require teacher candidates to demonstrate understanding of the influence of the physical setting, schedule, routines, and transitions on children's learning and to use these experiences to promote children's growth across the domains of development: social/emotional, cognitive, language/communication, self-help, and fine and gross motor. A field experience (practicum) of 10 hours is required. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 327: Teaching to the Standards

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy; Together with EDU 319, combination of both courses meets Research and Presentation requirement. This course is designed to familiarize the teacher candidate with the standards movement in New York State. This course will provide a national as well as state perspective on educational reform. The primary emphasis will involve a review of the Common Core content-area learning standards now in effect in New York State. A connection between curriculum, instruction, and assessment will be established, allowing students the opportunity to develop a learning experience that incorporates the New York State Common Core standards. Implications of these standards with respect to individuals with disabilities will also be addressed. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Corequisite: Concurrent registration in Student Teaching courses. Upper Division Course.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 336: Language/Literacy Development for the Adolescent Learner

3 Credit Hour(s)

This interdisciplinary course will allow Adolescence teacher candidates to discuss the theories of how learners continue to acquire and use literacy as they enter adolescence and how this differs/complements elementary acquisition. In addition, specific skills will be reviewed on how to help adolescents become better readers, writers, speakers and listeners. This course will use the seminar approach. Teacher candidates will participate in classroom discussions, prepare and present demonstrations, and create original projects. A field experience (practicum) of 20 hours is required. Prerequisites: grade of C or better in EDU 203,EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Fall (UG)

EDU 402: Methods in Classroom Management for Secondary Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

The primary purpose of this course is to provide Adolescence majors with a comprehensive, in-depth examination of strategies for creating a positive learning environment through the use of effective classroom management techniques. Particular emphasis will be placed on an introduction and examination of the development and implementation of classroom rules,procedures and consequences to enhance instruction, and prevention strategies and skills necessary to prevent classroom misconduct. Teacher candidates will examine teacher attributes and productive use of class time strategies to respond to minor classroom disruptions; diagnose and remediate chronic misbehavior; identify methods to create an effective learning environment; and investigate beliefs and theories related to classroom management. Field experience (practicum) of 20 hours required. Prerequisite: grade of B or better for EDU 203, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 457: Independent Study or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Research project arranged for the individual or a small group under the guidance and direction of a faculty member of the Education Department. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson and instructor required.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 458: Directed Study

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

An examination by an individual teacher candidate of a specialized topic in the field of education or the completion of a specialized project related to teaching at either the elementary or secondary school level under the guidance and direction of a faculty member of the education department. Prerequisite: Permission of department chairperson and instructor required.
Session: As Needed (UG)

EDU 471: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Preschool and Primary School Level (Birth-Pre K)

6 Credit Hour(s)

For teacher candidates in the Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education program. One professional laboratory experience includes observations of young children, preschool through second grade, with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327, ECSE 472 or ECSE 473, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 472: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Preschool adn Primary School Level (PreK-Grade 2)

6 Credit Hour(s)

For teacher candidates in the Early Childhood/Early Childhood Special Education program. One professional laboratory experience includes observations of young children, preschool through second grade, with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327, ECSE 472 or ECSE 473, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 473: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Primary School Level (1-3)

6 Credit Hour(s)

One professional laboratory experience at the childhood primary level (1-3) includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327 and EDU 474, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 474: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Intermediate Level (4-6)

6 Credit Hour(s)

One professional laboratory experience at the childhood intermediate level (4-6) includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all Education courses, with the exception of EDU 327 and EDU 473, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 475: Student Teaching and Seminar at Childhood Level (1-6)

6 Credit Hour(s)

For dual certification majors. One professional laboratory experience covers observation of special education classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for EDU 327 and SED 476, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 477: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Elementary School Level: Art (K-6)

6 Credit Hour(s)

One professional elementary level (K-6) laboratory experience in Art includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for ART 498 and EDU 478, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 478: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Secondary School Level: Art (7-12)

6 Credit Hour(s)

One professional secondary level (7-12) laboratory experience in Art includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for ART 498 & EDU 477, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 Overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 479: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Early Secondary School Level (7-9)

6 Credit Hour(s)

English, French, Mathematics, Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, General Science), Social Studies, and Spanish. One professional laboratory experience at the early adolescent level (7-9) includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for EDU 327 and EDU 480, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

EDU 480: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Secondary School Level (10-12)

6 Credit Hour(s)

English, French, Mathematics, Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, General Science), Social Studies, and Spanish. One professional laboratory experience at the secondary level (10-12) includes observations of regular classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Teacher candidates are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for EDU 327 and EDU 479, which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

English

ENG 94: Developmental Reading and Study Skills

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to assist students in developing selective reading, study, and thinking skills necessary for successful performance in college-level courses. Offered in HEOP Summer Program. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes.
Session: Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

ENG 95: Essential Reading Skills

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to develop the skills to comprehend and retain information from college-level texts. Offered Each Year (Fall). Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes. Please note: This is a developmental course. Students needing this course are required to register for it upon placement and to remain enrolled until satisfactory completion. Course withdrawal is not allowed except by permission of both the instructor and the student's advisor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Environmental Studies

ENS 201: Introduction to Environmental Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A survey of ecological principles, human modifications of environment, population dynamics, environmental pollutants and the effects on ecological systems. Intended for non-science majors, cannot be used for major credit for science majors.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 201: Introduction to Environmental Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A survey of ecological principles, human modifications of environment, population dynamics, environmental pollutants and the effects on ecological systems. Intended for non-science majors, cannot be used for major credit for science majors.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 205: Planet Earth I: Physical Features

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NSC 205. An introduction to physical aspects of geology, hydrology, the atmosphere and oceanography of the Earth and the application of these principles from a scientific perspective to land use and planning. Cannot receive credit for both ESC 107 and ENS/NSC 205.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 205: Planet Earth I: Physical Features

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NSC 205. An introduction to physical aspects of geology, hydrology, the atmosphere and oceanography of the Earth and the application of these principles from a scientific perspective to land use and planning. Cannot receive credit for both ESC 107 and ENS/NSC 205.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 211: Environmental and Energy Policies I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PSC 211. A survey of major environmental and energy policies and the intergovernmental administrative system established to implement them. Topics include a history of the environmental movement, green politics, international environmental issues and the contrasts between scientific and political decision-making. If taken as ENS 211, this course cannot be used as a science elective.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 211: Environmental and Energy Policies I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PSC 211. A survey of major environmental and energy policies and the intergovernmental administrative system established to implement them. Topics include a history of the environmental movement, green politics, international environmental issues and the contrasts between scientific and political decision-making. If taken as ENS 211, this course cannot be used as a science elective.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 212: Environmental and Energy Policies II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ENS/PSC 211. Prerequisite: GVT/ENS 211.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 212: Environmental and Energy Policies II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ENS/PSC 211. Prerequisite: GVT/ENS 211.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 219: Politics, Planning and Land Use

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PSC 219. Principles and practice of land management policies at the state and local levels of government. Topics include zoning power of local government, preparation of master plans, variance procedures, federal mandates and Environmental Impact Statements.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 219: Politics, Planning and Land Use

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PSC 219. Principles and practice of land management policies at the state and local levels of government. Topics include zoning power of local government, preparation of master plans, variance procedures, federal mandates and Environmental Impact Statements.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 303: Environmental Toxicology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NSC 303. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of different types of toxins, their routes into organisms, environmental fates and roles in metabolic pathways. Applications to environmental and occupational health as well as detection and risk assessment are included. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110/L and CHE 111/L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 303: Environmental Toxicology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NSC 303. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of different types of toxins, their routes into organisms, environmental fates and roles in metabolic pathways. Applications to environmental and occupational health as well as detection and risk assessment are included. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110/L and CHE 111/L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 304: Environmental Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the chemical aspects of pollution (water, air and land) including detection and remediation methods. Chemistry for the sustainable use of natural resources is discussed. Prerequisite: CHE 110.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 304: Environmental Chemistry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the chemical aspects of pollution (water, air and land) including detection and remediation methods. Chemistry for the sustainable use of natural resources is discussed. Prerequisite: CHE 110.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 304L: Environmental Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Employs the practical application of chemical analysis for detection and remediation methods of pollution in water, air and land. The chemistry of some alternative energy sources are also explored. Corequisite: ENS 304.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 304L: Environmental Chemistry Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Employs the practical application of chemical analysis for detection and remediation methods of pollution in water, air and land. The chemistry of some alternative energy sources are also explored. Corequisite: ENS 304.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENS 309: Population Dynamics

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the relationships between human and animal populations and their environment. Topics include demography, population growth and relevant models, population genetics and environmental stresses on populations. Prerequisite: BIO 302.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 309: Population Dynamics

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the relationships between human and animal populations and their environment. Topics include demography, population growth and relevant models, population genetics and environmental stresses on populations. Prerequisite: BIO 302.
Session: As Needed (UG)

ENS 310: Global Water Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 310. Fulfills core competencies: Information Literacy; Contextual Integration. This course investigates the environmental, technological and health-related issues associated with the availability and quality of water worldwide. Case studies of global water problems will incorporate the role of socioeconomic and political issues. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110 or ENS 201, or Permission of Instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

ENS 310: Global Water Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 310. Fulfills core competencies: Information Literacy; Contextual Integration. This course investigates the environmental, technological and health-related issues associated with the availability and quality of water worldwide. Case studies of global water problems will incorporate the role of socioeconomic and political issues. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110 or ENS 201, or Permission of Instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

Entrepreneurship

ENTR 201: The Entrepreneurial Mindset

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course identifies and analyzes the values, abilities, and personal attributes of entrepreneurs, with the premise that all people have the ability to be successful entrepreneurs. This course is the first of three required core courses in the entrepreneurship minor. Students will be introduced to the basic concepts of creativity and innovation, creative problem solving and brainstorming, opportunity recognition, networking, technology utilization, effective written, verbal and non-verbal communication, new venture development and entrepreneurship as it relates to for-profit, not-for-profit, and social ventures.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENTR 301: The Entrepreneurial Skill Set

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. In this course, students will learn and develop the skills necessary to transition an idea into action. Building off of ENTR 201, students will utilize techniques to effect creative thinking in combination with the practical skills for implementation. They will learn how to identify the critical tasks and hurdles in building an entrepreneurial venture (social action, business idea, or other venture), brainstorm creative solutions, and identify the necessary means for realization. These challenges and the resulting solutions will fall within the following categories: competitive advantage, feasibility studies, financial forecasts, marketing plans and validated learning. Students will learn how to develop their leadership skills and organizational effectiveness with an emphasis on opportunity recognition. Prerequisite: ENTR 201.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ENTR 401: Entrepreneurship in Action

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course is designed to explore entrepreneurial and business competencies by interconnecting ideas and objectives, through practical experience of assessing, planning, implementing, measuring and controlling a new business or social venture. Students will apply their knowledge of organizational management, best practices, problem solving, and strategic planning on real business scenarios. The course is relevant to entrepreneurs from all disciplines who want to develop a business venture in realistic terms, or to develop new ventures inside existing organizations.It is also relevant to students who are interested in pursuing social ventures, establishing non-profit organizations and creating a business with a strong mission. Prerequisites: ENTR 201 and ENTR 301.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Environmental Science

ESC 107: Introduction to Earth Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the earth sciences with emphasis on geology, oceanography and meteorology. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

English as a Second Language

ESL 215: Scholarly Research and Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course prepares the international nursing student to develop a written research project. The steps of literature review to determine the state of the science of the student's selected topic is addressed. Students will research and compile an annotated historical review/bibliography of a research journal series related to their topic. Instruction focuses on several forms of expository writing common in the health professions while emphasizing effective communication between the writer and different audiences. The course emphasizes critical reading and thinking, argumentative writing, library research, and documentation of sources in an academic setting.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Finance

FIN 212: Investing With Your Values

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Writing Intensive. This course is a basic course in the operation of the stock market and learning to invest in this market. The primary emphasis will be on natural investing and choosing profitable investments that will contribute to environmental and economic sustainability.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 212: Investing With Your Values

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Writing Intensive. This course is a basic course in the operation of the stock market and learning to invest in this market. The primary emphasis will be on natural investing and choosing profitable investments that will contribute to environmental and economic sustainability.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 325: Corporate Finance

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the principles of managing finance in all forms of corporate entities, emphasizing value creation by financial managers. Specific topics include an overview of the financial system, the determinants of firm value, securities' markets and valuation, the value of the firm, and investment decisions. In addition, coursework addresses ethics, accounting, business statistics, economics, computer information systems, and legal environment of business components of the common professional business core. Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 325: Corporate Finance

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the principles of managing finance in all forms of corporate entities, emphasizing value creation by financial managers. Specific topics include an overview of the financial system, the determinants of firm value, securities' markets and valuation, the value of the firm, and investment decisions. In addition, coursework addresses ethics, accounting, business statistics, economics, computer information systems, and legal environment of business components of the common professional business core. Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 328: Investments

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of investment principles, including the determination of objectives and a constructive approach to the attainment of these objectives. Securities markets, real estate, banking and insurance form the nucleus of the course. Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 328: Investments

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of investment principles, including the determination of objectives and a constructive approach to the attainment of these objectives. Securities markets, real estate, banking and insurance form the nucleus of the course. Prerequisite: ACC 226.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 409: Money and Banking

3 Credit Hour(s)

Nature of money, development of the American monetary system, role of the banking system in creating the nation's money supply and structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System as the principal agency for monetary control. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

FIN 409: Money and Banking

3 Credit Hour(s)

Nature of money, development of the American monetary system, role of the banking system in creating the nation's money supply and structure and functions of the Federal Reserve System as the principal agency for monetary control. Prerequisites: ECO 201 and ECO 202.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Literature in Translation

FLIT 200: Literature in Translation: Crisis of Identity in the 20th Century

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. The horrors committed against the Jewish people and other ethnic groups, in particular during the 1930s and 1940s in Europe, is the most obvious manifestation of a profound crisis of identity that dates most immediately to the great European conflicts of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This course will examine the theme of identity and marginalization through the films and the major works of literature of the pre and post-war period. Offered As Needed.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

Forensic Science

FOR 101: Introduction to Forensic Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing-Intensive. An introduction to the fascinating world of how science solves crimes. The topics for this course include and are not limited to: the history of forensic science, crime scene investigation, trace analysis, drugs, arson, fingerprints, firearms, tool mark analysis and document analysis. Lecture, 3 hours. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

French

FRE 101: Elementary French I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of French through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write French. Prerequisite: Less than 2 years previous French instruction.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 102: Elementary French II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of French through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write French. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students who successfully complete FRE 101 or have completed a college-level Elementary French I course.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 105: Intermediate French for Professional Communication I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. After a brief review of basics, the student continues to develop communicative ability in French in professional situations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of FRE 102 or its equivalent or 3 years high school French.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 106: Intermediate French for Professional Communication II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. After a brief review of basics, the student continues to develop communicative ability in French in professional situations. The specific areas covered may include Social Services, Education, Health-related professions, Travel and Tourism, Banking and Finance, and Law Enforcement. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students who have successfully completed FRE 105 or an equivalent college-level Intermediate French I course.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 207: French Conversation and Composition I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. The course is intended to develop the conversational and writing abilities of students in non-technical areas. Grammar review as needed. A variety of media is used, including film, TV, newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: FRE 106, or four years high school French, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

FRE 208: French Conversation and Composition II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. The course is intended to develop the conversational and writing abilities of students in non-technical areas. Grammar review as needed. A variety of media is used, including film, TV, newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: FRE 106, or four years high school French, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

FRE 220: Introduction to Literature in French

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. The course will introduce students to a variety of genres, time periods and authors of literature in French from France and the Francophone world. Focus will be on short stories, drama, poetry and the novella. While all work will be done in French, the pace will be appropriate for a student's initial experience with literature in the language. Prerequisite: FRE 106, or four years high school French or permission of instructor. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 240: Grammar and Culture Workshop I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course is a bridge between language-learning courses and more advanced study in French. The course will teach the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with greater emphasis on listening and speaking, focusing on the people and culture of the French-speaking world. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200 level or higher or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. Course type: Fluency; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 250: Grammar & Culture Workshop II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A continuation of FRE 240 Grammar and Culture Workshop I. This course is a bridge between language-learning courses and more advanced study in French. The course will teach the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with greater emphasis on listening and speaking, focusing on the people and culture of the French-speaking world. Pre-requisites: FRE 106, 4 years high school French, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Literature and Culture. (UG)
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 288: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in 288: the sophomore year of study, 388: the junior year of study, 488: the senior (488) year of study. Prerequisite: FRE-106 or concurrent enrollment in same or completion of any 200 level French course.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 299: Service Learning in French

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in French in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies, etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previous development project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. This course may be taken up to three times for credit. Prerequisites: Three credits French 200 level course or permission of instructor. Offered as Needed.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 307: Survey of French Literature I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. This course broadens the student's awareness of the developments of French literature. It provides a literary background for the religious, historical and political growth of the French nation. It fosters critical and creative thinking in French, and will enable the student to compare French literary trends with those of other nations. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 308: Survey of French Literature II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfils core competency: Affective Awareness; Writing Intensive; This course broadens the student's awareness of the developments of French literature. It provides a literary background for the religious, historical and political growth of the French nation. It fosters critical and creative thinking in French, and will enable the student to compare French literary trends with those of other nations. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 312: Advanced French Grammar

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfils core competency: Critical Thinking & Problem Solving. The more difficult concepts of French grammar will be analyzed in order to increase the student's ability to use them correctly in both the written and spoken language. Prerequisite: FRE 200-level or higher, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 315: French Civilization and Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The study of all the elements which combine to form the French nation. This course will include contemporary culture and norms as well as the traditional civilization components of historical, religious, economic, literary and artistic trends. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. Course type: Culture; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 326: Advanced Conversation in French

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course will focus on oral expression, giving the student the opportunity to hear and speak French exclusively in both directed and spontaneous conversations. Extensive use of French media is included. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 300-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

FRE 333: Special Topics in Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors, and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore various authors or genres of French literature. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 334: Special Topics in Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors, and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore various aspects of French or Francophone culture. Prerequisite: Three credits FRE 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Culture; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 335: Special Topics in Linguistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore the field of French linguistics. The course is delivered in the French language. Prerequisites: completion of 3 credits in French studies at the 200-level or higher. May be taken for credit up to three times (9 credits maximum). Offered as Needed. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 348: International Service Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)


Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 388: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in 288: the sophomore year of study, 388: the junior year of study, 488: the senior (488) year of study. Prerequisite: FRE 288. Offered Each Year.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 398: International Experiential Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)


Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 399: Service Learning in French

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in French in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies, etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previously development project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. This course may be taken up to three times for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits in French at the 300 level.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 420: Methods and Assessment

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the fundamental principles and practices of language learning theories and language instruction to prepare for work with and assessment of learners in various learning environments. Prerequisite: FRE 300-level or higher or permission of instructor, upper division status in Adolescent Certification French program. Offered As Needed.
Year: As Needed (UG)

FRE 442: Senior Project Research

1 Credit Hour(s)

Each Modern Language major must complete a senior project as one of the requirements for graduation. In this course, which must be taken in the junior year, students select the topic for research and make substantial progress on researching the senior project under the direction of Modern Language faculty members. Students are required to: submit a polished research proposal, submit an annotated bibliography, and present the research proposal to the class and faculty orally. Students may not enroll in FRE 443 Senior Project until FRE 442 is passed. Prerequisite: All junior majors must register for this course. This preparation course for the Senior Project is required of all majors and must be taken in the junior year.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 443: Senior Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. The French major will complete this 3 credit project that demonstrates mastery of the language in the context of literary or cultural studies or professional applications. The project may be a traditional thesis on a literary or cultural topic, or it may reflect the student's involvement in professional or volunteer work in the language. The project will normally require a significant research base culminating in the submission of an extensive written report and presentation at the Academic Festival. Prerequisite: Successful completion of FRE 442.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 488: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in 288: the sophomore year of study, 388: the junior year of study, 488: the senior (488) year of study. Prerequisites: FRE-388 and either concurrent enrollment in or completion of any 300 level French course. Offered Each Year
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

FRE 499: Service Learning in French

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in French in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies, etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previously development project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. This course may be taken up to three times for credit. Prerequisites: Three credits FRE 400 level course or permission of instructor.
Year: As Needed (UG)

Geography

GEO 117: World Geography

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will familiarize students with the spatial geography of the United States and other major regions of the world and will help them to understand the political and economic differences between nations, regions, and differently populated areas.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

History & Political Science

HP 333: Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Registration in this course is limited to History & Government Adolescence Education/Social Studies majors. This course is designed to prepare prospective teachers who will engage in teaching social studies at the secondary level. It is intended to invest them with an understanding of the skills of teaching as well as provide them with content knowledge. It is also intended to assist prospective teachers in generating and implementing ideas and then assessing how well these plans have worked in the classroom. Students must complete 50 hours of field experience as part of course requirements. Prerequisite: EDU 203, EDU 237, EDU 313, EDU 314, EDU 336, and SED 270 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring (UG)

HP 442: Thesis Research

2 Credit Hour(s)

Registration in this course is limited to History, History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies and Environmental Studies) and Political Science majors. In this course, taken in the spring semester of the junior year, students select topics for their research projects and make substantial progress on researching the senior thesis under the direction of History and Political Science Department faculty members. Students are required to submit a polished research proposal and an annotated bibliography and to make an oral presentation of the research proposal to the class. Prerequisite: Upper division status in department and successful completion of either HST 331 or PSC 331. This course is a prerequisite for HP 443 Research Project.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HP 443: Research Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. Registration in this course is limited to History, History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies and Environmental Studies) and Political Science majors. In this capstone course for students majoring in the History & Political Science department, students research an approved topic under the direction of History & Political Science Department faculty members and write a thesis of approximately 30 pages that synthesizes research from appropriate primary and secondary sources. Students are required to present their research orally, in a forum selected by the course instructor(s). Prerequisite: HST 331 or PSC 331, and HP 442.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Health Promotion

HPR 102: Introduction to Health Care: Systems & Professions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course explores the current health care system with an emphasis on health care professions, and provides students with an understanding of the major tenets of the health care system and the scope of practice in each of the health professions. The desired skills of health care professionals and the contributions these professions bring to patient care will be investigated. A review of educational preparation and practice requirements for each of the health careers will be explored to assist students in further delineating their own educational and career goals. The course will also provide opportunity for students to appropriately explore the current databases and literature and engage in discussions on the ethics and current events of healthcare.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 103: Introduction to Health Promotion

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to the skills and expectations of the Health Promotion program and related professions. This skill building class will place particular emphases on academic and professional writing, research, presentation, professional communications and leadership skills. HPR Majors only.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 105: Introduction to Weight Training

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces the student to the weight room environment. Specific instructions will be given on how to use resistance training equipment such as free weights, machines, and adjunct equipment to exercise and train the major muscle groups of the body to attain a higher fitness level. Basic concepts will be presented to allow the student to apply the knowledge gained in the course to their personal training goals. No prior exercise experience is necessary; this course is designed for the beginner.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 106: Introduction to Core Strengthening

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to a range of exercises aimed at increasing core strength, enhancing stability, and supporting posture. Students will learn and identify anatomical structures related to the core and perform tests to assess core strength and ability. Physioball, mat work and other exercises will be demonstrated and practiced, including modifications for beginning, intermediate and advanced routines. Beginners will learn how to safely incorporate these exercises into a personal training routine, while more advanced students will benefit by learning techniques and approaches for teaching these exercises to fitness clients.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 200: CPR and Emergency Health Care

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course outlines the roles of the health care provider and the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) in emergency care. The course focuses on first aid management for life-threatening and non-life-threatening emergencies such as choking, respiratory and cardiac arrest, medical emergencies, injury emergencies, and environmental emergencies incurred during daily, work and athletic activities. Content will also address the concept of "duty to act," liability, disease transmission/prevention, personal protective strategies and blood borne pathogen training. Successful completion by the student is required for eligibility for the Emergency Care and Safety Institute (ECSI) Health Care Provider CPR and AED and First Aid Certifications.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 201: Survey of Eastern and Western Complementary Medical Approaches

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an overview of current complementary and alternative medical approaches/therapies (CAM). These approaches/therapies, each in its own way, attempt to achieve a state of balance between physical, mental, emotional and spiritual aspects of the person, to help promote the return to wellness and to help the individual remain healthy in the future. Each approach/therapy will be presented by experts/practitioners of the field, and will then be compared and contrasted as to its history, purpose, uses, education/training and current based evidence. Offered Every Other Year (Fall).
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 202: Found of Meditation and Guided Imagery

2 Credit Hour(s)

This class will include an introduction to various forms of contemporary and wisdom tradition meditations and mental imagery exercises including concentrative, mindfulness and transcendental. The roots and theory of meditation and mental imagery will be discussed along with an overview of scientific inquiry regarding performance effects on the physical body and mind as it relates to health. Specific instruction regarding the performance of meditation and mental imagery will be offered in a lab type setting.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 203: Science of Prayer in Healing

1 Credit Hour(s)

In this course, an overview of prayer will be offered from a basis of theoretical foundation and purported efficacy on health and healing rather than from the perspective of spirituality or religiosity.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HPR 205: Healthy Eating and Body Image

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course explores community health education as it relates to disordered eating behaviors and body image. Both individual and societal preoccupations with body image are referenced, as modern Western society places increasing emphasis on women's and men's weight and appearance. The effects of popular media on individual's body perception and the way these effects manifest themselves in various physical and psychological disorders will be discussed. Healthy eating will be emphasized as well as other individual and community level approaches to prevention and education.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 206: Cardiovascular Health Education

2 Credit Hour(s)

The course will cover selected topics in cardiovascular health education including heart disease, hypertension, high cholesterol, stroke, diabetes and obesity. Current epidemiological research will be reviewed including risk factors, and screening; treatment and prevention of disease at the primary, secondary and tertiary level will be emphasized. Current models of health education promoting cardiovascular health will be introduced.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 208: Health Promotion and Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Through this course students will explore concepts and models of health and wellness, health promotion and health education. This course will review the history and profession of health promotion and education, the development of health education materials, learning theories, and will explore health related programs and initiatives in school, clinical, government and corporate settings. Strategies and implementation tactics will be discussed for successful development and delivery of health and wellness programs to address community and individual needs. Offered Each Year (Fall).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 213: Foundations of Yoga

2 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This class will provide an introduction to the practice of Hatha Yoga. The origins, postures, stretches, and breathing techniques aimed at spiritual and physical well-being will be discussed and practiced along with an overview of scientific inquiry regarding performance effects on the physical body and mind as it relates to health. Specific instruction regarding the performance of basic techniques to balance and liberate an individual's natural flow of energy or prana will be offered in a lab setting.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 214: Foundations of Tai Chi

1 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This class will provide an introduction to the practice of the Tai Chi art form. The ancient Chinese physical art form's series of slow choreographed movements combined with coordinated breathing and mental concentration will be discussed and practiced along with an overview of scientific inquiry regarding performance effects on the physical body and mind as it relates to health. Specific instruction regarding the performance of basic techniques to balance yin & yang and movement of chi, the vital life force, throughout the body will be offered in a lab setting.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 216: Sexual Health Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course explores a multitude of concepts related to the theory, practice and teaching of sexual health education at a community level. The course includes comprehensive coverage of information and issues of human sexuality, those related to sexuality education, and an explanation and practice of educational skills necessary for skilled sexuality educators.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 220: Foundations of Energy Therapies

1 Credit Hour(s)

The content of this course centers upon quantum physics perspective of matter and the physical body. Representative theory and research supporting the notion that all matter is composed merely of various forms of vibrations and energy waves will be offered and discussed. The non-local nature of these vibrations and energy waves will be discussed as it pertains to the holistic notion of the individual and the universe. The assertion that matter is merely non-local energy will be explored as it relates to several complementary healthcare practices.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 221: Introduction to Chakra System

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course will discuss the complex and vibrant human energy field system referred to as the chakra system. Its rich history as part of the Ayurvedic system of healthcare in India and its relationship to human health will be explored. Physical and especially psychological perspectives will be presented in depth. Through lecture and application, we will explore how the chakras affect the patient/client on a physical, mental, and spiritual level.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 222: Reiki

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces the history and the philosophy of this universal method of energy healing, and explores its techniques for adjustment of their energy patterns. The course and practice focus on the Reiki principle that the body recognizes the universal life energy and uses it to promote balance and total health.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 224: Qi Gong Healing Method

1 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This class will provide an introduction to the practice of one branch of Traditional Chinese Medicine, the healing art of Qi Gong. This art form utilizes various movement exercises, self- practices and meditations. Origins and techniques will be discussed and practiced along with an overview of scientific inquiry regarding performance effects on the physical body and mind as it relates to health. Specific instruction regarding the performance of basic techniques will be offered in a lab setting.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 225: Healthy Relationships

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces theories and approaches to education on healthy relationships. It will explore the formation of non-intimate and intimate relationships between people, and the effects (with an emphasis on health) of these relationships on people. These relationships include the everyday associations we have with others as a result of the positions we occupy in various situations (often called role-relationships), as well as the more intimate relationships we form with others (friendships, family relationships, and sexual relationships). Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 229: Holistic Lifestyle Practices

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to fundamental theories and approaches to a holistic, or wellness based lifestyle. Current evidence on the physiological and psychological effects of stress, as well as stress management techniques, expressive therapies and coping strategies will be explored. The course will explore the role of physical activity and nutrition as it relates to modern day lifestyles, including contemporary findings on functional foods, alternative diets and other nutritional and fitness approaches to health. This is an applied course in which students will actively engage in a wellness coaching model, stress management exercises, relaxation techniques, self assessments, and personal behavior change projects as related to health promotion.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 230: Herbal Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

The study of the ways that herbs and herbal remedies have traditionally been used in the Western and Eastern societies. Explore the philosophy of herbalism and distinct nutritional and therapeutic benefits that herbs can offer. Learn the fundamentals of preparing and using herbs for health enhancement. Specific health practices, which utilize the therapeutic applications of herbs and other botanical substances, will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 231: Aromatherapy

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course provides an introduction to aromatherapy and the uses, principles and physiological and psychological effects of essential oils. The course will explore the history, basic theory and practice of aromatherapy as well as current evidence of its effectiveness in treating many health conditions. Laboratory experiences will grant students the opportunity to explore the blending and use of essential oils.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 232: Foundations of Homeopathy

2 Credit Hour(s)

Introduces the basic principles of homeopathy. Course sessions introduce the system of healing based on the natural law of like cures like. Topics include information about homeopathic case taking and analysis, homeopathic first aid and home care and its uses for patient education and its application in acute and chronic ailments.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 233: Introduction to Naturopathy

2 Credit Hour(s)

This course will discuss the history, philosophy and fundamental principles of the healing art of naturopathy. Course sessions will include information about naturopathic practices and their application and use in creating a state of complete mental, physical and social well being. Naturopathic approach to health maintenance, prevention of illness and disease and therapeutic interventions for the treatment of acute and chronic ailments are presented.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 234: Foundations of Public Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is an introductory course which explores the basic principles of public health practice, including the history, function and infrastructure of public health; biopsychosocial perspectives of public health problems; the public health professions; and the legal and ethical concerns.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 300: Contemporary Issues in Integrative Health Care

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course explores contemporary issues in integrative health care, or the combination of evidence based complementary and alternative healthcare practices with Western, conventional practices. The changing paradigm of the current health care arena requires an inquisitive approach, research and critical thinking regarding new directions of health care. Controversial topics and themes in integrative health care will be introduced and students will examine these topics considering the perspective of the patient/consumer, health care provider and the health care system within which the services are being provided.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 301: Physiology of Exercise and Cardiopulmonary Assessment

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the physiological responses of physical activity and exercise. The course explores the cardiovascular, respiratory, bioenergetic and metabolic systems as these systems adjust to demands of physical work at various durations and intensities. Factors such as age, gender, disease risk factors, sedentary and non-sedentary lifestyle, and habitual training will be considered as they relate to cardiovascular risk assessment and individual limitations to performance including possibilities for safely minimizing limitations and maximizing performance. Course includes laboratory experiences directed toward competence in graded exercise testing, exercise prescription, and exercise programming as applied to asymptomatic, apparently healthy individuals and prevention of cardiovascular, pulmonary, or metabolic diseases. Prerequisite: BIO 207/L and BIO 208/L or BIO 330/L and BIO 340/L. Corequisite: HCS 301L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 301L: Physiology of Exercise and Cardiopulmonary Assessment Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for HCS 301.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 303: Traditional Chinese Medicine

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an overview of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and introduces the basic concepts and theories. It will provide an introduction to the philosophy and theories fundamental to TCM, including the essential principles of Yin and Yang, five elements and internal organ systems. Acupuncture as a therapy will also be introduced, including meridian theory and acupuncture points. Students will be exposed to the diagnostic methods of TCM and as well as techniques such as cupping, moxibustion, Tai Chi, Qi Gong, and herbology.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HPR 305: Communicating Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will present fundamental models and theories of health communication to students interested in health promotion and education. Students will move through the steps of the health communication process, from planning to evaluation; will learn to assess an audience and create culturally appropriate materials; and will examine and critique existing health promotion materials, media, and campaigns. Contemporary research in the areas of intercultural communication, provider-patient-family communication, community mobilization, advocacy, social marketing and health technology will be explored.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HPR 308: Environmental Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course will provide an introduction to the public health function of environmental and occupational health. This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of how environmental factors impact the health of individuals and the community as a whole, and of the efforts made to prevent or minimize the effects of negative impacts. The emphasis of this course is to explore the relationship of people to their environment how the environment affects individual health and how an individual affects the environment. Efforts and strategies to protect and enhance one?s health and to influence the quality of the environment will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 313: Principles of Health Behavior Change

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will focus on the theoretical background of health education, health promotion and disease prevention. Students will build critical thinking skills as they explore individual and social health behavior theories and their application to behavior change research and practice.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 314: Health Policy

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course examines the policies of the current U.S. healthcare delivery system. The history and evolution of the U.S. health care infrastructure and recent policy changes The former and current service delivery structure will be outlined, as well as advancements, and gaps/limitations in the provisions and delivery of care. The types of health care facilities, services, agencies and personnel that constitute the US health care system and the response of the system to the changing health care needs of the population will be explored. Class discussions will be centered on: managing the increasing demands on the health care system by a rapidly growing population affected by the epidemic of multiple chronic diseases; balancing population-based health care needs while delivering high quality health care and improving access to health care services in a cost-containment environment. Social, political, economic, legal and ethical issues as they relate to health care policy will be discussed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HPR 317: Human Motion: Principles and Perspectives

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course is a study of functional anatomy, biomechanical principles, and kinesiology as applied to human movement. Structure and function of the musculoskeletal system including muscle actions, joint motions, and the basic principles of kinesiology will be covered. Hands on lab experiences will promote development of skills critical to the understanding of human motion for careers centered in fitness, prevention of injury, promotion of function, and optimizing motor skill performance. An exposure to cadaver prosections in a lab setting will culminate the student experience. Prerequisites: BIO 207/L and BIO 208/L or BIO 330/L and BIO 340/L. Corequisite: HCS 317L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 317L: Human Motion: Principles and Perspectives Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for HCS 317.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 320: Community Health Education and Disease Prevention

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. The course identifies and explores infectious and non-infectious diseases in relationship to risk factors, populations at risk, and epidemiology. Etiology and mechanisms of injury and disease onset are presented with emphasis on principles and strategies for education, prevention and health maintenance. Medical and therapeutic interventions designed to address common injuries and infectious and non-infectious diseases will be discussed as they relate to community education, prevention and safety program development.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 330: Health Promotion Program Planning, Implementation and Evaluation

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide the knowledge and skills needed to plan, implement and evaluate health promotion programs in a variety of settings. Students will be introduced to concepts related to community needs assessment, data collection and measurement, intervention strategies, developing health education materials, evaluation techniques, acting as a health promotion/education resource person, and communication and coordination of health promotion programming. Prerequisite: HCS 310.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 331: Community Health Education: Outreach and Fieldwork

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to practical methods and processes related to community health fieldwork, outreach and community collaboration. Fieldwork and research methods, essential skills in communication and cultural competence, and skills necessary to act as a community resource person will be introduced and practiced as students actively engage in community outreach events.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HPR 332: Strength & Conditioning

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course, students will explore and apply concepts and principles used to develop effective and appropriate strength and conditioning training programs. Material will cover fundamental strength training philosophies, program design variables, and traditional and contemporary strength training techniques. Students will gain experience in the execution and appropriate instruction of various resistance training techniques. Prerequisites: HCS 301 and HCS 317. Required corequisite: HCS 332L.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 332L: Strength and Conditioning Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for HCS 332.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 335: Critical Issues in Global Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course introduces the many contexts of global health. Critical issues to be explored include multiple determinants of health, the disparities and burden of disease experienced around the globe, particularly by such populations as women and children, the ethical dimensions related to these disparities, current health priorities, and the importance of global health in terms of development. The Sustainable Development Goals will be referred to as a standard for future goals on a global scale.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 338: Social Determinants of Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course will provide students with an understanding of how social factors contribute to racial/ethnic, socioeconomic and gender disparities in health and health care. This course will explore the way the social environment and social behavior influence health. We will cover the most recent research findings in the area of social epidemiology and medical sociology and discuss and debate the causes and consequences of social inequalities in health. Students will gain experience in judging the sometimes conflicting evidence between claims and apply the body of literature to situations with which they are familiar and may have encountered in everyday life. Students will discuss the policy interventions that have been designed to address disparities in health and health care.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 340: Musculoskeletal Fitness Assessment

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to prepare Health Care Studies students for a career in a health or fitness profession by providing them with musculoskeletal fitness assessment knowledge and skills. This lecture/lab course will explore the steps of musculoskeletal examination, as well as provide the students with the tools to assess static and dynamic musculoskeletal fitness. The importance of musculoskeletal health to overall wellness will also be discussed. Prerequisites: HCS 301 and HCS 317. Corequisite: HCS 340L.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 340L: Musculoskeletal Fitness Assessment Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for HCS 340.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 350: Fitness Training and Exercise Prescription

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students develop the rationale for and the skills to examine, evaluate, and prescribe comprehensive fitness programs in a variety of settings. The class includes lectures, demonstrations and practical laboratories in which students acquire knowledge and competence in exercise testing and prescription, health evaluations, screenings, and risk classification as applied to asymptomatic, apparently healthy individuals and populations with special circumstances. Pathophysiology of disease conditions (CVD, pulmonary disease, metabolic disease), aging and pregnancy are also explored to help students understand the needs of these populations during exercise testing and prescription. The course will include the physiological basis of the short-term response and long-term adaptation of the neuromuscular and metabolic systems to exercise including the effect of manipulating specific exercise parameters. Program design and instruction in the proper techniques and execution of training activities is emphasized. Prerequisite: HCS 301 and HCS 317. Corequisite: HCS 350L.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 350L: Fitness Training and Exercise Prescription Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the laboratory requirement for HCS 350.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 353: Introduction to Epidemiology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to the field of epidemiology, which is the study of the distribution and determinants of health in populations. The course will emphasize methods for assessing factors associated with the distribution and etiology of health and disease. This course will introduce students to key epidemiological concepts and calculations, how to identify and evaluate sources of health information, epidemiological investigation techniques and the evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different study designs. Prerequisite: NSC 310.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HPR 391: Professional Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide Health Promotion students an opportunity to build their personal and professional skills and career readiness. An emphasis will be placed on career exploration and the development of positive personal habits, professional work ethics, communication and leadership skills with support from the Health Promotion department and the Office of Career Services. (UG)

HPR 415: Health Research Design and Methodology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Information Literacy. Fulfills Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This course will introduce students to the field of research design and methods for health related issues. Students will be prepared to critically review research articles and gain a comprehensive understanding of the research process, types of research designs, samples, bias and interactions in research studies as well as how to comprehend the results and study findings. Students will learn how to pose research questions, construct a relevant hypothesis, make valid causal inferences, operationalize concepts, and ways to formally test their hypotheses. This course is intended for HPR Majors only, to be completed the Senior Year. Prerequisite: HPR 353 or Permission of Instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Health Science

HSC 112: Health Promotion Across the Lifespan

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course focuses on the promotion of health and wellness across the lifespan from the perspective of both the individual and the family. Contextual factors will be examined through the lenses of self, family, provider, governmental and societal responsibility to explore the relationship between individual, community and global health. Students will assess their own health-promoting behaviors and identify their own health risks. Current evidence will be explored and critically examined to identify influences on health and well being. Offered in web-based format.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HSC 221: Issues in Women's Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NUR 221. This elective course is designed to provide students with an overview of topics impacting women's health in contemporary society. The course focuses on controversial issues related to women's health and investigates the roles that women play as health care consumers and as health care providers. The course is designed for students from multiple areas of study. These students will explore specific health care problems impacting upon women and will analyze contextual factors that affect the delivery of health care to women. Prerequisite: CMP 101; Web-based format.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HSC 232: Learning Through Service

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. Learning experience through participation as a volunteer for approximately four hours per week in a community-based agency within the area. Students will also be expected to keep a journal account of their experiences and attend class every other week for about an hour to process with others what is being learned. The focus of the course is to help students gain an appreciation that being of service to others is a way of learning and a way of growing as a person.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HSC 233: Herbs, Drugs, Supplements and the Body

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NUR 233. Grounded in a holistic framework, this course focuses on general concepts of herbs, drugs, supplements and nutrition in relation to the well being of self and the client. This course develops a basic comprehension of nutrition emphasizing the role of phyto-nutrients as well as toxic ingredients in our food. The impact of culture, spirituality, and biological factors, as well as psychosocial, economic, and ethical considerations, is discussed in relation to improving and maintaining health in self and client. Relevant and current evidence-based research is included. The notion of food, herbs, and supplements as pharmacy is explored throughout. The newest information on drug/herb interactions, Joint Commission requirements for herbal products, new FDA labeling guidelines, and how to select a quality herbal or supplemental product are addressed. This course fosters understanding and strategies for promoting specific herbs and supplements for individuals attempting to maintain health and coping with pathology. Health promotion (learning to make healthy choices in our toxic environment, healthy sleep habits) and maintenance are stressed. Concepts related to family therapy, consumerism, and advocacy are addressed. Students learn such strategies for improving self and client health as risk assessment, stress management, nutritional counseling, and health teaching. Web-based format.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HSC 329: Statistics for Evidence-Based Practice

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Core Competency; Critical Thinking & Creative Problem Solving; What one learns in PA school will not always apply to medical practice. Learning is never mastered. Thus, to be a good clinician, one must constantly educate oneself by evaluating the latest medical research to keep one's knowledge current. Evidence-based practice provides methodologies to evaluate scientific evidence for the delivery of the highest quality health care. This course is one of two courses in the Physician Assistant Department for the evaluation of medical research that provides: 1. a foundation in probability and statistics, and 2. an introduction to medical research designs and associated inferential statistical analyses In combination with PAS 529, this course is designed to increase students' competency in the evaluation of medical research. In this course, the emphasis is on basic study design, appropriate descriptive and inferential procedures, and interpretation of results. We will focus on real examples from the medical literature to cover the basics of clinical research design, sampling methodology, statistical methods for evaluating clinical research data, as well as introduce some of the many limitations of basic and clinical research. Topics include: Descriptive statistics, statistical inference probability theory and application, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, estimation, confidence intervals, measures of risk/association, association vs. causation, and pitfalls of p-values. Specific statistical analyses include: t-test, ANOVA, linear correlation, linear regression, relative risk, and the odds ratio with emphasis on clinical trial designs. Pre-requisite: At least second year matriculated Physician Assistant Studies major. (UG)

HSC 340: Foundations of Palliative Care for the Health Care Professional

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to introduce the healthcare profession student to concepts relating to palliative care. Contextual factors impacting views of death, the history of the palliative care movement, policy factors relating to palliative care, and future directions for palliative care will be addressed. This course is meant to serve as an introduction to the field of palliative care and to sensitize the health care student to macro and micro factors impacting upon end of life care. Open to students in the following majors who have earned a minimum grade of C in a 300 level course in the major: Health Care Studies; Nursing; Physical Therapy; Physician Assistant; Social Work.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

Health Systems Management

HSM 210: Introduction to Health Systems Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the structure and function of the health care delivery system. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, disease, quality, values, needs, and utilization; issues in health care workforce, institution, and system organization; general issues in policy, reimbursement, and regulation; and broad community and organizational considerations in health.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HSM 210: Introduction to Health Systems Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the structure and function of the health care delivery system. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, disease, quality, values, needs, and utilization; issues in health care workforce, institution, and system organization; general issues in policy, reimbursement, and regulation; and broad community and organizational considerations in health.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HSM 350: Grants and Contract Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course provides an overview of the role of grants and contracts in an organization's budget. Students will learn to plan grant projects, locate sources of funding, give effective presentations about their projects, and develop written grant proposals.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HSM 350: Grants and Contract Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course provides an overview of the role of grants and contracts in an organization's budget. Students will learn to plan grant projects, locate sources of funding, give effective presentations about their projects, and develop written grant proposals.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

History

HST 104: The Human Place in Nature: An Introduction to Global Environmental History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as IND 104. In this course, we will focus on different patterns of human responses to environmental challenges and identify ways in which they have changed over time. Students will be challenged to understand individual and collective behaviors in their social, cultural, political, and economic contexts. This course highlights several key aspects of environmental history: 1) humankind's impact on the environment as we have attempted to alter our natural surroundings; 2) various moral and ethical perspectives about the environment and humankind's place in the natural world; 3) the role that nature has played in various aesthetic visions; 4) modern environmental crises and their political impact; and 5) the modern "green" movement as a grassroots call for social justice in response to environmental degradation. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 105: Introduction to World History I: From Antiquity to 1500

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The two-course world history sequence focuses on the peoples, forces and ideas that have shaped the way individuals have experienced (and still do experience) the world. The course's perspective is global and focuses on the origins and development, geographical context, and interactions of world cultures. In this course, we will focus on two key themes of early world history: 1) the ways in which different cultures emerged in response to the demands of their environmental surroundings; and 2) the ways in which different peoples began to increasingly interact with one another by 1500. .
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 106: Introduction to World History II: From 1500

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The two-course world history sequence focuses on the peoples, forces and ideas that have shaped the way individuals have experienced (and still do experience) the world. The course's perspective is global and focuses on the origins and development, geographical context, and interactions of world cultures. In this course, we will focus on two key themes of modern world history: 1) the ways in which global connections have developed; and 2) the ways in which different peoples at different times have resisted globalization, instead seeking to preserve their distinct cultural traditions.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 125: Historical Approaches to Contemporary Problems: Domestic Affairs

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course attempts to deepen understanding of contemporary issues in American society by studying their historical evolution. We will examine the events and impact of contested economic, political, social, and cultural issues in the U.S. since the 1960s. Major topics include the impact of foreign policy on domestic affairs; the civil rights movement; the women's movements; the New Left; liberation movements; Watergate; the rise of modern conservatism; and the culture wars of the 1980s and 1990s.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HST 137: African American History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. A study of the African American experience in America. The course will explore African origins and cultural influences and examine the social and political significance of African Americans in American history.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 206: Twentieth Century Europe

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course deals with the story of Europe during the tumultuous 20th century. While we will focus much of our attention on political, economic and diplomatic developments; considerable time will be devoted to social and cultural phenomena as well.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 211: Introduction to Public History

3 Credit Hour(s)

This survey course introduces students to the field of public history - how historians make history come alive for the general public. Among areas covered will be the role of historians in museums, historical societies, archives, historic preservation, government and business organizations, and other non-academic careers. Students will explore effective exhibit design and presentation of history to the public through museum visits and class projects.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

HST 215: Introduction to Women's Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Cross-listed as WST 215. This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the language, concepts, and issues in the field of Women's Studies. We will explore the construction of gender by focusing upon the intersection of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion in shaping women's lives, and will look at women's efforts to define their identities through work, creative activity, and through feminism.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 216: History of Medieval Europe: 300 - 1400

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course will focus on five specific developments: 1) the transition from the Roman world to the medieval world; 2) the emergence of several distinct cultures within the territories of the old Roman empire; 3) the key role played by religion in the various medieval cultures; 4) the burst of creative energy and economic expansion associated with the High Middle Ages; and 5) the crises of the 14th century (church schism, the Black Death, etc.) that devastated medieval Europe.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 220: American History to 1877

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course, an introduction to American civilization from the age of exploration and colonization through the Civil War and Reconstruction, focuses on central themes and issues in the development of American society and institutions by raising questions about human values, economic growth, institutional change, cultural development, and political democracy in the American past. Major themes include: exploration and colonization; life in early America; the creation of a slave society; colonial America and the British empire; the establishment of representative government; the American Revolution; establishing a new nation; the era of Andrew Jackson; the first industrial revolution; social and cultural life in the early republic; expansion and sectional crisis; and the Civil War and Reconstruction. Offered Each Year (Fall).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 221: American History From 1877 to Present

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course seeks to have students gain a perspective on the position of the United States among the nations of the world and on the controversies and agreements among Americans concerning the desired attributes of their own culture, government, and ideals. Major themes include: conquest of the West; the Populist movement; the creation of the Jim Crow system; industrialization and its effects on the American society, economy, and political processes; immigration and urbanization; the American Empire; Progressivism and the struggle for social justice; World War I; social changes of the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the New Deal; World War II; post-war affluence and social change, the Cold War and anti-communism; the liberal state; minorities and civil rights; the Vietnam era; the New Right and neo-conservatism; and the recent past.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 224: History of the Byzantine Empire: 300 - 1453

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the history of the Byzantine Empire. This course focuses on the following key features of Byzantine history: 1) the transformation of the Roman Empire into the Byzantine; 2) the role of the Byzantine church in political and cultural affairs; 3) the interaction of Byzantium with the other "heirs" of Rome: medieval Islam and medieval Western Christendom; and 4) the influence of Byzantium on neighboring states that interacted with Byzantium, especially "Kievan Rus."
Session: As Needed (UG)

HST 225: The Indian Ocean in World History

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course covers the history of the Indian Ocean world, from the East African Coast to Southeast Asia, from the beginning of ancient maritime trade to the twentieth century, paying particular attention to the Islamic period. (Offered We will look at how movement in and around the ocean for purposes of trade, travel, and pilgrimage created a rich multi-cultural environment. We will examine how trade and religious networks connected people, and at how people throughout the region adopted and adapted new religions and cultures. In addition to syntheses of Indian Ocean history and modern histories, we will read primary sources, including accounts of individuals who traveled in the Indian Ocean. Students are encouraged to think about major historical processes and to develop critical and analytical skills: evaluating evidence, analyzing written and visual documents, developing and presenting an argument and supporting evidence in writing.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 229: History and Film: Democracy in the 20th Century

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course examines issues confronting societies around the world and the ways in which films portray them. Students should be prepared to write several papers based on films and readings.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 230: Problems of the Third World

3 Credit Hour(s)

The growing consciousness of the developing nations (LDC's) and their relationship with the advanced capitalist nations (First World) has been a major development of the post World War II period. While the term "Third World" was originally a political designation, it now implies certain economic and cultural characteristics. This course is designed to acquaint the student with many of the economic, political, social and international problems faced by these nations, while exploring the historical roots of these problems.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 232: Migration & Diaspora in Us

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course examines the history of immigration, migration, and diaspora communities in the United States from 1800-the present. Three overarching themes guide this course: the movement of peoples to the US and some of the major migratory movements of peoples within the US; the relationship between American ideas concerning citizenship and immigration and the experiences of immigrants within the US in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries; the evolving governmental policies towards immigration from throughout this period. The course addresses what draws people to the United States as well as what pushes them to leave their countries of origin. Students will learn about the ways in which the United States has been shaped by immigrants and diaspora communities through a variety of weekly readings, writing assignments, exams, and a study of an immigrant experience project.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HST 237: History of Early Modern Europe: From the Renaissance to the Age of Napoleon

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the key elements of modern European society that began to emerge during the period from the Renaissance to the age of Napoleon. In this course, we will focus on the following key developments: 1) the Renaissance; 2) the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Reformation; 3) the rise of the modern system of European states; 4) the creation of the Atlantic economy; 5) the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; 6) the global rivalries of the European colonial powers; and 7) the French Revolution and its legacy.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 248: Ancient Mediterranean World

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the various cultures of the ancient Mediterranean world. The course is divided into four sections: 1) the origins of Mediterranean civilizations, including the history of ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt; 2) the Greek cultural expansion from the classical period through the Hellenistic age; 3) the history of Rome from the foundations of the republic to the fall of the empire; and 4) the rise of Christianity as a cultural phenomenon in the Mediterranean world.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 304: Modern China

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses primarily on twentieth century China and will include the Revolution of 1911, the rise of the Kuomintang or Nationalist Party, and China since the Communist victory in 1949. Students will be encouraged to make their own evaluations regarding the Maoist regime, U.S.-Chinese relations in the twentieth century and the Chinese relationship with Third World nations.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 308: Modern Latin America

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. A course to acquaint the student with significant historical and cultural developments in Latin America since independence (political instability, economic underdevelopment, class conflict, anti-clericalism, militarism, and the relationship with the United States). Select countries such as Brazil, Argentina and Cuba will be emphasized; however, a topical rather than a country-by-country approach will generally be followed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HST 309: Introduction to the History of American Women

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as WST 309. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of American women from the colonial era to the present. The class places particular emphasis on the ways in which women's experiences have been shaped by such factors as race, class, and ethnicity, as well as by gender. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status, or foundational coursework in history or women's studies, is highly recommended.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 312: Sub-Saharan Africa

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of essential historical and cultural background necessary for understanding contemporary problems of Sub-Saharan Africa. Emphasis is placed on pre-selected countries: Nigeria, Zaire, Ghana and the Republic of South Africa.
Session: As Needed (UG)

HST 315: Modern Political Thought

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will analyze key problems in political philosophy by reading original works by thinkers who have influenced our own political discourse today.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 317: The Middle East

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is a survey of the history of the Middle East. Includes discussions of Islam, the growth of nationalism, Pan Arabism, the Arab-Israeli conflict, and Gulf War.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 319: 20th Century Russia and Eastern Europe

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the nature of communism in Russia and Eastern Europe, the reasons for the collapse of communist regimes, and the transition to the post-communist era. We begin by examining how communist governments gained control in Russia and Eastern Europe, the nature of communist rule, and the crisis confronted by various regimes. In addition, we explore the nature of the Cold War and the ideological struggle between state and society, the "democratization" of politics, the problems of ethnic conflict, and changing relations with the West.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 324: Global Environmental History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course deals with several key aspects of environmental history: 1) humankind's impact on the environment as we attempt to alter our natural surroundings; 2) various philosophical and religious concepts of the environment and humankind's place in the natural world; 3) European global expansion and the impact of this ecological imperialism on indigenous peoples and ecologies; 4) the modern "green" movement; and 5) global environment crises and their impact on domestic affairs and international relations.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 325: Introduction to Polish Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as IND 325. Students are introduced to the history of Polish culture. This survey course will focus primarily on cultural developments, but students will also learn about key political, economic, and social developments in Polish history.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 326: Culture Wars: Social and Political Conflict in Recent Us History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course explores the influence of the culture wars both historically and in contemporary American society and politics during the 20th and early 21st centuries. We will trace the historical roots of recent debates over culture while also analyzing and evaluating historical claims about past events. The course heavily emphasizes events and developments since the 1960s, although we also examine issues and themes from early American history and the early 20th through such topics as religion, science, urbanization, immigration and assimilation, race relations, changing gender roles, and sexual behavior as represented in cultural and political history. Offered as Needed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

HST 328: Multicultural Poland: History and Public Memory

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment; Affective Awareness; Writing Intensive. This study abroad course provides students with a unique firsthand approach to studying history. Readings, lectures, and site visits focus on the multicultural legacy in Poland, especially the historic region of Galicia that includes the cities of Krak w and Przemysl in Poland, and the city of Lviv in Ukraine. This course also requires students to consider the complex interplay of history and memory in Poland, especially as it relates to World War I, the interwar period, and World War II.
Session: Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 331: Introduction to Historiography

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Students will learn about how historians conduct research and write history. Classes are conducted in seminar format. Class discussions focus on research skills and strategies and the intensive study of a wide variety of historical writings. This course is part of a capstone requirement for History majors and History & Political Science majors (including Adolescent Ed and Environmental Specialization); non-majors may also enroll.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 345: Introduction to Russian Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as IND 345. This course introduces students to select themes in the Russian cultural tradition. The peoples of Russia have engaged actively with other cultures in Europe and Asia for over a millennium. We will explore how a distinct Russian culture has emerged, with special emphases on the following developments: the introduction of Christianity; the "Mongol Yoke;" the "Europeanization" of Muscovite Russia; the cultural splendor of the Russian empire during the reign of Catherine II; the flourishing of Russian literary culture under an absolutist regime during the "Golden Age" of the mid-19th century; and Russia's role in the birth of Modernism at the end of the tsarist era.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

HST 416: Internship in Public History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Encouraged for students who are pursuing a public history minor. Prerequisite: HST 211.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Interdisciplinary

IND 101: Sustainable and Critical Relationships

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduces freshmen students to the rich complexities of college education. It provides an extended orientation during which students are introduced to the meaning and value of a liberal arts education; learn to successfully adapt to the academic, personal and social complexities of college life; develop important social relationships with other students and with the broader campus community and learn to access important campus resources that support students' academic achievement as well as their physical and mental health. Along with this orientation, students will begin a journey of intellectual, aesthetic, moral and ethical self-reflection and growth. The primary intent of the course is to facilitate students' abilities to analyze knowledge from disparate sources and to enhance critical thinking skills.
Session: Fall (UG)

IND 104: The Human Place in Nature: An Introduction to Global Environmental History

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as HST 104. In this course, we will focus on different patterns of human responses to environmental challenges and identify ways in which they have changed over time. Whether discussing events from the 15th century in South America or events in the 20th century in China, you will be challenged to understand individual and collective behaviors in their social, cultural, political, and economic contexts. Unlike many history courses, we additionally provide special attention to the natural setting and the religious, ethical, and aesthetic responses to various environmental challenges. This course highlights several key aspects of environmental history: 1) humankind's impact on the environment as we have attempted to alter our natural surroundings; 2) various moral and ethical perspectives about the environment and humankind's place in the natural world; 3) the role that nature has played in various aesthetic visions; 4) modern environmental crisis and their political impact; and 5) the modern "green" movement as a grassroots call for social justice in response to environmental degradation. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department). (UG)

IND 114: Creative Community Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as ART-114. This course is designed to engage students in meaningful learning about how the arts are an essential part of our everyday lives and communities. The instructor will engage students in activities that illustrate ways art can be used as a vehicle for community development that seeks to improve community members' well being. The instructor will introduce students to local, national, and international artists, programs, and organizations that are using the arts to positively promote community development and support community members. Students will learn how arts communities (1) are conceived, (2) identify community concerns, (2) plan and use the arts as a way to address those concerns, (3) are funded, and (4) assess their work. The course will connect the arts, healthcare, education, community/cultural development, and civic responsibility/engagement.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 120: Introduction to Global Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course will introduce students to the various aspects of global interaction that characterize our world today. While our focus is on the 20th and 21st centuries, we will also discuss deeper historical contexts for the economic, political, and cultural challenges posed by globalizing forces in earlier eras. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department.)
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 121: Introduction to Global Studies LS

2 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency:Contextual Competency. This course will introduce students to the various aspects of global interaction and exchanges in economics, politics, and culture that characterize our world today. In addition to exploring competing conceptions of globalization, the interdisciplinary field of global studies addresses issues such as international organizations, human rights, the global environment, population and consumption, infectious disease, gender, global media, conflict and peace. (UG)

IND 123: Introduction to Sustainable Communities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 123. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Students will be introduced to economic, environmental and social sustainability, and evaluate local communities using sustainable criteria. Research will be reviewed on model sustainable communities: locally, nationally and internationally. Students will visit representative sites in Buffalo and participate in community meetings and lectures. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

IND 203: Peer Mentoring: Theory

1 Credit Hour(s)

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Learning Community I. Fulfills one credit for training (IND 203) applicable to core competency: Civic Responsibility; and an additional 2 credits toward Civic Responsibility if/when student spends a semester as a Peer Mentor. May be used toward fulfillment of 3-credit hour Service Learning requirement in the Core. Course prepares students to act as mentors in the Peer Mentor Program in support of Learning Community 1. It can also prepare students to act as mentors in other departments and programs as they develop within the college community.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 205: Peer Mentoring: Practicum

2 Credit Hour(s)

Requires (prerequisite) successful completion of IND 203. Applicable to core competency: Civic Responsibility: 2 credits toward Civic Responsibility if/when student successfully completes a semester as a Peer Mentor. May be used toward fulfillment of 3-credit hour Service Learning requirement in the Core. Course prepares students to act as mentors in the Peer Mentor Program in support of Learning Community 1. It can also prepare students to act as mentors in other departments and programs as they develop within the college community.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 209: Campus Environmental Service Learning

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students engage in a semester-long campus project that addresses sustainability of the campus environment. Students conduct a needs assessment, decide on a project (or continue on a previously developed project), create an action plan and actively participate in implementing the plan. Projects will vary depending on student interest and faculty expertise. Possible projects could include a campus energy audit, recycling plan, and campus beautification. (Sponsored by the Natural Sciences Department.)
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 210: Romantic Impulse

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Focus upon man's search for an all-encompassing theory of the universe and how circumstances and events influenced that search and modified the theory within a discrete time period. Beginning in the Romanesque period of the Middle Ages and culminating in the 19th century Romantic movement, the course will examine music, painting, sculpture, poetry, politics, philosophy, technology, and science and how each of these adapted to the others as the world and the world-view underwent changes. The term "romantic impulse" refers to the fact that so many of the necessary changes that occurred did so in accordance with someone's dissatisfaction with the status quo and the feeling that improvements were possible. (Sponsored by the English Department.)
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 211: Introduction to Digital Humanities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Information Literacy.This course introduces ways of exploring the humanities-literature, art, music, history, philosophy, religion and language-digitally. We will examine how we think, read and write and how we can use digital tools to analyze, visualize, interpret and present information.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 212: Latino and Latin American Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course examines the historical, literary, religious and artistic elements that form the cultures of Spanish-speaking people in the US, the Caribbean, Mexico, Central and South America. It is designed to inform students about L/LA cultures and to enable them to appreciate the richness of those cultures and to discern the different ways people of those cultures view themselves and the ways people in the U.S. view them. From understanding and appreciation will come an awareness of the many factors that create a moral and ethical framework that may be different from one's own, yet still be moral and ethical. The course will use historical and contemporary readings as well as literature and film, and to a lesser extent, fine art, to provide a framework for the value systems of Latinos & Latin Americans. (Sponsored by the Modern Language Department.)
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 213: Service Learning Through VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course certifies students to participate in the VITA (Volunteer Income Tax Assistance) Program. Students learn how to prepare basic tax returns. Students will be able to e-file these tax returns using TaxWise Software. The students will work at several VITA sites preparing tax returns for low-income taxpayers in the local community. The students will also identify social and political issues impacted by state and federal taxes. (Sponsored by the Accounting and Information Systems Department.) Prerequisite: ACC 318.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 214: Environmental Education in the Community

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Given input from targeted community members, students will develop, facilitate, and participate in a local environmental action project within a community educational setting (e.g., school, nature center, museum, community center). Through this experience, students will develop an awareness of the value of intergenerational community health and working towards common goals as well as an understanding of life-long civic responsibility. Examples of possible projects include school yard habitat projects (rain gardens, tree planting), butterfly gardens, vegetable gardens, energy audits and energy saving programs. Can be substituted for PHI 232 for Education majors with permission of Department Chair. (Sponsored by the Education Department). (UG)

IND 215: Service Learning for Refugees Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course will give students the opportunity to examine the issues of refugees from the global perspective. Students from various disciplines will be able to study refugees from the historical, political, legal, social, cultural, language, health, psychological, religious, and educational perspectives, among others. Potential topics to be explored include but are not limited to: the concepts of US citizenship, political asylum, role of IOs & NGOs, US Immigration policies, oral history, cross cultural education, refugees & US government/courts/agencies, voting, roles of: social workers, counselors, refugee agencies, groups and communities, as well as civic engagement, among others. Students will engage in a semester long off campus service project which addresses the study of refugees locally and globally. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 216: Women's Worlds: Global Issues in Women's Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as WST 216. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course examines the impact of global and transnational issues in shaping women's lives, historically and currently. While centering our analysis on the lives of women, we will study traditional roles in families and communities, reproductive rights, sexuality, capitalist economic development and poverty, the world of work, women's place in the environment, education, political participation, transnational movements of people and ideas, feminism, and human rights policies related to women. Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 217: Women and Girls in Literatre and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as WST 217. Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course will introduce short stories, poetry, biographical work and film by and/or about women in various cultures. We will look at how geography, religion, class, education, political events and family roles affect the lives and destinies of women in the world today. While we will see great challenges throughout the world we will also focus on the great progress being made toward gender equality. Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages.
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 219: 20th Century Film, Society and Ideology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course will examine a number of varied films from the 1930's to the end of the century in terms of text and technique. It will also examine film and the film industry as an institution of cultural validation within and challenges to modern society. It will also highlight how various films and their creators either support or confront society's dominant political and social ideologies, in terms of genre, genre criticism, and auteur theory. (Sponsored by the English Department.)
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 230: Refugees Tell Their Stories

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students work with a refugee resettlement organization to help introduce newly arrived refugees to Buffalo. Students interview an individual or family about their experiences in their home country and the United States. In class, students read about the challenges refugees face and learn methods for oral history and digital storytelling, which they use to create a digital story as their final project.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 231: Reaching Refugees

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will have the opportunity to promote literacy among refugee children and adults in our community from countries such as Burma (Myanmar), Somalia, Nepal, and Bhutan, among many others. In class students will learn about the numerous challenges refugees face and read literature written by refugee authors. Reflections connecting our readings and discussions with experiences in the field will be a key component of the course. This course fulfills the Service Learning requirement and Civic Responsibility core competency.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 232: Service Learning to Promote Sustainable Communities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course challenges students to explore the concepts of citizenship, civic engagement, and sustainability as well as their own roles in society. Students engage in semester long off-campus projects that address community needs. Students conduct a needs assessment, decide on a project or continue on a previously developed project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. Possible projects may include literacy projects such as tutoring children in after-school programs, cross-cultural education projects with global refugees, and community development efforts in underserved neighborhoods. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 233: SL-History and Politics of Poverty and Homelessness

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course will examine the public issues of poverty and homelessness in America, as well as globally. It will combine academic study with Service Learning experience in the local community, as a point of departure for students' awareness and intervention strategies to combat the impacts of poverty and homeless as a public issue. Students will devote four hours per week to community service. In addition, students will conduct a community needs assessment, decide on a project, and actively participate in implementing the plan.(Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 248: International Service Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. May also be taken as IND 348 or 448, as determined by student's standing. Students will perform service in another country in a variety of settings, such as schools, community organizations, and social service agencies. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Consultation with the International Studies Program advisor is required. This course may be taken up to three times for credit.(Sponsored by the Modern Language Department.)
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 249: Performance Enhancement

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Students will learn the latest in sport performance techniques, including the dynamic warm-up that develops pillar strength, posture, and flexibility. They will also engage in resistance training and read about current and controversial topics in the field of nutrition. This course requires moderate to strenuous physical exercise. (Sponsored by the Accounting and Information Systems Department).
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 256: The American Identity

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. What do you have in common with Christopher Columbus, Wilma Mankiller, Spike Lee, Amy Tan, Madam C. J. Walker, Lee Iacocca, Goyathlay, Cesar Chavez, Albert Einstein, I.M. Pei? The American Identity will examine the on-going process of Americanization of six racial/ethnic/religious groups: Native-, African-, European-, Jewish-, Asian-, and Hispanic-Americans. Through full-length films, film clips, readings, political cartoons and discussion we will explore Native American property rights, the Anglo-Saxon power structure, Africans as non-immigrants, anti-semitism, the impact of WWII, Korea and Vietnam on perceptions of Asians, the English Only movement and more. We will tackle the stereotypes and realities of how we see ourselves and how others see us.
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 269: Hollywood's America

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course explores the way that the divisive social issues of the recent past have been represented in film. The course will revolve around five sets of topics (Vietnam, the Cold War, civil rights, feminism, and the culture wars). The course will explore both technical and aesthetic aspects of the various films and the way that the film reflects and comments upon social reality. (Sponsored by the Philosophy and Religious Studies Department.)
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 275: History of Art: Ancient-Medieval

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness; Writing Intensive. Art History 275 will acquaint students with two and three - dimensional artifacts from the Paleolithic to Gothic eras. The primary focus will be to determine the relationship between aesthetics and the various cultural and historical factors of each time period.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 285: History of Art: Renaissance-Modern

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. IND 285 will acquaint students with two and three-dimensional artifacts from the Renaissance to Modern eras. Works of art will be discussed for their historical and religious context, artistic innovations, and social engagement. Prerequisite: CMP 101.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 315: Perspectives on Blacks & Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive; This course will explore Black culture and education from its beginnings to the present. It will emphasize the unique development of Black culture with specific attention paid to the development of and participation educational systems and formal schooling. This course will also address the socio-political foundation of the American schooling system, the impact of schools and education, implications for African Americans. Students will gain the information that will assist them to understand the historical development of Blacks, the role of education, and implications for the nation.
Session: As Needed (UG)

IND 322: Alternative and Renewable Energy Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 322. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking & Creative Problem Solving. This course will introduce students to the history of energy use, current sources of energy used worldwide, energy technologies including those under development, as well as discuss the role of governmental policies and funding in energy use and technological development. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

IND 325: Introduction to Polish Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as HST 325. Students are introduced to the history of Polish culture. This survey course will focus primarily on cultural developments, but students will also learn about key political, economic, and social developments in Polish history. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

IND 326: Green Buildings

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 326. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Affective Awareness. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of green building design through the use of Daemen's buildings as experimental laboratories. The US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system will be used as a guide to investigate and discuss construction site selection and protection, building energy-efficient features, water conservation strategies, indoor environmental quality and materials and resources used in buildings. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 328: The Image of Women in Art and Media

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as WST 328. This course addresses the ways in which women have been represented visually (painting, sculpture, film, advertising). The examination will examine both historical prototypes and contemporary examples. Among the issues we will discuss in an open forum are: the depiction of women from both a masculine and feminine vantage point, how the feminist agenda has been perceived in contemporary culture to condone sexualization and objectification, and how the image conveys assumptions and knowledge. (Sponsored by the Visual and Performing Arts Department.)
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 330: Italian Arts and Culture: Study Abroad

3 Credit Hour(s)

Italian Arts and Culture: Study Abroad (in Florence and Rome) is an abbreviated study abroad experience. Students will attend classes on Daemen's Main Campus prior to departing for a one-week travel experience. While in Italy, students will tour museums and architectural sites, while being exposed to new cultural contexts. Individual research on-site will provide the basis for the second half of the semester back in Buffalo. Students will complete and present projects based on a site, historical event or artist. Subsequent semester may focus on different Italian cities as the basis for the semester study.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 334: Non-Western Art & Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is a survey of art, literature, and religion from Africa, India, Japan and China. It will examine the products of these individual cultures, and discuss how they relate to contemporary historical events and philosophical or religious trends. Although the focus will be primarily on art objects, significant discussions will take place on related historical or religious themes, and other examples of this expression (i.e. literature, music, etc.) Among the issues discussed in the course are: the colonization of non-western cultures, the implications of the word "primitive," and the diverging belief systems of Islam, Buddhism, and Hinduism. (Sponsored by the Visual and Performing Arts Department.)
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 338: Food and Agriculture Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SUST 338. Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course integrates the science associated with food production with the social and economic issues influencing agriculture, food processing, distribution, safety and policy. Current and future use of sustainable practices in agriculture and food distribution will be discussed. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 340: Community Mural Painting

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. This course will challenge students to explore the art of painting and its ability to actively engage and contribute to diverse communities. Students will engage in a semester long service learning project whose final goal will be a completed public mural. The course will be simultaneously an introduction to basic painting techniques and brainstorming dialogue and instruction with community members with whom the class will collaboratively create a mural. The course will involve class painting exercises, in-class discussions, 60 hours of service, and written and photographic journaling. (Sponsored by the Visual and Performing Arts Department.)
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 344: Sustainable Business Practices

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as SUST 344. This course will introduce the concepts of sustainable business practices and corporate social responsibility. Sustainable business is a paradigm shift from a management style of maximizing profit at any cost. Sustainable business aims to restore and maintain environmental quality and develop social equity, while pursuing long term profitability. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.) Prerequisites: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 345: Introduction to Russian Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as HST 345. This course introduces students to select themes in the Russian cultural tradition. The peoples of Russia have engaged actively with other cultures in Europe and Asia for over a millennium. We will explore how a distinct Russian culture has emerged, with special emphases on the following developments: the introduction of Christianity; the "Mongol Yoke;" the "Europeanization" of Muscovite Russia; the cultural splendor of the Russian empire during the reign of Catherine II; the flourishing of Russian literary culture under an absolutist regime during the "Golden Age" of the mid-19th century; and Russia's role in the birth of Modernism at the end of the tsarist era. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

IND 348: International Service Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. May also be taken as IND 248 or 448, as determined by student's standing. Students will perform service in another country in a variety of settings, such as schools, community organizations, and social service agencies. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Consultation with the International Studies Program advisor is required. This course may be taken up to three times for credit.(Sponsored by the Modern Language Department.)
Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 351: Urban Planning and Community Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility. Cross-listed as SUST 351. This course will introduce the theories of urban design, history of urban development, decline and rebirth, and the roles that all stakeholders play in developing sustainable communities. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.) Prerequisites: Sophomore status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 398: International Experiential Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course provides students and faculty an opportunity for short-term experiential learning in a foreign country. This course is designed to provide students with background information such as history, art, culture, language, social mores,economy, environment, design, etc of another country so that a faculty-lead student group can apply classroom learning during a short-term stay in that country (defined as less than a semester). The focus of the course may be fully interdisciplinary or specifically focused on one aspect of the other nation.
Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

IND 412: Social Entrepreneurship

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Critical Thinking & Creative Problem Solving; Information Literacy; fulfills Research and Presentation requirement; Writing Intensive. This course introduces the student to the field of social entrepreneurship which focuses on creating long-term, sustainable change and impact through mission driven profit and non-profit ventures. The course will familiarize students with major social entrepreneurs and the challenges that they faced in growing their ventures from an idea to a fully mature organization or company. In addition, the course will encourage students to consider ventures within the context of social problems in areas such as education, community development, economic stability, health and other current issues. Prerequisites: Senior status and permission of academic advisor. (Sponsored by the Accounting and Information Systems Department.)
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

IND 443: Senior Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy; Research and Presentation requirement; Writing Intensive. This course is intended for students whose major is Individualized Studies, and whose program has been approved. (UG)

IND 448: International Service Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. May also be taken as IND 248 or 348, as determined by student's standing. Students will perform service in another country in a variety of settings, such as schools, community organizations, and social service agencies. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Consultation with the International Studies Program advisor is required. This course may be taken up to three times for credit.(Sponsored by the Modern Language Department.)
Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Technology in Education

IPP 318: Technology in Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course examines technology in today's educational system for students seeking certification in adolescence education. Emphasis is on current trends and issues, seminal readings, and research findings related to the use of technology in education. Issues related to curriculum planning, program development and evaluation, and staff development are addressed. Prerequisite: 3 credits in a minimum 200 level course with a competency.
Year: As Needed (UG)

Italian

ITA 101: Elementary Italian I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of Italian through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write Italian. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students with less than two years previous Italian instruction.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ITA 102: Elementary Italian II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A continuation of study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of Italian through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write Italian. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students with less than two years previous Italian instruction.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ITA 105: Intermediate Italian I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Intermediate I and II courses will continue to stress the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) with stronger emphasis on the listening and speaking components. The art, architecture and history of Italy will be examined. The student will progress from the "novice high/intermediate-low to the intermediate-mid" (Part I) "intermediate-mid to the intermediate-high" (Part II) level as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council On the Teaching of Foreign Languages. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ITA 102 or three years high school Italian.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

ITA 106: Intermediate Italian II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Intermediate I and II courses will continue to stress the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) with stronger emphasis on the listening and speaking components. The art, architecture and history of Italy will be examined. The student will progress from the "novice high/intermediate-low to the intermediate-mid" (Part I) "intermediate-mid to the intermediate-high" (Part II) level as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

ITA 207: Italian Conversation & Composition I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Conversation and Composition I and II courses will continue to stress the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) with stronger emphasis on productive language skills: writing and speaking. Literature, culture, current events, film, games and role-playing will be some of the elements to foster both spoken and written proficiency in Italian. The student will progress from the intermediate-mid level to intermediate-high/advanced-low level (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages:ACTFL). The student will acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to effectively communicate orally and in writing with native speakers of Italian.
Year: As Needed (UG)

ITA 208: Italian Conversation & Composition II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Conversation and Composition I and II courses will continue to stress the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing) with stronger emphasis on productive language skills: writing and speaking. Literature, culture, current events, film, games and role-playing will be some of the elements to foster both spoken and written proficiency in Italian. The student will progress from the intermediate-mid level to intermediate-high/advanced-low level (as defined by the guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages:ACTFL). The student will acquire the vocabulary, grammar and cultural information to effectively communicate orally and in writing with native speakers of Italian.
Year: As Needed (UG)

Literature

LIT 101: Introduction to English Studie

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to introduce students commencing a major in English to the history, traditions, issues, problems, and debates that make up the field. This course will prepare students for subsequent work in the department, providing context for other courses and a crucial grounding in core skills of close reading , research, and writing.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 112: Approaches to Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This survey course in literature includes textual analysis of literary works, classic through contemporary, selected from various genres. Writing assignments are based on the readings. CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 113: Literature and the Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Works of literature and media often present complex depictions of power, the law, and legal issues. In this course we'll look at dystopian fiction, legal history, television, and case studies to examine important questions about surveillance, freedom of speech, individual liberty, and governmental power.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 201: World Literature I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness, Communication Skills, Moral and Ethical Discernment; Writing Intensive.This course introduces literature from places often left out of traditional English studies. It examines major and minor works from selected global cultures, and gives students a chance to learn about civilizations, genres, and ethical dilemmas as they have arisen in various places and times around the globe. Regions to be studied vary according to semester, and may include a selection from East Asia/Japan, India, The Middle East, Africa, Australia and the Pacific, and the Caribbean. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 202: World Literature II-Myths and Modern Tales

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies:Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Communication Skills; Writing Intensive. Myths and Modern Tales introduces influential examples of classical and modern literature. We will read major works of ancient narrative, poetry and drama, with a focus on key mythical figures like Gilgamesh, Odysseus, and Antigone, and we will explore how these stories have been reinterpreted over time. Students will develop a firm understanding of how storytelling has changed in different historical periods, and why certain stories, episodes, and heroes persist across the centuries. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 203: Crown, Sword, and Empire: British Literature to 1800

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. This course is designed to give the student an understanding and appreciation of the traditions of British literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the early nineteenth-century Romantic period. Through close and critical reading of selected works, students are acquainted with the various genres and major thematic and philosophical movements in British literature. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 204: British Literature II: Empire Writes Back

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. This course is designed to give the student an understanding and appreciation of the traditions of British literature from the early nineteenth-century Romantic period to the present. Through close and critical reading of selected works, students are acquainted with the various genres and major thematic and philosophical movements in British literature. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 211: Readings in American Literature I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. During the first semester, emphasis will be placed upon the "becoming" of American literature and the development of an identity that is communicated in specifically American letters. The second semester will carry through with Whitman (whose early poetry will terminate the first semester's study) and present a different set of complexities from those of early America: industrialization, urbanization, and immigration, among others. It will trace the development of the literature and the aesthetic theory of a second "new" America - and take that development to the present. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 212: Readings in American Literature II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. During the first semester, emphasis will be placed upon the "becoming" of American literature and the development of an identity that is communicated in specifically American letters. The second semester will carry through with Whitman (whose early poetry will terminate the first semester's study) and present a different set of complexities from those of early America: industrialization, urbanization, and immigration, among others. It will trace the development of the literature and the aesthetic theory of a second "new" America - and take that development to the present. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 213: Contemporary Native American Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course provides an introduction to contemporary Native American literature, drawing readings from authors representing diverse culture areas. Fiction, poetry, and drama produced by Native American writers will be read as reflections of tribal and regional concerns and as material raising the broader questions of Native identity within mainstream white American culture. Critical analysis of the readings will address literary portrayals of the individual in her/his relation to the community, nature, spirituality, gender roles, political/economic conditions, and art and creativity. Literary images of Native America will be both reinforced and challenged with sensory experiences offered by contemporary film, dance, music, and artwork. Students will gain a deeper understanding of Native American perspectives on contemporary American culture. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 219: Literature and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This course examines the various literary genres (short story, novel, drama, poetry, and non-fiction) in relation to film. The course assumes that film has radically expanded both the forms of literary communication and the way literature (especially literary narrative) is understood and received. The course also assumes that film not only supplements more traditional literary forms and media, it also depends on them in a way which is at once parasitic and synergistic. In keeping with its primary and secondary competencies, the course emphasizes the aesthetic and communicative aspects of literature and film. The course also examines these same aspects in the commercial and technical/ technological process involved in adapting literature to the screen, e.g., aesthetic choices made in adapting a short story, a novel, a play or "the poetic" to film, both for the large screen and the small (television). Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 222: African American Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Introduces students to the major motifs, themes, and texts of African American literature. Beginning with the Antebellum period, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the course will also focus on the Harlem Renaissance, the long Civil Rights movement, the Black Power movement, and the #BlackLivesMatter movement. Throughout the course we will examine how the concepts we examine are relevant to our 21st century, so-called "post-racial" society, and the course will serve as a vehicle by which we can reflect on current events in the United States that resonate with our readings. The course aims to better understand the social, cultural, and political issues African Americans have faced historically and continue to face today. All students are welcome and encouraged to add various perspectives.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 230: Exile Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Communication Skills; Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. This course will examine, through close reading, women and men whose writing is central to the literature of exile and expatriation, particularly in the 20th century. We will explore "literature" in its various forms, such as memoir, the short story, the novel, non-fictional writing, and literary criticism. Whether self-imposed (expatriation) or imposed by authorities (exile), the loss of "home" has been described as one of the most difficult states of existence to endure. At the same time, exile is productive, and it has contributed to some of the most thoughtful literature ever written. We will attempt to understand how this is so. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or Permission of Instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 232: Shakespeare Onstage: Character And Conflict

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving.This course will examine the conflicts Shakespearean characters face in three representative plays, using the literary technique of close reading to understand plot action and character motivation. Our study of the plays will be furthered by learning more about Shakespeare's world and the Renaissance cultural values and attitudes reflected in these dramas. We'll also investigate problems of both interpretation and staging, looking at aspects of literary criticism and theatre history to see how critics, directors, and actors have imagined these characters and their uniquely human predicaments.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 241: Literary Legacies of the Sixties

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This introductory course to literature includes the study of selected literary works of late twentieth-century America. It contextualizes contemporary literature and provides students with sources (including works of literature, film, and other primary source materials) that explain the background and development of a number of issues including the Cold War, Vietnam, the Civil Rights Movement, the Feminist Movement, the Gay Rights Movement, and the Culture Wars. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 248: Whodunit? The Detective Story

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course focuses on the history and rhetorical strategies of detective fiction, which begins in the nineteenth century with works by Edgar Allen Poe and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and continues into the present with many variations along the way, including several popular films and television series. Today it is a widely read form of popular fiction that usually has several entries on the bestseller lists. This course follows the general division of the detective story into three categories: the Amateur Detective, the Private Investigator and the Police Procedural. Students will explore the conventions of each category through short stories and will write a term paper on a representative novel. Prerequisite: CMP 101.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 301: Chaucer

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. An intensive study of The Canterbury Tales and major poems with attention given to language and historical background. An extensive reading of the minor poems. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 302: Milton

3 Credit Hour(s)

An intensive study of Paradise Lost and the minor poems, as well as a discussion of Milton's representative prose. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 304: The Romantic Movement in English Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

In 1798, young poets Wordsworth and Coleridge published Lyrical Ballads, a manifesto that changed the direction of poetry by insisting on the importance of the common person, Nature as an inspirational presence, and the central role of the imagination in transforming experience. This course explores the development of Romanticism, a new way of thinking about human experience, as expressed in the poetry of the older generation of Romantic poets (Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, and Burns), in the younger Romantics (Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Hemans, and Keats), and in the gothic novel (Mary Shelley and Horace Walpole).
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 309: Film Seminar

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. This course involves screening and discussion of classic and contemporary feature-length films. It is designed to expose students to a wide variety of film periods, styles, and genres, as well as cinema cultures and national co-texts. Discussion of technical matter provides background for interpreting film as a distinct literary genre.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 310: The English Novel

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the evolution of the novel as a genre, beginning with its prototypes in the romance and allegory and including representative selections from the more prominent 19th and 20th century authors. The study will include various types of novels as well: the novel of manners, the sociological novel, the philosophical novel, etc.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 311: Survey of English Poetry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Analysis of representative English poetry from 1530 to the Romantics, in terms of thought, technique, type, and historical background. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 312: Survey English Poetry II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Analysis of representative English poetry from the Romantics to the present, in terms of thought, technique, type, and historical background. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 313: The Gothic Imagination

3 Credit Hour(s)

Gothic literature pushes the boundaries of social convention, exploring the darker side of human experience and opening taboo subjects. This course engages contemporary critical and theoretical assessments as it covers three main avenues of gothic literature - horror stories, sensation fiction, and detective narratives. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 314: Magical Realism in Fiction and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Communication Skills; Writing Intensive. This course charts the development of the magical realist genre - from two or more different geographic regions - through the close reading of fiction and film. Essential to our reading of these texts will be a few key questions: how do we begin to differentiate magical realisms? How is a magical realist film different from a magical realist text? And what are different strains of this diverse genre attempting to do? Prerequisites: CMP 101 or LIT 112 or permission of Instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 315: Religious Themes in Modern Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment.Cross-listed as REL 315. The purpose of this course is to analyze the relationship of theology to literature by examining the religious dimensions as they are portrayed in modern creative literature. Themes to be developed will be: religious perspectives in eastern and western religions, the pursuit of religious identity in western culture, good and evil, relationship of sacred to profane, the loss of innocence, love, suffering, freedom and destiny, time and eternity. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Alternate Years
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 316: Empire and the Imagination

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Empire and the Imagination explores the role of literature in creating and destroying empires. Focusing on the late-nineteenth century to the present, we will examine fiction, poetry and film by imperial and anti-colonial authors from Europe, Africa, India, the USA and New Zealand. Prerequisite: LIT 101 or CMP 101 with permission from the instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 317: Gender Trouble: Literature and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as WST 317. Do the gender roles represented in literary works reflect a "reality" based on biological differences between the sexes? Or are gender roles simply a product of a culture's religious, economic, and political agendas? This course examines works from various genres and historical periods in order to understand how they reinforce or subvert gender stereotypes that inform and condition people's lives. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 318: The English Drama

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the development of English drama from its medieval beginnings in church ritual to its contemporary forms. Readings include representative selections from the mystery and morality plays of the 14th century, Renaissance and Restoration drama, 19th century social drama, and modern experimental theatre. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 320: Modern & Contemporary Irish Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. In this course we will read and analyze works (fiction, drama, poetry) produced in Ireland during the twentieth century. The early part of this period, following the late 19th c. Celtic Twilight, is known as The Irish Renaissance. This period saw a resurgence of Irish Nationalism that manifested itself in several ways, some of which were renewed interests in the Irish language, literature and culture. The latter part of the period is marked by the emergence of Ireland as a postcolonial republic under partition (post 1922), leading up to the ongoing sectarian conflict we still refer to today as "The Troubles." More recently in the 1990's, Irish writing reflects Ireland's entrance into the European market economy, earning the epithet "The Celtic Tiger." The works we will read are all part of the Anglo-Irish tradition (written or translated into English). We will focus on modern and contemporary Ireland in selected works of its major writers as they examine their country's encounters with the British Empire, Catholic/Protestant religious conflict and its own mythological past. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 322: Medicine and Contemporary Literature and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility; This course examines-representatively rather than exhaustively-the connections of various kinds between medicine and illness on one hand and literature and film on the other, with particular (but not exclusive) emphasis on the United States. The course acknowledges the prominent role the health sciences play at Daemen College and seeks to create a bridge between those programs and the Humanities so as to benefit both by emphasizing common ground and mutual dependency at a time when the division between C. P. Snow's "two cultures" is both more pronounced and less persuasive. The course will be part of the interdisciplinary Medical Humanities cluster.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 323: 18th Century English Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course surveys literature produced during the Age of Enlightenment, from Dryden to the Pre-Romantics. We will discuss Neoclassicism in the poetry of Dryden and Pope, the development of satire in Swift, the essay as an art form, and the rise of the novel from Pamela and Tom Jones to Jane Austen. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 324: Jane Austen

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. This study of the works of Jane Austen situates the six major novels in the context of early nineteenth-century culture, introducing the comedy of manners as an important contribution to the rise of the novel in the nineteenth century. Readings include excerpts from Austen's letters as well as the juvenilia and fragments. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 325: Major Authors

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This course offers an in-depth survey of one or more significant authors in the field of English literature. Significant works of fiction by the author will be closely examined in relation to her or his specific history and culture, socio-political positions, national affiliations, critical reception, and representations in the media. The author's minor works, biographical material, nonfiction, and other key documents will also be analyzed. Prerequisite: LIT 101 or CMP 101 with permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 326: Understanding Africa

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness, Contextual Integration, Communication Skills; Writing Intensive. This course offers an in-depth understanding of African literature. Through close analysis of selected fiction, poetry, drama and film from West, North, East and South Africa, we will explore the diversity of life for Africans on the continent and outside it, with particular reference to national identity, race and gender, armed conflict, and migration. Prerequisite: LIT 101 or CMP 101 with permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 329: Imagining Trauma

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. In this course we will read and analyze literary works that deal with traumatizing events arising out of personal experience (e.g., racial, sexual) to the communal experience (e.g., war, terrorism). While often confronted and pathologized as an individual problem, in the contemporary globalized world, trauma may in fact have transcultural significance and be a defining feature of contemporary life. The works studied in this course will examine the aesthetic and rhetorical strategies of the literary representation of trauma within a specific historical/cultural context. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 330: The Scottish Renaissance and Scottish National Identity

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. This course examines the major works of fiction of the second Scottish Renaissance (1982) as they both reflect and contribute to the preservation/ formation of a distinctive but highly contested and increasingly fragmented sense of Scottish national identity. It examines this fiction as a primary means for reinvigorating Scottish national identity while at the same time challenging it by critically examining the past rather than nostalgically reproducing it in light of past and present forces that have altered and in many cases eroded both community and identity. Alasdair Gray's "Lanark," Irvine Welsh's "Trainspotting," Alan Warner's "Morvern Callar," Janice Galloway's "The Trick Is to Keep Breathing" are some of the required readings. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 334: British Women Writers

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This course presents selections from the work of British women writers from the fifteenth century to the present, with emphasis on the nineteenth century, when female authors came into their own through the popularity of prose fiction. We place these literary works in their social context, learning about historical, legal, and scientific influences on the condition of women in Britain. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 336: Dystopian Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Dystopian stories and films have long captivated audiences, and the purpose of this course is to examine a number of different works of dystopian (and utopian) literature and film in order to understand the conventions of the genre, the anxieties it explores, and the responses readers have to it. We'll explore the following questions: why do we read dystopian literature, and what does it tell us about the world in which we live? Prerequisite: LIT 101 or CMP 101 with permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 337: Contemporary American Novel

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. In this course contemporary novels will be presented as additions to, and variations on, the novel form. The study will include the theory of the novel and the development, and the connections between contemporary themes and those of earlier American literature. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 338: The Short Story

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. This course will focus on the development of the short story as a literary genre, or on a specific aspect or period of that development, e.g. the contemporary American (or British, or Irish) short story. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 339: Contemporary British Novel

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to a representative sampling of some of the most interesting, important and influential British novels and novelists of the past two decades, while situating these works in the larger context of contemporary British literary, cultural, socio-economic and political life. In addition, the course uses these works to hone students' reading, writing, research and critical thinking skills.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 340: Dickens and Victorian Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Charles Dickens was without a doubt Victorian England's favorite literary celebrity, and his characters have amused and brought tears to the eyes of readers for nearly two hundred years. In this course, we will read representative works from each phase of Dicken's long career in the light of the aspects of Victorian culture illuminated by his novels. Background readings will help you to understand the social conditions that prompted Dickens to write passionately in the cause of a variety of social issues. Textual analysis of the novels and other primary sources will help you to appreciate the social, political, and moral climate of Dickens' London, as we assess how his novels shaped public policies, laws, and popular attitudes toward the complex human problems so movingly rendered in his works. We will also consider the impact of contemporary film adaptations as they help the novels to reach a broader modern audience. Written assignments will support your development of analytical, research, and interpretive skills, as you offer argumentative readings of literary texts, supported by critical commentaries on Victorian culture. Prerequisite: CMP 101.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 401: Contemporary American Poetry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An investigation of the particular concept of American poetics as expressed in Olson's "Projective Verse" and developed from Whitman through Ezra Pound and William Carlos Williams, the influence of which is evident in the work of poets representing all of the major schools of American poetry since the 1950's.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 403: Myth and the Invention of Self

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Writing Intensive. Through a series of readings and discussions of primal myths, urban legends, and folk tales, the course first examines the dynamics of the storytelling process and then how the story becomes elevated by repetition and ritual into myth. After further research into mythopoesis, we investigate how the individual's concept of the self is developed with reference to myths, or stories of belief. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 410: Shakespeare

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. This course offers an overview of Shakespeare's dramatic oeuvre, covering works that represent the histories, the tragedies, the comedies, and the romances or "problem plays." Since this course fulfills the contextual core competency, we will be reading the plays in chronological order to study and appreciate Shakespeare's development as a playwright responding to the social and political issues of his day. We will also consider the staging of Shakespearean plays, film adaptations, and works of literary criticism as they all reflect our changing ways of interpreting the plays. Prerequisite: CMP 101 and LIT 101.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

LIT 411: Modern Poetry

3 Credit Hour(s)

An intensive study of the modernist period in American and British Poetry. Special attention will be given to William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot,William Carlos Williams, and Wallace Stevens. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 413: Victorian Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the major authors and literature of Victorian England, including poetry, prose, and the novel. We will consider a range of topics that not only deeply concerned the Victorians but also continue to interest us today: race and social class, poverty, the woman question, imperialism, and the increasing influence of science and technology. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LIT 415: Modern and Contemporary British Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the major figures of British literature since 1900, plus the literary and cultural characteristics of the period. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

LIT 420: Seminar for English Majors

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course involves the intensive study of a literary topic selected by the instructor. It requires intensive reading and research as well as report writing and presentation of research in a cooperative seminar format. The course is open only to English majors or to non-majors nominated by the English faculty. Students may take LIT 420 more than once, providing the topic is different. Prerequisites: LIT 101, LIT 203, LIT 204, and CMP 217. This course fulfills the Research and Presentation requirement for English majors.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

LIT 442: Capstone Research

1 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PR-442. This course will prepare students to devote the spring semester to organizing, drafting and revising a capstone project in LIT/PR 443. In LIT/PR 442, students will meet with primary and secondary faculty readers to develop an appropriate topic, prepare an annotated bibliography, and develop a capstone project proposal (preliminary, revised, and final).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

LIT 443: Senior Capstone

2 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed with PR-443. This capstone course concentrates on the production of a polished academic text, a sustained discussion (20-25 pages) of a topic of critical importance, representing the culmination of the student's intellectual accomplishments in English Studies. Students will begin with a review and evaluation of the capstone project proposals developed in LIT/PR 442, with class meetings alternating with individual tutorial meetings. Students will prepare two formal drafts for evaluation by primary and secondary faculty readers, and the completed project will be presented in conference format for the Daemen College community at Academic Festival.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Language

LNG 307: The English Language: Structure, Power And Change

3 Credit Hour(s)

The nature and origin of language, the ancestry and growth of English, history of English sounds and inflections, sources of vocabulary and variations in standards.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

LNG 309: Language in Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course introduces students to the field of sociolinguistics, examining the relationship between language and society on a national and global level through the examination of social factors such as age, gender, educational level, social class, race, and the like. Topics include: monolingualism to multilingualism; language contact, prestige and change; diglossia and code switching; language identity, language socialization and language ideology; consequences for educational policy and practice. Offered As Needed.
Year: As Needed (UG)

LNG 335: Special Topics in Linguistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore the field of linguistics. The course is delivered in the English language. Prerequisites: completion of 3 credits in language studies at the 200-level or higher. May be taken for credit up to three times (9 credits maximum). Offered as Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

LNG 337: Practicum in Implementing Language Arts at the Secondary Level

3 Credit Hour(s)

The primary purpose of this course is to provide secondary English education majors with a comprehensive examination of the many methods and materials used in the classroom at the secondary level. Particular emphasis is placed on the introduction and examination of the characteristics, definitions, standards and trends employed in effective middle and high schools.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

LNG 415: 2nd Lang Acquisition/Applied Linguistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Contextual Integration. This course examines the processes of language learning from linguistic, psychological, and social perspectives. While it address native language acquisition, the focus is on second language acquisition. The underlying assumptions of the three perspectives will be examined from a research vantage point as well as from the perspectives of the language teaching professional.
Year: As Needed (UG)

Management - Quantitative

MGQ 221: Business Statistics I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Quantitative Literacy requirement. An introductory business statistics course that focuses on data collection, presentation, and analysis. Topics covered include graphical methods, descriptive statistics with exploratory data analysis, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals. A microcomputer package will be used for analyzing selected data sets. Prerequisite: MTH 97 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGQ 221: Business Statistics I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Quantitative Literacy requirement. An introductory business statistics course that focuses on data collection, presentation, and analysis. Topics covered include graphical methods, descriptive statistics with exploratory data analysis, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals. A microcomputer package will be used for analyzing selected data sets. Prerequisite: MTH 97 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGQ 360: Production and Operations Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the design, planning, and control of systems that create goods and services. Topics include Total Quality Management, Just-in-Time, capacity planning, scheduling, facility layout, project management, and inventory management. Prerequisites: MGQ 221.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGQ 360: Production and Operations Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the design, planning, and control of systems that create goods and services. Topics include Total Quality Management, Just-in-Time, capacity planning, scheduling, facility layout, project management, and inventory management. Prerequisites: MGQ 221.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGQ 427: Managerial Decision Making

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to some of the important models and problem-solving techniques used in business decision-making. Topics include statistical decision theory, queuing theory, linear and integer programming, the transportation and assignment models, graph theory, and network flow models. Prerequisites: MGQ 221.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGQ 427: Managerial Decision Making

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to some of the important models and problem-solving techniques used in business decision-making. Topics include statistical decision theory, queuing theory, linear and integer programming, the transportation and assignment models, graph theory, and network flow models. Prerequisites: MGQ 221.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Management

MGT 101: Intercollegiate Athletics Experience

1 Credit Hour(s)

This courses is offered in a seminar-style format for first year student-athletes and sport management to aid with the adjustment to college while helping these students develop a better understanding of intercollegiate athletics and the role of athletics staff at Daemen College. This course focuses on a variety of topics that will impact the student-athlete during their studies at Daemen College including scheduling, travel and representing the College on Campus and the Western New York Community.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 101: Intercollegiate Athletics Experience

1 Credit Hour(s)

This courses is offered in a seminar-style format for first year student-athletes and sport management to aid with the adjustment to college while helping these students develop a better understanding of intercollegiate athletics and the role of athletics staff at Daemen College. This course focuses on a variety of topics that will impact the student-athlete during their studies at Daemen College including scheduling, travel and representing the College on Campus and the Western New York Community.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 111: Recreation and Facility Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

The operation and management of recreational sport and sport facilities is an important part of the sport industry. This foundation course emphasizes the study of recreation & facility management, including relevant marketing and human resource topics, and strategic management within this sector of the sport industry.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MGT 111: Recreation and Facility Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

The operation and management of recreational sport and sport facilities is an important part of the sport industry. This foundation course emphasizes the study of recreation & facility management, including relevant marketing and human resource topics, and strategic management within this sector of the sport industry.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MGT 208: Principles of Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major principles, theories and issues pertaining to the management of organizations, including organizational behavior and human resource management. It will provide a basic foundation for future studies in management. Major topic areas will include the role and scope of management, decision-making, planning, organizing, leading and controlling.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 208: Principles of Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major principles, theories and issues pertaining to the management of organizations, including organizational behavior and human resource management. It will provide a basic foundation for future studies in management. Major topic areas will include the role and scope of management, decision-making, planning, organizing, leading and controlling.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 260: Introduction to Sport Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A comprehensive introduction to the field of sport management which covers sport management specializations, required skills, and career opportunities.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 260: Introduction to Sport Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A comprehensive introduction to the field of sport management which covers sport management specializations, required skills, and career opportunities.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 302: Labor Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the general nature of the labor-management relationship as it currently exists in the U.S. today. A historical and legal background will be provided as well as a review of labor contract contents and administration. A number of "real-life" arbitration cases will be reviewed to enhance understanding of course concepts. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 302: Labor Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the general nature of the labor-management relationship as it currently exists in the U.S. today. A historical and legal background will be provided as well as a review of labor contract contents and administration. A number of "real-life" arbitration cases will be reviewed to enhance understanding of course concepts. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 306: International Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course delineates the key frames of reference for understanding global human resource management by discussing various functional human resource management (HRM) areas and their implementation in the global arena, and by focusing on a number of countries and the HRM processes and cultural issues typical of their foreign affiliates. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 306: International Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course delineates the key frames of reference for understanding global human resource management by discussing various functional human resource management (HRM) areas and their implementation in the global arena, and by focusing on a number of countries and the HRM processes and cultural issues typical of their foreign affiliates. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 312: Human Resource Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide an understanding of the policies and practices of human resource management. Specific emphasis will be on recruitment, selection, training, appraisal and compensation of personnel. Considerable attention will be given to the issue of equal employment opportunity and other areas of legislation that affect this field. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 312: Human Resource Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide an understanding of the policies and practices of human resource management. Specific emphasis will be on recruitment, selection, training, appraisal and compensation of personnel. Considerable attention will be given to the issue of equal employment opportunity and other areas of legislation that affect this field. Prerequisites: BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 321: Organizational Behavior and Theory

3 Credit Hour(s)

An in depth examination of theories and practices relating to human behavior in organizations. Three levels of behavior will be examined; individual, group and organizational. Some topics included are employee personality, attitudes, job satisfaction, motivation, leadership, power, group processes and organizational culture. Prerequisites:BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208, and Junior status.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 321: Organizational Behavior and Theory

3 Credit Hour(s)

An in depth examination of theories and practices relating to human behavior in organizations. Three levels of behavior will be examined; individual, group and organizational. Some topics included are employee personality, attitudes, job satisfaction, motivation, leadership, power, group processes and organizational culture. Prerequisites:BA 211, BA 220, MGT 208, and Junior status.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 410: Seminar in Human Resource Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Core Competency: Information Literacy. This is the final course in the HR Management sequence. It reviews and integrates previously covered theoretical concepts and applications within the context of HR ethics, current issues and events. Students will be required to read articles within the HR field and reflect on the state of current HR practice. In addition, students will be provided exposure to significant HR legal and administrative practices in order to prepare them for working as a professional in the field of HR. Students will also complete HR related case studies, conduct an organizational HR ethics audit, and develop and present one or more HR related training classes for a group of their peers. Prerequisite: MGT 302, MGT 306, MGT 312 and Senior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MGT 410: Seminar in Human Resource Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Core Competency: Information Literacy. This is the final course in the HR Management sequence. It reviews and integrates previously covered theoretical concepts and applications within the context of HR ethics, current issues and events. Students will be required to read articles within the HR field and reflect on the state of current HR practice. In addition, students will be provided exposure to significant HR legal and administrative practices in order to prepare them for working as a professional in the field of HR. Students will also complete HR related case studies, conduct an organizational HR ethics audit, and develop and present one or more HR related training classes for a group of their peers. Prerequisite: MGT 302, MGT 306, MGT 312 and Senior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Management Information Systems

MIS 201: The E-World

3 Credit Hour(s)

An exploration of the electronic world and how websites are designed to affect the consumer. Diverse exercises in criticism and analysis to broaden the student's awareness of the impact of these sites on the individual will be completed. In addition the student will design and implement a website using current webdesign software.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 201: The E-World

3 Credit Hour(s)

An exploration of the electronic world and how websites are designed to affect the consumer. Diverse exercises in criticism and analysis to broaden the student's awareness of the impact of these sites on the individual will be completed. In addition the student will design and implement a website using current webdesign software.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 205: Ethics of the Electronically Connected World

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course examines the different ethical situations that arise in the realm of an electronically connected world that affect both the individual and society, such as computer and internet crime, privacy issues, freedom of expression, intellectual property, and employer/ee issues. The student will discuss what ethics are, why it is important to act in ways that are consistent with a code of principles and will develop a personal approach to ethical decision making.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 205: Ethics of the Electronically Connected World

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course examines the different ethical situations that arise in the realm of an electronically connected world that affect both the individual and society, such as computer and internet crime, privacy issues, freedom of expression, intellectual property, and employer/ee issues. The student will discuss what ethics are, why it is important to act in ways that are consistent with a code of principles and will develop a personal approach to ethical decision making.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 280: Computer Studies and Problem Solving

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This is an intensive introductory computer course for majors in the Accounting and Business programs. Topics include the fundamentals of information processing including computer hardware concepts, operating systems, program management, electronic spreadsheets, and word processing. Emphasis is placed on analysis of business problems using PC software.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 280: Computer Studies and Problem Solving

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This is an intensive introductory computer course for majors in the Accounting and Business programs. Topics include the fundamentals of information processing including computer hardware concepts, operating systems, program management, electronic spreadsheets, and word processing. Emphasis is placed on analysis of business problems using PC software.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 290: Information Systems Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to develop concepts and applications to give students a view of how computer-based processing is used in the functions of management in modern enterprises. Terminology and concepts of information management and control developed to process transactions and to create reports used in management decision-making. Prerequisite: MIS 280.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 290: Information Systems Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to develop concepts and applications to give students a view of how computer-based processing is used in the functions of management in modern enterprises. Terminology and concepts of information management and control developed to process transactions and to create reports used in management decision-making. Prerequisite: MIS 280.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 295: Accounting Information System

3 Credit Hour(s)

Accounting information systems are a subsystem of management information systems that processes financial transactions. It is more about critical thinking and judgment rather than journal entries. Its purpose is to provide internal reporting to managers for use in planning and controlling current and future operations and for non-routine decision making. It also impacts external reporting to outside parties such as to stockholders, creditors, and government agencies. In addition, students will become proficient in the use of advanced EXCEL techniques and become familiar with XBRL and Quickbooks. Prerequisites: ACC 225 and MIS 280.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 295: Accounting Information System

3 Credit Hour(s)

Accounting information systems are a subsystem of management information systems that processes financial transactions. It is more about critical thinking and judgment rather than journal entries. Its purpose is to provide internal reporting to managers for use in planning and controlling current and future operations and for non-routine decision making. It also impacts external reporting to outside parties such as to stockholders, creditors, and government agencies. In addition, students will become proficient in the use of advanced EXCEL techniques and become familiar with XBRL and Quickbooks. Prerequisites: ACC 225 and MIS 280.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MIS 331: Animation Software

3 Credit Hour(s)

An advanced course in the computer arts field that teaches methods of animation for the Web and CD-Rom. The principles of effective design and communicating information visually will be reinforced. The student will learn how to develop their own digital movies, animate websites and add text, audio and video elements to their movies.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 331: Animation Software

3 Credit Hour(s)

An advanced course in the computer arts field that teaches methods of animation for the Web and CD-Rom. The principles of effective design and communicating information visually will be reinforced. The student will learn how to develop their own digital movies, animate websites and add text, audio and video elements to their movies.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 428: Forensic Accounting Data Analysis

3 Credit Hour(s)

Forensic data analysis helps the forensic accountant learn the techniques required to audit large volumes of transactions to discover fraudulent activities. The student will utilize various audit software programs to test financial records for fraud. Topics include: digital prevention and deterrence, digital detection and investigation, and digital presentation and reporting tools. Prerequisite: ACC 325.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MIS 428: Forensic Accounting Data Analysis

3 Credit Hour(s)

Forensic data analysis helps the forensic accountant learn the techniques required to audit large volumes of transactions to discover fraudulent activities. The student will utilize various audit software programs to test financial records for fraud. Topics include: digital prevention and deterrence, digital detection and investigation, and digital presentation and reporting tools. Prerequisite: ACC 325.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Marketing

MKT 209: Principles of Marketing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of marketing. Focus areas include market and product planning, selection of target markets, market segmentation, competitive influences, and the marketing mix.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 209: Principles of Marketing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles of marketing. Focus areas include market and product planning, selection of target markets, market segmentation, competitive influences, and the marketing mix.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 210: E-Commerce

3 Credit Hour(s)

The internet is a dynamic marketplace. This class focuses on the theoretical understanding of the internet-based marketplace necessary to adapt to its many changes, while also equipping students with the skills needed to perform vital daily functions in an e-commerce environment. Students will be able to work independently or with a company to create, implement, maintain and administer an online presence and improve their use of the internet for commerce. Topics covered include: search engine optimization, search engine marketing, online advertising, web analytics, email marketing, social media marketing, reputation management and ethics.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 210: E-Commerce

3 Credit Hour(s)

The internet is a dynamic marketplace. This class focuses on the theoretical understanding of the internet-based marketplace necessary to adapt to its many changes, while also equipping students with the skills needed to perform vital daily functions in an e-commerce environment. Students will be able to work independently or with a company to create, implement, maintain and administer an online presence and improve their use of the internet for commerce. Topics covered include: search engine optimization, search engine marketing, online advertising, web analytics, email marketing, social media marketing, reputation management and ethics.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 302: Physical Distribution Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Logistical considerations of plant, warehouse and store location, inventory control, warehousing and transportation planning. Channels of distribution from an institutional-behavioral viewpoint. Design, management and evaluation of the distribution system. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 302: Physical Distribution Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

Logistical considerations of plant, warehouse and store location, inventory control, warehousing and transportation planning. Channels of distribution from an institutional-behavioral viewpoint. Design, management and evaluation of the distribution system. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 310: Foreign Markets of International Business

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course applies marketing concepts and practices in an international business setting. Special attention is given to the management of marketing functions and networks that span national boundaries. Key international business marketing decisions are studied. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 310: Foreign Markets of International Business

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course applies marketing concepts and practices in an international business setting. Special attention is given to the management of marketing functions and networks that span national boundaries. Key international business marketing decisions are studied. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 312: Promotional Strategies

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is a study of the functions, theory, principles and applications of the many parts of the promotion variable. Topics include: advertising, personal selling, publicity, public relations and direct marketing. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making aspects of promotional strategy. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 312: Promotional Strategies

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is a study of the functions, theory, principles and applications of the many parts of the promotion variable. Topics include: advertising, personal selling, publicity, public relations and direct marketing. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making aspects of promotional strategy. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 313: Customer Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce the students to the skills required to uncover consumer needs, the methods of establishing and building trust, and effective techniques for constructive resolution of consumer complaints. Special emphasis is placed on understanding consumer behavior and motives. Prerequisites:, MKT 209, MGQ 221 and Junior Status.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MKT 313: Customer Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce the students to the skills required to uncover consumer needs, the methods of establishing and building trust, and effective techniques for constructive resolution of consumer complaints. Special emphasis is placed on understanding consumer behavior and motives. Prerequisites:, MKT 209, MGQ 221 and Junior Status.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MKT 335: Market Research

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course covers the essential methods, techniques, and analysis approaches used in contemporary market research. Study areas include the marketing research process, designing qualitative and quantitative studies, sampling and testing, as well as data analysis and reporting. Prerequisites: MKT 209, MGQ 221 and Junior status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 335: Market Research

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course covers the essential methods, techniques, and analysis approaches used in contemporary market research. Study areas include the marketing research process, designing qualitative and quantitative studies, sampling and testing, as well as data analysis and reporting. Prerequisites: MKT 209, MGQ 221 and Junior status.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 402: Sport Marketing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course applies traditional marketing theory to the business of sport. It covers product marketing of products such as professional and amateur teams as well as recreational and sport club services. Innovative and traditional approaches to promotion and public relations in the sport industry are studied. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 402: Sport Marketing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course applies traditional marketing theory to the business of sport. It covers product marketing of products such as professional and amateur teams as well as recreational and sport club services. Innovative and traditional approaches to promotion and public relations in the sport industry are studied. Prerequisites: MKT 209 and Junior Status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 420: Marketing Planning and Strategy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Research and Presentation. This is the capstone course for the Marketing specialization. Students will focus on the analysis and application of previously studied marketing principles and techniques critical to an organization's strategic marketing strength. Special emphasis is placed on developing strategic thinking capabilities in areas of innovation, long-term competitiveness, customer satisfaction, and profitability. Senior status. Prerequisite: MKT 209, MKT 302, MKT 312 or MKT 313, and MKT 335.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

MKT 420: Marketing Planning and Strategy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Research and Presentation. This is the capstone course for the Marketing specialization. Students will focus on the analysis and application of previously studied marketing principles and techniques critical to an organization's strategic marketing strength. Special emphasis is placed on developing strategic thinking capabilities in areas of innovation, long-term competitiveness, customer satisfaction, and profitability. Senior status. Prerequisite: MKT 209, MKT 302, MKT 312 or MKT 313, and MKT 335.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Mathematics

MTH 100: Mathematics in Our Daily Life

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Fulfills Quantitative Literacy requirement. A course designed to improve students' application of mathematical concepts in their everyday experience. These concepts will be developed through inductive/deductive reasoning, and topics such as fractal, pattern, sequences, geometry, logic, and statistics. Not offered for credit to mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MTH 97 or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 104: Survey of Statistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. An intuitive study of descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on applications using a statistical package. Prerequisite: MTH 97 (or adequate competence as determined by the mathematics placement). This course is not permitted for BA Math majors.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

MTH 111: Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. Basic ideas underlying mathematics in general, arithmetic and geometry in particular. Prerequisites: MTH 97 or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 112: Geometry and Logic

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. The second of a two-course sequence for future elementary teachers. Elementary logic and truth tables, geometric entities with their properties as sets of points, coordinate geometry, measurement, other geometries. Prerequisite: MTH 111.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 124: College Algebra

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. The real number system, first and second degree equations and inequalities, exponents, polynomials and rational functions are studied in depth. Elementary analytic geometry is also covered. Prerequisite: Grade C in MTH 97 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

MTH 131: Calculus and Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. This course is specifically designed for non-science majors. It covers single and multi-variables calculus, linear algebra including the simplex method for linear programming, with their applications in business and social sciences. Prerequisite: MTH 124 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

MTH 134: Pre-Calculus

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. Topics in this pre-calculus mathematics course include functions; graphing; polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; and trigonometry. Intended for students who must take calculus but who lack the necessary background. Prerequisite: MTH 124 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

MTH 144: Calculus and Analytic Geometry I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. Limits, continuity, differentiation, anti-differentiation, definite integrals, transcendental functions, formal integration, and application to physical, natural and engineering sciences. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in MTH 134 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 145: Calculus and Analytic Calculus II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Quantitative Literacy. Limits, continuity, differentiation, anti-differentiation, definite integrals, transcendental functions, formal integration, and application to physical, natural and engineering sciences. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in MTH 144 (or adequate competence as determined by mathematics placement).
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 246: Linear Algebra

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics covered include systems of linear equations, vector spaces and subspaces, dimension of vector spaces, linear transformations and eigenvalues. The interrelationship between these concepts is emphasized. An attempt is made to provide motivation for abstract ideas by presenting them as natural generalizations of familiar geometric concepts. Prerequisite: a grade of a C or better in MTH 144 or equivalent.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 254: Calculus and Analytic Geometry

3 Credit Hour(s)

Polar coordinates, infinite sequences, series, vector algebra and geometry, two and three dimensional vector algebra, calculus of functions of several variables, vector differential calculus lines and surface integrals. Prerequisite: a grade of a C or better in MTH 145.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 255: Calculus and Analytic Geometry IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

Polar coordinates, infinite sequences, series, vector algebra and geometry, two and three dimensional vector algebra, calculus of functions of several variables, vector differential calculus lines and surface integrals. Prerequisite: MTH 254.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 264: Discrete Mathematics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Study of a variety of discrete mathematical systems. Introduction to mathematical logic and its applications; sets, relations, and functions; combinatorics; discrete number systems; induction, recursion and generating functions; graph theory; lattices and boolean algebra. Prerequisite: Minimum grade C in MTH 144.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 274: Differential Equations

3 Credit Hour(s)

Ordinary equations of the first, second and higher orders; linear differential equations with constant coefficients; applications in physics and geometry. Solutions of linear systems of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite: MTH 145.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 303: Introduction to Proofs

3 Credit Hour(s)

A course that teaches students how to read and construct proofs as they are typically presented in the textbook, journal articles, and other mathematical literature, at the appropriate level. Prerequisites: Minimum grades of C in MTH 145 and MTH 264.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 307: Introduction to Abstract Algebra I

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the first part of a two-course sequence. Introduction to theory of groups, rings, ideals, integral domains and fields; vector spaces, matrices and determinants. Prerequisite: MTH 145 and upper division status.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 308: Introduction to Abstract Algebra II

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is part two of a two-course sequence. Introduction to theory of groups, rings, ideals, integral domains and fields; vector spaces, matrices and determinants. Prerequisite: MTH 307 and upper division status.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 310: Methods in Teaching Secondary and Middle School Mathematics

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the secondary school curriculum and pedagogical implications for teaching mathematics. Topics include developing lesson plans, exploring assessment techniques, and special learning techniques. Includes lectures, field experience, the role of technology as a teaching resource and classroom tool, and classroom management issues. Students are expected to complete 50 hours of field experience. Prerequisite: Upper division status. This course cannot be used as a Math elective for BA Math majors or Education majors with Math Area Studies. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 351: Modern Geometry

3 Credit Hour(s)

Historical background, transformational geometry: mapping and transformation, synthetic plane geometry: Mobius and hyperbolic geometry, other geometries: projective geometry, pseudo geometry, universal and multidimensional projective geometry. Prerequisites: MTH 145 and MTH 264 and upper division status. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 407: Advanced Calculus

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is part one of a two-course sequence. A rigorous study of calculus, sequence, real number system, functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, infinite series. Prerequisite: MTH 255 and upper division status. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 408: Advanced Calculus II

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is part two of a two-course sequence. A rigorous study of calculus, sequence, real number system, functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, integration, infinite series. Prerequisite: MTH 407. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 414: Elementary Theory of Probability

3 Credit Hour(s)

Algebra of sets applied to discrete sample spaces; combinational analysis; conditional probability; binomial, Poisson and normal distributions. Applications of advanced probability techniques to a research problem. Prerequisite: MTH 145, MTH 264 and upper division status, or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 415: Theory of Mathematical Statistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Sampling, distributions, statistical inference, estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and regression. Prerequisite: MTH 414. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 416: Numerical Analysis

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as CSC 416. Study of finite differences, interpolation, root finding algorithms; numerical differentiation and integration. Numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisite:MTH 145. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 430: Mathematics Reading List and Proseminar

3 Credit Hour(s)

History, development and foundations of mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 264 and upper division status. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 457: Independent Study or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Individually arranged reading and research. Open to qualified students at the invitation of the faculty. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MTH 459: Introduction to Mathematical Research

1 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students select topics for their research project and make substantial progress on researching the senior thesis required in MTH 460 Mathematics Capstone. Students are required to submit a polished research proposal and an annotated bibliography and to make an oral presentation of the research proposal to the class. Prerequisite: Upper division status in the Mathematics Department. Offered as Needed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MTH 460: Mathematics Capstone

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This course has been designed to give students an introduction to research and literature in mathematics. Students will demonstrate their research, analytical, oral, and writing skills by researching and writing an original document (minimum 12 pages) based on sources appropriate to the discipline and approved by the instructor. At the end of the semester students will offer oral presentations to the class with selected members of the Daemen College community in attendance. Prerequisite: Junior/Senior status. Offered As Needed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

MTH 90: Pre-Algebra

3 Credit Hour(s)

This self-paced course emphasizes basic computational skills including whole number operations, fractions, mixed numbers, decimal fractions, ratios and proportions, signed numbers, simple linear equations and operations on polynomials. As a student's level of preparation for entry into this course may vary, mastery of course content may require enrollment in the course for more than one semester. Offered Each Semester. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

MTH 96: Developmental Skills in Basic Mathematics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course emphasizes computational and fundamental skills, including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, proportions, percents, and beginning algebra. Offered in HEOP Summer Program. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes.
Session: Summer (UG)

MTH 97: Basic Mathematics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course covers the essentials of algebra, including signed numbers, fractions, factoring, polynomials, rational functions, solving equations, and word problems. Intended for students needing skills in mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH-90 or adequate competency as determined by mathematics placement. Offered Each Semester. Please note: The number of credits this course carries are in clock hours, not institutional credit hours. A clock hour course will not advance your degree progress; rather, it is designed to strengthen your skill in order to qualify for a credit-bearing course in this area of study or in a related field. The clock hours DO count, however, towards your course load and for financial aid purposes. Please note: This is a developmental course. Students needing this course are required to register for it upon placement and to remain enrolled until satisfactory completion. Course withdrawal is not allowed except by permission of both the instructor and the student's advisor.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

Music

MUS 100: Introduction to Music

3 Credit Hour(s)

Basic concepts and terminology; survey of selected periods in music history, with study of representative compositions.
Session: As Needed (UG)

MUS 115: The Music of the United States

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. A survey of the entire range of American music: religious, folk, classical, popular, jazz, etc.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Natural Science

NSC 130: Scientific Excavation as a Window on the Past

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Two Western New York scientific excavation projects will be used to demonstrate the application of the scientific method to real-life situations in complex and sometimes misleading field situations. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 201: Comprehensive Science I

3 Credit Hour(s)

An integrated approach to the sciences, covering physics, chemistry, earth science, astronomy and biology. Interconnections of these disciplines is emphasized to promote a basic science literacy and informed civic involvement. Intended for non-majors. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 202: Comprehensive Science II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Continuation of NSC 201. Cannot be used for science credit for science majors.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 205: Planet Earth I: Physical Features

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 205. An introduction to physical aspects of geology, hydrology, the atmosphere and oceanography of the Earth and the application of these principles from a scientific perspective to land use and planning. Cannot receive credit for both ESC 107 and ENS/NSC 205.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 209: Service Learning in the Natural Sciences

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning requirement. A course that involves students working together to use their scientific knowledge to benefit the community. Project topics will vary each semester, but will involve students in identifying relevant community problems, developing proposed solutions and helping to implement these in the community. Science majors cannot use this course for credit in the major.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 231: Natural Science: Scientific Language & Literacy Seminar

3 Credit Hour(s)

A seminar on research problems and recent advances in natural science. Emphasis is placed on using different forms of media and presentation to communicate scientific ideas. Prerequisites: Biology, Biochemistry or Natural Science major; Sophomore status = min. grade C in CHE 111, BIO 110, and 3 credits in an additional 300/400 level BIO or CHE.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 244: Scientific Techniques and Data Interpretation

3 Credit Hour(s)

A survey of basic methods of data collection and analysis. Students will learn about the theory and practice of basic laboratory skills that are considered necessary for entry-level laboratory positions or beginning graduate studies in the sciences. Methods of data collection and analysis for different techniques and instrumentation will be reviewed. Prerequisite: BIO 110, CHE 111.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 303: Environmental Toxicology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 303. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of different types of toxins, their routes into organisms, environmental fates and roles in metabolic pathways. Applications to environmental and occupational health as well as detection and risk assessment are included. Prerequisites: BIO 109 and BIO 110/L and CHE 111/L.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 306: Teaching Science in Middle and High School

3 Credit Hour(s)

An investigation of the diverse methods for presenting science material in the middle and high school classroom to meet the national and state standards for science education. Classroom visitation will be required outside of course time. Prerequisites: Upper division status in biology, EDU 313 and EDU 327.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 307: Pharmacotherapeutics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NUR 307. (Not open to Biology, Biochemistry or Natural Science majors). This elective course presents the latest information about the newest medications and up-to-the minute information about traditional drugs in a manner that is relevant to the needs of the professional nurse caring for patients in a variety of clinical settings. Through a nursing process approach, the course stresses pharmacological principles that will aid the nurse in the administration of medications. The course is designed for the nurse who already has a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Problem-solving sessions throughout the course focus on therapeutic usages and monitoring of each of the classes of agents. Prerequisites: BIO 207-208 or BIO 330-340. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 310: Biostatistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking. An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on applications in biological and health sciences. Prerequisite: MTH 134, BIO 110. Lecture, 3 hours; Computer Lab, 1 hour.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 331: Natural Science Literature Survey

2 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with NSC 443, combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. An introduction to the general principles and procedures of scientific research with emphasis on the use of scientific literature and methods of research. Prerequisite: Upper division status in Biochemistry, Biology or Natural Science and successful completion of BCH 317 or CHE 302 and 3 additional courses in BIO or CHE at the 300/400 level. Seminar, 1 hour; Literature work, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 342: Biomaterials

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the range of biomaterials available for orthopedics, cardiology, plastic surgery, dentistry, and other applications. The selection of materials and their manufacture for implantation in the body are discussed. Issues surrounding safety of biomaterials in the body, as well as the FDA processes governing implants and clinical trials are examined. Prerequisites: BIO 110 and CHE 111.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 401: Research Problems in Cell Biology

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in cell biology under supervision. Prerequisites: BIO 325; NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 404: Research Problems in Mammalian Physiology

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in mammalian physiology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 405: Research Problems in Genetics and Microbiology

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in Genetics and/or Microbiology. Prerequisites: NSC 331, permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 406: Research Problems in Organic and Environmental Chemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in organic or environmental chemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 407: Research Problems in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in molecular biology and/or biochemistry. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 408: Research Problems in Biochemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in molecular biology and/or biochemistry. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 409: Research Problems in Analytical and Physical Chemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in analytical or physical chemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 410: Research Problems in Ecology and Environmental Biology

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in ecology and evolutionary biology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 412: Research Problems in Zoology and Natural History

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in zoology and/or natural history under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 413: Research Problems in Organic & Biochemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in organic chemistry and/or biochemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 414: Research Problems in Developmental Biology

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in developmental biology under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 415: Research Problems: Bioengineering and Wound Healing

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in bioengineering and/or wound healing under supervision. Prerequisites: NSC 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 416: Research Problems: Inorganic Biochemistry

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Individual literature and/or laboratory research in inorganic biochemistry under supervision. Prerequisites: NCS 331; permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NSC 443: Natural Science Research Seminar

2 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy; Writing Intensive. Together with NSC 331, combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. A capstone seminar focusing on research conducted by seniors and faculty. Prerequisites: NSC 331, with a grade of C or better; Senior status in Biochemistry, Biology or Natural Science. Seminar, 1 hour; Literature and/or Laboratory Work, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NSC 458: Natural Science Directed Study

1-3 Credit Hour(s)

Independent study or project in a natural science discipline under supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Senior status in a natural science discipline and permission of the department chairperson.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Nursing

NUR 221: Issues in Women's Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as HSC 221. This elective course is designed to provide students with an overview of topics impacting women's health in contemporary society. The course focuses on controversial issues related to women's health and investigates the roles that women play as health care consumers and as health care providers. The course is designed for students from multiple areas of study. These students will explore specific health care problems impacting upon women and will analyze contextual factors that affect the delivery of health care to women. Prerequisite: CMP 101; Web-based format.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 222: Healing, Holism and Spirituality in Health Care

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as PHI 222. This three (3) credit course is a truly inter-disciplinary, inter-divisional course team-taught by a faculty member of the nursing department and a faculty member of the humanities. The course is designed to explore the meaning and mutual inter-connectedness of healing, holism, spirituality and care. Students will investigate the role of spirituality in their own personal lives, the power of healing and care both in medicine and everyday experience. Complementary therapeutic modalities such as prayer, therapeutic touch, meditation, friendship, etc. will be explored. There will be special focus on matters relating to the living-dying continuum exploring end-of-life matters), the inter-relatedness of the universe, and the implications of certain cultural differences, especially those in eastern cultures. Assignments for the course, including journal assignments and a hospice experience, are designed to stimulate personal as well as professional growth. Assigned readings, faculty presentations, and class discussions are intended to encourage student self-reflection, as well as a shared learning experience. Lecture/seminar, 3 hours.
Session: Fall (UG)

NUR 233: Herbs, Drugs, Supplements and the Body

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as HSC 233. Grounded in a holistic framework, this course focuses on general concepts of herbs, drugs, supplements and nutrition in relation to the well being of self and the client. This course develops a basic comprehension of nutrition emphasizing the role of phyto-nutrients as well as toxic ingredients in our food. The impact of culture, spirituality, and biological factors, as well as psychosocial, economic, and ethical considerations, is discussed in relation to improving and maintaining health in self and client. Relevant and current evidence-based research is included. The notion of food, herbs, and supplements as pharmacy is explored throughout. The newest information on drug/herb interactions, Joint Commission requirements for herbal products, new FDA labeling guidelines, and how to select a quality herbal or supplemental product are addressed. This course fosters understanding and strategies for promoting specific herbs and supplements for individuals attempting to maintain health and coping with pathology. Health promotion (learning to make healthy choices in our toxic environment, healthy sleep habits) and maintenance are stressed. Concepts related to family therapy, consumerism, and advocacy are addressed. Students learn such strategies for improving self and client health as risk assessment, stress management, nutritional counseling, and health teaching. Web-based format.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 251: Special Topics: Oncology Nursing I

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the first of two courses designed to give the international registered nurse student a core knowledge base in oncology nursing. This course serves as an introduction to the student to nursing theory, nursing research, and evidence-based nursing to patient and family centered oncology nursing practice. The purpose of this course is to acquaint registered nurse students with the fundamentals of cellular basics of cancer, biology of cancer, health promotion, epidemiology, prevention and detection, treatment modalities, oncologic emergencies, psychosocial issues, supportive care, palliative care, survivorship, and research.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 251L: Special Topics: Oncology Nursing I Lab

6 Credit Hour(s)

This practicum is designed to introduce Registered Nurse students to the role of the professional nurse in the oncology care setting. Emphasis is on further development of professional nursing skills and the use of the nursing process, particularly assessment, decision making, and evaluation. Clinical experiences in a variety of inpatient and ambulatory care settings enable students to develop essential skills for providing accessible, continuous, collaborative, affordable, and patient centered oncology care. Students gain experience in independent and interdisciplinary decision making with nurse preceptors and other health team members. Students have the opportunity to participate in off-unit/clinic experiences such as with the Ostomy & Skin Care team, Diagnostic Radiology, Infusion and Chemotherapy Amherst Satellite, and surgery. Clinical rotations will include opportunities in both inpatient and outpatient settings within Roswell Park Cancer Institute. The rotation includes a quality improvement Capstone project. The lab will include 18 hours of clinical practice per week (3/1 ratio).
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 252: Special Topics: Oncology Nursing II

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the second of two courses designed to give the international registered nurse student an advanced knowledge base in oncology nursing. This course serves as an introduction to the student to advancing nursing theory, nursing research, and evidence-based nursing to patient and family centered oncology nursing practice. The purpose of this course is to acquaint registered nurse students with advanced concepts of cancer symptom management. Prerequisite: NUR 251/L.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 252L: Special Topics: Oncology Nursing II Lab

6 Credit Hour(s)

Continuation of NUR 251 Lab. The rotation includes a research Capstone project. The lab will include 18 hours of clinical practice per week (3/1 ratio).
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 305: Health Assessment

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a health assessment on an adult and child. The impact of genetics and genomics are explored in relation to disease prevention, health promotion, and health screening. Critical thinking and clinical reasoning are utilized to inform assessment and evidence-based nursing diagnoses. Emphasis is placed on normal findings of the physical assessment. Lecture, 3 hours. Prerequisites: BIO 207 and BIO 208.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 307: Pharmacotherapeutics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as NSC 307. (Not open to Biology, Biochemistry or Natural Science majors). This elective course presents the latest information about the newest medications and up-to-the minute information about traditional drugs in a manner that is relevant to the needs of the professional nurse caring for patients in a variety of clinical settings. Through a nursing process approach, the course stresses pharmacological principles that will aid the nurse in the administration of medications. The course is designed for the nurse who already has a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology. Problem-solving sessions throughout the course focus on therapeutic usages and monitoring of each of the classes of agents. Prerequisites: BIO 207 and BIO 208 or BIO 330 and BIO 340. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 308: Interprofessional Patient and Family Educaion

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as HSC 308.This interprofessional course will provide health care providers with the tools to deliver understandable patient and family education. We will explore the concepts of health literacy and communication for health care professionals. We will explore the role of literacy in patient and family education, preparing health care professionals to use the best communication tools to assess health literacy and readability. We will also examine how to evaluate health literacy using tools designed for their ability to measure plain and understandable information, transfer information and communicate high risk and care transitions. Students will explore health literacy through the eyes of their discipline, and will develop an appreciation for the advantages to participating in an interprofessional team focused on the improvement of patient and family education. Web-based format.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

NUR 315: Concepts of Professional Nursing Practice

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides an introduction to the nature of professional nursing with a dual emphasis on self as learner and self as nurse. The course is designed to introduce the student to the application of nursing theory to contemporary nursing practice. Nursing theory will be explored as the foundation for the development of professional nursing. This course also broadens the Registered Nurse's perspective of professionalism, the role of research, and value-based behavior at the baccalaureate level. Web-enhanced. Majors only. Also available in a web-based format.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 316: Holistic Perspectives

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course focuses on the relationship between values and attitudes of the nurse, individuals, and families in the health care system based on a holistic approach. Various macro and micro-cultures are explored in terms of specific cultural influences affecting the adaptation response of individuals, families, and communities. The rendering of health care to meet health needs as well as culture specific values, communication, religion, customs, and health beliefs and practices is emphasized. Future implications for the health care delivery system based on concepts of caring and humanistic nursing are explored. Web-enhanced. Also available in a web-based format.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 317: Professional Nursing Practice I

6 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to enhance critical thinking and clinical reasoning abilities by introducing the student to the application of nursing research and evidence based practice to contemporary nursing practice. The purpose of this course is to acquaint nursing students with the fundamentals of research methods and to understand the importance of research in practice. Evidence based practice will be explored as a basis for further development of professional practice. Application of research and the formation of evidence based practice will be explored in classroom and external learning experiences. Lecture 60 instructional hours (4 credits); External Learning Experiences, 60 hours (2 credits). Offered in a web-enhanced format. Also offered in web-based format. Prerequisite: NUR 315. Corequisite NUR 317L.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 317L: Professional Nursing Practice I Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the external learning experiences requirement for NUR 317. 60 hours per semester.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 324: Leadership Development in Clinical Nursing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills in leadership, communication, interprofessional teamwork and quality improvement systems that are necessary to provide quality health care. Group dynamics and group processes are examined. The course emphasizes ethical and critical thinking/clinical reasoning skills used to initiate and maintain effective working relationships, and develop conflict resolution strategies in professional nursing practice. Leadership theory and management functions in contemporary nursing practice will be explored. Various models of nursing practice will be examined and related to the leadership function of nurses.
Session: As Needed (UG)

NUR 417: Professional Nursing Practice II

6 Credit Hour(s)

This course prepares students with the knowledge and skills in leadership, communication, interprofessional teamwork and quality improvement systems that are necessary to provide quality health care. Group dynamics and group processes are examined. The course emphasizes ethical and critical thinking/clinical reasoning skills used to initiate and maintain effective working relationships, and develop conflict resolution strategies in professional practice. Leadership theory and management functions in contemporary nursing practice will be explored. This course enhances the nurse's ability to manage him or herself and others effectively within the context of change occurring within the healthcare system. Offered in a web-enhanced format. Lecture 60 instructional hours (4 credits); External learning experiences, 60 hours (2 credits). Prerequisites: RN Licensure, majors only, NUR 315. Corequisite: NUR 417L.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 417L: Professional Nursing Practice II Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the external learning experiences requirement for NUR 417. 60 hours per semester.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 432: Professional Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Together with NUR 453, fulfills Research and Presentation requirement for Nursing majors. This capstone course continues the process of professional nursing socialization. It is designed so that students may lead seminars to discuss issues affecting the nursing profession. The course includes a student led debate and written articulation of each student's philosophy of nursing. The major goals of this course are to increase student involvement in policy/politics and to enhance student awareness of the importance of lifelong learning. Lecture, 3 hours. Majors only. Prerequisites: NUR 317 and 417. Corequisite: NUR 453. RN licensure, Majors only.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 453: Professional Nursing Practice III

6 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with NUR 432, meets Research and Presentation requirement. In this course, the student applies the nursing process to population-focused nursing of the community. Population-focused nursing care in this course incorporates working with the community as partner, assessing determinants of health, examining available resources within the community, and identifying needs to improve health outcomes of the community. In addition, students collaborate with healthcare professionals and utilize informatics to promote conditions and healthy behaviors to improve population health. Offered in a web- enhanced format. Lecture 60 instructional hours (4 credits). External Learning Experiences, 60 hours (2 credits). Prerequisite: NUR 317, RN licensure, majors only. Co-requisite: NUR 453L.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

NUR 453L: Professional Nursing Practice III Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

This course satisfies the external learning experiences requirement for NUR 453. 60 hours per semester.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Paralegal Studies

PAR 210: Law for Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Critical Thinking; Contextual Integration; Research & Presentation; Writing Intensive. In this course, students will engage in supervised work in schools, with youth programs, and in community service settings. They will conceive, organize and implement their own applied theatre projects, in consultation with representatives of the partners as well as the theater faculty advisors. Students will meet weekly with the faculty advisor to chart time, troubleshoot about organizational issues and discuss assignments. The faculty advisor will correspond closely with the cooperating partners to monitor student progress. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director. Offered as Needed.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 301: Legal Research and Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. This course teaches legal analysis, legal writing and problem-solving using the premier legal database WestlawNext which is typically used in law offices. Students learn to use a variety of electronic legal sources, perform legal research, analyze legal problems, and write legal documents, primarily case briefs and legal memos. Students also learn to locate and use both primary and secondary legal research sources, including federal and state cases, digests, statutes, treatises, encyclopedias, law reviews, citators and legal practice manuals. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and a minimum grade of B in CMP 101; or declared Pre Law minor and minimum grade of B in CMP 101, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 302: Law Office Computer Technology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is designed to teach the student commonly-used software in the law office and to apply the knowledge of computer hardware and software applications in legal work. Students will learn the technical skills necessary to enhance their ability to incorporate technology in litigation as well as those skills necessary to technologically support a law practice. Students will complete the course with a portfolio of assignments including legal memos, PowerPoint presentations, the creation of a law office website and LinkedIn profile completion. The course also features guest speakers that are experts in their fields. Guests will cover topics including use of weather data in litigation, eDiscovey, social media, etc. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 303: Litigation

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to the principles of civil litigation in federal and state courts. All phases of the litigation process will be reviewed in detail, with special emphasis upon rules of procedure, discovery, and pre-trial, trial and post-trial practices, as these are areas in which paralegals are most extensively used. Ethical considerations as applied to litigation will also be covered. Students will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills in practical exercises and research and writing projects. Students will learn to draft typical litigation documents such as complaints, answers, and motions. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 304: Contract Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BA304. This course provides an introduction to the law of contracts, including analysis of the basic elements of contract formation, defenses to contract performance, breach of contract and remedies, drafting and interpretation of contracts. Students will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills through practical projects typically required in law offices. Writing projects will require legal research. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific legal scenarios. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 305: Real Property Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BA305. This course is an introduction to real estate law and practice. Students will be required to not only learn the basic law but to problem-solve and draft documents that are typical to legal practice in this area, and will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills. The course covers New York Real Estate statutes and the areas of law include property rights, types of land ownership/estates, easements, agreements for sale and closings, financing, conveyancing. Students will do a real estate closing as their final project. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 306: Tort Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide an introduction to the broad area of civil wrongs, and their appropriate remedies, as well as Tort Law principles in the traditional areas of intentional torts, negligence, absolute liability, product liability, nuisance and commonly employed defenses. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and upper division status in program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 307: Criminal Law and Procedure

3 Credit Hour(s)

This Criminal Law and Procedure course is designed to provide student paralegals with an overview of the criminal justice process and apply this knowledge to practical writing projects such as motions and memos. This course covers the substantive aspects of criminal law and includes the general principles of criminal liability, specific analysis of particular crimes, parties to crimes, and the substantive defenses to crimes. Constitutional safeguards and procedures from arrest through trial, sentencing, punishment, and appeal are also studied. Prerequisites: PAR 2210, PSC 117 and upper division status in program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PAR 308: Family Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course presents fundamental common law and statutory concepts of family law with emphasis on the paralegal's role in this area. Topics include formal and informal marriages, separation, divorce, annulment, marital property, the parent-child relationship, child custody and support, adoption, guardianship, domestic relations court procedures, public records research, and the paralegal's role in alternative dispute resolution/mediation processes. Ethical obligations, family law terminology and emerging computer applications in domestic relations practice are also presented. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and upper division status in program.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 401: Elder & Estates Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will be introduced to topics in the law affecting older persons. Topics including ethical and communications issues, advance directives and guardianships, financial and estate planning, healthcare, personal planning and protection, and consumer protection will be covered in the course.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 402: Environmental Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Students will develop a broad understanding of the roles of federal, state, and local environmental laws in a highly industrialized society and be introduced to relevant concepts in administrative, tort, and real estate law. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and upper division status.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 403: Business and Corporate Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BA403. This course is an introduction to the law of corporations and requires students to problem-solve and analyze the different types of corporate forms found in legal practice. Students will learn New York corporate law including statutes covering the formation, operation, and dissolution of various kinds of business organizations. The areas of law include sole proprietorships, corporations, partnerships, the law of agency and employment agreements. Students will develop their legal analysis and legal writing skills. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 404: Intellectual Property

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is intended to provide the student with an in-depth analysis of the law pertaining to the fields of intellectual property: trademarks, copyrights, patents, trade secrets, and unfair competition. The methods by which each is created and protected will also be explored. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and upper division status.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 405: Immigration Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide an overview of immigration law in the United States, with an emphasis on the practical application of that law in a law firm or corporate environment. Students will learn the skills needed to deal with a deadline-oriented caseload for a diverse clientele. Topics will include the basics of immigration and education, employment, family based immigration, refugee law and the procedures for applying for citizenship and asylum. Prerequisites: PAR 210 and upper division status.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 406: Bankruptcy Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as BA 406. This course is an introduction to the law of bankruptcy and requires students to apply the bankruptcy statutes to a variety of factual situations. Students will learn the federal bankruptcy statutes, and topics include voluntary and involuntary liquidations, discharge of debts, exemptions, creditor claims, trustee functions, reorganizations, and Chapters 7, 11, 12 and 13 plans. Students will develop their legal analysis and writing skills. Ethics will be discussed throughout the semester relating to specific scenarios in legal work. Prerequisites: PAR 210 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

PAR 408: Administrative Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to basic concepts of administrative law in federal and state agencies, with emphasis on the paralegal's role in the administrative process. Students will learn both formal and informal advocacy techniques, including representing clients before administrative bodies. Substantive topics will include administrative delegation of power, rule making, agency discretionary powers, remedies, and judicial review. Procedural topics include agency operation, adjudication, hearing preparation, and administrative and judicial appeals. Practical projects which require legal research and writing will be required. Prerequisites: PAR 210, PAR 301 and upper division status in program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 409: Advanced Litigation

3 Credit Hour(s)

This class is an extension of Litigation, and builds upon the knowledge and skills learned in that class. Students will have legal writing projects that may include responses to discovery demands, deposition summaries, trial evidence logs, compiling an appellate record, settlement documents, and mediation/arbitration documents. Prerequisites: PAR 301, PAR 303, and upper division status in program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 410: Advanced Research and Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. This course is designed to build upon the research and writing skills introduced in Legal Research & Writing. Development of electronic research skills and analytical skills will be emphasized, and students will be assigned research and writing projects in various areas of the law. Prerequisite: PAR 301 and upper division status in program, or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PAR 450: Paralegal Internship

3 Credit Hour(s)

The paralegal internship is a wonderful means of experiential learning. This is a required course for Paralegal Studies majors which includes course work in professionalism skills and job search skills. Placements will be arranged with the assistance of the Program Director according to availability and interests of the student. Prerequisite: PAR 301, upper division status, and permission of instructor required.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PAR 460: Paralegal Studies Senior Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Information Literacy and Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This course will require Paralegal Studies students to use the legal analysis skills they have acquired, and the writing skills they have acquired, to develop an original argument on a legal topic. Students will identify a legal issue that interests them, formulate a specific question, and answer that question with an argument based on their independent research. Constructing the argument will require sustained and in-depth research - both legal research using primary and secondary sources, and research into other disciplines. Students will have the opportunity to consult with an appropriate advisor in the Daemen (or other academic) community, as well as a legal practitioner (such as an attorney, a judge, a legislator, or a legal scholar). Students will also present their research and argument at the Academic Festival. Prerequisites: PAR301, PAR410.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

Physician Assistant Studies

PAS 329: Statistics for Evidence-Based Practice

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Core Competency; Critical Thinking & Creative Problem Solving; What one learns in PA school will not always apply to medical practice. Learning is never mastered. Thus, to be a good clinician, one must constantly educate oneself by evaluating the latest medical research to keep one's knowledge current. Evidence-based practice provides methodologies to evaluate scientific evidence for the delivery of the highest quality health care. This course is one of two courses in the Physician Assistant Department for the evaluation of medical research that provides: 1. a foundation in probability and statistics, and 2. an introduction to medical research designs and associated inferential statistical analyses In combination with PAS 529, this course is designed to increase students' competency in the evaluation of medical research. In this course, the emphasis is on basic study design, appropriate descriptive and inferential procedures, and interpretation of results. We will focus on real examples from the medical literature to cover the basics of clinical research design, sampling methodology, statistical methods for evaluating clinical research data, as well as introduce some of the many limitations of basic and clinical research. Topics include: Descriptive statistics, statistical inference probability theory and application, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, estimation, confidence intervals, measures of risk/association, association vs. causation, and pitfalls of p-values. Specific statistical analyses include: t-test, ANOVA, linear correlation, linear regression, relative risk, and the odds ratio with emphasis on clinical trial designs. Pre-requisite: At least second year matriculated Physician Assistant Studies major. (UG)

Philosophy

PHI 102: Medicine, Culture and the Self: Introduction to Medical Humanities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency Contextual Integration; Affective Awareness; The course explores crucial questions about health, well-being, medicine, environment, and social inequality in the twenty-first century. Through a philosophical study of historical texts, scientific and clinical data, and first person narratives on illness and wellbeing, students will examine definitions of health and well-being; the strengths and limitations of science and medicine in making sense of illness; disparities in global burdens of disease; the relationship among health, illness, and narrative; and gendered, racialized, and cultural differences in the experiences of illness and the practices of healthcare and medicine
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 110: Philosophical Thinking

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An exploration of the nature and content of philosophical inquiry.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

PHI 113: Critical Thinking with Google

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking In this course critical thinking will be presented as a set of skills that has been long established and well defined in our philosophical tradition.
Session: Spring (UG)

PHI 203: The Question of the Human

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as REL 203. In order to explore the dignity and worth of the human, the course examines the relationship between the individual and community. Through a series of readings and reflections, the attempt is made to expose the inter-relatedness of various thinkers from the liberal arts tradition.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

PHI 209: Science and Values

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will explore the standards, values, and goals of science by examining issues related to bioethics and health care, technology, the environment, and animal rights. Rather than viewing science merely as a cold impersonal way of arriving at the objective truth about natural phenomena, this course is premised on the idea that science is intimately involved in questions of values; it is committed to standards of right and wrong, and in doing so it moves toward larger social aims.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 211: African American Thought

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as REL 211. This course explores the tradition of African-American response to slavery and legalized racism. After some brief historical background, this course will focus on three particularly important moments in this tradition of resistance: the slave narratives (especially Frederick Douglass and Linda Brent), the turn of the century debates over education (especially Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois and Marcus Garvey), and the civil rights movement (especially the student movement, Martin Luther King, Malcom X, and the Black Power movement.)
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 213: Ethics of Sex, Drugs and Sports

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as REL 213. Designed to be offered in learning community format with BIO 200 Science and Contemporary Social Issues. The course introduces students to moral issues and questions with regard to such matters as human cloning, genetic engineering, stem cell research, euthanasia, the environment and sustainability, and the emergence of life (e.g., fetal development).
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 222: Healing, Holism and Spirituality in Health Care

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as NUR 222. This three (3) credit course is a truly inter-disciplinary, inter-divisional course team-taught by a faculty member of the nursing department and a faculty member of the humanities. The course is designed to explore the meaning and mutual inter-connectedness of healing, holism, spirituality and care. Students will investigate the role of spirituality in their own personal lives, the power of healing and care both in medicine and everyday experience. Complementary therapeutic modalities such as prayer, therapeutic touch, meditation, friendship, etc. will be explored. There will be special focus on matters relating to the living-dying continuum, exploring end-of-life matters, the inter-relatedness of the universe, and the implications of certain cultural differences, especially those in eastern cultures. Assignments for the course, including journal assignments and a hospice experience, are designed to stimulate personal as well as professional growth. Assigned readings, faculty presentations, and class discussions are intended to encourage student self-reflection, as well as a shared learning experience. Lecture/seminar, 3 hours.
Session: Fall (UG)

PHI 225: Readings in World Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as REL 225. This course is part of a learning community exploring the relationship among texts, historical contexts, and cultural conflicts. Students will study crucial moments in the modern era (i.e. slavery, the Holocaust, the Native American experience, the Cold War, and the immigrant experience) and will examine a variety of different texts (film, memoirs, novels, speeches, etc.) that reflect and comment upon these seminal historical moments and conflicts.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 231: Moments of Vision

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as REL 231. Co-sponsored by the Jewish Chautauqua Society and the National Federation of Temple Brotherhoods. The objective of this course is to consider the human imagination as it gives rise to certain visions which speak to dimensions of human experience with respect to a depth otherwise lost and hidden in the everyday world. The course explores the predicaments of evil and suffering, joy and silence, to gain an understanding of the need for visions about the boundaries and depths which open within human experience.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 232: Learning Through Service: Individuals, Societies, and Social Equity

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course will investigate the causes and consequences of social inequity in the U.S., focusing on disparities linked to gender, race, class, and disability (with particular focus on issues pertaining to the specific learning sites students are participating in). Taking a perspective that aims for greater social justice, students will learn to analyze contexts, individual and communal implications, and current and possible solutions for identified problems (How did we get here? Are the solutions beneficial and to whom? What is the connection between individual action and social systems?). We will focus our analysis on the growing disparity between those who have access to well-funded institutions/programs versus those who do not. In doing so, we will analyze the role of larger socio-economic systems, our own social location, and historical developments that contributed to the current social inequity in the Buffalo region.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 234: Scientific and Religious Views of the World

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as REL 234. The focus of this interdisciplinary course is to engage in healthy dialogue with respect to problems and possibilities, conflicts and complementarities, differences and/or similarities of religious and scientific perspectives.
Session: Spring (UG)

PHI 248: Selected Periods in the History of Philosophy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Selected periods in the History of Philosophy, e.g. ancient philosophy, medieval philosophy, modern philosophy, etc.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 306: Eastern Philosophies

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will explore various philosophical and religious concepts in Buddhism, Hinduism, and Taoism. Some cultural and historical background will be provided from which students can understand better how these various concepts, with their associated symbols and myths, arose. A methodology will be provided by which these concepts might be related to the spectacle of our age.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 309: The Holocaust

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as REL 309. This course analyzes the variety of historical, religious, philosophical and political issues posed by the Nazi policy of systematic genocide. We will explore religious and racial anti-Semitism, the philosophy of fascism, the logic of genocide and the development and implementation of the final solution. Attention will also be paid to concentration camp life and to its effect upon the perpetrators and the survivors.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PHI 310: Nature in Human Experience

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course will examine the philosophical foundations of our relations with nature. It will explore the values humans find in nature, and the responsibility humans have to the natural environment. It will discuss the ethical dimensions of our relation with animals. Finally, it will study a number of contemporary environmental issues.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PHI 312: Ethics

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the principal ethical theories and their relevance to problems of conduct. Readings from classical and contemporary philosophy on the nature of the moral life.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

PHI 314: Philosophy of Art

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness; Critical Thinking; In this course we will read many of the classic works on the nature and value of the arts (including visual art, literature, and music), from the Ancients up to the mid twentieth century. We will address such questions as: What is art? How has the evolution of art forms over the course of time influenced philosophical conceptions of art? What is beauty? What distinguishes judgments of taste from purely factual judgments? Can such judgments be objective, or are they solely a matter of personal feelings? What makes a person beautiful? Are our judgments of human beauty solely the product of our evolutionary past, or do these judgments reflect cultural standards? This is a required course for Art programs. Signed off from Art and Theater. As well as PHI department.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 315: Social Philosophy

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of some of the philosophical concepts and moral principles employed in the rational appraisal of social life.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 321: Medical Ethics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Topics to be discussed include general introduction to ethical theory, health as a value, death and dying, euthanasia, behavior control, medical care and distributive justice.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PHI 322: Philosophy of Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. An exploration of some of the fundamental issues in the philosophy of law. Topics discussed include: the nature of law, law and morality, issues involving freedom of speech and constitutional interpretation, equality and the law, responsibility, crime and punishment, issues in tort law.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PHI 326: Meaning of Care in a Technological Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as REL 326. This course will probe the complexity of the issue of human values as these relate to a humane and meaningful future for society. It is a course committed to discovering the interrelations of religious and ethical thinking with the social issues of economics, politics, science and technology.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

PHI 328: Comparative Genocide

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as REL 328. This course will examine phenomenon of modern genocide, with particular attention to the ideological motivation of the perpetrators and to the effect upon families and individuals. After some opening theoretical reflections on the connection between modernity and genocide, the course will focus on four particular examples: American slavery, the Nazi final solution, the Khmer Rouge revolution, and the Rwanda genocide.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 329: Magic and Science: Principles of Scientific Reasoning

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. Scientific reasoning applies the principles of critical reasoning to the pursuit of scientific activity, which consists of description, explanation, prediction, and control of empirical real world-phenomena. This course will examine the answers to a set of philosophical questions concerning the structure and the limits of scientific explanations, the principles of research design, and research methodology (e.g., quantitative or qualitative) in natural sciences, and social sciences, the differences and similarities between natural sciences and human sciences, discrimination of science from pseudoscience, objectivity of scientific knowledge, and the place for values in science. Students will learn to identify and apply the forms of critical reasoning (e.g., inductive or deductive) to evaluate these philosophical problems pertaining to scientific activity. Prerequisite: One 100/200/300 level Philosophy course or a writing intensive course.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 330: Witches, Cripples & Other Monsters

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills Core Competency: Contextual Integration; Cross-listed as REL 330. This course examines the construction of "disability" as a historical concept with real live consequences. We will learn about the different theoretical approaches to disability (moral, medical, social, cultural, limits models), and explore issues regarding sexuality, relationships, civil rights, cultural representation, and advocacy. We will also keep in mind the intersections with other bodily and social markers, such as gender, race, sexuality, class, and nationality.Special focus will be given to the role religion, particularly Christianity (its doctrines and practices), has played in how we understand disability as a concept, and persons with disability as members (or not) of our communities. We will analyze historical and contemporary sources like art, literature, religious and medical discourses to explore how images of the "normal," "healthy," and "beautiful" are generated and contested by embodied differences. For the purposes of this course, "disability" will include various ways in which bodies/minds can be seen as "abnormal," including physical and cognitive disabilities as well as chronic illness and emotional/mental difference.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 333: Religions in the World Sequence 1: Monotheistic Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as REL 333. This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on the so-called Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), as well as Mormonism. Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, and modern lived expression (globally and in the US context) will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 334: Religiions in the World Sequence 2: Asian Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as REL 334. This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on the so-called Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), as well as Mormonism. Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, and modern lived expression (globally and in the US context) will be discussed. Offered regularly, in sequence with connected Religions in the World courses.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 335: Religions in the World Sequence 3: Indigenous and New Age Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as REL 335.This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on indigenous and so-called New Age traditions: North American traditions, African traditions, Australian Aboriginal Tradition, and New Age Traditions (Neo-Paganism). Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, the religious situation of native people in the postcolonial world, and issues/conflicts arising out of contemporary socio-political contexts will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PHI 336: Sex, Love and God

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as REL 336 or WST 336. This course is about human sexuality and religion, specifically, how religious people have read and interpreted biblical texts and traditions in relation to sex, human sexuality, and expressions of love. Students are encouraged to investigate how their own religious beliefs inform their bodily lives and attitudes regarding sexual, romantic, and erotic expressions. The main focus of this course is concerned with Christianity, though depending on student interest, Jewish and Muslim interpretations may be covered briefly as well. Students will learn about concepts of the human body and related concerns of sexuality in ancient and medieval times, and investigate religious perspectives and prescriptions as they relate to specific understandings. Students will distinguish between historical ideas of erotic love and the modern construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality. The politicization of sexuality by religious groups and the use of religious ideas about sexuality by secular groups will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Physics

PHY 101: Physics I

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the elements of physics. Part I covers mechanics, heat and sound. Prerequisite: MTH 134 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PHY 101L: Physics I Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Experimental analysis of concepts discussed in Part I lecture. Co or prerequisite: PHY 101. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PHY 102: Physics II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of the study of the elements of physics. Part II covers electricity, magnetism, light and radioactivity. Prerequisite: PHY 101. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PHY 102L: Physics II Lab

1 Credit Hour(s)

Experimental analysis of concepts discussed in Part II lecture. Co or prerequisite: PHY 102. Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PHY 151: General Physics I Lecture

4 Credit Hour(s)

A typical course in general physics intended for students in Biochemistry and Mathematics. Emphasis is placed on fundamental principles and theories. Prerequisite: MTH 144 or equivalent placement. Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PHY 151L: General Physics I Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Physics I. Corequisite: PHY 151.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PHY 152L: General Physics II Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Laboratory techniques for General Physics II. Corequisite: PHY 152.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

Public Relations

PR 222: Introduction to Mass Communication

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as CA 222. This course will emphasize the application of the theories and concepts to specific forms of human communication including mass media, the graphic arts, interpersonal and group communications, and written communication.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

PR 301: Dynamics of Interpersonal Communication

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as CA 301. A thorough and intensive study of dyadic (two-person) interaction, its component parts, and its basic issues and concerns. Particular attention is given to the evolution of human relationships.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PR 322: Introduction to Public Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

An introduction to the concepts, history, ethics and techniques of public relations. The course is designed to provide the student with both theoretical knowledge and the development of basic skills required in professional public relations positions. Research, planning and programming, evaluation and analysis are examined and practiced in the classroom/workshop format. Offered Each Year (Fall).
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

PR 420: Promotional Writing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as CMP 420. This course introduces students to a style of marketing writing commonly known as "copywriting." Students will learn to write text (copy) whose aim is to promote products and services. Among units focused on will be brochures, print advertisements, broadcast advertisements, public service announcements for radio and television, direct mail, and other elements of marketing communications. CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PR 442: Capstone Research

1 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as LIT-442. This course will prepare students to devote the spring semester to organizing, drafting and revising a capstone project in LIT/PR 443. In LIT/PR 442, students will meet with primary and secondary faculty readers to develop an appropriate topic, prepare an annotated bibliography, and develop a capstone project proposal (preliminary, revised, and final).
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PR 443: Senior Capstone

2 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed with LIT-443. This capstone course concentrates on the production of a polished academic text, a sustained discussion (20-25 pages) of a topic of critical importance, representing the culmination of the student's intellectual accomplishments in English Studies. Students will begin with a review and evaluation of the capstone project proposals developed in LIT/PR 442, with class meetings alternating with individual tutorial meetings. Students will prepare two formal drafts for evaluation by primary and secondary faculty readers, and the completed project will be presented in conference format for the Daemen College community at Academic Festival.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Political Science

PSC 101: Comparative Politics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is a general introduction to the field of comparative politics. The course's main objective is to enable students to analyze the political systems of countries outside the U.S. The course covers countries selected from established democracies, transitional political systems, and developing societies.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 113: Introduction to American Politics

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This is an introductory course focusing on the basic structure and processes of the American political system, the institutions of the federal government, and the processes of decision making. The course is also a foundation for the American Politics subfield of the political science discipline.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 114: State and Local Government

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. A survey of the development, structure and functions of state and local government in the United States. Specific reference is made to the politics and problems of New York State and the Buffalo Metropolitan Area.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PSC 117: Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The case-based approach used in this course requires students to analyze criminal procedure rulings of the United States Supreme Court. Students will be exposed to the logical and legal arguments of a series of cases which comprise the evolving corpus of the Court's criminal rights jurisprudence.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 121: International Relations

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. An introduction to international politics. Covers the transformation of world politics since the early modern era. Examines major international events such as the two world wars, the Cold War, and the end of the Cold War. Exploration of the origins and causes of wars and conflicts, the roles of international organizations and international law in achieving lasting peace, and key issues of post-Cold War international politics including globalization, the environment, human rights and terrorism.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 125: Introduction to Public Policy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving. This course is an introduction to the policy making process and the subfield of Public Policy and covers the evolution of the field of public policy, and the policy making process from agenda setting to policy termination and change; select substantive policy areas and current events are used as illustrative examples. Students will learn the basic social science research approach and its critical uses in policy-making and analysis.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 210: The Politics of Globalization

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course focuses on the politics of globalization in the new world order and its impact on international relations and on developing nations. Topics include international terrorism, issues of justice and poverty, the role of multinational corporations, environmental issues, and the role of international organizations such as the IMF, the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 211: Environmental and Energy Policies I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 211. A survey of major environmental and energy policies and the intergovernmental administrative system established to implement them. Topics include a history of the environmental movement, green politics, international environmental issues, and the contrasts between scientific and political decision-making. If taken as ENS 211, this course cannot be used as a science elective.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 212: Environmental and Energy Policies II

3 Credit Hour(s)

A continuation of ENS/PSC 211. Prerequisite: PSC/ENS 211.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 213: Sustainability and Third World Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course examines the process of development in the Third World. Topics include HIV/AIDS, overpopulation, the role of women, the environment, socio-cultural barriers, and responses to inequality and poverty.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 214: Introduction to Refugee Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration. This course will introduce students to the basic theories, concepts, and vocabulary of Refugee Studies. It will primarily focus on the political, historical, economic, socio-cultural, and global processes that have impacted refugees and Refugee Studies in our world today. Why are there refugees? How does local, national, and international communities address refugee crises? How can the academic study of refugees lead to policy changes in national and international political and economic systems? To the extent that forced migration of refugees is an integral part of the relationship between poor and rich nations, the issues facing refugee communities are not just a product of internal/civil wars and local impoverishment, but are closely linked to the fundamental political and economic structures and processes of our globalized world. As such, students, organizations, policy advocates interested in working with refugees need to take the holistic approach to refugee studies in order to have a better understanding and in-depth knowledge of the issues. This course will provide students with foundational knowledge of refugee populations and the field of Refugee Studies. The course will involve intensive reading and writing, the use of theoretical analyses, critical discussions, and in-depth examination of displacement and forced migration of refugees globally.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 215: Issues in Public Policy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. An examination of the various analytical models employed by political scientists in the study of political life and the application of these models to specific domestic policy areas, with a focus on environmental policy.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 217: American Political Parties and Pressure Groups

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. An examination of the principles, development and organization of American political parties as well as the electorate and the electoral process. The nature and role of political interest groups will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed on environmental activism at national, state and local levels.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 219: Politics, Planning and Land Use

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 219. Principles and practice of land management policies at the state and local levels of government. Topics include zoning power of local government, preparation of master plans, variance procedures, federal mandates and Environmental Impact Statements.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 221: Political Economy of East Asia

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ECO 221. An analysis of the successful industrialization of East Asia. Topics include the roles of development strategies, political institutions, industrial policy, culture, financial and monetary policies and China's recent transition toward a market economy.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 222: Polling and Public Opinion: Following The Will of the People

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Information Literacy. This course focuses on why public opinion and polling are important to American democracy and how political scientists go about measuring public opinion. The course explores where public opinion comes from, how people form opinions, how well informed people are about political objects, and how public officials use public opinion.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 223: Political and Civil Rights in the United States

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course will examine the development and current state of political and civil rights in the U.S., through the use of texts, court cases and the U.S. Constitution. Areas covered will include prohibitions against discrimination, voting rights and elections, freedom of expression and the right to privacy. While emphasis is placed on the role of the Supreme Court, discussion will address the interplay of the other branches of government as well as other factors (historical, economic, societal, etc.) in the evolution of political and civil rights. Students will be asked to consider whether these rights exist primarily to serve the interests of individuals, or to promote communitarian values.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 224: Influencing Politics: The American Voter in Campaigns and Elections

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. This course is designed to present students with an understanding of why elections are important to American democracy and how political scientists go about measuring campaign effects. Further, we begin to explore how individuals come to a decision on which candidate to support in an election, if they choose to participate at all. We will explore a number of different aspects of campaigns and elections in American politics, including campaign finance, strategy, the media, and the different stages of various elections. We also tackle the "big" questions: Should you vote? Why do people vote the way they do? How can we get people to vote? The goal is for you to have a broad understanding of how American elections work and why they are important.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 225: Politics of China

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is an introduction to Chinese politics. We will study the history, institutions, and processes of Chinese politics. We will critically examine the economic and political reforms that have transformed China since the late 1970's. We will also compare China's reforms with other countries that have undergone similar transitions. Finally, this course will examine the strategic and economic impact of China's rise as a great power.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 227: Introduction to Public Administration

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is a general survey course designed to familiarize students with the role and function of government agencies. This course will introduce students to the field of public administration through an examination of both theory and practice.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 228: Community Planning and Sustainability

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. This course focuses on neighborhood planning for both citizens and professionals. Students will learn how to pinpoint key issues, set clear goals, and devise strategies to achieve these goals. In addition, they will learn what type of information to collect, where to get it, and how to assess it. Finally they will be able to package the information, implement the plan and update it periodically. This will be achieved both through classroom work and actual development and implementation of a neighborhood plan. (Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department).
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 230: United States Judicial Process

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course will examine the basic elements of the United States judicial system. Among the topics to be discussed will be the functions of the courts within a federal system of government, different roles of different state and federal courts, roles of attorneys and judges within the system, distinctions between different areas of the law, different methods of dispute resolution and the difference between the trial and appellate process, judicial selection and philosophy, and judicial policymaking. Students will also address the effect of the judicial process on citizens and ways in which citizens can either support or oppose the current functioning of the judicial system.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 231: Global Governance

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the growing importance of global governance. This course studies how recent trends have generated greater international cooperation in various issue areas, such as proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, trade and investment, environment, and human rights. Students will be required to design their own plans to resolve selected policy problems through global cooperation.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

PSC 232: International Political Economy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ECO 232. Study of the globalization of the world economy, why nations trade with each other and why they sometimes practice trade protectionism. Examines the growing importance of regional economic blocs, such as the European Union and the North American Free Trade Agreement. Other topics include the rise and decline of American economic hegemony, the rise of Japan's economic power, global trade conflicts, economic reforms in the former Soviet Union and China, and causes of development and underdevelopment in the third world.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 233: Democracy in America

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Students will gain comprehension of the democratic process and participatory rights in the United States. This knowledge will be geared toward helping students better understand myriad forms of civic engagement and encouraging greater political efficacy. The manifestation of democratic ideals in America will be analyzed against the backdrop of historical developments and worldwide trends in democratization. Thus, while the primary focus will be on democracy in America, students will study how the development of the American political system compares to broader conceptions of democracy and democratic theory.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 238: Dictatorship and Democracy in World Politics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course examines the global resurgence of democracy in recent decades, analyzing the causes and dynamics of this recent wave of democratization as well as the different paths of democratic transitions in Southern Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Eastern Europe. Exploration of strategies for achieving successful democratic consolidation. Study of factors that influence successful democratic consolidation, such as ethnic conflicts, economic reform, constitutional choice, and the role of culture.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 242: African Politics, Culture & Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course examines African politics, culture, and society from pre-colonial era to present. It will primarily focus on the political, historical, and developmental processes that have shaped contemporary African societies as we know them today. It will involve intensive readings, theoretical analyses, critique, discussions, and in- depth examination of this unique continent and its impact on our contemporary world historically. Some of the themes addressed include, an examination of the culture of traditional Africa, cultural barriers to development, change and continuity in African politics and society, European colonization, African nationalism, impact of modernization, impact of today's globalization, impact of transatlantic slave trade, and why Africa is the richest continent in world (in terms of natural resources), but the poorest in per capital income. The course will also address post independence problems, quality of life, corruption, and diseases, among other topics. In addition, students will engage in cross cultural education experience off-campus in select humanitarian groups and organizations that serve African people; such as refugees, agencies, and the African community.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 305: American Constitutional Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course offers an in-depth examination of major constitutional doctrines, including judicial review, separation of powers, and federalism and theories of constitutional interpretation. This course is excellent preparation for pre-law students and for those who want familiarity with the foundations of American constitutional government. Upper Division or PSC 117 or PSC 230 highly recommended.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 310: Seminar in Black Political Leadership, Consciousness and Change

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will examine the role of Black political leadership and consciousness in American political system. What is the impact of Black political leadership in changing American society? What are the current and future prospects for Black leadership in America? This course will attempt to answer these and other questions. It will involve intensive readings, analyses, critique, discussions, reports, interviews, and in-depth research by students in the issue area of Black political leadership and consciousness in American political system. In addition, students will be asked to select a Black leader and/or problem area in Black political leadership for class presentations.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 311: Congress and the Chaos of Democracy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. This course will explore Congress, how it fits into our system of government, how it interacts with the other branches of government, and how the legislative process works. The course is designed to look at the organization of Congress, its membership, the various procedures used, and the policy outputs. In this course, we also explore why Congress is often seen as "broken." Political parties, interest groups, the president, and the courts are just a few groups that often affect policy outputs and are a major obstacle to Congress passing the policies it wants. Congress is integral to U.S. politics and this course explores why that is the case and how Congress works.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 312: Judical Politics & Behavior

3 Credit Hour(s)

This class addresses the role of law in the political process. We explore several central questions: "What is law, what role does law play in the political process, and how does the political process impact the law?" We will examine the critical role which judges and courts play in the interpretation, creation and evolution of law by focusing on judicial review, constitutional and statutory interpretation and judicial decision-making. We will explore the major classifications of the law, including administrative, contract, criminal, property, and tort law, with an emphasis on constitutional and statutory interpretation. We will also focus on the competing theories of judicial decision making (attitudinal model, legal model and strategic model) as identified in political science research: how and why do judges make their decision? Are they mere "oracles" of the law as Blackstonian conceptions would argue, or are they politicians wearing robes? What factors influence judicial choices - what role does political ideology, political bargaining, and role theory play in judicial rulings?
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 313: Politics and the Media: Watchdogs Or Lapdogs

3 Credit Hour(s)

The media are called many things: governmental watch dogs, the fourth branch of government, and partisan lapdogs. No matter what you call the media, it is impossible to dispute their importance in the US system of government. In this course, we will examine the role the media plays in politics. The media report on what the government is doing as well as on how the public reacts to what the government is doing. We will examine how the media landscape has changed over time. We look at the advent of cable news reporting as well as the rise of the new media--Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, for example--and how these new media sources have changed the role of candidates and campaigns are able to use the media for their benefit. The United States has a unique media system and we will compare it to other countries. Partisanship and bias in the media will also be discussed extensively, as these are issues that have plagued media outlets since the founding of our country.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 315: Politics of Western Europe

3 Credit Hour(s)

An examination of the politics and governments of selected nations of Western Europe including Britain, France and Germany. Special emphasis on comparative and contemporary policymaking and on progress toward European unification. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 320: Gender and Policy in the US

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as WST 320. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving; Writing Intensive. This course will be a survey of the development of, and current issues involving, legal rights as they are impacted by gender in the U.S. Among the topics that will be covered are interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and gender concerns regarding equal protection, reproductive rights, political participation, education law, labor issues, and family law. The course will also address the role of feminism in the development of civil rights, including the diversity of approaches and concerns among different branches of feminism. Also addressed will be examples of ways in which males have been negatively affected by protective legislation and rigid policy approaches to gender roles. Offered as Needed.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 321: Politics and Popular Culture in America

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contectual Integration; Civic Responsibility. Writing Intensive. This course is designed to provide students with an examination of cultural change in American politics using film, television, music, and literature. We explore a number of different aspects of American politics, including the presidency, elections, protests, and issue evolution. While this is not an exhaustive list, the course should help students gain deeper insight into these aspects of American government. Further, this course should help students begin to think more critically about different aspects of popular culture and how American politics permeates film, television, music, and literature.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 325: Local Government Reform and Community Renewal

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course provides an examination of local government in New York State, including counties, towns and villages, with emphasis on structure, function and duties of each municipality, and the rise of local government reform. Students will research the origin, purpose and principles of local governments in providing service delivery, representation in local and state policy-making, and as a pass-through entity for state and federal funding. Particular emphasis will be given to citizen engagement and coalition-building in local governance and the rise of citizen-led efforts for reform.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 326: Politics of East Asia

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive understanding of the principal events and interactions in East Asia. Various political, social, and economic aspects of China, Japan, and the two Koreas will be closely examined within the regional context of the past and present, carefully discerning the similarities and differences among those East Asian countries. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 327: Politics of South Asia

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course is designed to provide an introduction to the governments and politics of South Asia. We will begin the course with an overview of South Asian civilization and its unique development for over several millennia. We then look at the British colonialism and independence movement. Since the independence and the partition that soon followed, the countries in the Indian subcontinent have taken different paths to modernity and national development. The politics, society, and economy of each country - India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka - will then be carefully examined. In doing so, students will gain a better understanding of such questions as how and why these countries have adopted different ways; what are the sources of social and religious tensions in each country; how these countries have accommodated social diversity, etc. We will complete the course by paying special attention to the conflict between India and Pakistan, two nuclear-armed states. Prerequisite: PSC 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 331: Political Science Research Methods

3 Credit Hour(s)

Registration in this course is limited to Political Science and History & Political Science (including Adolescence Education/Social Studies) majors. This course addresses the different ways in which political scientists formulate and attempt to answer questions about politics and political behavior. We will begin by considering fundamental issues in the philosophy of science, including the process of inquiry, the limits to knowledge, and the extent to which the study of politics can be scientific. We will address issues central to the discipline of Political Science: methodological approaches, the literature review, research designs, and data collection as they pertain to both qualitative and quantitative research. Prerequisite: junior status in the department; majors only.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

PSC 350: Political Argumentation and Debate

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course will be an introduction to the skills of persuasive speaking and argumentation. Students will develop the ability to advocate a position persuasively, in an enthusiastic yet dignified manner, using current political controversies as subjects. In the process, students will also gain a deeper understanding of the multiple points of view inherent in current political controversies which they have selected to discuss. Among the topics that will be covered are the role of argumentation in society, structure and process of debate, development of arguments, researching and analyzing subjects for debate, use of evidence, use of logic and rhetorical devices, refutation and the role of emotion in advocacy. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status or PSC 113 or PSC 125 or PSC 223 highly recommended.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSC 401: American Foreign Policy

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course examines the content of American foreign policy and the processes by which it is made. Students will be introduced to the theories and grand strategies that guide US foreign policy. Students will also be introduced to the actors, including individuals and institutions that shape foreign policy decisions. We will study the historical context of current foreign policy choices made by the United States, while giving emphasis the post WW2 and Cold War period. Finally, we will debate the direction future of US foreign policy given the current engagements of the United States. Prerequisite: PSC 121.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 411: Environmental Law

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 411. Case method approach to judicial interpretations of environmental laws. Additional topics may include litigation as a political tactic, expansion of standing to sue and intervener funding strategies. Prerequisite: PSC/ENS 211.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 415: Seminar on the Presidency

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Civic Responsibility; Contextual Integration. This seminar focuses on the institutional powers of the modern executive, the presidential selection process, presidential campaigns and elections, presidential character and performance an presidential/congressional relations. Discussion and analysis will follow current events in presidential politics and practice.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSC 416: Internship in Public Administration

3 Credit Hour(s)

Available to students who have declared a minor in Public Administration. Prerequisite: PSC 227.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Psychology

PSY 103: Introduction to Psychological Science

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. A single-semester introduction to psychological science, including research methods, brain and behavior, individual differences and intelligence, memory, learning, development, motivation, perception, personality, mental disorders, and social psychology.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 210: Social Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on the ways in which individuals' thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the presence of others/social interaction. Experimental findings will be used to understand individuals in a social context. Sample topics include stereotyping and prejudice, conformity and obedience, attitude formation and persuasion, and aggression and conflict. In addition, practical application of theory and research findings will be discussed (e.g., jury decision making, reducing prejudice). Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PSY 212: Developmental Psychology: Infancy Through Childhood

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course explores human psychological development from infancy through childhood, including cognitive and language development, socialization, and personality. The course will also include a critical evaluation of current methodologies used to study development, and discussions of practical and social applications of psychological knowledge about children. This course includes observations of children in real life settings. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 214: Psychology of Adolescence

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course introduces students to psychological changes that occur between childhood and adulthood, including psychological correlates of physical maturation, cultural definitions of adolescence, cognitive change, and social challenges facing adolescents. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 215: Cognitive Psychology: Learning, Thinking and Problem Solving

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to the scientific study of mental processes and human information processing, with emphasis on theory and research findings, both historical and present. Sample topics include: visual and auditory processing, attention, memory, language acquisition and processing, reasoning, decision making, and problem solving. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PSY 216: Principles of Learning and Behavior Modification

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces the principles and procedures of Learning and Behavior Modification, including operant and respondent conditioning and their component procedures, including reinforcement, extinction, punishment, stimulus control, discrimination, generalization, shaping, prompting, and chaining. Students will be introduced to the research designs, data recording methods, and data analytic procedures of behavior modification, and will apply course material by designing and conducting a self-management project. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or equivalent.
Session: Each Year (UG)

PSY 217: Sensation and Perception

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Information Literacy; Writing Intensive. This course introduces students to theories, empirical data, and research tools and techniques related to sensation and perception. Perceptual organization and the relationship of perception to clinical and social areas will be considered. Prerequisites: CMP 101 and PSY 103.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 218: Theories of Personality

3 Credit Hour(s)

Several of the major personality theories as well as current research findings examined in a general survey of crucial factors in the development and organization of human personality. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

PSY 219: The Psychology of Mental Illness

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course surveys the origins, symptoms, and treatment of various forms of mental illness described in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Revision 5, May, 2013). Current theories of the causes of mental disorders are also discussed, along with recent research evidence to support or question these explanations. Controversies associated with the cause, course, and treatment of mental illness as well as ethical considerations will be covered. Legal implications for mentally disordered offenders will be considered, along with other legal issues associated with mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of the instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 220: Life Span Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will explore human psychological development from birth through aging, including physiological, cognitive, and psychosocial changes that occur from birth until death. The role of individual/personality characteristics, relationships with others, and the sociocultural environment in which individuals live will be discussed with regard to their influence on social, cognitive, emotional, and psychophysiological development. Current research and theories used to describe and explain human growth and change will be discussed within the framework of the scientific method. Prerequisite: PSY 103.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 231: Behavior Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces psychological conditions that occur in childhood and adolescence (infancy to 18 years) including Anxiety and Mood Disorders, Conduct Disorder, Attention Deficit Disorders, Language and Learning Disabilities, Intellectual Disability, Autism Spectrum Disorder, disorders of basic physical functions (for example, eating disorders), and psychological aspects of medical conditions. The course is grounded in psychological science, and therefore is evidence based and includes research methods and ethical issues in research and treatment of developmental psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSY 103.
Session: Each Year
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PSY 301: Sexuality and Psychology of Love

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course examines the biological, psychological, emotional, and social components of human sexual behavior. Sample topics include historical aspects of human sexuality, theories of human sexual behavior and attitudes, love and attraction, gender identity, sexuality across different stages of development, sexual dysfunctions and disease, and forms of sexuality that are currently listed in the DSM 5 as symptomatic of a paraphilic disorder. Topics will be discussed within the framework of the scientific method, and may also address ethical and legal considerations. Presentation of course material and the discussions that occur will sometimes require exposure to sexually explicit materials and/or content. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 304: Counseling and Interviewing

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an introduction to theories of counseling and psychotherapy, emphasizing the acquisition of basic skills in listening and interviewing. This is a practical and applied as well as theoretical course including demonstrations of counseling techniques, and practice using these techniques in class. Course format is varied, including lecture, group discussion, team based activities, and hands-on practice of skills being learned in lecture portions of the course. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 306: Forensic Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course surveys multiple ways in which the field of psychology and the legal system interact. Theories of criminal behavior, available treatment for mentally ill offenders, and ethical controversies related to psychologists' involved in law are also discussed. Topics include mental disorders and crime, competency to stand trial and the insanity defense, eyewitness testimony and other questions of evidence, forensic assessment (polygraph testing, hypnosis), psychopathy, serial murder, sexual offending, and juvenile crime. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

PSY 308: Health Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course examines psychosocial influences on how we stay healthy, why we become sick, and why individuals have different responses when they become ill. The biopsychosocial model will be discussed as it relates to individuals' risk for illness, resilience, ability to achieve optimal wellness, and longevity. Topics include placebo and nocebo effects, stress and coping, trauma and resilience, personality and disease, emotional influences on illness, health behavior change, addiction, eating disorders, and medical adherence. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

PSY 309: Assessment in Psychology and Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course considers historical, political, and legal aspects of testing and reviews currently available tests of aptitudes, skills, and personality traits. The course will review test construction, test item selection and interpretation, and ethical issues that arise in testing/assessment situations. Students in this course will participate in hands-on activities that help them develop skills in test use and interpretation of test results. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 314: Biological Bases of Behavior

3 Credit Hour(s)

A survey of biological influences on behavior. The primary emphasis is on the physiological regulation of behaviors in humans and other vertebrate animals as they relate to neuronal, hormonal and developmental structure and function. Topics include perception, cognition, sleep, eating, sexual behaviors, learning, cognition, and mental disorders. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 333: Statistics for Psychology and Social Sciences

4 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Quantitative Literacy requirement. The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the basic statistical procedures used in modern behavioral sciences, as well as the tools and basic procedures used for computing them in statistical software packages (e.g., SPSS). In doing so, students will gain both the conceptual and computational knowledge necessary to appropriately employ such statistical analyses. Topics include (but are not limited to) assessing and constructing graphs/tables, probability, descriptive and inferential statistics, correlation, prediction through regression, analysis of variance, parametric versus nonparametric tests, interpreting statistical significance, and using statistical software to achieve these goals. By the end of this course students will recognize statistical analyses as an integral component to the scientific process. Students will not only be able to apply such analytical techniques to their own research efforts, but will develop their ability to critically evaluate conclusions derived from such procedures offered by the scientific community and the popular media.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 335: Junior Seminar in Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course involves students in an in-depth exploration of a specific topic or a series of related topics in contemporary psychology through primary source readings in the research literature, and secondary source material relevant to discussion and analysis (topics may vary each semester). Course format is generally discussion rather than lecture oriented. Brief lectures may be used to provide a framework for discussion and debate. Students develop critical thinking, critical reading, analytic, research, and writing skills by preparing discussion topics in both oral and written format. Prerequisite: Upper division status in Psychology and completion of PSY 353/353L with C- or better, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 353: Research Methods in Psychology

4 Credit Hour(s)

This course is the first in a required sequence of research courses for upper division psychology majors. The main purpose of this course is to help students understand psychology as a behavioral science by introducing them to the methods by which psychologists gather, analyze, and evaluate data. Topics include: Experimental methods, correlational methods, survey methods, observational designs, single subject methods, and validity and reliability of methods and measures. Students will engage in hands-on laboratory exercises involving literature review, planning research studies, collecting and statistically analyzing data with a statistical software program, and reporting research in the style and format of the American Psychological Association. This course culimnates in a required literature review that forms the basis of a research proposal. Prerequisite: PSY 333 with C or better and upper division status.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 353L: Research Methods in Psychology Laboratory

0 Credit Hour(s)

Fundamental research and statistical analysis techniques in psychological science. Corequisite: PSY 353.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 354: Advanced Research Methods in Psychology Psychology

4 Credit Hour(s)

The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate Psychology majors to more advanced research methods used in the field of psychological science, as well as to further practice and begin to master their corresponding applications. Some of these advanced methodologies represent more complex versions of the simpler methods learned in the prerequisite research sequence course (PSY 353), whereas others represent conceptually new methods that have not yet been introduced. The goals of this course are to encourage students to consider important philosophical, ethical, and measurement concepts as they relate to more advanced methodologies, both experimental and non-experimental, and to apply selected statistical concepts to these more advanced methodologies. Most importantly, all students should demonstrate continued improvement and development towards mastery relative to the prior course in the research sequence (PSY 353) in assessing the value, validity, and proper application of research claims. This critical evaluation of research claims means learning to read and understand peer reviewed research, consider the methodology used to arrive at a particular finding, and evaluate whether such methodologies are capable of providing the information such claims suggest. In this second more advanced methods course, students should demonstrate significant development relative to the first course in their ability to understand peer reviewed research papers/findings, and their ability to evaluate whether or not the conclusions based on particular methodologies are reasonable given the nature of the research designs. In addition, students in this second course should demonstrate continued development and progress towards mastery in using APA style to report research findings, and to develop literature reviews and research proposals. This course will require small group projects, computer lab sessions in which students statistically analyze data, library sessions for database and other literature review/research, and research experiences in which students collect data and/or analyze existing data. Therefore, students should expect to work outside of class at least two hours per week throughout the semester on course-related projects.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 354L: Advanced Research Methods in Psychology Lab

0 Credit Hour(s)

Advanced research and statistical analysis techniques in psychological science. Corequisite: PSY 354.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 380: Drugs and Behavior

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course surveys behavioral effects of psychotropic drugs as a result of drug distribution, drug elimination, and drug-receptor interactions in the body. It covers fundamentals of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology as they relate to these, and emphasizes current, historical, and moral vs. legal contexts for use and distribution in the US and other countries. Other drug classes are considered and discussed for comparative purposes. It includes drug classification and development and the role of learning and addiction as they relate to drug use/abuse. Because mental disorders are among the most debilitating conditions worldwide and are commonly comorbid with other psychiatric, and medical illnesses, the course is useful to students of behavioral, legal, and healthcare-related fields. Prerequisites: PSY 103.
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 409: Psychology and Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Given the increasing rate of intercultural contact through the media, technological advances in communication, and of face-to-face contact, an appreciation of human behavior as it develops and is understood within diverse cultures is essential. This course will explore how culture influences human thought and behavior. Students will explore to what extent our identities and ways of thinking are common across the different cultures in our world and to what extent are they unique to our own cultural environments and experiences. In order to thoroughly examine this, the course will explore the individual, universal, and cultural-specific influences involved in human development, morality, emotion, cognition, mental health and treatment, relationships and attraction, and gender conceptualizations. This course will integrate multiple sub-fields within psychology challenging students to integrate and examine psychological theories and principles through the lens of culture. Through examining scientific literature, classroom discussion, and applying psychological principles and theories learned previously, students will consider how culture has shaped their own personal experiences and beliefs as well as develop an application of why certain cultures engage in specific behaviors and belief systems.Prerequisite: PSY 103 Completion of 55 credits.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 413: History and Systems of Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

A perusal of the various journals in psychology or an examination of any psychology conference schedule seems to suggest that psychology is a highly disjointed discipline. However, psychology is unified through its historical traditions and systems of thought. In this course, we will explore the roots of modern psychological thought and methodology. We will trace these roots from their origins in philosophy and the natural sciences through the early schools of psychology (e. g., Functionalism, Structuralism, Gestalt, etc.) and on into its current form. We will also examine the lives and works of the men and women whose work created psychology's foundation. Through these explorations we will discover the common threads and patterns interwoven into the broad tapestry of psychology.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

PSY 444: Senior Thesis

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. This capstone course is one of the options for the capstone requirement that represents the culmination of the required research sequence for psychology majors. Activities include: completion and submission of the HSRRC proposal, continued research into psychological literature, preparation of all testing materials, arranging lab space for data collection, recruitment, data collection and analysis, completion of a manuscript prepared utilizing the format and style of the American Psychological Association, and a public oral presentation (poster format) of student research projects. Prerequisites: successful completion of PSY 354/354L (C- or better) and senior status in psychology. Junior year students who meet the prerequisite requirements may be eligible by permission of instructor.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 445: Senior Practicum in Psychology

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in a community agency, business organization, or other psychology-related setting. This course enables students to apply the theories, research, and specific psychology content they have learned to date in their undergraduate curriculum to a real world setting. Therefore, this course will supplement students' classroom learning to date, with first-hand experience in professional settings which are appropriate for their academic background and career objectives. As this course is meant to be a senior capstone experience, there will also be an academic component of the course, which includes a weekly, one-hour seminar involving presentations and discussions of relevant ethical and organizational issues. In addition, students will be required to complete a scholarly, critical review of the theoretical and empirical literature on an issue/topic related to the practicum experience they are completing.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PSY 457: Independent Study Or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an opportunity for students to become involved in research outside the classroom under the mentorship of a faculty member (s) in the department. Students may assist faculty with ongoing research, design their own project, or design an extension of prior faculty research or their own prior research. Prior coursework and skills required to participate may vary by project/faculty mentor. Open to juniors and seniors with a 2.5 GPA, no current Incomplete grades, and permission of the instructor. Sophomore students with exceptional preparation may also be considered. Students must complete an independent study contract in order to register for this course (see department chair and/or your faculty mentor for details).
Session: As Needed (UG)

PSY 458: Field Experience in Psychology

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

This course is an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in a community agency, business organization, or other psychology-related setting. Prerequisite: Permission of psychology department chair. Individual agencies/organizations may also require students to complete specific requirements prior to placement (e.g., specific coursework, background checks, upper division status, etc.)
Session: As Needed (UG)

Physical Therapy

PT 101: Freshman Seminar in Physical Therapy

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course is the first in the sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the physical therapy profession and to the professional phase of the physical therapy curriculum. Students will be introduced to the history of the physical therapy profession, scope of practice, professional organizations, roles of other health care professionals, and the importance of scientific research and its link to the concept of evidence-based practice. Concepts related to managed care and the changing healthcare environment will be explored as they relate to the health care professional and consumer. Additionally, issues of contemporary practice will be discussed and debated.Prerequisite: PT Freshman status or permission of instructor or PT Department.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PT 201: Sophomore Seminar in Physical Therapy

1 Credit Hour(s)

This course is the second in a sequence of two courses designed to introduce students to the professional phase of the physical therapy curriculum and the profession. Topics will include principles of therapeutic communication, ethics and core values, sociocultural issues and cultural fluency in health care delivery, issues in professional continuing education in a dynamic profession, computer literacy in physical therapy, and an introduction to medical terminology and documentation formats in physical therapy. The relationship between course objectives and the Daemen College Core Competency most closely associated with them is also identified. Prerequisite: PT 101 or permission of instructor or PT Department.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

PT 312: Principles of Teaching and Learning

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Together with CMP 315, Advanced Composition for Health Professionals, combination of both courses meets Research & Presentation requirement. This course will focus on the principles of teaching and learning relevant to the role of the physical therapist as an educator addressing the changing needs of the learner across the lifespan. We will begin with an exploration of the role of education in health care including its historical evolution, and associated ethical, legal, and economic issues. Topics will include theoretical models of adult learning styles, adult learning theories, cognitive development, and taxonomies of educational objectives. Principles of teaching and learning will be applied in the affective, cognitive, and psychomotor domains. As the course progresses we will explore characteristics of the learner including: assessment of the learner's needs across the lifespan, and contextual factors that influence the process of learning including adherence, empowerment, and motivation. Cross-cultural issues broadly defined, that affect the teaching and learning process will be discussed including: access to healthcare, age, culture, disability, family, gender, poverty, religion, and socio-economic status. Throughout this, course students will formally and informally present content to their peers affording the opportunity for application of course content, practice, and feedback. The final course presentation is evidence-based and draws on work completed in CMP 315, and fulfills the presentation component of the core requirement for Research and Presentation within the Physical Therapy curriculum. Prerequisites: PT 101, PT 201 or permission of instructor or PT Department.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Religious Studies

REL 105: God and Violence

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the nature of the three Western monotheistic religions of the Book (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) and seeks to understand the way that these religions both encourage and discourage inter-communal violence. The course focuses upon the way that holiness and holy spaces function within the foundational texts and practices of each religion. Includes exploration of the role that the holy places in Jerusalem and Saudi Arabia have played in conflicts between Jews and Christians, between Muslims and Jews, and between Islam and the United States.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 109: Contemporary Religious Thought

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. An examination of the different approaches to religious thinking. The content and methodological assumptions of various schools of religious inquiry.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 114: Culture and Story

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course, which compliments and will be in continued dialogue with THA 119 Theatre, Madness and Power, examines the role that ancient religious belief plays in establishing and maintaining categories that have been essential to modern life: purity, holiness, morality, sexuality, and honor. We will then look at how modern life maintains, redefines and transgresses these fundamental categories. For the first part of the course, which deals with antiquity, we will primarily employ the Bible, which will be put in dialogue with the plays of Sophocles and Shakespeare. The modern part of the course will explore the relevant issues with the help of both historical events and secular and religious writers.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 203: The Question of the Human

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness Cross-listed as PHI 203. In order to explore the dignity and worth of the human, the course examines the relationship between the individual and community. Through a series of readings and reflections, the attempt is made to expose the inter-relatedness of various thinkers from the liberal arts tradition.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

REL 211: African American Thought

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core requirement: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as PHI 211. This course explores the tradition of African-American response to slavery and legalized racism. After some brief historical background, this course will focus on three particularly important moments in this tradition of resistance: the slave narratives (especially Frederick Douglass and Linda Brent), the turn of the century debates over education (especially Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois and Marcus Garvey), and the civil rights movement (especially the student movement, Martin Luther King, Malcom X, and the Black Power movement).
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 213: Ethics of Sex, Drugs and Sports

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as PHI 213. Designed to be offered in learning community format with BIO 200 Science and Contemporary Social Issues. The course introduces students to moral issues and questions with regard to such matters as human cloning, genetic engineering, stem cell research, euthanasia, the environment and sustainability, and the emergence of life (e.g., fetal development).
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 224: Women and Religion

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as WST 224. This course will explore the place of women in the three Western monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). The course will explore the views of women found in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, the non-canonical Gospels, and the Koran. It will also explore modern attempts to rework the biblical tradition (e.g., in the novel "The Red Tent") and to confront the Islamic revolution (e.g., in the graphic novels "Persepolis I & II"). The class will also explore a number of contentious gender related issues (e.g., birth control, women clergy, traditional marriage, homosexuality).
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 225: Readings in World Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as PHI 225. This course is part of a learning community exploring the relationship among texts, historical contexts, and cultural conflicts. Students will study crucial moments in the modern era (i.e. slavery, the Holocaust, the Native American experience, the Cold War, and the immigrant experience) and will examine a variety of different texts (film, memoirs, novels, speeches, etc.) that reflect and comment upon these seminal historical moments and conflicts.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 232: Learning Through Service: Individuals, Societies, and Social Equity

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. This course will investigate the causes and consequences of social inequity in the U.S., focusing on disparities linked to gender, race, class, and disability (with particular focus on issues pertaining to the specific learning sites students are participating in). Taking a perspective that aims for greater social justice, students will learn to analyze contexts, individual and communal implications, and current and possible solutions for identified problems (How did we get here? Are the solutions beneficial and to whom? What is the connection between individual action and social systems?). We will focus our analysis on the growing disparity between those who have access to well-funded institutions/programs versus those who do not. In doing so, we will analyze the role of larger socio-economic systems, our own social location, and historical developments that contributed to the current social inequity in the Buffalo region.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 234: Scientific & Religious Views of the World

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as PHI 234. The focus of this interdisciplinary course is to engage in healthy dialogue with respect to problems and possibilities, conflicts and complementarities, differences and/or similarities of religious and scientific perspectives.
Session: Spring (UG)

REL 241: Introduction to Islam

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. With 1.5 billion adherents, Islam is the second largest religion in the world and in the United States today. It is also the fastest growing religion of our time. One out of every five people is a Muslim. As we study Islam, we will be examining a religion that dominated and shaped world history for many centuries. This course will provide an outline of the history of Islam and the impact of Islamic belief and culture on the world's social and political development, as well as an introductory survey of the fundamental tenets and practices of the last religion in the Semitic tradition. Attention will also be given to contemporary Islam and to the modern interpretation of the Islamic tradition. The course will be divided into three parts: the first will focus upon the history of Islam; the second will examine Islamic faith, sources of authority, and practice; and the third will explore contemporary Islam. No prior knowledge is assumed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 309: The Holocaust

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as PHI 309. This course analyzes the variety of historical, religious, philosophical and political issues posed by the Nazi policy of systematic genocide. We will explore religious and racial anti-Semitism, the philosophy of fascism, the logic of genocide and the development and implementation of the final solution. Attention will also be paid to concentration camp life and to its effect upon the perpetrators and the survivors.
Session: Each Year (UG)

REL 313: Religious Values and Contemporary Moral Problems

3 Credit Hour(s)

The interaction between religious values and contemporary moral concerns. A discussion of selected ethical topics and perspective, nature of religious ethics and the meaning of religious values for modern society.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

REL 315: Religious Themes in Modern Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as LIT 315. The purpose of this course is to analyze the relationship of theology to literature by examining the religious dimensions as they are portrayed in modern creative literature. Themes to be developed will be: religious perspectives in eastern and western religions, the pursuit of religious identity in western culture, good and evil, relationship of sacred to profane, the loss of innocence, love, suffering, freedom and destiny, time and eternity. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: Alternate Years (UG)

REL 316: Gospels Scholarship: Assessing the Field

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. This course will examine recent trends within New Testament scholarship, with particular attention to recent scholarship on the Gospels. The course will focus on three large sets of topics: methodological questions (what is the best approach to reading the Gospels?), ideological questions (what is the place of gender and social status in the analysis of the Gospels?), and historical questions (what is the relationship between the Gospels and their historical environment?). In particular, the course will focus on the following topics: historical reconstructions of the situation in Palestine during and immediately following the life of Jesus; feminist readings of the Gospel; Christian conflicts with Judaism; the relationship between early Christianity and the Roman empire; and the interrelationship between the Gospels. Students will be asked to read and evaluate the recent forms of criticism and to draw their own conclusions on how best to approach the text.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 322: The Gospels

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. After locating the Gospels in the complex and diverse world of first century Judaism, we will examine the four New Testament Gospels as well as other, non-canonical Gospels (The Coptic Gospel of Thomas, The Sayings Source). Particular attention will be paid to the distinctive structure, characterization, themes, rhetoric and theology of each Gospel.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 328: Comparative Genocide

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as PHI 328. This course will examine phenomenon of modern genocide, with particular attention to the ideological motivation of the perpetrators and to the effect upon families and individuals. After some opening theoretical reflections on the connection between modernity and genocide, the course will focus on four particular examples: American slavery, the Nazi final solution, the Khmer Rouge revolution, and the Rwanda genocide.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 331: Reading List

2 Credit Hour(s)

Seminar provides a discussion of literature in the discipline.
Session: As Needed (UG)

REL 332: Reading List

2 Credit Hour(s)

Seminar provides a discussion of literature in the discipline.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 333: Religions in the World Sequence 1: Monotheistic Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 333. This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on the so-called Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), as well as Mormonism. Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, and modern lived expression (globally and in the US context) will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 334: Religiions in the World Sequence 2: Asian Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 334. This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on the so-called Abrahamic traditions (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam), as well as Mormonism. Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, and modern lived expression (globally and in the US context) will be discussed. Offered regularly, in sequence with connected Religions in the World courses.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 335: Religions in the World Sequence 3: Indigenous and New Age Traditions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 335.This course will help the student distinguish between and appreciate the specific select religious and spiritual approaches covered in this course. This sequence will cover monotheistic religions with an emphasis on indigenous and so-called New Age traditions: North American traditions, African traditions, Australian Aboriginal Tradition, and New Age Traditions (Neo-Paganism). Origins, historical developments, rituals and practices, the religious situation of native people in the postcolonial world, and issues/conflicts arising out of contemporary socio-political contexts will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 336: Sex, Love and God

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 336 or WST 336. This course is about human sexuality and religion, specifically, how religious people have read and interpreted biblical texts and traditions in relation to sex, human sexuality, and expressions of love. Students are encouraged to investigate how their own religious beliefs inform their bodily lives and attitudes regarding sexual, romantic, and erotic expressions. The main focus of this course is concerned with Christianity, though depending on student interest, Jewish and Muslim interpretations may be covered briefly as well. Students will learn about concepts of the human body and related concerns of sexuality in ancient and medieval times, and investigate religious perspectives and prescriptions as they relate to specific understandings. Students will distinguish between historical ideas of erotic love and the modern construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality. The politicization of sexuality by religious groups and the use of religious ideas about sexuality by secular groups will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

REL 443: Proseminar

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Communication Skills; Information Literacy. Research & Presentation; Writing Intensive. Introduction to research through an individual project. Required of all seniors.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Special Education

SED 102: American Sign Language, Level I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as CA 102. An introductory course in the use of manual communication within the framework of everyday conversation. The course includes background on language, deafness, deaf Americans and their culture, communication modes, approximately 370 signs, the numbers 1-30, and the American Manual Alphabet. At the culmination of this course, the student will begin to develop functional proficiency in American Sign Language using everyday situations as context for communication, listen and speak effectively using ASL, gain a basic understanding of language, deaf Americans and their history and culture, and form reasons, values, and judgments about the larger culture we exist in, and the deaf culture.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SED 106: American Sign Language, Level II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as CA 106. This course is a continuation and extension of American Sign Language I for students who have completed the first level course SED 102 American Sign Language I. The course will further develop the communicative competencies of manual sign language beyond the basic level. Students will continue with the examination and understanding of deaf culture, history and language, along with exposure to ASL sentence types, time, and all aspects of grammar, syntax and pragmatic use of manual sign. Prerequisite: CA/SED 102.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SED 270: Introduction to Nature and Educational Needs of Students With Disabilities

3 Credit Hour(s)

A comprehensive survey of factors related to individuals with disabilities, including those who have learning disabilities, mental retardation, emotional or behavior disorders, visual impairments, hearing impairments, orthopedic impairments, or multiple disabilities, autism spectrum disorders or who are gifted. Topics addressed in the course include definitions, prevalence, identification, characteristics, related vocabulary, educational implications, ancillary services, relevant legislation and litigation, and current issues and trends in special education. A field experience (practicum) of six (6) hours is required. Prerequisites: grade of C or concurrent registration in EDU 203. A grade of C or better is required in this course for admission to upper division.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

SED 333: Elements of Behavior Change and Specific Behavior Change Procedures

3 Credit Hour(s)

Behavior Change and Procedures is a course that will introduce students to the basic principles of Applied Behavior Analysis including measurement of behavior, behavioral assessment, behavioral techniques used for skill acquisition and reduction of problem behaviors as well as professional ethics. This course fulfills the instructional and skills assessment requirements put forth by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) to become a Registered Behavior Technician (RBT) (http://bacb.com/rbt/).
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SED 340: Inclusive Education for Students with Emotional/Behavioral Disorders

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide an understanding and knowledge of current terminology and definitions of students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD); social characteristics; effects of dysfunctional behavior on learning; use of formal/informal social and academic assessment; identification and use of intervention strategies in the classroom; planning, organization and implementation of individualized instruction for cognitive and affective needs of students with E/BD. This course also examines programs for inclusion of E/BD while addressing career/vocational and transition issues; promotes understanding of the use and selection of specific management techniques for individuals with E/BD and the special educator's role as a collaborator and/or consultant to assist with reintegration of students with E/BD into the classroom. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in SED 270.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SED 363: Inclusive Education for Children with Learning Disabilities and Mild Disabilities

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides a historical and contemporary overview of mild disabilities (learning disabilities, mental retardation, behavior disorders and emotional disorders and autism) and learning theories, methods, and instructional strategies for educating these STUDENTS in the least restrictive environment. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270.
Session: Fall (UG)

SED 364: Inclusive Education for Students with Moderate/Severe Disabilities

3 Credit Hour(s)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the historical and present management of the physically disabled in the educational environment. It will deal primarily with the treatment of cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, rheumatoid arthritis, congenital abnormalities, and chronic health impairments. Other areas will also be addressed. Emphasis will be placed on resource room intervention techniques. Prerequisites: EDU 203 and SED 270. Field experience (practicum) of 15 hours required.
Session: Spring (UG)

SED 371: Classroom Management Techniques for Individuals with Disabilities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Writing Intensive. This course covers the skills and competencies needed in order to design, implement, and evaluate behavior management programs for individuals with behavior disorders, emotional handicaps, mental retardation, learning disabilities, and other pervasive developmental disorders. Principles of operant learning, relationships between behavior and environmental events, and systematic data collection and analysis will be included. Provides teacher candidates an opportunity to observe individual student behavior, collect baseline data, design and implement an intervention plan to increase appropriate behavior and/or decrease inappropriate behavior, and evaluate the results. A field experience (practicum) of 15 hours is required. Prerequisite: C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270. Upper Division Course.
Session: Spring (UG)

SED 401: Methods of Inclusive Special Education

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course and its corresponding practicum enable students to understand and apply methods of effective collaboration and/or co-teaching while providing the opportunity to practice instructional design and delivery, assessment, and reflection. This course examines methods for effective development of IEP and lesson plan objectives; creation of lesson plans and learning centers incorporating instructional design features shown in research to increase effectiveness with students with disabilities; and use of performance data to make changes and adaptations to materials, teaching procedures, or curricular content. The course also explores curriculum models and teaching/learning approaches used across a continuum of special education settings; classroom arrangements, activities, and procedures that have been shown in research to increase the achievement and learning of students with disabilities; and cultural and linguistic factors that affect the design and implementation of instruction for students with disabilities. A field experience (practicum) of 45 hours is required. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in EDU 203, EDU 217, EDU 237, and SED 270.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

SED 457: Independent Study or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Research project arranged for the individual or a small group under the guidance and direction of a faculty member of the Education Department. Prerequisites: Permission of department chairperson and instructor required.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SED 458: Directed Study

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

An examination by an individual teacher candidate of a specialized topic in the field of education or the completion of a specialized project related to teaching at either the elementary or secondary school level under the guidance and direction of a faculty member of the Education Department. Prerequisites: Permission of department chairperson and instructor required.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SED 476: Student Teaching and Seminar at the Childhood Level 1-6 Inclusive Education

6 Credit Hour(s)

For dual certification majors. One professional laboratory experience covers observation of special education classroom situations with gradually increasing responsibility through participation under supervision. Individual student teachers are guided by periodic conferences with the College supervisor. Prerequisites: Completion of all courses, except for EDU 327 and EDU 475 which are taken concurrently; a minimum GPA of 2.55 overall and in Education courses; permission of Department Chair required.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

Sociology

SOC 110: Individual, College and Society: Introduction to the Sociological Imagination

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. The purpose of this course is to introduce beginning Daemen students to some of the core concepts drawn from sociology while at the same time giving them an opportunity to see the relationship between themselves, colleges and universities, and the social world. In addition, a significant amount of attention will be devoted to orienting students to a competency-based core curriculum, in general, and critical thinking, in particular. Further, students will be introduced to the current literature on what it means to be educated, the purposes of colleges and universities, the meaning of an undergraduate degree, the purposes of liberal education, and what society needs from higher education.
Session: As Needed
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 201: Introductory Sociology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. The systematic study of social behavior and human groups. Examination of the influence of social relationships upon people's attitudes and behavior and on how societies are established and changed.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 202: Individual and Society

3 Credit Hour(s)

Focus on social interaction, the emergence of mind and the development of the self. Examines the symbolic aspect of the individual and the constructed nature of his or her mental world environment.
Session: Summer
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 209: Social Problems

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Major social problems, e.g., racism, sexism, heterosexism, militarism, crime, substance abuse, poverty and their effect on the individual and society, will be examined. Theories will be evaluated relative to the role that existing social arrangements play in perpetuating social problems.
Session: Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 217: Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Other Addictions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 217. Examines the broad range of important facts and information about AOD use and abuse. The major legal and illegal drugs, patterns and trends in drug usage, the history of drug usage in our culture, public policy and treatment issues will be the focus of the course. Students will also explore the concept of addictions as the framework for analysis of AOD use and abuse. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or 209 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

SOC 218: Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as SW 218. This course introduces students to the history of social welfare as a social institution and to the profession of social work. The course provides an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values that are necessary for effective generalist social work practice. Attention is given to learning about key factors that led to the development of social work as a profession, social welfare policies that govern the delivery of social welfare services and the evolution of social work practice with specific client populations. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. This course offers service learning credit - twenty (20) hours of community service required.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 224: Ethnicity, Race and Cultural Diversity

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. Explores the dynamics of human diversity and social differentiation. Differentiation based upon race, ethnic identification, sex, and sexual orientation, majority and minority groups, lifestyle and life chances; social class and caste will be examined. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. This course offers service learning credit - twenty (20) hours of community service required.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 232: The Aging Process: An Introduction to Gerontology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 232. Examines a profile of aged Americans; major biological, psychological and sociocultural paradigms of aging; societal and individual response to the aged and the aging process.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 243: Child Welfare Policy and Services

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 243. Presents concepts, policy and practices in the field of child welfare. The needs of children and their families as well as programs designed to meet these needs are examined. Content also includes the child welfare service system, historical and current developments, child abuse and neglect, and the legal system relative to child welfare services. Prerequisite: SOC 201, or PSY 302, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 303: Sociology of the Family

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. A study of the family as a distinctive social world; emphasis on the structuring and dynamics of the family; cross-cultural comparisons; analysis of contemporary family systems.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SOC 304: Social Class and Inequality

3 Credit Hour(s)

Examination of the existence of different types of inequality and the various explanations for them. Historical and structural interconnections with various forms of inequality will also be explored. Prerequisite: SOC 201.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 305: Sociology of Sport

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Writing Intensive. This course provides an in-depth sociological examination of sport in American society in an effort to create a better understanding of sport as both a positive and negative social force on people's lives. Offered As Needed.
Session: Summer
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 307: The Juvenile Justice System

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 307. This course will present concepts, policies and practices regarding Juvenile Justice in our country. The subject is examined in relation to the needs of children, their families, the major programs and social services that have been designed for them, and the issues which emerge for future planning. The intent of the course is to instill in students a desire to advocate for children in our society and to provide students with a basis for more proficient practice in their chosen field. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or SOC201.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

SOC 327: Death, Dying and Bereavement

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 327. Students are guided through an examination of death as a universal human experience. The psychological and sociocultural impact of dying will be explored as well as a brief history of thanatology, the process of grief, mourning and bereavement, ethical issues concerning death, legal aspects of death, euthanasia and funeral and last rites. Prerequisites: SOC 201, PSY 103.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

SOC 328: Basic Training in Military Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross- listed as SW 328. The United States has been engaged in some form of combat across the world for almost a hundred years. Understanding military culture and the environmental and political nature of the military is crucial for all service providers. The current war on terror presents its own challenges and stressors due to the total force concept of the military, long deployments and redeployments, signature injuries of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), anxiety, depression, and suicide. This course will engage students in researching information regarding the historical and contemporary aspects of military culture; the physical and mental wounds combat veterans suffer from, including the signature injuries of the current conflicts, and their impact on military families. Students will examine the structure, policies and services of the Veterans Administration, and local veteran community providers. Students will also engage in field research as they spend some time with a service provider in the Veteran community and engage in conversation with guest speakers from the military community. Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 201 or PSY 103.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 411: Contemporary Issues in Mental Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 411. This course is structured with a glance to the past and a view of the future of mental health and the mental health system. Themes that will be explored are the history of mental health, the mental health system, governmental roles in the mental health system, mental health services, the mental health exam, assessment of lethality and crisis intervention, children and the mental health system, dual diagnosis, the elderly and the mental health system, religion, race, ethnicity and gender and mental health, consumer rights and the mental health system and mental health services in the managed care environment.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SOC 432: Contemporary Social Welfare Policy and Services

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SW 432. This course focuses on the functional analysis of contemporary social welfare policies. It emphasizes the political and economic implications of major social welfare legislation as well as the linkage between social problems and social policies, programs, and services. Students are also introduced to the legislative process and engage in projects to develop their advocacy skills. Prerequisites: SW 311 and senior status in Social Work program.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Spanish

SPA 101: Elementary Spanish I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of Spanish through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write Spanish. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students with less than 2 years previous Spanish instruction.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 102: Elementary Spanish II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A study of the basic grammar and vocabulary of Spanish through oral and written drills designed to develop the ability to understand, speak, read and write Spanish. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students who successfully complete SPA 101 or who have completed a college-level Elementary Spanish I course.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 105: Intermediate Spanish for Professional Communication I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. After a brief review of basics, the student continues to develop communicative ability in Spanish in professional situations. Prerequisite: successful completion of SPA 102 OR 3 years high school Spanish.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 106: Intermediate Spanish for Professional Communication II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. After a brief review of basics, the student continues to develop communicative ability in Spanish in professional situations. Prerequisite: This course is intended for students who have successfully completed SPA 105 or an equivalent college-level intermediate Spanish I course.
Session: Fall and Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 110: Spanish for the Health Professions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course introduces the student to the basics of Spanish grammar, focusing on vocabulary and expressions useful to health care providers. Classes will concentrate on patient-provider dialog including Q & A and examinations. Cultural information for effective treatment of the Latino population is included. No prerequisites.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 207: Spanish Conversation and Composition I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. These courses are intended to develop the conversational and writing abilities of students in non-technical areas. Grammar review as needed. A variety of media are used, including film, TV, newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: SPA 106, four years high school Spanish, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 208: Spanish Conversation and Composition II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Writing Intensive. These courses are intended to develop the conversational and writing abilities of students in non-technical areas. Grammar review as needed. A variety of media are used, including film, TV, newspapers and magazines. Prerequisite: SPA 106, four years high school Spanish, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 209: Business Spanish

3 Credit Hour(s)

Class work will be designed to meet the career needs of the student. The class will include intensive career-specific vocabulary, role-playing, lesson planning and the use of trade and professional journals. Prerequisite: SPA 106, four years of high school Spanish, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 210: Advanced Spanish for the Health Professional

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course prepares students in health care professions to work with a Spanish speaking population. Students will acquire the linguistic and cultural skills to work with patients and professionals in Spanish. Students will work with native speakers and participate in visits to appropriate sites. There are no formal prerequisites for this course, but students should have the equivalent of 4 years of high school, intermediate college level or other previous experience with Spanish. Registration in this course is limited to the following majors: Bio-Chemistry Pre-Professional (Pre-Med), Health Care Studies, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant, and Nursing.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 220: Introduction to Literature in Spanish

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. The course will introduce students to a variety of genres, time periods and authors of literature in Spanish from Spain, Latin America and the U.S. Focus will be on short stories, drama, poetry and the novella. While all work will be done in Spanish, the pace will be appropriate for a student's initial experience with literature in the language. Prerequisite: SPA 106, or four years high school Spanish, or permission of instructor. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 240: Grammar and Culture Workshop I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This course is a bridge between language-learning courses and more advanced study in Spanish. The course will teach the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with greater emphasis on listening and speaking, focusing on the people and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Pre-requisites: SPA 106, 4 years high school Spanish , or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Literature and Culture.
Session: Fall
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 250: Grammar and Culture Workshop II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. A continuation of SPA 240 Grammar and Culture Workshop I. This course is a bridge between language-learning courses and more advanced study in Spanish. The course will teach the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, writing), with greater emphasis on listening and speaking, focusing on the people and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Complete 3 credits in Spanish at the 200 level or higher or permission of instructor. Offered As Needed. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Session: Spring
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 288: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in the sophomore (288), junior (388), and senior (488) year of study. Prerequisite: SPA 106 or either concurrent enrollment in or completion of any 200 level Spanish course.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 299: Service Learning in Spanish

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in Spanish in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies, etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previously developed project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. Prerequisite: Three credits SPA 200 level course or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 307: Survey of Spanish Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. This course provides a survey of literature written in Spanish. This course will present narrative, poetry and drama from major authors from Spain approximately covering the Early Middle Ages to contemporary writers. Students will understand and appreciate the many cultures that have contributed to literature written in Spanish from the Islamic, Jewish and Christian traditions of early Spanish literature to the Italian influences of the Renaissance, the height of Spanish literary achievement in the Golden Age and the considerable French influence in the 18th and 19th centuries, the critical self-analysis of the Generation of `98, the innovations of the Generation of `27, the censorship of the Franco era and the explosion of creativity on the heels of democracy. Critical thinking skills will be promoted as students analyze literature as part of a broader cultural reality that deals with issues of national and personal identity, gender, social status and religion. Prerequisite: 200-level Spanish course, or permission of instructor. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 309: Survey of Spanish-American Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Writing Intensive. This course provides a survey of literature originally written in Spanish by authors in the Spanish speaking nations of the Western Hemisphere. This course will present narrative, poetry and drama from major authors from pre-conquest indigenous writing to contemporary writers. Students will understand and appreciate the European, Indigenous and African cultures that have contributed to Spanish-American literature from the creation book of the Maya, Aztec poetry and Inca drama, the historical narratives of the Conquest, the nascent regional identities of Colonial texts, nationalistic post-independence literature, the innovations of Vanguardista poetry of the early 20th century and the phenomenal creativity of the Boom narrative of the late 20th century. Select contemporary readings will be included as well, including writings by US Latino authors. Critical thinking skills will be promoted as students analyze literature as part of a broader cultural reality that deals with issues of national and personal identity, gender, social status and religion. Prerequisite: 200-level Spanish course, or permission of instructor. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 312: Advanced Spanish Grammar

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking & Problem Solving. The more difficult concepts of Spanish grammar will be analyzed in order to increase the student's ability to use them correctly in both the written and spoken language. Prerequisite: Three credits of SPA 200-level or higher, or permission of instructor. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 315: Spanish Civilization and Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The study of all the elements which combine to form the Spanish nation. This course will include contemporary culture and norms as well as the traditional civilization components of historical, religious, economic, literary and artistic trends. Prerequisite: Three credits SPA 200-level or higher or permission of instructor.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 316: Spanish-American Civilization and Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Communication Skills; Moral and Ethical Discernment. This course will introduce the student to the major geographic, historical, artistic, political and economic factors that reflect the diversity of Spanish-speaking nations in the Western Hemisphere. We will examine the significant linguistic, religious, artistic and political contributions of Spain, which reflect Christian, Jewish and Islamic traditions, the importance of the varied indigenous societies that existed pre-conquest and how their legacy survives in language, culture, and social and political institutions and the impact of Africans from the slavery of colonial times, through independence movements and the cultural, social and political integration of the 20th - 21st centuries. We will analyze how in each nation of the Spanish speaking world - Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America - these three influences have combined to form distinct national cultures. This exploration of historical events will be examined concurrently with discussion and analysis of the moral and ethical concerns both of the historical period and in the context of our own sensibilities. Prerequisites: 3 credits of 200 level Spanish course or Permission of Instructor.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 326: Advanced Conversation in Spanish

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This course will focus on oral expression, giving the student the opportunity to hear and speak Spanish exclusively in both directed and spontaneous conversation. Extensive use of Spanish media is included. Prerequisite: Three credits SPA 300-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 328: Spanish Language Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course will use film in Spanish from Spain, Latin America and the US as a vehicle for artistic expression, for linguistic enrichment and for cultural understanding. Students will come to see film both as an art form and as a vehicle for social commentary. Prerequisites: 200-level SPA course or permission of instructor. Course type: Culture; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 333: Special Topics in Literature

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors, and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore various authors or genres of Spanish literature. Prerequisite: Three credits SPA 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Literature; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 334: Special Topics in Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors, and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore various aspects of culture of Spanish speaking people. Prerequisite: Three credits SPA 200-level or higher or permission of instructor. May be taken for credit up to three times. Course type: Culture; Literature and Culture.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 335: Special Topics in Linguistics

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will provide majors, minors and advanced language students with the opportunity to explore the field of Spanish linguistics. The course is delivered in the Spanish language. Prerequisites: completion of 3 credits in Spanish studies at the 200-level or higher. May be taken for credit up to three times (9 credits maximum). Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 336: Phonetics & Phonology-Spanish

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology is designed to bring an understanding of the phonetic features of Spanish sounds, the linguistic logic and historical context behind how the sounds are organized into a system, and how they operate when they form syllables, words, sentences and discourse (phonology). This course is both analytical and practical and covers: contemporary Spanish pronunciation (phonetics and phonology); how geographical, social and ethnic variation is manifest throughout the Spanish sound system through the study of geolects and dialects; as well as the interplay of morphological, syntactical and lexical elements with the phonological system. Ultimately students will: improve their pronunciation in Spanish, develop and improve their auditory perception of the Spanish sounds, reasonably successfully replicate L2 pronunciation and intonation patterns, recognize dialectal variation for improved comprehension and communication, all within sociocultural, historical, pragmatic, and contexts of the language and the cultures particular to the language. Prerequisite: Completion of a 200-level Spanish course. Course type: Fluency; Language and Linguistics.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 388: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in the sophomore (288), junior (388), and senior (488) year of study. Prerequisites: SPA 288.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 398: International Experiential Learning

1-3 Credit Hour(s)


Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 399: Service Learning in Spanish

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in Spanish in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previously developed project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. Prerequisite: SPA 299 or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 420: Methods and Assessment

3 Credit Hour(s)

A study of the fundamental principles and practices of language learning theories and language instruction to prepare for work with and assessment of learners in various learning environments. Prerequisite: SPA 300-level or higher or permission of instructor, upper division status in Adolescent Certification Spanish program. Offered As Needed.
Year: As Needed (UG)

SPA 442: Senior Project Research

1 Credit Hour(s)

Each Modern Language major must complete a senior project as one of the requirements for graduation. In this course, which must be taken in the junior year, students select the topic for research and make substantial progress on researching the senior project under the direction of Modern Language faculty members. Students are required to: submit a polished research proposal, submit an annotated bibliography, and present the research proposal to the class and faculty orally. Students may not enroll in SPA 443 Senior Project until SPA 442 is passed. Prerequisite: All junior majors must register for this course. This preparation course for the Senior Project is required of all majors and must be taken in the junior year.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 443: Senior Project

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. The Spanish major will complete this 3-credit project that demonstrates mastery of the language in the context of literary or cultural studies or professional applications. The project may be a traditional thesis on a literary or cultural topic, or it may reflect the student's involvement in professional or volunteer work in the language. The project will normally require a significant research base culminating in the submission of an extensive written report and presentation at the Academic Festival. Prerequisite: SPA 442.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 488: Colloquium

1 Credit Hour(s)

The course is designed to assist language majors (including student teaching candidates) to: move beyond the partial control phase in their linguistic development; address language standards and learn by assisting less proficient peers; address the need for intercultural knowledge and competence. Students enroll in the colloquia in the sophomore (288), junior (388), and senior (488) year of study. Prerequisites: SPA-388 and either concurrent enrollment in or completion of any 300 level Spanish course.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SPA 499: Service Learning in Spanish

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Service Learning. Students will perform service in Spanish in a variety of settings: schools, community organizations, social service agencies etc. Projects will vary depending on student interest. Students will conduct a needs assessment of the agency or individual, decide on a project or continue on a previously developed project, and actively participate in implementing the plan. Prerequisite: SPA 399 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall, Intersession, Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Sustainability

SUST 123: Introduction to Sustainable Communities

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 123. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Students will be introduced to economic, environmental and social sustainability, and evaluate local communities using sustainable criteria. Research will be reviewed on model sustainable communities: locally, nationally and internationally. Students will visit representative sites in Buffalo and participate in community meetings and lectures. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SUST 140: Sustainability Design Seminar I

3 Credit Hour(s)

First of annual seminars taken by students in the Global and Local Sustainability major. The seminar introduces students to the process of approaching community problems as a team to seek sustainable solutions. From identifying the problems through community conversations to communicating possible solutions, seminar students will apply the sustainable design process to real-world issues. The first seminar will introduce the design process to identifying community problems and developing their solutions. Seminar projects will typically address campus-wide problems or work within one of the three neighborhoods where Daemen's Center for Sustainable Communities has established programs and relationships. Some field trips will be scheduled outside of class meeting time. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Global and Local Sustainability major or permission of the instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 240: Sustainability Design Seminar II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Second in annual seminars taken by students in the Global and Local Sustainability major. The seminar introduces students to the process of approaching community problems as a team to seek sustainable solutions. From identifying the problems through community conversations to communicating possible solutions, seminar students will apply the sustainable design process to real-world issues. This second seminar will introduce research methods appropriate for community assessment. Seminar projects will typically address campus-wide problems or work within one of the three neighborhoods where Daemen's Center for Sustainable Communities has established programs and relationships. Some field trips will be scheduled outside of class meeting time. Prerequisite: SUST 140 or permission of the instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 304: Conservation Biology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration;Civic Responsibility; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as BIO 304. An interdisciplinary science course that combines theory and applied research to address the problems of widespread loss of biological and genetic diversity. Prerequisite: BIO 110, and CMP 101. Lecture, 3 hours.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SUST 310: Global Water Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as ENS 310. Fulfills core competencies: Information Literacy; Contextual Integration. This course investigates the environmental, technological and health-related issues associated with the availability and quality of water worldwide. Case studies of global water problems will incorporate the role of socioeconomic and political issues. Prerequisite: BIO 100 or BIO 110 or ENS 201, or Permission of Instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SUST 322: Alternative and Renewable Energy Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 322. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking & Creative Problem Solving. This course will introduce students to the history of energy use, current sources of energy used worldwide, energy technologies including those under development, as well as discuss the role of governmental policies and funding in energy use and technological development. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SUST 326: Green Buildings

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 326. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking and Problem Solving; Affective Awareness. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of green building design through the use of Daemen's buildings as experimental laboratories. The US Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification system will be used as a guide to investigate and discuss construction site selection and protection, building energy-efficient features, water conservation strategies, indoor environmental quality and materials and resources used in buildings. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 338: Food and Agriculture Issues

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 338. Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. The course integrates the science associated with food production with the social and economic issues influencing agriculture, food processing, distribution, safety and policy. Current and future use of sustainable practices in agriculture and food distribution will be discussed. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.)
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 340: Sustainability Design Seminar III

3 Credit Hour(s)

Third in annual seminars taken by students in the Global and Local Sustainability major. The seminar introduces students to the process of approaching community problems as a team to seek sustainable solutions. From identifying the problems through community conversations to communicating possible solutions, seminar students will apply the sustainable design process to real-world issues. This third seminar will emphasize qualitative and quantitative methods in data analysis, oral and visual presentation, peer critique, and communication styles for different audiences. Seminar projects will typically address campus-wide problems or work within one of the three neighborhoods where Daemen's Center for Sustainable Communities has established programs and relationships. Some field trips will be scheduled outside of class meeting time. Prerequisite: SUST 240 or permission of the instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 344: Sustainable Business Practices

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration; Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as IND 344. This course will introduce the concepts of sustainable business practices and corporate social responsibility. Sustainable business is a paradigm shift from a management style of maximizing profit at any cost. Sustainable business aims to restore and maintain environmental quality and develop social equity, while pursuing long term profitability. (Sponsored by the BA Global and Local Sustainability program.) Prerequisites: Sophomore status or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 351: Urban Planning and Community Development

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Civic Responsibility. Cross-listed as IND 351. This course will introduce the theories of urban design, history of urban development, decline and rebirth, and the roles that all stakeholders play in developing sustainable communities. Prerequisites: Sophomore status.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 440: Sustainability Design Seminar IV

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fourth in annual seminars taken by students in the Global and Local Sustainability major. The seminar introduces students to the process of approaching community problems as a team to seek sustainable solutions. From identifying the problems through community conversations to communicating possible solutions, seminar students will apply the sustainable design process to real-world issues. This fourth seminar will emphasize leadership skills in facilitating community change. Seminar projects will typically address campus-wide problems or work within one of the three neighborhoods where Daemen's Center for Sustainable Communities has established programs and relationships. Some field trips will be scheduled outside of class meeting time. Prerequisite: SUST 340 or permission of the instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SUST 443: Capstone Research in Sustainability

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Fulfills Research and Presentation requirement. Writing Intensive. In this capstone course, students complete research on an approved topic under the direction of faculty members and generate a thesis that synthesizes research from appropriate primary and secondary sources and uses appropriate assessment methods to evaluate their research. Students are required to present their research orally, in a forum selected by the course instructor(s). Prerequisites: Registration is limited to Global & Local Sustainability majors. Upper division status in the Sustainability department, SUST 340 and concurrent registration in SUST 440.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

Social Work

SW 217: Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Other Addictions

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 217. Examines the broad range of important facts and information about AOD use and abuse. The major legal and illegal drugs, patterns and trends in drug usage, the history of drug usage in our culture, public policy and treatment issues will be the focus of the course. Students will also explore the concept of addictions as the framework for analysis of AOD use and abuse. Prerequisite: SOC 201 or 209 or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: Even Years (UG)

SW 218: Introduction to Social Work & Social Welfare

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as SOC 218. This course introduces students to the history of social welfare as a social institution and to the profession of social work. The course provides an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values that are necessary for effective generalist social work practice. Attention is given to learning about key factors that led to the development of social work as a profession, social welfare policies that govern the delivery of social welfare services and the evolution of social work practice with specific client populations. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. This course offers service learning credit - twenty (20) hours of community service required.
Session: Fall and Spring and Summer
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 226: Adolescence: Interdisciplinary Approach To the Understanding and Treatment of Adolescents

3 Credit Hour(s)

A course designed to provide students with both theoretical understanding and practical skills for dealing with adolescent behavior. Primary emphasis will be on working more effectively with adolescents.
Session: As Needed (UG)

SW 232: The Aging Process: An Introduction to Gerontology

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 232. Examines a profile of aged Americans; major biological, psychological and sociocultural paradigms of aging; societal and individual response to the aged and the aging process.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SW 243: Child Welfare Policy and Services

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 243. Presents concepts, policy and practices in the field of child welfare. The needs of children and their families as well as programs designed to meet these needs are examined. Content also includes the child welfare service system, historical and current developments, child abuse and neglect, and the legal system relative to child welfare services. Prerequisite: SOC 201, or PSY 302, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 307: The Juvenile Justice System

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 307. This course will present concepts, policies and practices regarding Juvenile Justice in our country. The subject is examined in relation to the needs of children, their families, the major programs and social services that have been designed for them, and the issues which emerge for future planning. The intent of the course is to instill in students a desire to advocate for children in our society and to provide students with a basis for more proficient practice in their chosen field. Prerequisite: PSY 103 or SOC201.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

SW 311: Social Work Research I

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Together with SW 312 - combination of both meets Research and Presentation requirement. Engages students in an exploration of research focusing on scientific inquiry, problem formation, use of scholarly literature, research design, measurement, sampling, research ethics, culturally sensitive research, data analysis, and evaluation of research. Introduces students to major research techniques used to observe and interpret the social world including experimental design; single subject design; surveys; qualitative research; and applied social work research. Prerequisite: SW 218.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 312: Social Work Research II

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Information Literacy. Writing Intensive. Together with SW 311 - combination of both courses meet Research and Presentation requirement. Building on SW 311, students participate in the design and implementation of a real world research project. Students gain experience using data analysis software (qualitative and/or quantitative) and present their research findings as part of a conference. Students complete a full research paper including introduction, literature review, methodology, and results sections. Prerequisite: SW 311.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 315: Professional Communication in Social Work

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course offers students an opportunity to learn techniques for enhancing their interpersonal interactions and listening skills, basic writing and problem solving skills, and the ability to present information to various audiences. It focuses on the development of communication skills which focus on self (technology-based communication tools, resume writing), as well as interaction-based and organizational communications. Students will also research an issue of concern to a high need population group and engage in various persuasive writing techniques to educate and engage others. Prerequisite: SW218; Limited to Social Work majors.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 325: Foundations of Generalist Practice I: Social Work Method

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the first course in a four-course practice sequence. This course introduces the generalist practice model of professional social work. It emphasizes use of the problem solving approach and examines core theories of social work practice with various client systems. Content focuses on the ethical use of value-based, culturally sensitive techniques for effective engagement, assessment, intervention, and evaluation. Prerequisites: SW 214 and upper division status in Social Work program.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 326: Foundations of Generalist Practice II- Individuals and Families

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the second course in a four-course practice sequence. In this course, students continue to apply the principles that guide professional social work practice with particular emphasis placed on micro-level practice.The course focuses on the interactional skills necessary for work with individuals and families (both voluntary and involuntary). Students are required to spend 2 hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 325 and upper division status in Social Work program.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 327: Death, Dying and Bereavement

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 327. Students are guided through an examination of death as a universal human experience. The psychological and sociocultural impact of dying will be explored as well as a brief history of thanatology, the process of grief, mourning and bereavement, ethical issues concerning death, legal aspects of death, euthanasia and funeral and last rites. Prerequisites: SOC 201, PSY 103.
Session: Spring
Year: Even Years (UG)

SW 328: Basic Training in Military Culture

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Moral & Ethical Discernment. Cross- listed as SOC 328. The United States has been engaged in some form of combat across the world for almost a hundred years. Understanding military culture and the environmental and political nature of the military is crucial for all service providers. The current war on terror presents its own challenges and stressors due to the total force concept of the military, long deployments and redeployments, signature injuries of PTSD and traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), anxiety, depression, and suicide. This course will engage students in researching information regarding the historical and contemporary aspects of military culture; the physical and mental wounds combat veterans suffer from, including the signature injuries of the current conflicts, and their impact on military families. Students will examine the structure, policies and services of the Veterans Administration, and local veteran community providers. Students will also engage in field research as they spend some time with a service provider in the Veteran community and engage in conversation with guest speakers from the military community. Prerequisites: SOC 110 or SOC 201 or PSY 103.
Session: Fall
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SW 333: Human Behavior and Social Environment I

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course engages students in analysis of the behavior of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities in their bio-psycho-socio-cultural milieu. The theoretical paradigms that impact the development of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities are examined with special emphasis on evaluating the impact of social class, gender, sexual orientation, and racial/ethnic group membership. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 214, SOC 224, BIO 103 and upper division status in Social Work program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 334: Human Behavior and Social Environment II

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course engages students in analysis of the behavior of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities in their bio-psycho-socio-cultural milieu. The theoretical paradigms that impact the development of individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities are examined with special emphasis on evaluating the impact of social class, gender, sexual orientation, and racial/ethnic group membership. Students are required to spend two hours per week in service learning. Prerequisites: SW 333 and upper division status in Social Work program, or permission of instructor.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 351: Intervention in Marriage and Family Problems

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course introduces students to the area of marital and family dynamics with particular focus on the major areas of dysfunction. Through both analysis of the essential elements of these relationships as well as introspective looks at their own families, students learn to identify the primary reasons for marital and family discord. Prerequisite: Junior status.
Session: As Needed
Year: Even Years (UG)

SW 411: Contemporary Issues in Mental Health

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 411. This course is structured with a glance to the past and a view of the future of mental health and the mental health system. Themes that will be explored are the history of mental health, the mental health system, governmental roles in the mental health system, mental health services, the mental health exam, assessment of lethality and crisis intervention, children and the mental health system, dual diagnosis, the elderly and the mental health system, religion, race, ethnicity and gender and mental health, consumer rights and the mental health system and mental health services in the managed care environment.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

SW 424: Foundations of Generalist Practice III: Groups

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the third course in a four-course practice sequence.This course explores the nature of social work interventions with groups - focusing on history; theoretical phases of group development; typical group settings; various types of groups (task; psycho-social or educational; mutual aid, support, or self-help; family; treatment); and key ethical standards to be applied when working within groups. Students will also learn about group processes and dynamics by assessing and evaluating the activities of a group currently operating in the community. They will also engage in group facilitation. Special attention will be paid to diversity and the factors that may limit or oppress specific group members or populations. Offered concurrently with the first semester of field placement. Prerequisites: SW 326, 334, senior status in Social Work program.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 432: Contemporary Social Welfare Policy and Services

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as SOC 432. This course focuses on the functional analysis of contemporary social welfare policies. It emphasizes the political and economic implications of major social welfare legislation as well as the linkage between social problems and social policies, programs, and services. Students are also introduced to the legislative process and engage in projects to develop their advocacy skills. Prerequisites: SW 311 and senior status in Social Work program.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 451: Field Experience in Social Work I

5 Credit Hour(s)

Requires students to complete a 420-hour, supervised field placement experience (210 hours per semester). Field Education affords students the opportunity to maximize the integration of social work knowledge, values, and skills in a community setting. Students are given the opportunity to work with diverse clients including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students are also encouraged to grow their professional network by engaging with other social work practitioners. Prerequisite: SW 325, SW 326 and senior status in social work program. Offered each fall semester. Corequisite: SW 451S
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 451S: Field Experience in Social Work I Seminar

1 Credit Hour(s)

This is the first course in a two-course sequence.This course focuses on the enhancement of generalist practice professional social work skills and the integration of theory and practice concurrently with the student's field placement. The course offers students an opportunity to process their field placement experiences in a safe, confidential, and educationally enriching environment. The role of diversity in social work practice will also be addressed. Corequisite: SW 451
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 452: Field Experience in Social Work II

5 Credit Hour(s)

Requires students to complete a 420-hour, supervised field placement experience (210 hours per semester). Field Education affords students the opportunity to maximize the integration of social work knowledge, values, and skills in a community setting. Students are given the opportunity to work with diverse clients including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Students are also encouraged to grow their professional network by engaging with other social work practitioners. Prerequisite: SW 451 and senior status in Social Work program. Offered each spring semester. Corequisite:SW 452S.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 452S: Field Experience in Social Work II Seminar

1 Credit Hour(s)

This is the second course in a two-course sequence. This course builds on issues raised in SW 451S with increased emphasis on student knowledge. In this second semester of Field Education, students are expected to demonstrate their knowledge of social work methods by engaging and assessing a client, designing and implementing an intervention for the client, and evaluating their practice. Corequisite: SW 452.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 454: Foundations of Generalist Practice IV: Organizations and Communities

3 Credit Hour(s)

This is the fourth course in a four-course practice sequence. This course focuses on macro-level social work practice. Students will learn how to engage organizational and community-based assessments in order to create structures and processes that reduce the vulnerability of at risk populations; enhance access to needed resources; and/or foster social and economic justice.The course will also examine the important role of leadership related to service delivery and social policy. Prerequisite: SW 424.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

SW 457: Independent Study Or Research

1-6 Credit Hour(s)

Individually guided research in social work. Prerequisite: Senior status in Social Work program.
Session: As Needed (UG)

Theater Arts

THA 103: Basic Acting Technique

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Acting as an art, survey and evaluation of its development, analysis of method acting and current trends. Exercises and application of acting principles to individual talents and towards development of an ensemble. Theatre games, improvisation, and beginning scene work.
Session: Fall (UG)

THA 106: Introduction to the Theater

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Analysis of theater and drama, historical and current production practices, in order to enhance aesthetic appreciation.
Session: Fall and Spring (UG)

THA 108: Masked Performance

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. This introductory class will explore the fundamentals of acting and characterization through the lens of the mask and the specific problems it creates for the actor.
Session: Spring (UG)

THA 119: Theater, Madness, Power

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course, which complements and will be in continued dialogue with REL 114 Culture and Story, examines the role that theater plays in establishing, creating, maintaining or transgressing the categories and boundaries considered essential to modern life: purity and the sacred; morality; sexual identity and gender roles; sanity; honor; free will and choice.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

THA 203: Improvisation in the Classroom

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to the work of improvisational practitioners Viola Spolin, Paul Sills and Keith Johnstone. They will gain practical experience with these techniques as tools to engage students in a classroom environment, and will learn how to create a class activities progression, assess student progress, and use the techniques themselves as means of assessment.
Session: Spring
Year: Odd Years (UG)

THA 207: Improvisation

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. The class will look at improvisation in various performative and cultural contexts. Activities will include practical experiences, including solo and group performances, readings, viewings, research, and writing on historical aspects and contexts of improvisation. Prerequisite: THA 103.
Session: Fall (UG)

THA 213: Introduction to Stage Combat

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This class will focus on the idea of unarmed, staged violence, and will seek primarily to gain an understanding and respect for the physical safety concerns of the stage. Prerequisite: THA 103.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 214: Stage Movement

3 Credit Hour(s)

Studies techniques for presence and movement on stage.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 215: Introduction to Suzuki Method of Actor Training

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course introduces students to the Suzuki method of actor training.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 216: Mask Construction & Performance

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course, students will learn to engage in an aesthetic conversation with the forms and materials involved with mask construction. This awareness will then be used to create original masked performance, as well as exploring the various uses of mask and what advantages each of these uses offers within an Applied Theater context: ritual, educational, psychological and physical. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 222: Costume Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

Introduces the student to the art of costume design.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 223: Lighting Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course presents techniques and facets of lighting design.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 224: Set Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

This class focuses on the fundamentals of set design.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 225: Sound Design

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course provides instruction in the basics of sound design.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 230: Acting for Animators

3 Credit Hour(s)

The course will deal in depth with the skills and sensibilities associated with communication through speech, the physical appearance and structure of the vocal articulators, the implementation of the Laban effort actions and their relationship to the definition of a character and the use of improvisation as a tool for creating and evaluating narrative structure. (UG)

THA 231: Performing Objects

3 Credit Hour(s)

The manipulation of objects is an ancient form of popular performance. This course will explore the history, technology, theory and practice behind puppetry, both mainstream and experimental, and how the traditional role of puppetry has been, and can continue to be extended into previously unexplored areas and sources of objects. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 232: Shakespeare in Performance: Acting/Directing

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness and Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. A practical, "conservatory" approach to performing Shakespeare's work, THA 232 will be offered in tandem with LIT 232 - Shakespeare in Performance: Character and Conflict. Together, the two courses will offer a rounded approach to Shakespeare's work as text on the page and in performance. THA 232 will guide students to work as actors and directors, who will engage a range of challenges to staging Shakespeare, both by observing and analyzing the work of eminent professionals and by rehearsing scenes in and outside class. Students will concentrate on character and scene-work in class meetings and will interpret scenes, under the instructor's guidance, for public presentation in lieu of final examinations. Although the emphasis of the course will fall on acting and directing, students interested in other media (the fine arts, animation, video, photography, creative writing) will be encouraged to produce final projects that demonstrate their ability to engage and interpret the plays in non-traditional ways.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 246: Design for the Theater: History of Theatrical Space

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. This course explores the design of theatrical spaces throughout history, especially in terms of the cultures that shaped them. Students will use this information to investigate what they can learn about a culture from its theatrical events and the spaces designed to hold these events. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 250: Voice and Speech for the Actor

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills. This class explores the different facets of vocal communication and how they can be manipulated purposefully towards a theatrical end. The class will also investigate the differences between the concerns of stage voice and everyday voice. Prerequisite: THA 103.
Session: Spring (UG)

THA 253: Theater As Outreach

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Civic Responsibility. Fulfills Service Learning requirement. The broad purpose of this course is to equip students with the means to design and lead theater workshops for others, especially disadvantaged citizens. The course will train students to facilitate workshops and residencies in a range of settings (schools, hospitals, places of detention, etc.), and will prioritize assisting people of all ages and in a variety of circumstances to find and express an artistic voice. Our main focus will be learning how to assist non-actors to express their issues and concerns through the medium of theater, and to empower members of our community to articulate those concerns in live performances that can then serve as fora community discussion. A signed petition from the Coordinator of Service Learning is required for registration in this course.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

THA 260: Advanced Acting: Scene Study

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course for advanced acting students focuses on the skills involved in interpreting text, especially in terms of character development. We will explore the notions of character objective, tactics and arc, as well as continuing our study of narrative structures and the actor's responsibilities toward story. Prerequisite: THA 103.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 308: Community Acts: Community-Based Theater

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course focuses on creating new works for performance through workshops, improvisation, and rehearsal. Students are engaging acting skills and using basic storytelling and improvisation techniques to craft a new work through collaboration. Prerequisite: THA 103, THA 207, THA 253.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 326: Performance in Space

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking. A collaborative experience with ART 344: Art in Space and Environment that leads students to address issues relating to art and theater in a site-specific context.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 328: Advanced Improvisation

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. This course for advanced acting students is a continuation of the skills introduced in THA 207. Prerequisite: THA 207.
Session: As Needed (UG)

THA 333: Stage Management

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will explore and articulate the various duties, responsibilities and skill sets associated with the role of stage manager in a theatrical production. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 352: Directing for the Stage

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will give students an immersive introduction to the process of directing live performance. It will be a project-based examination of the process, from text selection to fully realized production, including negotiating design elements, exploration of dramaturgical questions and working with performers.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 404: Devised Performance

3 Credit Hour(s)

Devising performance is one of the most exciting of contemporary ensemble practices. In this course, students will learn about theories of narrative and dramatic structure, and experiment with a range of methods and techniques for applying these creatively in practice. The course focuses on creating new works for performance through workshops, improvisation and rehearsal, and will teach students to engage acting skills, storytelling and improvisational techniques, as well as making directorial and design decisions. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 410: New Media & Performance

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will introduce students to practical and theoretical innovations in contemporary theater and performance. We will explore new technologies, and investigate how these technologies affect performance, either through communication, information processing/exchange and the performer as interface. Through practical exploration and theoretical study, students will explore the human on stage and how s/he is commented upon, mediated, alienated or celebrated through technological intervention. Prerequisite: THA 106, THA 326.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 419: Theater of the Oppressed

3 Credit Hour(s)

This course will expose the students to the methodologies of Augusto Boal and the various formats and styles of performance that are covered broadly by his "Theater of the Oppressed". It is a practical course that will focus on project-based learning and a high level of reflective analysis and writing to build a relationship with the work of Boal. Prerequisite: THA 106.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

THA 480: Applied Theater Practicum

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course, students will engage in supervised work in schools, with youth programs, and in community service settings. They will conceive, organize and implement their own applied theatre projects, in consultation with representatives of the partners as well as the theater faculty advisors. Students will meet weekly with the faculty advisor to chart time, troubleshoot about organizational issues and discuss assignments. The faculty advisor will correspond closely with the cooperating partners to monitor student progress. Prerequisite: Permission of Program Director.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

Visual Effects

VFX 110: 2D and 3D Matchmoving

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will begin acquiring post-production skills for employment in the Visual Effects industry. This first section instructs students on how to adjust for lens distortion by incorporating survey data in order to solve complex and problematic shots.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

VFX 115: Rotoscoping

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will develop a thorough knowledge of the software Nuke and its Roto/Paint node. Specific attention will be placed on basic studio practices related to work flow, such as establishing proper file structures and naming conventions.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

VFX 220: Compositing

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will effectively utilize Nuke for compositing purposes, and to develop a full working knowledge of basic production and pipeline procedures. Additionally, the course explores the more traditional aspects of cinematography as they pertain to visual effects. Prerequisites: VFX 110, VFX 115.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

VFX 230: Paint and Rig Removal

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will continue working with the software Nuke in its Paint/Roto node. Additional emphasis will be placed on basic studio practices, such as proper file structures and naming conventions. Prerequisites: VFX 110, VFX 115.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

VFX 255: Stereoscopic Conversion

3 Credit Hour(s)

In this course students will learn to employ different techniques to convert standard 2D plates into stereo shots. They will discover the latest techniques for solving complex stereo problems, including how to rectify different focal lengths, to address vertical misalignment between plates, to employ stereo re-timing to solve stereo artifacts and rotation misalignment. Prerequisites: VFX220, VFX 230.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

Women's Studies

WST 215: Introduction to Women's Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving. Cross-listed as HST 215. This course is an interdisciplinary overview of the language, concepts, and issues in the field of Women's Studies. We will explore the construction of gender by focusing upon the intersection of race, class, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, and religion in shaping women's lives, and will look at women's efforts to define their identities through work, creative activity, and through feminism.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

WST 216: Women's Worlds: Global Issues in Women's Studies

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 216. Fulfills core competencies: Contextual Integration; Critical Thinking; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course examines the impact of global and transnational issues in shaping women's lives, historically and currently. While centering our analysis on the lives of women, we will study traditional roles in families and communities, reproductive rights, sexuality, capitalist economic development and poverty, the world of work, women's place in the environment, education, political participation, transnational movements of people and ideas, feminism, and human rights policies related to women. Sponsored by the History & Political Science Department.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

WST 217: Women and Girls in Literatre and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as IND 217. Fulfills core competencies: Affective Awareness; Moral & Ethical Discernment. This course will introduce short stories, poetry, biographical work and film by and/or about women in various cultures. We will look at how geography, religion, class, education, political events and family roles affect the lives and destinies of women in the world today. While we will see great challenges throughout the world we will also focus on the great progress being made toward gender equality. Sponsored by the Department of Modern Languages.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)

WST 224: Women and Religion

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Moral and Ethical Discernment. Cross-listed as REL 224. This course will explore the place of women in the three Western monotheistic religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam). The course will explore the views of women found in the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, the non-canonical Gospels, and the Koran. It will also explore modern attempts to rework the biblical tradition (e.g., in the novel "The Red Tent") and to confront the Islamic revolution (e.g., in the graphic novels "Persepolis I & II"). The class will also explore a number of contentious gender related issues (e.g., birth control, women clergy, traditional marriage, homosexuality).
Session: As Needed (UG)

WST 309: Introduction to the History of American Women

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as HST 309. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of American women from the colonial era to the present. The class places particular emphasis on the ways in which women's experiences have been shaped by such factors as race, class, and ethnicity, as well as by gender. Prerequisites: None, but upper division status, or foundational coursework in history or women's studies, is highly recommended.
Session: Spring
Year: All Years (UG)

WST 317: Gender Trouble: Literature and Film

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Communication Skills; Writing Intensive. Cross-listed as LIT 317. Do the gender roles represented in literary works reflect a "reality" based on biological differences between the sexes? Or are gender roles simply a product of a culture's religious, economic, and political agendas? This course examines works from various genres and historical periods in order to understand how they reinforce or subvert gender stereotypes that inform and condition people's lives. Prerequisite: CMP 101 or permission of instructor.
Session: As Needed (UG)

WST 320: Gender and Policy in the US

3 Credit Hour(s)

Cross-listed as PSC 320. Fulfills core competency: Critical Thinking and Problem-Solving; Writing Intensive. This course will be a survey of the development of, and current issues involving, legal rights as they are impacted by gender in the U.S. Among the topics that will be covered are interpretation of the U.S. Constitution and gender concerns regarding equal protection, reproductive rights, political participation, education law, labor issues, and family law. The course will also address the role of feminism in the development of civil rights, including the diversity of approaches and concerns among different branches of feminism. Also addressed will be examples of ways in which males have been negatively affected by protective legislation and rigid policy approaches to gender roles.
Session: As Needed (UG)

WST 328: The Image of Women in Art and Media

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Affective Awareness. Cross-listed as IND 328. This course addresses the ways in which women have been represented visually (painting, sculpture, film, advertising). The examination will examine both historical prototypes and contemporary examples. Among the issues we will discuss in an open forum are: the depiction of women from both a masculine and feminine vantage point, how the feminist agenda has been perceived in contemporary culture to condone sexualization and objectification, and how the image conveys assumptions and knowledge.
Session: Fall
Year: All Years (UG)

WST 336: Sex, Love and God

3 Credit Hour(s)

Fulfills core competency: Contextual Integration. Cross-listed as PHI 336 or REL 336. This course is about human sexuality and religion, specifically, how religious people have read and interpreted biblical texts and traditions in relation to sex, human sexuality, and expressions of love. Students are encouraged to investigate how their own religious beliefs inform their bodily lives and attitudes regarding sexual, romantic, and erotic expressions. The main focus of this course is concerned with Christianity, though depending on student interest, Jewish and Muslim interpretations may be covered briefly as well. Students will learn about concepts of the human body and related concerns of sexuality in ancient and medieval times, and investigate religious perspectives and prescriptions as they relate to specific understandings. Students will distinguish between historical ideas of erotic love and the modern construction of heterosexuality and homosexuality. The politicization of sexuality by religious groups and the use of religious ideas about sexuality by secular groups will be discussed.
Session: As Needed
Year: As Needed (UG)