Academic Festival 2019 Program

Daemen College Academic Festival

A Celebration of Academic Achievement,
April 19, 2019.

The Daemen College Academic Festival 2019 brings us together on campus to celebrate the academic and creative achievements of Daemen students. This Festival Program Book contains the schedule, descriptive abstracts for all events, and a student presenter index in the back section.

The Academic Festival centers on student presentations to the campus and community, providing a showcase for academic excellence and achievement through student and faculty presentations, exhibitions, and performances. These presentations may reflect work done in a single discipline or be interdisciplinary in nature, and include posters, papers, panel discussions, exhibits, videos, and artistic, musical, or theatrical performances. In some disciplines, you will be viewing final capstone projects and/or research.

Celebrating our 19th year, we thank our President Gary A. Olson, and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, Dr. Michael Brogan, for their support of the annual Academic Festival. We also thank members of the Festival Planning Committee who have worked diligently to plan the event. They are listed in the back of this book.

We are deeply appreciative of the level of student involvement in Academic Festival 2019. We are also appreciative of faculty support for this endeavor. Faculty sponsors have worked with students through teaching, research projects, Think Tank projects, study abroad experiences, and by encouragement in the development of proposals. We hope you will enjoy the insightful and exciting ideas generated through student and faculty scholarship. Enjoy your day!

Presentations

Long Term Effects of Preeclampsia on the Infant

Lucy Connery
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
10:30 am - 11:00 am
Duns Scotus 11

The long term effects of preeclampsia and eclampsia on infant health will be presented. Preeclampsia affects almost 10% of all pregnancies and globally is responsible for 76,000 maternal and 500,000 infant deaths each year (about preeclampsia, 2019). The exact cause of preeclampsia and eclampsia is unknown. Preeclampsia is associated with increased risk of stroke, organ failure, death, and the seizures from epilepsy can be fatal for both mother and infant (Bibbins-Domingo et al., 2017). The etiology of these conditions will be presented in relation to infant morbidity and mortality throughout the lifespan. It is anticipated that preeclampsia and eclampsia increase the risk of infant epilepsy, heart disease, and other chronic conditions and disorders. Results will be discussed.

Bio-identical Progesterone Compared to Synthetic Progestin: Evaluating Safety and Efficacy

Michelle Correa
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:00 am - 11:30 am
Duns Scotus 11

The use of synthetic Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), a combination of synthetic progestin plus estrogen, increases the risk of breast cancer. Synthetic HRT is highly accessible, typically cost-effective, and the most frequently prescribed treatment for symptomatic menopausal, peri-menopausal, and postmenopausal women. However, bio-identical progesterone may be safer and more effective in alleviating symptoms without increasing breast cancer risk. A meta-analysis of published research was performed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bio-identical progesterone compared to synthetic progestin. Eight articles were analyzed with the Daemen College databases: Academic Search Complete and MEDLINE. All studies found bio-identical progesterone to be safe and efficacious compared to synthetic progestin. The use of bio-identical progesterone is safer as well as being more effective in alleviating menopausal symptoms and decreasing breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and cardiovascular diseases. All findings stated that synthetic progestin increased breast cancer risk, a risk of breast cell proliferation, tumor incidence, angiogenesis, increased endothelial growth, and worsened endometrial functions.

The Effects of Race and Ethnicity on Infant and Maternal Outcomes

Rachel Roberson
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Duns Scotus 11

Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that manifests during pregnancy and can lead to preterm birth and other negative infant and maternal outcomes. Risk factors associated with the development of gestational diabetes include racial/ethnic minority, low socioeconomic status, the area of residence, and environmental exposures. In the United States, one in ten infants is born preterm. African American women are disproportionately affected, whereby 16% of infants are born preterm compared to 9% among Caucasian women. Additionally, African American women have a maternal mortality rate of 40.0 deaths per 100,000 live births compared to 12.4 deaths per 100,000 live births for Caucasian women. A secondary review of published research investigating the effects of race/ethnicity on risk of gestational diabetes on infant and maternal outcomes will be performed. Results will be presented.

Introduction to Mindfulness Training: Perceptions of Individuals Residing at a Homeless Shelter

Lindsey Kreuzer
Faculty Sponsor: Brian Wrotniak
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
DS 24/26

Many homeless adults live with a serious mental illness and/or substance use disorder. Mindfulness practices have been shown to reduce stress and have the potential to ameliorate conditions of those experiencing homelessness. Through breathing and focus exercises, mindfulness allows one to awaken to the present moment rather than constantly worry about the past or future. This project explored the perceptions of mindfulness practices in adults suffering from homelessness, a mental illness, and/or a substance use disorder in Buffalo, NY. Using a mixed methods study, quantitative and qualitative outcomes were measured to determine if there is sufficient interest in mindfulness techniques as a continued practice for homeless individuals with a mental illness or substance use disorder.

Why passing the Paycheck Fairness Act is essential to closing the gender pay gap in the United States.

Isabella Acosta
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
RIC 120

Many people believe that the gender pay gap in the United States is a myth; however, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, it has shown that women typically made 80¢ to every man’s dollar in 2017. Steps have already been taken to try and reach pay equity in the U.S., such as the passage of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, the Equal Pay Act of 1963, and the Lilly Ledbetter Act. However, there are still many loopholes that can be used to continue this unfair chain of unequal pay. The Paycheck Fairness Act was just reintroduced to Congress on January 30, 2019, and includes provisions that will address these ambiguities, such as having the EEOC issue regulations to provide for the collection from employers of compensation data and other employment-related data and sponsoring community informational and educational programs about pay disparities. Passing this act is essential in ensuring that employers pay women and men equally for equal work.

Effects of salt on Hypertension

Aidan Stehm
Faculty Sponsor: Paulette Niewczyk
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

   

Hypertension is one of the leading causes of burden of disease and mortality in the world. Hypertension does not directly cause death, but if left untreated, may lead to debilitating, fatal diseases. Health professionals will advise patients with hypertension to reduce intake of dietary salt as a first approach to managing hypertension or
preventing hypertension in those susceptible. High dietary salt intake is
believed to be a risk factor for hypertension. However, research evidence on the
association between high salt intake and hypertension is not conclusive.
Several risk factors can contribute to the development of hypertension, making
it difficult to measure the independent effect of salt intake on blood
pressure. This meta-analysis will review recent, published research examining
the effect of salt intake on blood pressure. Results will be presented.
 

Evaluating Mindfulness: Self Care for the Caretaker Group Intervention

Noah Groves
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
RIC 101

Mindfulness is described as a psychological process which enables the individual to bring specific attention to the present moment in order to achieve greater focus and centering (Kabat-Zinn, 2013). Evidence suggests that use of mindfulness-based practice is effective at reducing anxiety in a wide variety of population groups (Stahl and Goldstein, 2010). Mindfulness: Self Care for the Caretaker is a new educational group being offered through GA Family Services’ Foster Care Program. The group is designed to help foster parents reduce anxiety and provide them with important coping skills to deal with potentially stressful situations. The group operates over six, two-hour sessions which take place over the course of a few weeks. Prior to participation, foster parents are asked to complete a questionnaire describing their perceived anxiety and ability to cope with it. This study will evaluate the effectiveness of this mindfulness-based group intervention using experimental design. Recommendations for improvements to the mindfulness group will also be provided.

Nobody kneeds a torn ACL!

Elizabeth Potalivo
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 336

The cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) is an important stabilizer inside the canine stifle joint (similar to the knee) and analogous to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in people. Rupturing the CrCL in canines is one of the most common causes of hind-end lameness, pain, and arthritis of the stifle. Two treatment options exist for the disease: surgery and pain-management care. There are several surgery options depending on various factors of the canine. This presentation will demonstrate the disease, symptoms, causes, and treatments.

Feline Hyperthyroidism

Samantha Garcia
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 336

Hyperthyroidism, the overproduction of thyroid hormone by the thyroid glands, is a very common issue in cats. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism include weight loss, increased appetite, and increased urination. Fortunately, this disease can usually be managed well with correct monitoring and medication. This presentation will focus on the treatment and management of feline hyperthyroidism and how it is diagnosed.

Why Background Checks for Gun Carrying Licenses Should be Enhanced.

Khala Carter
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
RIC 120

Background checks should be expanded to obtain a gun license in New York State. Currently in New York State, to obtain a gun license, one is required to obtain a National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) a background check which can be completed in minutes by the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI). This type of background check looks for felonies, criminal and mental health history, and ensures that one is a legal resident of the United States. In 2018, New York State’s death rate by firearms was 65.4%. A Single Scope Background Investigation (SSBI) is necessary for individuals to obtain a license for a firearm in NYS in hopes that the deaths by firearm rates will eventually decrease. This background check searches for information in the last ten years including citizenship, education, job history, employment, public records, credit, and neighborhoods. If firearms are harder to obtain, it would be harder for an individual to be murdered using one.

Gastrointestinal Parasites in Canines

Jessica Schrader
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 336

Gastrointestinal parasites are a common problem in dogs characterized by the presence of small organisms in the intestines, causing a number of symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and blood or mucus present in feces. These parasites can have severe effects in immunocompromised dogs, like young puppies, and they have been associated with the development of anemia and developmental complications. However, gastrointestinal parasites can easily be treated and eliminated using an effective control plan. The presentation will feature the diagnosis of intestinal parasites while focusing on effective treatment and management of the symptoms in canines.    

Canine Pyometra

Jessica Burka
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 336

Canine pyometra is an infection in the uterus of an unaltered female dog. A canine can exhibit various signs including, but not limited to, vomiting, diarrhea, fever, and anorexia. Treatment for the condition usually requires surgical removal of the animal’s reproductive organs. This presentation will cover the causes, signs, diagnostic techniques, and treatment options for canine pyometra.

Hip Dysplasia in Dogs

Kenneth Kent Jr
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 336

Hip dysplasia is a common joint condition among dogs that causes pain and discomfort. This generally results from improper growth as a puppy due to genetics and/or dietary deficiencies. Hip dysplasia generally deteriorates over time and is further exacerbated by exercise. While proper nutrition and growth as a puppy can help prevent hip dysplasia, nothing can be done to prevent it if a dog is genetically predisposed; however, the condition can be managed through medication and limited exercise. This presentation will examine ways to prevent hip dysplasia beginning in puppies, as well as the symptoms, treatments, and outcomes for dogs who have already been diagnosed.

Many Americans would like more flexibility with their jobs in case of a medical emergency in their family.

Jennifer Terry
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
DS 24/26

Many Americans would like more flexibility with their jobs in case of a medical emergency in their family. Under the Family Medical Leave Act in New York State, employees that meet the standards set forth by New York State are entitled to twelve weeks of leave without pay. In addition to this act, New York has also created the Paid Family Leave Insurance Act, which entitles an employee to eight weeks off with pay, after meeting similar standards set forth by New York State. In addition to these two programs, I would like to propose that New York State offer an additional program for employees that do not meet the standards for either program by allowing the ability to exchange their vacation, sick days, and holidays in exchange for 3 weeks of medical leave, which would be available from the date of hire.

The Euler Circle

Jordan Vazquez
Faculty Sponsor: Claudiu Mihai
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
RIC 101

The Euler line, named after Leonhard Euler, and the nine-point circle are important in Euclidian geometry. The line passes through several important points, such as the center of the Euler circle, orthocenter, the circumcenter, and the centroid. The nine-point circle, which passes through all of the important points from the Euler line, is also significant. The properties of a triangle and its important lines are intriguing to look at. We will present several of these important features in a triangle.

Lead Based Paint: The Exposure of Buffalo

Melanie Vazquez
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
Business 101

Lead poisoning remains a major problem among minorities and low-income individuals in Buffalo. The Erie County Department of Health and the City of Buffalo must engage in primary prevention practices of lead poisoning by being more proactive with home inspections and expanding their outreach by providing educational pamphlets on lead hazards, prevention, safety, and/or remediation to educate the Buffalo community so minorities and low-income individuals will no longer be disproportionately affected.

Insight into Thailand’s Culture

Alliya Foster, Julianna Everrdyke, Kristen Callanan, Gary Brodhead
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
DS 24/26

Thailand is located on an Asian peninsula surrounded by Malaysia, Myanmar, Laos, and Cambodia. Its geographic location plays a major role in its culture. With an estimated seventy million people residing in the country today, Thailand can be viewed as a “very rich and delicious stew” of the cultural diversity of Southeast Asia. This presentation will provide a snapshot of Thailand’s culture and its impact on the day-to-day life of the people living there as well as those who visit. The notion of Thai Time, the reason why Thailand is often called the “Land of Smiles,” Thai values, beliefs, and teachings, interpersonal relationships, and communication strategies will be discussed.

The Role of Individualized Assistance in Addressing Depression and Isolation

William Moll
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm
RIC 101

Doris (name changed to protect confidentiality) is a 77-year-old woman who was moved to a skilled living program following a fall. Since her incident, she has withdrawn from day-to-day activities, reduced her engagement with peers, and shows signs of depression. Continued activity is critically important for older adults to insure appropriate cognitive and physical functioning and quality of life (Watts, Burns, Mortby, 2018; Andre, Ferrand, Albinet, Audiffren, 2018). Without this, research suggests that older adults may experience diminished brain functioning, greater bodily impairment, and reduced “will to live” (Loprinzi, 2013). This research study investigates whether case management and one-on-one engagement activities can yield greater socialization and reduced depressive symptoms in this older adult. Using a single subject design, the social work researcher will determine the effectiveness of the intervention using the “Fox Run Depression Scale” and target behavior scaling. Recommendations for further assistance are also provided.

Challenging Issues I: PA Medical Case Studies

Gregg Shutts
Faculty Sponsor: Gregg Shutts
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Business 107/109

In PAS 613 Research II, a capstone course, students in PA-18 present a challenging or thought-provoking clinical case to their peers in Grand Rounds format, emphasizing the principles of evidence-based practice. Students demonstrating excellence in research and presentation will be selected by faculty advisors and asked to repeat their case presentations. These 5-8 selected case studies will each be about 20 minutes. Presentations will also be honored at the PA Program's White Coat Ceremony before Commencement in May.

What are the strengths and achievements experienced to earn Magnet Designation as a Community Hospital?

Cara Skulski, Dr. Valazza, Audra Urban , Julie Morton, Wendy McDonald
Faculty Sponsor: Deborah Merriam
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

A Daemen College think tank grant-supported study was conducted as a collaborative academic-practice study. Appreciative Inquiry was used to assist nurses at a community hospital who had earned the coveted Magnet Designation to identify strengths as well as a vision for the future. Participants included nurses, nurse leaders, nurse administrators, nurse educators, and nurse practitioners to gain a broader perspective. Nurse practitioners were interviewed to identify the unique strengths and achievements experienced as a Magnet Designated organization. Inductive content analysis was used to identify themes that included the strengths and achievements experienced, as well as a vision for future organizational growth.

Strengths and Achievements of Nursing Staff During the Magnet Journey

Wendy MacDonald
Faculty Sponsor: Deborah Merriam
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

A Daemen College Think Tank Grant-supported study was conducted as a collaborative academic-practice study. An Appreciative Inquiry method was used to assist nurse leaders at a community hospital who participated in the process of earning Magnet Designation to identify organizational strengths as well as a vision for the future. Participants included nurses, nurse leaders, nurse administrators, nurse educators, and nurse practitioners to gain a better perspective. Nurse leaders were interviewed to identify the unique strengths and achievements experienced as a Magnet Designated organization. Inductive content analysis was used to identify themes from the interviews. The themes which were identified included teamwork, a sense of community, a nurse's perspective, and future visions. The identified strengths experienced by the nurse leaders also provided a vision of the future.

What are the Identified Strengths/Achievements Experienced by the Community Hospital as they continue on their Magnet Journey?

Audra Urban
Faculty Sponsor: Veronica Valazza
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

A Daemen College Think Tank Supported Grant Study was conducted as a collaborative academic-practice study. The Magnet Recognition Program recognizes health-care organizations for quality patient care, nursing excellence and innovations in professional nursing practice.  Appreciative Inquiry was used to assist nurses at a community hospital to identify unique organizational strengths, as well as, a vision for the future as they continue on their road to re-designation. Nurse educators and nurses were interviewed to identify unique strengths. Inductive content analysis was used to identify categories that included the strengths and achievements experienced, as well as a vision for future organizational growth. Strengths of the hospital that were identified included a nurturing environment, teamwork, unity, and diversity. 

Understanding a Community Hospital's Magnet Journey Through Appreciative Inquiry

Julie Morton
Faculty Sponsor: Deborah Merriam
1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Duns Scotus 11

A Daemen College think tank grant-supported study was conducted as a collaborative academic-practice study. Appreciative Inquiry was used to assist nurses at a community hospital who had earned the coveted Magnet Designation to identify strengths as well as a vision for the future. Participants included nurses, nurse leaders, nurse administrators, nurse educators and nurse practitioners to gain a broader perspective. Nurse leaders were interviewed to identify the unique strengths and achievements experienced as a Magnet Designated organization. Inductive content analysis was used to identify themes that included the strengths and achievements experienced, as well as a vision for future organizational growth.

Lawyers and Legal Advertising

Christine Kramer
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 101

It's hard to imagine, but prior to a Supreme Court decision in 1977, lawyers were not allowed to advertise at all. Since that time, law firm marketing and advertising specialists have developed savvy social media campaigns that play on the fears and emotions of the public. Very little monitoring of this practice is done; when it is, it's by the legal profession itself. I will explore the history of legal advertising, how rules that govern advertising by lawyers vary from state to state and why national oversight is impractical, how the myriad of mesothelioma and other mass tort solicitations came to be, and how they affect you and I. I will argue why judges must exert control in order to better protect the public from unscrupulous practices.

Green Buildings: Good for the Planet and Good for You?

James schaab-rozbicki, Garvin, Darius D., Harris, Breon L., Kalwicki, Madison T., Kosmowski, Adam P., Mott, Kristyn E., Ortiz, Luis C., Rydza, Brittany A., see excel spreadsheet for other students**
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm
DS 336

A “green” built environment should consider a balance between environmental, social, and economic benefits. Modern buildings that are energy-efficient are desired; however, the buildings must have a healthy indoor environment and use materials that are safe for occupants. Including more environmentally-friendly features in a building may increase its initial cost, but often reduces the long-term operating expenses. Students in the Green Buildings course will discuss several Buffalo building case studies (the US Courthouse, Innovation Center, Burchfield Penney Art Center and Harbor Center) with an evaluation of the positive and negative social, environmental, and economic aspects of the projects.    

An Act to Amend 18 NYCRR § 489.7 to Expand Care Services Offered in Family-Type Homes for Adults to Reduce Premature Institutionalization of Disabled Elderly Persons

Stefan Foster
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm
Business 101

Across the nation, family-type homes are expanding as a preferred alternative to nursing homes for elderly persons in need of care and assistance with activities of daily living. Through many states’ Medicaid programs, family-type homes provide disabled elderly persons with support in areas of self-care, medication administration, mobility, transportation, and financial supervision. However, in New York, family-type homes are not offered as a long-term care benefit through Medicaid nor offered as a waiver program. By incentivizing family-type homes in New York through Medicaid reimbursement rates, structuring local health department licensure, and amending 18 NYCRR § 489.7 (admission standards), New York could offer services beyond basic supervision for residents living in family-type homes. In effect, disabled elderly persons throughout the state could be diverted away from premature and inappropriate institutionalization and live within the community.

Engaging in Service to Address Human Trafficking in Northern Thailand

Natalie Chiodo, Sydney MacInnis, MacKenzie Robbins, Kathleen Lemke
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm
DS 24/26

Development & Education Programme for Daughters and Communities (DEPDC) is a non-governmental organization working to combat sex and labor trafficking in the Greater Mekong Subregion of Northern Thailand. This highly effective organization was established more than twenty-five years ago by two-time Nobel Prize nominee, Sompop Jantraka. Daemen College students from various disciplines spent two weeks working with at-risk children and youths at DEPDC’s Half Day School Program. Our time was spent teaching English, providing life skills training (e.g., dental care, personal hygiene, self-defense, and healthy relationships), and developing interpersonal relationships through participation in International Children’s Day, the Annual Sports Day Competition, and other regular engagements. This presentation will describe our experiences of working in Northern Thailand. We will also share how we, as international service program participants, learned much more from the children and youths than we could ever hope to teach them.

Pollinator House Design: Save our Bees and Raise Awareness

Rebecca Chilelli, Christopher Reed, Camryn Porter, Adam Kosmowski, Kristyn Mott, Peter Bellanca
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
DS 336

Pollinator numbers have been declining worldwide due to human environmental impact. To raise awareness about pollinators’ plight and celebrate our local gardens, Garden Walk Buffalo, Gardens Buffalo Niagara, and the Buffalo Architecture Foundation have created a competition. The 2019 Pollinator House Design-Build Competition invites community members to construct artistic homes for native bees, butterflies or other pollinators. The entries will be auctioned to generate funds for the groups with some of the pollinator houses on display during local garden walks. The Sustainable Design Seminar students will showcase their designs and discuss their rationale in choosing certain materials and features to create their homes.

Proposed Primary Prevention Program For Child Sexual Abuse

Samantha Kellogg
Faculty Sponsor: Rachel Hoopsick
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
Business 101

Sexual abuse of children is prevalent in the United States population and is frequently underreported. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, child abuse is defined as the words or actions that cause, potentially cause, or imply harm to a child including sexual abuse. Specifically, sexual abuse of a child occurs when the child does not comprehend and does not freely give consent for a sexual act to be committed against them. This presentation will discuss the epidemiology of child sexual abuse in the United States and present a potential primary prevention program that aims to eliminate the abuse before it begins.

Human Trafficking in Thailand

Madelynn Turano, Gissela Rodriguez , Emily Goldenberg , Rachel Mathews , Christina Stasiuk
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
DS 24/26

The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) defines human trafficking as the “recruitment, transport, transfer, harboring, or receipt of persons by improper means (such as force, abduction, fraud, or coercion) for improper purpose including forced labor or sexual exploitation.” Thailand is recognized as a key destination for human trafficking within Southeast Asia. The majority of trafficking victims found there are Thai nationals who are trafficked for sexual exploitation domestically and to a number of countries internationally. In addition, Thailand’s relative prosperity also attracts migrants from neighboring countries, including Myanmar (Burma) and Cambodia, who flee conditions of poverty and political repression without proper permissions or paperwork. This presentation discusses the nature of human trafficking in Thailand as well as the anti-trafficking work of the Development and Education Programme for Daughters and Communities (DEPDC), a non-profit, non-governmental organization led by two-time Nobel Prize nominee, Sompop Jantraka.

Harmful Effects of Sugar in American Foods

SheMisa Ali
Faculty Sponsor: Steven Harvey
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm
RIC 101

Food is a necessity, consumed for its nutritional value. It is also what builds, revitalizes, and fuels the human body. When formulated with additives, food can often pose long-term detrimental effects on human health. One common high-volume additive is sugar. The sweet, appealing flavor entices customers, and thus leads to the quick sale of products containing sugar. Recent studies link high sugar consumption to chronic medical illnesses such as diabetes, obesity, cancers, heart disease, kidney failure, and hyperactivity in children. This project will explore the harmful effects of high-volume sugar consumption, look at the negative effects of our fast food culture, and share what can be done to preserve health and wellness in America. 

Handwashing Workshop in Uganda Among Primary School Children

Elizabeth Renner, Jessica Leone
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 24/26

This presentation will provide an overview of a two-week community health project aimed at improving hand hygiene in Ugandan primary school children at Bethlehem Parent School. Details to be discussed include community mobilization techniques used to support a hand hygiene initiative, the building of handwashing stations called tippy taps, and an educational session on the critical times of handwashing and proper techniques to promote behavior change to improve hand hygiene. A reflective evaluation of the project being presented will include the community health impact of the project, perceptions of the school children, related hand hygiene behavior changes, and strategies for future work. The water infrastructure in Uganda and related epidemiology considerations will also be reviewed as background to support the significance for this project.

International Service Learning: Health Education and Menstrual Hygiene in Uganda

Jordan Hardie, Micayla Monks, Adrianna Pencek, Erin Fransen
Faculty Sponsor: Justine Tutuska
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm
DS 24/26

A small group of undergraduate and graduate Daemen College students from the health professions spent two weeks in Uganda during January of 2019 for service learning with faculty member Justine Tutuska. The student presenters will introduce their experiences regarding the diverse culture exchange experienced while in Uganda as well as a collaborative menstrual hygiene management project presented to young females at Bethlehem Parent School. In addition, they will discuss how this study abroad experience impacted their views on global awareness and their own lives.  

   

Investigating the Efficacy of Healthy Nutrition on ADHD Symptoms

Omari Thompson
Faculty Sponsor: Rachel Hoopsick
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
RIC 101

One of the most common behavioral disorders in childhood is attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is identified as trouble or distress in sustaining intended alertness to activities which can be both academic or everyday responsibilities and can be paired with a low control of impulses. With most cases lasting into adulthood, genetic, environmental, and lifestyle risk factors all contribute to ADHD. Evidence suggests that diet is an environmental risk factor for ADHD. Diets low in copper, zinc, iron, magnesium, and omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to be prevalent in children with ADHD. Research suggests an increased risk of ADHD was found in children with diets high in artificial food coloring, sugar, and preservatives. A review of existing literature was conducted to determine the efficacy of healthy nutrition on ADHD symptoms.

Working with Local Government to Improve Community Energy Efficiency

Peter Bellanca
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm
DS 336

Human activity has now been accepted to play a major role in climate change. While international agreements aim to reduce fossil fuel emissions, many communities and local governments are taking a more active role by pledging to change their practices to reflect their concern for the environment. In New York State, the Clean Energy Communities Program and the Climate Smart Communities Certification Program assist local communities to increase their overall sustainability for benefits such as the creation of jobs, a cleaner environment, and government awarded grants and other financial incentives. It is my goal to assist my hometown of West Seneca in pledging to these two programs. My presentation will detail the steps I recommend for my community to take to meet the requirements of said programs.

Teen Pregnancy and HIV Prevention Among Minority Populations: Immigrants and Refugees

Mu Paw
Faculty Sponsor: Rachel Hoopsick
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Business 101

When addressing teen pregnancy prevention, HIV prevention is an important and related consideration. Low income minority youth have a higher risk of teen pregnancies and HIV infection compared to females of the same age who are white. African American and Latino women are among the highest risk of HIV infection and Native American women are at higher risk of teen pregnancy. This presentation will review the literature related to teen pregnancy and HIV prevention among immigrants and refugees, as well as suggest as possible intervention program.

Reducing Single Use Plastic Cutlery

Kristyn Mott, Kevin Kegler
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
2:45 pm - 3:00 pm
DS 336

In schools throughout the nation, we are taught to “reduce, reuse, and recycle” but are then given single-use plastic cutlery during the lunch hour. Single-use plastics contribute a significant amount of waste and pollution to the environment and are altogether unsustainable. It is time to move back to using silverware in schools and using compostable alternatives where food can be taken to go. Getting rid of single-use plastics in the school system will create better habits for young consumers and reduce overall environmental impact. In my presentation, I will discuss the pros and cons of moving away from single-use cutlery and how explaining this decision to students will have a long term effect on their environmental awareness.

Posters

Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

What Do Student Veterans Want From Their Daemen College Experience?

Madelynn Turano, Alyssa Mazurkiewicz, Rebecca Baran
Faculty Sponsor: James Golden
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Since 2009, more than two million veterans have returned from active duty and often face difficulties transitioning from military to civilian life. Though military processes for assisting in the transition process have improved, many veterans face significant economic, social, and health challenges upon their return. These challenges are often exacerbated when veterans choose to enroll in or return to college, where they frequently report feeling disconnected and misunderstood. Many colleges have attempted to address these challenges by creating programs to assist student veterans, but there is often a risk of unintentionally objectifying and/or pathologizing student veterans, which can often happen when such programs are developed without input from student veterans. The focus of this research is to assess the desired educational environment of student veterans and current perceptions of such at Daemen College. Results from the study will provide feedback to Daemen and its programs in order to benefit student veterans.

A Life-Saving Motor Vehicle Accident: A Young Woman's Car Crash Leads to a Rare Malignant Finding

Allison Christie
Faculty Sponsor: Donna Russell
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A 21 year-old female arrived in the emergency room following a motor vehicle accident. Upon her arrival, she was sent to CT imaging to ensure there was no internal hemorrhaging. Unbeknownst to the patient and her medical team, she was harboring a 7 cm retroperitoneal mass. This incidental finding had multiple alternative cancer diagnoses including lymphoma, sarcoma and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. Immunohistochemical stains proved this mass to be an adrenocortical carcinoma, which is an extremely rare finding in a young female. The patient underwent a total left adrenalectomy and is expected to survive this otherwise aggressive cancer because of the early finding.

A misconception: Higher Education Opportunities and Social Location

Gissela Rodriguez
Faculty Sponsor: Ann Robinson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Only 10 percent of college students study abroad during their time as a student; 70 percent of those individuals who study abroad are white and come from higher-income families. As a Benjamin A. Gilman scholar recipient, the purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate that social location and economic standing should not prevent an individual from the ability to achieve their goals. People of color, low-income families, and first-generation college students are underrepresented in study abroad opportunities. What barriers stop minority students from studying abroad? Should we help these students through the barriers, or do we focus on helping students for whom it will be easier to send abroad? Should universities and academic advisors help the underrepresented students study abroad?

A Review of Response Interruption and Redirection as an Intervention for Automatically Reinforced Vocal Stereotypy in Children with Autism

Natalie Azeez
Faculty Sponsor: Deborah Napolitano
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Response Interruption and Redirection (RIRD) refers to the evidence-informed practice that is used to decrease inappropriate and maladaptive behaviors, specifically those that are repetitive or stereotypic. RIRD has been demonstrated in multiple studies for its effectiveness in reducing behaviors that are not generally associated with or maintained by social consequences (e.g., escape/avoidance or attention). The mechanism for the efficacy of RIRD has been described as an obstruction that interrupts or gets in the way of an individual engaging in stereotypic and repetitive behaviors. The therapist then redirects the individual to a more adaptive and appropriate behavior (Ahearn, Clark, & McDonald, 2007). In this review, the existing empirical literature on RIRD as an intervention for automatically reinforced vocal stereotypy is analyzed. It will include studies between the years 2007 and 2018. Based on the findings of these studies, recommendations for practitioners regarding RIRD in the treatment of vocal stereotypy are provided.

AMP-ing Up Student Success! Assessing Amherst Central High School’s Academic Monitoring Program

Megan Starner
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Students at risk of failing can earn better grades with the assistance of a trained adult tutor who can teach them critical strategies for how to learn and perform in a school setting (Hock, Pulvers, Deshler, & Schumaker, 2001). Amherst Central High School’s Academic Monitoring Program (AMP) is an afterschool intervention program designed to provide support and direction to students struggling to maintain their academic performance. Student progress is regularly tracked by teachers who work with them one-on-one. The AMP staff members maintain consistent communication with the participants' classroom teachers to identify growth and areas for improvement. By examining report cards, this study will determine whether the AMP program achieves its intended results. In addition, the program staff will be interviewed to learn about opportunities to expand these efforts to further enhance student achievement.

An Evolving Lens: Inclusive and Affirming Sexual Health

Rebecca Dirschberger
Faculty Sponsor: Whitney Mendel
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in 2015, gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are at an increased risk for contracting a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). The CDC also states that in 2018, a quarter of transgender women and half of the Black transgender women are living with HIV. The 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance (YRBS) Survey shows these groups of individuals are placed at a higher risk due to engaging in riskier sexual behaviors and are faced with many health disparities. The Pride Center of Western New York is an organization where members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, intersex, asexual+ (LGBTQIA+) community can go for STI screening and support. This poster presentation will showcase why it is important to consider sexual health from an LGBTQIA+ lens and not strictly a cisgender or heterosexual lens while highlighting the importance of early detection.

An investigation into the relationships between objective sleep quantity and self-report measures of sleep quality, perceived stress, sleep hygiene and mindfulness in healthy college students.

Darlene Eckhardt
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sleep quantity and quality are important for physical and mental health. Sleep is hindered by high tension/stress but can be improved through mindfulness and lifestyle habits. However, these relationships have not been explored in college students who may be at high risk. The purpose of this project is to investigate the relationships between objective sleep quantity and self-report measures of sleep quality, perceived stress, sleep hygiene, and mindfulness in healthy college students. Self-report and objective sleep assessments are recommended to understand sleep patterns. Participants will wear wrist-worn sleep trackers (ActiGraph GT9X) for 7-nights to quantify sleep and then complete the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Perceived Stress Scale, Sleep Hygiene Index, and Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale. Spearman’s rank order correlations will be performed to identify strength and direction of relationships. We hypothesize that poor sleep quantity in college students will be associated with poor mindset characteristics.

An investigation of Backwards Gait Analysis (BGA) and the Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC) for People with Parkinson’s Disease (PD)

Sierra Iavarone, Lindsay , Emily
Faculty Sponsor: Sharon Held
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Standardized outcome measures (SOMs) are used by physical therapists (PTs) to assess patients’ functional abilities/limitations and participation level with results guiding patient outcomes and interventions. PTs manage patients with Parkinson’s Disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disease of progressive rigidity, bradykinesia, tremor, postural instability (particularly backwards), gait disturbances (ie. freezing), and fall risk. Various SOMs are appropriate for patients with PD; however, may not provide comprehensive assessments for these limitations. The Backwards Gait Analysis (BGA) examines postural stability and walking backwards. The Standardized Walking Obstacle Course (SWOC) examines functional ambulation with varying task conditions, physical features, and environmental dimensions. Both the BGA and SWOC have not been fully validated for the PD population. This presentation analyzes current evidence on PD with related limitations and SOMs to provide the foundation for a study examining the BGA and SWOC for patients with PD. Study results could provide PTs with stronger SOMs, thereby improving outcome and intervention planning.

Anxiety in Graduate Physical Therapy Students

Michael Mauro, Ellen Merchant, Alexis Stewart
Faculty Sponsor: Laurie Walsh
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

According to the DSM V, Generalized Anxiety Disorder is characterized by excessive or unrealistic anxiety and worry about two or more aspects of life (e.g., work, social relationships, financial matters, etc.), often accompanied by symptoms such as palpitations, shortness of breath, or dizziness occurring “more days than not for at least 6 months”. Evidence indicates that many students struggle with anxiety in graduate school due to numerous factors such as increased workload, decreased sleep, and poor time management. The specific aim of this literature review is to examine the etiology and prevalence of Generalized Anxiety Disorder in graduate students who are earning their Doctorate of Physical Therapy (DPT) at Daemen College. Furthermore, the goal of this review is to explore a cost-effective and efficient standardized outcome measure for anxiety.

Behavioral Management Strategies For Students With ADHD in Pre-school and Kindergarten Classrooms

Tia Fulater, Kelsey Martin
Faculty Sponsor: Mark Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Behavior management pertains to evidence-based strategies that are used to modify a student’s behaviors in the classroom setting. Students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) often demonstrate behaviors that are inappropriate in classroom settings and disruptive to learning environments. This can be due to a student’s persistent patterns of impulsivity, hyperactivity, inattention, and an inadequate display of age-appropriate social skills. Teachers can incorporate a variety of evidence-based behavioral management strategies to support the skills that are needed for students to succeed socially and academically in the classroom setting. Behavior management strategies are important to implement as early as preschool and kindergarten. This is to ensure that a student’s age-inappropriate behaviors are recognized, assessed, and carefully modified when needed. Finally, positive reinforcement strategies must occur intermittently and across multiple learning environments for the overall behavioral and academic success of students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

Brexit

Kristen Callanan
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

For my Academic Festival poster, I am going to explore the Brexit, its meaning to the British people, and how this can be understood in America. I will also explore the first-hand feelings of London in the moment of the transition and the tension that can be felt there today.

Business Crime

Nicole Campanella
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Business crime, a perpetual issue across the globe, includes embezzlement, money laundering, fraud, and more. Business crime is also associated with cybercrime, which has become a danger to for-profit businesses, not-for-profit businesses, and society. Business crimes fall into two categories: internal and external crimes. Internal crimes are committed by those within a company. External crimes, such as robbery, are committed by individuals outside a company. It is important for business owners to know what internal controls, such as having trained accountants, can help them avoid crime. The use of preventative measures, such as employee drug testing and background checks are also helpful. Due to increases in cybercrime and business crime, more security procedures have been put in place to help minimize threats. It is crucial for businesses and consumers to be aware of online threats and how to spot suspicious activity.

Can Buddhist Belief and Practice Improve Your Health?

Brian Morreale
Faculty Sponsor: Heike Peckruhn
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Researchers identified how Buddhist-based therapeutic practices can improve the mental health of patients. The literature review examined how Buddhists (Buddhist monks or Buddhist practitioners) deal with depressive symptoms. Buddhists have been found to be less depressed than Westerners. Different Buddhist practices, including meditation, integrated within therapy were identified in studies conducted throughout Asia and America. The prevalence of Buddhists who have depression was researched by observing geographic locations where Buddhism is popular. Buddhist beliefs were also identified to further explain how the therapeutic practices were effective. A Buddhist practitioner’s response towards depression is paramount for psychologists and counselors to understand to help treat patients. Professionals must be aware that there are cultural therapeutic practices that are effective. Buddhist therapeutic techniques help Buddhist practitioners respond to depression and provide a diverse framework within their professional practice. The studies concluded that different Buddhist practices were effective in the decrease in depression.

Can the Pediatric Balance Scale Detect Changes in Functional Balance in Children Participating in Adaptive Dance Programs?

Taylor Tilley, Elizabeth Galleher, Jenna Kent, Rachel Shopene
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Rose Franjoine
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS) is an outcome measure commonly used by physical therapists to examine balance capabilities in children 2 to 13 years of age. The PBS with current modifications contains 20 common balance items that a child routinely does throughout the day at home and in school. The purpose of this study is twofold: first to investigate how children of different ages and abilities perform on the PBS and second to determine if the revised PBS is capable of detecting change in balance abilities over time and in response to therapeutic interventions. Specifically, this phase of the study aims to examine the tool's ability to detect change in functional balance capabilities in young adults with known balance dysfunction who participate in a community-based fitness and/or dance program. The focus of this poster is to review the literature related to community-based fitness programs and their effect on balance skills.

CAUSE

Gretchen Ringler, Matthew Stewart, Ryan Bonville
Faculty Sponsor: Hailey Dietrich
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Center for Allied and Unified Sports and Exercise (CAUSE) is a weekly sports sampling. Since 2017, Daemen College has provided opportunities at no cost for people with disabilities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, and experience the camaraderie and sportsmanship that comes with athletics participation. In addition, CAUSE provides a venue for caregivers to access athletic-based care, participate in health and wellness programs, or simply experience the joy of watching a loved one compete. Under the supervision of Daemen Athletics Coaches and Faculty, Daemen Students and Student-Athletes are paired with participants to engage in activities that promote sport, exercise, and socialization. During sessions, caregivers can enjoy time to themselves, use the Fitness Center, or socialize with other caregivers. CAUSE receives grant funding from The Children's Guild Foundation, Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Legacy Funds at the Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo, Margaret L. Wendt Foundation, Buffalo Bills Foundation, and Wegmans.

Christopher Wren and London Architecture

Jessica Blewett
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I will be focusing on how older architecture impacts the overall look and identity of London. The primary architect I will be focusing on is Christopher Wren, the architect who designed iconic places such as St. Paul’s Cathedral, Temple Bar, and Hampton Court Palace.  While in London and visiting these places, I will focus on the specific details of Wren’s design and how it impacts the architecture of the rest of the city—how these buildings stand out and how they have survived the plague, the Great Fire, and two World Wars.  I love cathedrals and I want to show how English architecture differs from that of other countries as well as how St. Paul’s is depicted in English literature.

Collective Bargaining Agreements

Dmarco Barnes
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Fans all over the world enjoy the events of their beloved sports, but rarely reflect on why things are the way they are throughout the different sports leagues. This presentation focuses on the various collective bargaining agreements within professional sports leagues. Sports are entertainment and provide a sense of pride for fans. Few people look at sports as a business that is complex, calculated, and taken very seriously by owners, managers, and players. With an emphasis on the collective bargaining agreements of the NBA, NHL, NFL, and MLB, this presentation gives a detailed description of the corporate side of the sports industry, including TV agreements, fines, work stoppages, player unions, and contracts.

Comparison of Student Veteran Programs at Private Colleges in Western New York

Mikaila Mault, Celeste Rodriguez, Michael Ruiz, Brenda Pryor, Danitra Simmons
Faculty Sponsor: James Golden
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The transition from military to civilian life can be difficult for veterans, who often experience a sense of loss in terms of status, identity, and relationships, while also coping with challenges caused by physical and/or mental health concerns as a result of their military service. Furthermore, because the skills gained during military service do not transfer to the demands of the job market as readily as past cohorts of veterans, many veterans choose to pursue a college degree to improve their employment prospects. Though colleges have recognized the need to attend to the needs of the recent influx of student veterans, those needs are often defined from an institutional perspective, such as assisting with the bureaucratic demands of the Veterans Administration, rather than the veterans’ perspective. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the perceived structure and function of the student veteran program at Daemen College compared to other local private Western New York colleges from an institutional, programmatic, and student perspective.

Conservation isn't irrelephant!

Elizabeth Potalivo
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Borneo pygmy elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) is an endangered subspecies of the Asian Elephant. It differs both physically and behaviorally from other Asian elephants. The Borneo pygmy elephant is found in Malaysia and Borneo. Only 1,000-1,600 of the individuals remain due to habitat loss for oil palm plantations and human-elephant conflicts. Several conservation plans exist which target the protection of migratory paths for the elephants and identify where palm oil plantations may be established. This poster will evaluate these existing plans and propose additional strategies to aid in the conservation efforts for the Borneo pygmy elephant.

Conservation of the Amur Tiger

Jessica Schrader
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), also known as the Siberian tiger, is native to Eastern Russia, Northern China, and North Korea. Due to hunting and habitat destruction, the tiger population has decreased. Recent conservation efforts have encouraged habitat protection and anti-poaching measures in order to maintain the population of tigers. This research will investigate the strengths of the current conservation programs for Amur tigers and build on those plans to propose additional procedures.

Conservation of the Pig-nosed Turtle

Joanna Budzynski
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The pig-nosed turtle (Carettochelys insculpta) is an omnivore that can grow up to 70cm in length. They are found in the freshwater wetlands of Australia, Indonesia, and Papua New Guinea. Carettochelys insculpta is the only surviving member of the genus Carettochelys and the family Carettochelyidae. The pig-nosed turtle is listed as endangered due to flooding, habitat destruction, and human egg collection for consumption of turtles by the indigenous people. In addition, the pet trade traps and sells these turtles. The total population number is unknown; however, it is known that the population has declined by 50% since 1981. Conservation efforts include the legal protection of the species in Australia, control of international trade of the pig-nosed turtle, research and monitoring of the species, and identifying conservation sites to protect their habitat. My poster will assess the conservation plan in place along with creating alternative conservation plans which address previously unresolved issues.

Conservation of the Polar Bear

Maya Rutherford
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The polar bear (Ursus maritimus) is a large carnivore found on the sea ice of the Arctic Ocean. As a result of climate change, the melting of the sea ice has listed this species as vulnerable. Polar bears depend on ice for their existence and play an important role in the overall health of the marine environment. Current conservation efforts have focused on preserving the biodiversity in the Arctic by reducing industrial impacts. This poster will evaluate the current conservation plans for this species and offer alternative solutions.

Development of a Chromatographic Method for the Simultaneous Determination and Quantification of Amino Acids

William Walkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Sally Smesko
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Amino acids are essential to cellular function. Since they play a very important role in human physiology, the use of amino acids as nutritional and therapeutic supplements is continually being studied by the scientific community. Recently, there has been a rise in the popularity of sports drinks, energy drinks, and water-based amino acid supplements. These drinks contain a variety of amino acids in varying concentrations. A single method that could simultaneously quantify multiple amino acids in simple solutions (such as sports drinks) would prove useful in extending physiological and dietary research of the amino acids used in these formulations. Herein, we demonstrate a chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination and quantification of amino acids in simple solutions. This method requires less derivatization than some current methods used to analyze physiological samples. Furthermore, we expand upon existing methodology allowing for the simultaneous determination of multiple amino acids utilizing the instrumentation currently available in the Natural Science Department of Daemen College.

Effectiveness of Country Line Dancing Reduces the Risk of Falls among Community Dwelling Older Adults

Christian Kyles, Allison Maloney, Kelly Nolan, David Perez
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Bogulski
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Falls among individuals 65 years and older are one of the leading causes of disability in the United States. In Western New York, older individuals comprise over 15% of the population. This population is at a higher risk of sustaining a fall over any other age group. Impairments associated with falls include decreased leg strength and gait speed and increased postural sway. More individuals are staying physically active and maintaining a healthy lifestyle than ever before. Current evidence demonstrates many positive effects of participating in physical activity, including decreased fall risk. Country line dancing is a new form of group exercise for older individuals; however, evidence regarding its effectiveness in this population is lacking. This project seeks to review the literature regarding the effectiveness of country line dancing to improve balance and reduce fall risk.

Effectiveness of Individual Counseling and Case Management for Probationers

Julianna Everdyke
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Erie County Probation Department is charged with helping individuals reintegrate into society following a court-ordered sentence. Probationers often face disruptions in their sense of self as well as in their family and community relationships following the identification and subsequent punishment of their offenses (Leonard, 2004). They are also at greater risk for mental health issues (Trupin, Wood & Harris, 1999), substance use and abuse (Fearn, Vaughn, Nelson, Salas-Wright, DeLisi, & Zhengmin, 2016), unemployment (Harrison & Schehr, 2004), homelessness (Rawlinson, 2012), and re-offending (Williams & Houghton, 2004). This single subject design seeks to determine the effectiveness of counseling and case management interventions in helping Stan (name changed to protect confidentiality), a middle-aged male who was imprisoned following employment-related fraud, rebuild his life. Stan’s goals include improving his self-esteem, marital stability, and community affiliations. The researcher uses goal attainment and task achievement scaling as well as other measures to determine Stan’s success.

Effects of Blood Flow Restriction Training on Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy in Various Populations

Allison Bartholomew, Mark Binkley , Rachel Stephenson
Faculty Sponsor: Greg Ford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Blood flow restriction training (BFR) consists of low-intensity weight training with high repetitions while wearing resistance bands on the upper or lower extremities. This can result in significant positive changes in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and strength gains. Occluding the blood flow of an extremity reduces the amount of arterial blood flow to working muscles and venous blood flow return, which has demonstrated an increase in type II skeletal muscle fiber recruitment. Current research is analyzing the use of BFR in an athletic population to stimulate hypertrophy and strength gains while exercising at a relatively low load, thereby decreasing muscle recovery time and risk of injury from heavy weight lifting. This research poster is a review of the literature with respect to the effects of muscle hypertrophy during strength training with and without the use of BFR in athletes.

Effects of Classroom Based Yoga on Gross Motor Skills and Self-Regulation in Preschool Aged Children with Developmental Delays

Stacie Dailey, Abigail Stone, Raechel Rowley, Bethany Sivak
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Priore
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Mental, behavioral, or developmental disabilities are diagnosed in 15.4% of children ages 2-8 years and prevalence is expected to increase. Children with developmental disabilities experience challenges and limitations across several domains, which impact their ability to fully participate in their daily activities across environments. Children with developmental disabilities often require many different types of therapy to address various needs throughout their lives. As a result, families often seek alternative therapies to complement the traditional therapies that are received. Yoga is a popular complementary form of exercise that is easily accessible and a viable option for children. Research has demonstrated positive results of yoga on motor and emotional aspect in adults. Although yoga has proposed benefits in pediatric populations, current evidence is lacking in children with developmental disabilities. This poster provides an overview of the current literature examining the effect of yoga for the pediatric population with developmental disorders on gross motor skills and emotional regulation.

Effects of Group Exercise on Self-Efficacy and Intrinsic Motivation in Patients With Parkinson's Disease

Emily Raetz, Jennifer Goodman, Karley Schweinfurth
Faculty Sponsor: Christina Kelly
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by a decrease in the production of dopamine by the basal ganglia in the brain. This contributes to deficits in executive function, mobility, motor planning, and reaction time compared to peers who are not living with Parkinson’s Disease. In addition, living with a progressive neurologic condition influences psychosocial factors including self-efficacy and motivation. Evidence suggests that dance classes or group exercise may improve cognition and self-efficacy as well as decrease depression among individuals living with Parkinson’s Disease. However, the effects of exercise dosage on self-efficacy and motivation requires further study. This presentation will analyze the literature to determine if the frequency of individual or group exercise increases self-efficacy and motivation in individuals with Parkinson's Disease. If self-efficacy and motivation are found to be impacted by exercise dosage, the appropriate parameters relative to the application of exercise will be considered.

Efficacy of the Motion Guidance Laser System on Correcting Medial Knee Displacement During a Single-Leg-Squat

Kaitlyn Phillips, Katherine Casale, Karl Smiley , Carson Doorley
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Research shows individuals perform better with an external focus of attention rather than an internal focus of attention. Research has not investigated Motion Guidance™ as an effective external focus of attention to correct medial knee displacement (MKD), which is shown to be a risk factor for injury. The purpose of this research is to compare the change in MKD across two conditions (external focus, internal focus) during the single-leg squat. Using a randomized crossover research design, all participants will perform each condition on a single day. Participants will be 18-25 y/o with MKD during the single-leg squat, free from lower extremity injury, or balance impairments. A two-dimensional video will be recorded to calculate peak MKD during the single-leg squat. A dependent samples t-test will be used to compare MKD change scores between conditions. We hypothesize that Motion Guidance™ will be more efficacious in decreasing MKD compared to standardized verbal instruction.

Establishing advanced care guidelines in inflammatory bowel disease: a multi-center, double-blinded, randomized control trial of Vedolizumab, Azathriopine, and Infliximab

Vincent Derienzo, Ashley Lauricella
Faculty Sponsor: Colleen Kashino
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The two main types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Both conditions have the potential to cause serious morbidity and impaired quality of life for patients. With an estimated annual healthcare cost of $6 billion, there is a significant economic burden on the U.S. healthcare system. The main contributors to this cost are hospitalizations and surgery. Traditional management of IBD relies on step-up therapy. To our knowledge, intra-class efficacy has been established for TNF-inhibitors and thiopurines; however, there is limited evidence comparing cross-class efficacy. This proposed study will investigate the incidence of hospitalization and surgical interventions between a thiopurine (azathioprine), TNF inhibitor (infliximab), a novel anti-integrin (vedolizumab), and placebo.

Ethics in Sports

Tyler Ford
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Many modern-day ethical controversies in the world of sport have negative undertones; some have been exemplified in court cases and scandals that have rocked the sports world and shocked the rest of the world. Examples of these ethical issues include sports gambling, performance-enhancing drug use, concussions occurring in contact sports, college recruiting infractions, and sexual harassment in sports organizations. This project highlights the many recent and important, progressive changes improving the overall ethical standing of the sports world. For example, one positive improvement occurring since the turn of the 21st century is concussion protocol and player safety in the NFL. Another example is the extensive investigations by the NCAA that has led to a reduction in unethical recruiting activity. Research-based reasons that unethical behaviors persist, as well as suggestions for reducing them, are included in the presentation.

Evaluating CAUSE from the Perspective of Student Participants and Families

Ryan Bonville
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Participation in sport and/or recreational activities has been widely shown to have positive effects on the social, emotional, and physical (fine and gross motor) skills of persons with disabilities (Angba, 2016). Unfortunately, this population receives far fewer opportunities to participate in sport and/or recreational activities than non-disabled persons. In 2016, Daemen College established the Center for Applied and Unified Sport and Exercise (CAUSE) to give persons with disabilities the opportunity to engage in varied activities. CAUSE combines the efforts of Daemen’s athletics, social work, and special education departments to offer young people with disabilities the opportunity to participate in weekly sessions to help build health, sportsmanship, and lasting friendships. This study utilizes a single subject evaluation to determine the effectiveness of CAUSE’s weekly sessions in helping a young man with Autism build his social skills. More specifically, the intervention is designed to assist with engagement with others and completion of assigned tasks. Recommendations for program improvements are also provided.

Evaluation of the Provision of Services to Assist with Student Veterans’ Transition to College Life at Daemen College.

Paige Casey, Jeffrey Duah, Jacob Kaiser , Lizandro Chino, Esmeralda Hernandez, Shyanne Cady
Faculty Sponsor: James Golden
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Student veterans represent one of the fastest growing student populations in higher education and bring with them a unique array of experiences, expectations, and challenges. Student veterans are typically older, married, employed full-time, and may report feeling disconnected from the traditional college experience. In addition to any number of physical and/or mental health issues resultant of their military service, the transition from military to civilian life often leaves veterans with a sense of loss of status and identity. As a result, student veterans often report feeling socially isolated, negatively affecting retention and persistence in their degree programs. Though college campuses are making a concerted effort to assist veterans in achieving academic success, it is unclear how well those efforts are aligned with the challenges that veterans face in transitioning to civilian life on a college campus. This study will evaluate the services offered by Daemen College to address issues related to student veteran transition, adjustment, and integration.

Evaluation of Utilization of Academic Support Services Among Daemen College Student Veterans

Sara Shanley, Jennifer Reedy , Kari Buyea
Faculty Sponsor: James Golden
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

From 2009 to 2013, the student veteran population on college campuses in the United States doubled and has continued to increase faster than the rate of traditional student enrollment. As private colleges have struggled with the demographic changes resulting in declining enrollment, many have sought to recruit veterans and advertise their campuses as “Military Friendly,” though it is unclear how colleges operationalize “Military Friendly” into specific policies, programs, and practices that support the academic success of student veterans. This is particularly important because veterans represent a unique student population, not just in terms of demographics (e.g., older, married, employed full time), but also the potential for physical and mental health problems (e.g., chronic pain, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, social isolation) that could negatively affect their ability to thrive in a higher education setting. For the purposes of this study, service utilization and satisfaction among student veterans enrolled at Daemen College, a small private college in Western New York, will be evaluated.

Exercise Effects on People's Everyday Mood and Daily Functioning

Quinn Lee Yaw
Faculty Sponsor: Shannon Lupien
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Exercise has been shown to affect mood and cognitive functions such as memory. However, several factors of exercise, as in the type (aerobic vs. anaerobic), intensity, frequency, and duration may be important to consider. The current study examined the relationship between these specific exercise factors, mood, and memory. People who reported exercising more frequently, at low to moderate intensity levels, for shorter duration, and preferred more aerobic exercises were expected to have better daily mood and general memory. Results indicated that the exercise factors together did predict a positive mood; however, none of the factors alone uniquely predicted mood. Additionally, none of the exercise factors, together or individually, predicted general memory. This may indicate that the positive effects of exercise may be short-lived and only temporarily affect memory, as opposed to the long-term effects examined in the study. Thus, future research could experimentally test the exercise factors to determine if they have more immediate vs. long-term effects on memory and mood.

Factors Related to NCAA Student-Athlete Retention

Erin Sinnott
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

High school students recruited to play a college sport for revenue or non-revenue face some challenges concerning their treatment and socialization during their collegiate years. The first-year experience of NCAA student-athletes is the most vital time during their collegiate years. A student-athletes’ educational background, academic standing, and coping skills to make the adjustment from high school to college are just the beginning of the factors that affect retention rates of student-athletes. Once at a college or university, the educational institutions have a duty to care for the overall well-being of student-athletes who are plagued with issues ranging from emotional pressures to perform to the experience of loneliness and isolation in the classroom, not feeling supported by academic advisors, and, for some, academic deficiencies. Research shows that when a student-athlete integrates into the academic and social systems of their institution, they have higher retention rates.

Green Marketing: Changing How Marketing is Executed

Kristyn Mott
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Green marketing is a rapidly growing practice that relays environmental, and sometimes social, factors of products and production to consumers. While some may look at green marketing as a trend, it has proven to be an essential step towards the sustainability of an organization. Since our economy cannot exist outside the boundaries of the environment, companies must recognize the strain that their products have on that same environment and work to create well-designed products that reduce the overall impact and resource strain. Creating a successful green marketing campaign comes with challenges such as the ethical issues of green-washing a product or a business, or completely changing the foundation of an organization to convey the importance of becoming truly green. Although challenging, green marketing has shown to increase profitability and consumer trust, perhaps leading green marketing to someday become known simply as marketing.

High School Sport Specialization Levels Among NCAA Track and Field Athletes

Kendall Marshall
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sports specialization has been identified as a risk factor for developing overuse injuries in athletics. Overuse injuries are common in track and field; previous research identifies distance runners as being at risk for overuse injuries. However, specialization patterns among track and field athletes (TFA’s) have not been explored. The purpose of this study is to investigate the high school (HS) specialization differences among current NCAA Division I, II, and III TFA’s. We hypothesize those female distance runners will specialize at a greater frequency than the other events and plan to investigate the distribution of specialized athletes and mean differences between the sexes and events. Our research utilizes a cross-sectional study design surveying current NCAA Division I, II, and III TFA’s about their HS sporting habits and is distributed via SurveyMonkey. Chi-Squared analysis and Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA will be used to compare distribution between sexes and events and mean differences between groups.

High School Sport Specialization of Current NCAA Division I, II and III Athletes

Elizabeth Hauke
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sport specialization is a risk factor for injury. Larger, suburban or private high-school attendance and higher family income are factors contributing to sports specialization. Specialization has been investigated at high-school and collegiate levels; however, no studies compare specialization between all three NCAA Divisions. The purpose of this study is to examine high school specialization of NCAA Division I, II, and III athletes. We hypothesize that Division III athletes, athletes who attended larger or private high schools, and athletes with higher estimated parental income will have a higher distribution of specialized athletes. Athletes at Western New York collegiate institutions will complete a survey (surveymonkey.com) regarding participation habits, high school size, hometown classification, and parental income. Chi-square analysis will determine frequencies of specialization between groups; Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA will determine specialization differences between groups.

How do Norms and Groups Impact the Workplace?

Michael Horton
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Business owners strive to provide employees with an effective workplace. Within the workplace, norms and groups play a significant role in employee performance, a role that is highly dependent on the size of a company. Norms and groups contribute to the success or failure of workgroups and workplace teams, especially with respect to their level of performance and whether they perform as business owners would expect. This research shows that various subgroups are best for specific and desired workplace performance. Additionally, the project illustrates particular norms, such as the competence norm and the mortality norm, lead to better behavior and better results in the workplace. Other norms revealed by research and included in this project include the in-group favoring norm.

How Social Media Has Impacted Marketing Strategies

Tyler Smith
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This research highlights the significance of how social media has impacted marketing strategies. The rise of social media sites such as Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc. have made a major impact on how businesses communicate their product or service to their target market. With the rise of social media, companies can leverage content to millions of social media users for minimal cost per impression. Million-dollar advertisement channels can now be challenged by the low-cost marketing channel of social media. Social media has also contributed to start-up companies being able to compete amongst the big players of their industries due to their ability to leverage social media marketing to combat a low budgeted marketing campaign. This research highlights the importance of social media and how it changed the marketing world as we know it.

How to eat your way through London

brooklyn crockton
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

During my study abroad experience, I decided to eat the foods that are customary to Londoners, as well as get to know the history behind what made them so popular. Some of the dishes included fish and chips, high tea, and Indian takeaways!

Impact of chronic stress on zebrafish brain development

Lia Harmon
Faculty Sponsor: Jon Good
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Zebrafish are an extremely important model species in biology due to their similar genome and evolutionary history with humans. Zebrafish often are kept in conditions causing chronic stress, and this brings about physiological consequences. However, there is almost no research on the impact of such stress on neuronal development. Using their alarm pheromone and an olfactory blocker, we were able to control the stress level of captive zebrafish and show the possible effects of chronic stress on zebrafish neural development. These results could call for a major re-evaluation of all neural and developmental zebrafish research to date and redefine the routine handling and care for one of the model vertebrate research species.

Internet Sports Gambling Comes at a Risk

Steven Geffert
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sports gambling has become more of a social norm in society today than in years past; this has paved the way for easy access for people to gamble. Advances in technology have also allowed ease of access to gambling. Internet gambling has promoted habitual gambling and has led people to form addictions. In addition to the effect gambling has on people, it also has affected the competitions being bet on and the behaviors of fans as well as others around those particular fans. Gambling is involved in nearly every aspect of sports, professional or amateur, legal or illegal, through the nature of competition. Fantasy sports have changed the way people look at gambling and has garnered it a new identity. Fantasy sports start with young people which helps gambling agencies draw in participants and keep them long-term.

Literature of London

Amanda Fox
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My poster will be on London Characters, specifically Harry Potter. My poster will focus on different locations we visited from Harry Potter in London, as well as the impact I perceived the movies having on residents of London, and how the movies have permeated into Londons native culture.

Literature of London

Gary Brodhead
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

A poster on an aspect of London culture related to a literary work, with observations drawn from the study abroad journal.

Living with and Managing Osteoporosis

Stephanie Bobeck, Veronia Nashed, Nathan Nasternak, Emily Zobrest
Faculty Sponsor: Theresa Kolodziej
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Osteoporosis is a disease affecting 10.3% of individuals living in the United States. As the aging population continues to rise, the prevalence of Osteoporosis will also rise. The most predominant risk within this disease are fractures, which can result in medical costs over $215 billion annually. Research in rehabilitation reveals there are no clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of Osteoporosis. There is also little evidence about the lived experience of people diagnosed with Osteoporosis. The purpose of this literature review is to gain a better understanding of the disease process, review the medical management of Osteoporosis including physical therapy, pharmacology, and alternative therapies. Additionally, we are examining the use of qualitative research methods to gain a deeper understanding of the lived experience of Osteoporosis. The ultimate goal is to guide clinical decision making in physical therapy treatment plans.

London in the Swinging 60's

Rachel Witkowski
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The 1960’s in London were a major turning point. They had been through some really rough years with World War II and the 60’s marked a new chapter in history for them. This change was highly expressed in the music and fashion through the different bands that emerged with pretty different sounds that previously known bands.

Mathematics in Cryptography

Kaitlyn Good, Justin Milner , Marina Frears, Olivia Colon, Vivian Ladd
Faculty Sponsor: Intisar Hibschweiler
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Cryptography is the study of codes. These codes are generated in advance and are meant to be kept secret. There are three primary functions of Cryptography: Secret Key Cryptography (SKC), Public Key Cryptography (PKC), and Hash Functions. These functions play a role in database security, game theory, cybersecurity, and cryptocurrency. Cryptography is essential in order to keep our identity and personal information secret so we will not be robbed of either. This poster will show how Mathematics and Cryptography go hand and hand. 

Middle School and College Students Helping Each Other Find Beauty, Confidence, Pride, and Success

Noah Ost, Ashley Dusza
Faculty Sponsor: Mary Wolf
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

During this photo project, we took students “off the streets” by having them “walk the streets” to find the beauty in their neighborhood. We taught them a variety of photographic techniques and about contemporary street photographer Phil Penman. Inspired by his work as well as by their community, students used the strategies to create personally meaningful photographs, which we will share in this poster presentation. Through photography shows and sales at Daemen and at the Seneca Street Church, we raised $925 for their after-school program. As a result of the artistic success they achieved through documenting the beauty in their neighborhood, students developed a stronger sense of confidence and pride. In a twist, these students taught us the beauty of being a teacher. As a result of this experience, we have developed a stronger sense of confidence and are proud of their successes as student-photographers and our successes as student-teachers.

Monitoring Cardiopulmonary Response to Dance Exercise Intervention in the Elderly

Alexandrea Artise, Elizabeth Egloff, Loran Fleischman , Mark Lukomskiy
Faculty Sponsor: Laura Favaro
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The normal physiological process of aging can lead to pathological changes such as arteriosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, and muscle weakness. Older individuals participating in community exercise programs have experienced an improvement in their endurance, strength, and mobility. Literature focused on dance exercise have similarly shown positive outcomes, with the mode of intervention suggesting a session of at least 12 weeks duration, once a week for 45 minutes. One form of dancing that is related to popular culture is country line dancing, but only a few studies have examined this mode of exercise for the elderly population. The goal of this literature review project is to identify novel and convenient screening tools and measurements for cardiovascular disease risk, and cardiopulmonary endurance and strength in elderly individuals. Future studies with a community-based country line dancing class of elders are discussed.

Pay For Play

Darius Garvin
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

There are mixed opinions about whether the revenue of the multi-billion dollar NCAA enterprise should be used to pay college student-athletes. The NCAA is against the idea because the organization strives to protect and maintain a student-athlete’s amateur status. Instead of pay for student-athletes, the coffers of the NCAA fund million-dollar contracts for coaches and top-notch multi-million dollar facilities. This project highlights the varying views on the pay-for-play conversation including arguments that Division I athletes are in fact being compensated via athletic scholarships and other arguments that scholarships are simply not enough and Division I student-athletes should be able to profit from their name and likeness. The time and effort student-athletes dedicate to their craft is unmatched and the risk of injury during practice or competition looms in the minds of student-athletes every day. That includes the fear of not knowing if their next game or practice could be their last.

Peace of the City

Kayla Berhalter
Faculty Sponsor: Charles Wesley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will examine how the environment created by the volunteers at the afterschool program, Peace of the City, affects the neighborhood youth that participates in the program. Focusing on children ranging from ages 4-12, it will highlight how the children are impacted by the very welcoming environment set up by the organization. These children often come from low-income families and may not feel comfortable going home right after school until they have to go to bed. This safe space was created in order to welcome anyone from the neighborhood, where kids can play together and work on their homework with help from the staff. Being involved in this outstanding program brings awareness to the amazing opportunities and places that you can find in Buffalo. This poster will illustrate the benefits of the environment created by Peace of the City on the children as well as the impact the program can have on its college student volunteers.

Perceptions of Faculty Preparedness for Working with Student Veterans

Hidy Merrill, Lexie Blackwell, Alecia Cultrara, Sheila Crouse , Arianna Coppola
Faculty Sponsor: James Golden
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Over the past decade, higher education has faced a number of demographic, economic, and social challenges, with non-profit colleges suffering the most in terms of declining enrollment of traditional-aged students. Concurrent with these trends was a marked increase in student veteran enrollment, largely due to the passage of the Post-9/11 GI Bill, with the student veteran population doubling in size from 2009 to 2013. Eager to recruit student veterans, colleges have sought to distinguish themselves as “Military Friendly,” though that distinction remains poorly defined in terms of distinct policies, procedures, and services, particularly given the unique challenges faced by student veterans. To this end, recent surveys of college faculty indicate the overwhelming majority report being ill-equipped to address the needs of student veterans, a feeling often shared by student veterans. The purpose of this study is to evaluate perceptions of faculty preparedness for working with student veterans at Daemen College.

Pet Obesity

Kelly Engels, Jillian Bauman, Shannon Weatherley, Samantha Kelly
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Obesity in companion animals has been a growing issue, becoming the most commonly diagnosed nutritional disorder. Long term obesity can cause an array of health complications and ultimately lead to a shorter life span. Often, there are other factors involved besides overfeeding, such as genetics and early age spay/neuter. Our poster will describe how to recognize pet obesity, minimize the chance of it occurring, and how to take action if it is already a concern. We will also discuss the different types of health consequences associated with obesity in cats and dogs, highlight specific types of breeds requiring more attention regarding the topic, as well as give tips and ways pet owners can be proactive.

Physical Therapist Knowledge of Diagnostic Imaging

Katelyn Sikora, Tolbert Jefferies, Bryan Cheskiewicz
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Ross
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

While many areas of healthcare are under review, the use of diagnostic imaging (e.g., radiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography) is currently in the policy spotlight due to a dramatic increase in the use of these services. As the use of diagnostic imaging has increased, the costs associated with imaging have also grown dramatically; unfortunately, these trends have not been associated with improved patient outcomes. For physical therapists, a strong understanding of all aspects of diagnostic imaging is necessary and its use must be judicious and evidence-based. There have been recent changes in the physical therapy curricula and increased opportunities to utilize diagnostic imaging during clinical practice. However, few studies have described physical therapist education in the area of diagnostic imaging, as well as competence related to appropriate patient referral for diagnostic imaging. Therefore, this presentation will assess physical therapist education and knowledge regarding diagnostic imaging in clinical practice. 

Positioning your Product or Service for Success

Jay Sarkis
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Data and statistics are used by companies to develop marketing strategies to position their products and services. Firms use various marketing strategies to maximize their revenue and to create a competitive advantage for their business. Examples of strategies are product differentiation, service orientation, and resource-based theory; these and other marketing strategies enable companies to have powerful impacts on consumers. This project discloses the strategic variables associated with marketing, advertising, and the service level that play a role in how marketers make the most effective decisions for a company. Analysis of the effectiveness of different marketing values is very important for companies since every product and service is important for present and future revenues and also for the continuation of brand loyalty from customers.

Positive Effects of Correct Assessment of English Language Learners

Shirley Cardona-Hampton
Faculty Sponsor: Kevin Telford
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

 

 

A growing trend in Special Education is misidentifying and over-representing
Hispanic English Language Learners (ELL). In Fall 2015, the National Center
for Education Statistics reported for the population of school-age children in
K-12, 4.8 million students identified as ELLs, of which 3.7 million students
used Spanish as a language at home. My study will show the impact factors can
have on Hispanic ELLs when these students are placed in the most restrictive
settings, such as Special Education. I will also show the benefits these
students can have when placed in the least restrictive settings. Many ELLs are
often labeled and placed in the wrong educational programs due to poor language
proficiency or delays from dual-language learning. Sometimes these students do
have learning or behavioral disabilities and belong in more contained classrooms
or special education. However, when these students are assessed properly as
first, second, or third graders (the earlier, the better), with the proper
academic supports, such as certified bilingual teachers, certified English as a
Second Language (ESL), tutors, and bi-lingual para-professional aides, these
students have the highest probability of achieving long-term academic success,
graduation from high school, etc.
 

Poverty In Western New York "What Does It Look Like"

Sonji Sullivan
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In my Paralegal Service Learning class, I intern with the Volunteer Lawyers Program (VLP) at the Niagara Family Court Help Desk. Most of the people seeking legal guidance are living well below the poverty line. My poster will review U.S. Census Bureau data on poverty in Western New York (WNY), specifically in the Buffalo area. Buffalo is one of the top three poorest cities in our country. I will also explore some factors that contribute to poverty and some ideas that might help combat the poverty level in our city. We can be part of the solution on an individual and group level.

Reading Intervention at Peace of the City

Georgia Wicker
Faculty Sponsor: Charles Wesley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

 

My Service Learning location, Peace of the City, is a non-profit organization in
North Buffalo that works as an optional after school program for students in
the neighborhood. The after school program is known around that neighborhood
for involving students in day to day skills, as well as incorporating reading
intervention. For students who are having a difficult time reaching grade level
in reading in classes, reading intervention allows students to get one on one
help in a positive environment. I will examine how Peace of the
City incorporates reading intervention into the after school program and
the statistics that the reading interventionist collects on each student. I
will observe the reading interventionist during my time throughout Service
Learning to see what impact Peace of the City and reading intervention make on
the students’ lives that are enrolled in the program.
 

Response to Love

Olivia O'Neill
Faculty Sponsor: Charles Wesley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My poster will promote an organization called Response to Love. This is an organization that refugees go to for support including clothing, food and English instruction. The poster will describe the three literacy classes students can take. I will be researching the struggles refugees face with literacy while living in the United States. I will look at how many students make it through all the English classes, and how many take and pass the GED and citizenship exams. Lastly, I will be interviewing students and head organizers about how Response to Love has impacted their everyday lives.

Sales and general business ethical dilemmas

Tyler Hockenberger
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Ethical conduct should remain constant in the business world. Since the 2008 stock market crash, ethics in business has grown to a level of heightened importance for individuals and businesses. Before the stock market crash, there was a simple delineation: some individuals were ethical and others were not. Organizations also did not put employment candidates’ ethics as a high priority during the hiring process. In the last decade, however, research shows that ethical thinking and behavior has become very important in the business world. Research revealed a connection between ethical business practices, what is taught to business and sales students, and how good and bad ethical conduct is represented to them. With proper awareness of ethics, business students who become business professionals may be less likely to be involved in scandals and scenarios like a stock market crash and can help build a better business world.

Service Learning Lafayette High School

Celia De Pablo Esteban, Krishanti Trivedi, Makayla Cash, Lissette Santiago
Faculty Sponsor: Denise Mills
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Our SPA 299 Service Learning in Spanish has given us the opportunity to interact with two communities of high school students: International Refugees and Spanish-speaking students at Lafayette High School. We work with students who are learning English and help with homework in various subjects. International Students have the challenge of learning new material in an unfamiliar language. We have learned about their struggles to adapt to a different culture and their determination to succeed academically. Spanish-speaking students give us the chance to expand our linguistic and extra-linguistic skills. We have come to appreciate the mutuality of service learning as we recognize that we learn while helping others learn. We have gained an understanding of language acquisition and the importance of cultural integration.

Snow Leopard's Vulnerability

Savannah Warner
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) is a vulnerable species on its way to endangerment. Its population size is around 3,000 individuals who reside in mountainous regions in Asia. The population decline of snow leopards is due to hunting and trapping, problematic native species/diseases, and human encroachment on their habitat. While there are some conservation efforts already in place through action recovery plans, education and awareness programs, trade control, and conservation areas, there is still more that can be done. This poster will discuss the reasons for snow leopard vulnerability and ways conservation efforts can affect the snow leopard population.

Student Athlete Advisory Committee

Tiara Filbert, Jamie Boyar, Monique Green, Andrea D'sa, Rachel Roberson
Faculty Sponsor: Hailey Dietrich
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) at Daemen College is an NCAA affiliated club that affords athletes the opportunity to have a voice with the NCAA through their campus SAAC. The purpose of SAAC is to enhance the overall student-athlete experience by promoting opportunity, protecting student-athlete welfare, and fostering a positive student-athlete image. At Daemen, our athletes participate in various community service opportunities that help to create civically engaged lifelong learners. Our athletes read to local youth, host athletic clinics, help with local down syndrome awareness walks, raise money for cancer research, and a variety of other opportunities. During the fall semester, Daemen College ranked 7th for community service against all Division II schools and is hoping to improve that ranking during the spring semester.

Sustainability in Professional and Collegiate Sports

Ryan Gibbons
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sustainability and the concept of going green are becoming a topic brought up not only in a business aspect but also in professional sports. Professional sports throughout the world is turning into not only a form of entertainment, but also a platform to demonstrate and set the bar for upper echelon sustainability initiatives. The main focus of this presentation will give insight to how professional sports organizations, such as the Atlanta Falcons, San Francisco 49ers, and the Minnesota Twins, have taken large strides to improve their carbon footprint and raise the bar for what should be the standard for sustainability in professional sports. There are many other organizations in the lower ranks, such as college organizations that are taking strides to better themselves as well. With the support of organizations such as LEED and Green Project Management, taking action to become sustainable should be considered the norm.

Symbiotic business. Corporate ethics and responsibilities in a global setting.

William Forrester
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Issue marketing and socially responsible marketing have become cornerstones of business in the modern era. Businesses have a responsibility to utilize their advantages for the benefit of the public. Companies that help their consumers enrich their own lives are often rewarded by the market, growth. Also, companies that have championed causes and have changed society for the better have earned consumer loyalty, positioning them with the ability to invoke changes. Corporate social responsibility is an ever-developing consideration as firms enter a global market. As companies grow and expand globally, their impact on environments and societies they do business in also grows. Companies that leverage their advantages for the benefit of all society will truly become global institutions. Companies give back to society by producing goods that benefit society as a whole and that contribute to charitable social programs related to their endeavors.

Systematic Design of Xerogel Coatings to Reduce Bacterial Settlement

Alyssa Gadd
Faculty Sponsor: Caitlyn Montross
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Medical devices, such as catheters, are a useful tool for medical professionals; however, their function can be compromised if bacteria settle around the site of insertion and cause an infection. According to the CDC, catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are responsible for about 75% of all UTIs acquired in a hospital setting. One of the current methods to decrease bacterial adhesion on the surface of a catheter is to alter the surface characteristics of the material with the objective of decreasing bacterial settlement and as a result reduce the occurrence of CAUTIs. In this study, a library of xerogel coatings were created and characterized, and their ability to reduce bacterial (included Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans) settlement was evaluated. 

The Adsorption of Sea Water Cations to Materials Containing Phenyl Rings

Elizabeth Potalivo
Faculty Sponsor: Caitlyn Montross
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Xerogels are inexpensive, easy-to-produce films whose surfaces are easily tailored. As such, these coatings have been evaluated as a method for preventing marine fouling on man-made surfaces. Various surface properties can be obtained by changing the organic functional groups present at the coating surface. Coatings made from two commonly studied functional groups, a phenyl ring (PH) and a trifluorocarbon (TFP), have been shown to generate very similar surface properties; however, recent studies comparing organismal settlement on these two chemistries indicated biofouling organisms differentiated between the two surfaces. Current methods for characterizing the coating surfaces failed to discover significant differences in surface properties. Cations can interact with pi electrons via cation-pi interactions; thus, it is hypothesized that cations in seawater adsorb to the PH coating via cation-pi interactions producing a significantly different surface than TFP coatings, which could influence organismal settlement. This current study investigated the absorbances of cations in seawater to the PH coating in preference to the TFP coating.

The Analytical Movement in Sports

Joel Jacus
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

   

The sport industry has followed other businesses in the use
of data and analytics to develop successful business models. Sports franchises
have begun to integrate data tracking, data models, and analytical thinking into
their decision-making process in order to maximize their resources and produce a
better product. Many sport teams are building entire departments full of
analysts for the sole purpose of building models and tracking data and
statistics. With this increased use of data, the fan experience in the sport
industry is beginning to grow in ways never seen before. The amount of
information available to fans is forever changing the way that sports are
watched and enjoyed. At their fingertips, fans have access to the same
information that most professional teams use. This project highlights how data
and analytical decision-making has impacted the sports industry at the
management and fan level.
 

The Antibacterial Effects of Essential Oils on Cariogenic Bacteria

Zackery Elliott
Faculty Sponsor: Sally Smesko
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Dental caries is a major public health problem. Research for dental hygiene products that are safer to use than those currently containing fluoride and chlorhexidine is ongoing. Accidental chlorhexidine ingestion implications include mucosal desquamation and dental fluorosis. Fluoride ingestion has been linked to an increased risk of bone fracture, gastric mucosa irritation, and interruption in enzymatic function leading to a decreased immune response. A safe and commonplace alternative has yet to be established. Here we investigate the viability of essential oils for use in dental hygiene products, and the inhibitory properties of three essential oils against Streptococcus mutans growth. Furthermore, we assess their ability to decrease dental calcium dissolution in the acidic environment created by this bacterium. Current results indicate that essential oil-based ingredients could be effective alternatives to the active ingredients found in traditional anti-caries agents.

The Benefits of Sensory Integration for Students with Moderate to Severe Autism (Grades 1-2) in a Special Education Classroom Setting

Rachel Cooke, Caitlin Hoch
Faculty Sponsor: Mark Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sensory integration is the use of sensory stimulations that will enhance an individual’s sensory input, motor output, and sensory feedback. Sensory integration is crucial due to the significant role it plays in a child’s ability to participate in daily life. This integration aims to advance neurologically based sensory processing. It can be achieved through different activities, such as sand/water tables or stress balls that accommodate certain sensory deficits. Students with Autism often require sensory integration within the classroom due to their challenges with sensory input. Students with Autism can experience sensory difficulties ranging from unresponsiveness to overly hyperactive. Their struggles with sensory processing can affect their ability to perform well in school and maintain social relationships with their peers. Therefore, sensory integration provides individualized opportunities for students with Autism to become familiar with varying forms of sensory input. The effective use of sensory integration within a special education classroom setting can provide these students with significant benefits. This will result in higher functioning within their classroom environment.    

The British Museum and the Elgin Marbles

Julie Karpinski
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

I plan to talk about how the Elgin Marbles should remain in England because it gives people a chance to see them. London is an extremely cosmopolitan and diverse area, meaning a high volume of people are able to see the statues. As London has grown, the Elgin Marbles have helped make this historical city the wonder it is.

The Effect of Concussion on BESS Scores Among Adolescent Male and Female Athletes

Michelle Rivers
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sport-related concussions (SRCs) are common injuries sustained by athletes. Balance is affected by SRCs and is usually tested during evaluation using the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS). Previous research suggests that older individuals have better balance than their younger counterparts. Studies have also shown that males tend to have poorer postural control than females. This study is a retrospective cohort design and is intended to investigate the differences in BESS scores of adolescent athletes who have sustained one or more SRCs based on age and sex. We hypothesize that 13-15-year-old athletes will not perform as well on the BESS as 16-18-year-old athletes. We also hypothesize those female athletes will earn better scores than male athletes on the BESS. The data will be analyzed using an ANOVA to identify the interaction between age and sex, the main effect of age, and the main effect of sex.

The Effects of Diaphragmatic Breathing on Median Neural tension on Asymptomatic College Students with and without a History of Neck Pain.

Aaron Proefrock, Matthew Grichen, Erin Kwiatkowski, Steven Kleinhammer
Faculty Sponsor: Michael Policella
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Diaphragmatic Breathing (DB) protocols demonstrate improvement in pain tolerance as well as decreases in sympathetic response, anxiety, heart rate, respiratory rate, and cortisol levels. In addition, neurodynamic mobilizations of the median nerve show improvement in pain levels for patients with nerve-related neck and arm pain and improve neurodynamic range of motion. To determine patients that may benefit from treatment, the Upper Limb Tension Test 1 is an effective test to identify increased median nerve mechanosensitivity in patients with non-specific neck pain. Nerve mobilization interventions demonstrate positive results, however, the body of literature is lacking research on the effect of DB on median nerve mechanosensitivity. The purpose of conducting future research will be to determine the effects of DB on median nerve mechanosensitivity for a patient sample with and without a history of neck pain.

The Effects of Dosage Parameters On Amplitude Based Training for Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

Jillian Moscicki, Deanna Cerlanek, Keith Feind
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa Inglis
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Parkinson’s Disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disease, results from the loss of dopamine-secreting neurons within the basal ganglia, leading to deficits in motor function. The common symptoms of PD include rigidity, resting tremors, and bradykinesia. Large amplitude training is one treatment strategy to address bradykinesia, with demonstrated improvements in speed and amplitude of functional movements. Recently, amplitude training protocols, such as LSVT-BIG®, have been developed with set dosages and parameters; however, the evidence to support these specific parameters is limited. This presentation will analyze the current research on the effects of amplitude training based on protocol parameters such as type, intensity, and frequency of the intervention. This information will guide future research related to dosage and delivery of amplitude-based training protocols to individuals with PD.

The Effects of Exercise on Sleep in Individuals with Parkinson's Disease

Brook Bittner, Christine Anderson, David Wheat
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Mazzone
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a degenerative, neurologic disorder that affects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. PD is a hypokinetic movement disorder, which results in the slowness of movement, tremors, lack of postural control, and rigidity of muscles. PD is also associated with some non-motor symptoms such as mood disorders, cognitive changes, hallucinations and delusions, fatigue, and sleep disturbances. Interventions outside of the pharmacological realm are becoming increasingly popular to manage non-motor symptoms related to PD. Previous research has shown that exercise can have a positive effect on sleep disturbances in patients with PD. Many forms of exercise such as resistance training and multimodal exercise approaches have been shown to be efficacious in decreasing sleep disturbances associated with PD. This poster will provide a detailed analysis of the current literature examining the impact of exercise on sleep disturbances in patients with PD.

The Effects of Globalization on Modern Immigration Policy

Stephanie Hadley
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

With a global rise in immigration and migration concerns amidst a record number of refugees on the move, it is even more concerning that a significant majority of the world’s refugee population are migrating into second and third-world economies. As a country discovered and founded on the footsteps of hard-working immigrants, the United States owes a sense of responsibility and compassion to the global community in leading the movement for comprehensive immigration reform to adapt to the modern era of globalization. This includes moving away from the ideological strains of society and compromising to the actual issues at hand – the concern for economic security, national security, and public safety.

The Effects of Music on Aerobic Performance and Mindfulness

Schneidie Delmas
Faculty Sponsor: Rebecca Begalle
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

While running, music can impact performance measures such as heart rate, distance covered, and perceived exertion. Music often causes emotional responses in listeners, which may affect state mindfulness. Mindfulness is the conscious awareness of one’s mental, physical, or environmental stimuli. The purpose of this research is to analyze the effects of self-selected music on performance during the Cooper 12-minute run test and state mindfulness following each condition. Using a randomized crossover research design, all participants will perform the Cooper 12-minute run test under two conditions (music or no music) in a randomized order on two separate test days. One-way repeated measures ANOVA will be used to compare the dependent variables between the conditions. We hypothesize that the participant in the music condition will have lower heart rate and rating of perceived exertion as well as an increase in distance covered and an improvement on the state mindfulness scale for physical activity.

The Effects of Service Learning on Self-Efficacy and Anxiety in Athletes and Non-Athletes

Bethany Lewis
Faculty Sponsor: Lynn Matthews
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Service Learning is a tool used by educators to give their students hands-on experience while offering them a chance to learn more about themselves and process their experience. It’s shown that self-efficacy and anxiety levels have been improved by involvement in service learning projects for the public. The purpose of this study is to look at how the levels of self-efficacy and anxiety are affected in athletes and non-athletes through service learning, acting as a pilot study for this topic. Participants will complete a survey before and after the Daemen College service learning project to measure their self-efficacy and anxiety levels. It is hypothesized that self-efficacy levels will increase in athletes and non-athletes. It is also hypothesized that anxiety levels will increase in athletes and decrease in non-athletes. A Mann-Whitney U test will be used to analyze the data collected from this research project.

The effects of telecommuting on the workplace

Jeffrey Redband
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

One way that professional work arrangements have changed over time is that employers and employees have embraced telecommuting. As more employees work from home or an alternative site, managers and project leaders have needed to alter the organization of work, revise the ways in which they communicate with employees, establish expectations for employees, and then hold them accountable. Research reveals that for both employees and employers there are positives and negatives associated with telecommuting. Technological advances have made it possible for telecommuters to stay connected with corporate databases and systems, coworkers, project teams, and managers. Employees who telecommute are able to balance other aspects of their lives with work obligations and some are more satisfied with working remotely. However, the lack of face-to-face contact, which excludes the ability to interpret body language, has been shown to be problematic and create confusion between employees and also between the employee and the boss.

The Endangerment of the Nubian Giraffe

Alexa Casacci
Faculty Sponsor: Brenda Young
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Nubian Giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a large herbivore that resides in the African savanna. Due to habitat loss, habitat fragmentation, habitat degradation, poaching, and human population growth, this species has been declining. The current estimate of Nubian giraffes is 2,645. Conservation efforts include relocating the giraffes to wildlife reserves and creating National Strategies/Action Plans in which countries in Africa are enlightened on how to assess threats, limit resources, and monitor the species. My poster will investigate which conservation plan works best and what other methods may help in saving this species.

The Evolution of Sexual Harassment Policies in the United States

Andrew Strobele
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Sexual harassment in the United States has taken on several definitions throughout the past 50 years as sexual harassment issues have been in the spotlight. A change in ideologies has advanced people’s views on sexual and gender harassment at their core, leading to informed citizens and greater policy changes. Policies and guidelines in all sectors of business have been adjusted in response to the attention on sexual harassment issues and the views of individuals. The most recent major update came from New York State on October 9, 2018. Peer-reviewed sources from the 1980s through today were used to explore this topic. This project outlines the timeline of sexual harassment policy changes, varying mindsets and attitudes, and key court cases that have influenced sexual harassment policy updates. 

The Great Fire and the Plague

Sidney Green
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Great Fire had a huge impact on Londoners that can be seen in London society today. Many precautions have been taken throughout the city to prevent another disaster. On the other hand, the destruction of plague organisms during the Great Fire was the one positive outcome.

The Housing Crisis in Buffalo & the Effect on Low-Income Residents

Madison Flores
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

In my paralegal studies service learning class, I’ve been working with the Volunteer Lawyers Project in Buffalo defending eviction cases at the Buffalo City Court. I’ve witnessed first-hand accounts of the devastation the housing crisis in Buffalo has created. Buffalo has the oldest housing stock in the nation, with 67% of homes being built before 1940. In 2016, the poverty rate in the city of Buffalo was 30.5% and 55% of Buffalo households could not afford their rent. Homes in the city are old, falling apart, uninhabitable, and still too expensive for low-income families to afford. While people raise the question of “why don’t you just call the city inspector,” it’s a much larger issue because safe and inexpensive living situations are so hard to come by. This project documents the true reality low-income individuals living in Buffalo face.

The Impacts of Tourism

Ricardo Ruiz Martinez
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This paper examines various types of tourism and their impacts in four different areas: economy, society, culture, and environment. Some examples of different types of tourism include cultural tourism, business tourism, medical tourism, religious tourism and ecotourism. This paper goes into detail and specifies the positive as well as the negative impacts of some of the types of tourism. Tourism can enhance economic growth, increase quality of life, increase environmental awareness, promote technological development, and assist in the survival of cultural traditions among others. On the other hand, economic growth can also increase prices in specific regions, create environmental deterioration, and cause demonstration effect in society. Another objective examined in this paper is whether sustainable tourism can be achievable or just a marketing tool used by community leaders and companies to attract people. After a lot of research, it is concluded that the positive impacts outweigh the negative impacts and that sustainable tourism is viable.

The Importance of the Early Childhood Educator in Promoting Mindfulness in a Classroom Setting

Anna Nicolia, Heather Brady
Faculty Sponsor: Mark Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Mindfulness has been described as being aware of one’s thoughts, experiences, and emotions. When teachers incorporate strategies to promote mindfulness into the classroom, it can positively affect how children view and manage their behavior and maintain focus. Mindfulness in the classroom can help students understand their thinking and learn how to self-regulate their behaviors in the classroom for longer periods of time. In this presentation, we will examine the effects of mindfulness in early childhood, a special education setting, and its benefits for students with anxiety, ADHD, and autism. For students who are diagnosed with special needs, their worry and anxious thoughts often cause them to have trouble focusing on what they are learning in the classroom. Creating a mindful classroom can benefit every student because it can ease their worries and refocus their attention on classroom learning. The ultimate goal of having a mindful classroom is to bring greater self-awareness and self-regulation to students in the classroom.

The Influence of Centralization and Directional Preference on Spinal Control in Patients with Nonspecific Neck Pain

Ellory Roberts, Andrew Bartz, Alex Warthling, Seth Goodier
Faculty Sponsor: Ron Schenk
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The prevalence of neck pain is estimated at 20-70% and represents the second leading musculoskeletal cause of disability in the United States. Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) is a system of musculoskeletal examination and treatment which involves an analysis of the patient’s response to end range repeated movements. The testing of end range repeated movements may determine a direction of motion that improves the person’s symptoms and/or movement and is referred to as a directional preference (DP). The deep neck flexor test (DNFT) assesses neuromuscular control of the cervical spine, which is often impaired in people with neck pain. A published case study of a person with neck pain found a relationship between directional preference and improved deep neck flexor strength. The purpose of this study is to determine the correlation between DP and neuromuscular control, as measured with the DNFT, in patients referred for physical therapy at the Catholic Health System of Buffalo, NY.

The Knowledge of Athletic Trainers on the Female Athlete Triad

Erin DeHeer
Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Scheid
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

The Female Athlete Triad (Triad) has been defined as the relationship between energy availability, bone mineral density, and menstrual dysfunction. There are no studies identifying the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of athletic trainers (ATs) in regard to the Triad. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine the level of factual and practical knowledge of ATs on the Triad. We hypothesize that ATs will have knowledge of the components of the Triad but will not implement screening strategies or have knowledge on the return-to-play protocol. We also expect that female ATs will be more comfortable discussing the Triad than their male counterparts. This is a cross-sectional study utilizing a survey to assess knowledge levels among ATs. We will target active ATs from the professional membership listing and compare factual to applied knowledge of the Triad. We will use a chi-squared-analysis to examine these differences.

THE MISREPRESENTATION OF PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES

Alexander Fabiilli
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

It is a common belief that professional athletes are privileged and do not contribute as equally to society as everyday workers and business professionals do. This view stems from the pay athletes receive, which is higher than most others in society. Some people also insist athletes are excluded from experiencing labor exploitation from their employers. Research suggests that professional athletes are exploited just as much, if not more, than others in the working world. This project details how collective bargaining agreements and other labor practices have left professional athletes in extremely vulnerable positions, including that much of their earning potential is derived from the profit of team owners. Professional athletes should be viewed similarly to other professional employees and be entitled to fair labor representation comparable to the general working class versus being viewed as commodities to entertain the world.

The Prevalence of Depression and Suicidal Ideations in Graduate Physical Therapy Students at Daemen College

Kayla Stannard, Kara Ransbury , Alex Gordon , Brian Honadle
Faculty Sponsor: Ryan Boggs
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Depression and suicidal ideations are some of the leading mental health issues affecting students enrolled in graduate healthcare programs. While healthcare students are often selected for their compassion, resiliency, determination, and strong academic performance, the expectation to succeed at a high level and lack of self-care leads to an increase in stress. This increase in stress for prolonged periods of time often leads to depression, decreased job satisfaction, burnout, and in extreme cases, suicide. The relatively recent transition to the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree has resulted in an increase in coursework and academic requirements to fulfill new licensure standards along with an increase in financial burdens. Limited research has examined the prevalence of these conditions in DPT students. The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of depression and suicidal ideations in DPT students at Daemen College.

The Role of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Problems with Self Esteem

Sarah Grubbs
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Problems with low confidence and self-worth are not limited to adolescence (Ali, Ali, and Suhail, 2016). Adults and older adults can experience a variety of self-esteem issues which likely developed out of past experiences being bullied by peers or by exposure to a disapproving authority figure (Leary, Schreindorfer, Haupt, 1995). The experience of low self-esteem can have very serious implications for their relationships and can heavily influence their decisions and life choices (Campbell and Lavallee, 1993). Will (name changed to protect confidentiality) is an adult male who sought assistance from G.A. Family Services Foster Care Program’s Skill Builder/Therapist. This research project involves the use of single-subject design evaluation in determining the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) in improving Will’s self-esteem. More specifically, the study will examine changes in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale following one-on-one and couples counseling.

The Role of Decapentaplegic in Wound Healing of Vanessa cardui

Jessica Pillard
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Ramos
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

   

Butterfly wings have become a common biological model used to
show how cells responds to different chemical signals, because adult wing
eyespots and the wing color pattern are determined by the cell interactions in
the epidermis. There are multiple signaling pathways that are used to transduce
the signal, one being the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)
pathway. An important morphogen signalling molecue of this pathway is
Decapentaplegic (Dpp), which has a role in the formation of the wing imaginal
disc in fruit flies. To test the role of Dpp in butterfly wing development,
wings of Vanessa cardui pupa were wounded and treated with a Dpp
inhibitor, SB431542 and subsequent development was monitored. These results
could give insight to butterfly wing formation, and a better understanding of
the role of Dpp.
 

The Role of Seed Caloric Value on Seed Selection by Harpalus pensylvanicus

Joshua Greene
Faculty Sponsor: Jeffrey Law
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Biological control agents such as granivorous invertebrates are an important component of integrated weed management in agroecosystems. This study investigated the role of a seed’s caloric value on the seed selection of two lesser consumed weed seed species by Harpalus pensylvanicus De Geer, a granivorous carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) that is found throughout North America, and tested their ability to be reared for targeted weed seed removal. H. pensylvanicus individuals used in this experiment were reared on a diet of either kitten food (control), Giant foxtail (S. faberi), or Velvetleaf (A. theophrasti). Comparisons were made between the caloric value of the weed seed species and both the individual H. pensylvanicus seed selections during the seed preference tests and the death rates of the feeding groups that occurred during the feeding trials. These results enhance the understanding of the role of H. pensylvanicus as a targeted biological control agent and examine the criterion for weed seed consumption and removal by H. pensylvanicus.

The Role of Temperature on Weed Seed Predation by a Common Ground Beetle

Rachel Krawczyk
Faculty Sponsor: Jeffrey Law
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

H. pensylvanicus, a ground beetle found throughout the United States, presents as the dominant weed seed predator in portions of the Northeastern United States. Even though they occupy a variety of habitats, H. pensylvanicus spend most of their time in open fields and forests. Olfaction, mediated by specialized sensory cells in the antennae of invertebrates, is the main sense H. pensylvanicus use to locate food sources. This research project focuses on determining how temperature impacts olfaction and how the impact correlates to seed selection by H. pensylvanicus. Bioassays were completed with seeds from two weed species abundant in the Northeastern United States: Giant Foxtail (S. faberi) and Velvetleaf (A. theophrasti).  After testing at 23°C, 17°C, and 15°C, H. pensylvanicus only sensed and foraged for seeds at 23°C (two-sided binomial test: p <0.05). The results of this project have implications for sustainable agricultural practices

The Social Context of Humor-based Interventions

Dung Dinh
Faculty Sponsor: Jack Peltz
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Recently, there have been a number of studies generating humor-related training for participants to increase their humor abilities and aim to mitigate their depression. Specifically, when the participants were clinically depressed or had high levels of depressive symptoms, the results showed that humor-based interventions can decrease depression and increase happiness (John & Tungol, 2017), decrease state seriousness and increase life satisfaction (Konradt et al. 2012), increase the ability to use humor as a coping mechanism (Falkenberg et al., 2011), and improve self-esteem (Rudnick et al., 2014). Therefore, the aim of this review is to examine humor-based interventions and to provide recommendations for how the use of humor to build social relationships and/or gain social support can also be included to further improve mental health and further develop into a new type of treatment.

The Use of Picture Exchange Program (PECS) in an Early Childhood Special Education Classroom for Students on the Moderate to Severe End of the Autism Spectrum

Jennifer Wetherbee, Clarisa Delgado
Faculty Sponsor: Mark Brown
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Children on the moderate to severe end of the Autism Spectrum may experience difficulties communicating with their peers and adults in an Early Childhood Special Education classroom. This inability to effectively communicate may be due to their not being able to verbalize their thoughts. Therefore, they can't exchange meaningful information with another classmate or adult. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) refers to the use of images or symbols to express a thought for children who are not capable of communicating their concerns verbally in an Early Childhood Special Education classroom. PECS can be used to help a student with Autism communicate his thoughts through the symbolic presentation of one word (i.e., digital picture) or a set of connected pictures that are placed on a Velcro strip to represent a complete sentence. The effective use of PECS in the Early Childhood Special Education classroom can benefit children with Autism socially and academically, as well as in their daily lives.  

Transforming Insight: What It Takes and How It Gets Done

Aaliyah Abraham, Evan Coyle
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Artman
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

By means of Daemen’s Think Tank program, we were granted the opportunity to attend the 2018 National College Media Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. During our time at the convention, we attended numerous workshops that were relevant to the large spectrum of what college media is. These workshops enlightened our perspective and stimulated new ideas for us to incorporate into our own college newspaper program. Our presentation will reflect upon the key components that we have taken away from the convention and the ways in which we have begun applying them to our present infrastructure.

Trauma Informed Care at Peace of the City

Kirsti Aylor
Faculty Sponsor: Charles Wesley
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

This poster will illustrate how the Trauma-Informed Care system of healing that is implemented at the Peace of the City afterschool program has affected the children who attend the program. Trauma Informed Care is a form of treatment that focuses on understanding, recognizing, and ultimately responding to the effects all kinds of trauma can have on an individual. The children who attend Peace of the City are often institutionalized from a very young age and may suffer from some forms of trauma due to unstable or unsafe home situations. This poster will illustrate the main principles of Trauma-Informed Care, how it has been properly implemented at Peace of the City, and how this kind of therapeutic system has affected the children at Peace of the City.

Understanding the Effects of Concussions in Sports

Ragen Dolan
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Concussions are prevalent in most every sport around the world. In recent decades, however, the conversations about concussions have become a crucial stimulus for education, understanding of the intricacies of this topic, and for the prevention and treatment of those concussed. Concussions affect people when they first get them. More importantly, research shows the effects from concussions can persist throughout one’s life, causing strains on professional careers, personal lives, and quality of life. Concussion-related issues can also cause long-term health problems such as dementia and depression. This research includes information about concussion occurrence within a wide range of sports, highlights the importance of strategies to help prevent concussions, and steps for successful recovery from a concussion. This includes the protocol for both the medical professional to follow and the person who has been concussed.

Unethical Behavior in Sports

Samuel Coran
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Monitoring ethical behavior in sports is a current and rising discussion topic with a focus on unethical behavior in sports. This project reveals the definitions and perceptions of ethical behavior, the considerations of individuals while making decisions on how to behave, how people’s perceptions play a role in the decision-making process, and how ethical behavior is determined and controlled on playing fields. People’s perception of what is ethical varies by culture, country, and religious beliefs. For example, in India, it is considered unethical and illegal to kill and eat cows, whereas in the U.S. most people do not think twice about eating a steak. As in the general society, the field of sport also has behaviors that are considered to be unethical. Ethical behaviors are important in order to keep the integrity of the game. Ethics in sports are defined by laws of society and league rules.

Use of Phone-Based Case Management Services to Serve Victims of Domestic Violence

Tirzah Hall
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Victims of domestic violence experience a wide range of challenges as they leave their perpetrators and regain a sense of their own power (Candela, 2016). These can include engagement with the courts related to divorce and/or child custody, problems maintaining financial stability, and the need to manage other personal responsibilities (Campbell, 2017). The Morlock Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving quality of life by connecting individuals to resources. The Foundation offers crisis support and phone-based case management services to victims of domestic violence and others in need. This poster highlights the Foundation’s work with Sally (name changed to protect confidentiality) to determine its success in helping her to secure her own home and rebuild her life. Using single subject design, this study will assess the effectiveness of staff interventions using task achievement and goal attainment scaling.

Voices for 2020: Assessing the Needs of Homeless Families in WNY

Jacqueline Bouchane, Latajha Coker
Faculty Sponsor: Diane Bessel-Matteson
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Homelessness is on the rise in New York State. In Western New York alone, about 35% of families are homeless and more than half of these families live in rural areas (Homeless Alliance of Western New York, 2017). Living in a rural community can provide a number of barriers for families who need access to resources within the community. Therefore, many homeless families experience stress and frustration due to gaps in services to meet their needs. This poster will display a needs assessment based on the data collected for the Voices for 2020 project. This project is an initiative to end homelessness. The data collected assesses the physical, biological, social, and psychological needs of homeless families living in Erie, Niagara, Genesee, Orleans, and Wyoming Counties. Information has been collected through focus groups with homeless families living in a shelter, as well as key informant interviews with human service agencies. This information will help to examine the service gaps that are present in the local community.

Volunteer Lawyers Project; Effects of Domestic Violence

Leecia Clinkscales
Faculty Sponsor: Margaret Phillips
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

My poster will be based on the paralegal service learning class where I am working with the Volunteer Lawyers Project at the Erie County help desk doing intake. Along with my personal experience working and a few details about the intake process, I will be explaining domestic violence statistics and how the conviction can effect many other family court cases. For example. there are common misconceptions that domestic violence is a complete bar for obtaining custody or visitation rights, even though there is a lot more criteria considered to determine this. Also, the different child support collection options when domestic violence is the source of incarceration which stops the ability to be able to pay are an example of the effects criminal consequences of domestic violence has on family court matters.

Winston Churchill

Amy Haines
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Without Winston Churchill and his strong personality, England may not have survived the war. Churchill's speeches provided exactly the rejuvenation the country needed; his powerful rhetoric was the glue holding the country together. As the subject of recent films, Churchill still embodies the strength and persistence of the English people.

Women's Role in the World of Sport

Jedidiah Gallagher
Faculty Sponsor: Carol Bartlo
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Lumsden Gym
Throughout the day, between 9:00 AM - 1:30 PM, posters will remain displayed in the Athletic Center GYM.

Women who choose sports as a career face disparity and barriers that their male counterparts may not, as well as women in other sectors of business. Careers in the sports industry include the professional athlete, gym teacher, coach, sports marketer, lawyer, contractor, and many others. Research shows that throughout history, women have been marginalized in the sports industry and face struggles that parallel women’s fight for equality going back to the days of suffrage and voting rights. Feminists often use disparities of men and women in the sports field to show how women deal with things like double standards, salary disparities, sexism, and visibility in the media and the workplace. It is important that the industry be inclusive of everyone, regardless of one's sex.

Exhibits

Waste : An Installation

Student Group Student Group, Jemal Clarke, Elizabeth D'Amore, Ana Jaimes, Miles Miller, Thomas Randall, Alissa Rice, Imani Williamson, Jose Williamson
Faculty Sponsor: Casey Kelly
11:30 am - 12:00 pm
Tower Gallery; Haberman Gacioch Visual & Perfo

The average college student produces 640 pounds of waste each year and the average American will leave a legacy of 90,000 pounds of trash for the future.* This can include items like disposable cups, paper, cans, straws, electronics, containers, clothing, as well as other things. Our goal for this project is to demonstrate the magnitude of waste we make by creating an installation that uses typography and materials to show the impact that we are leaving for the future and to make a statement that might encourage us to consider our choices about waste. The project is currently being developed, but will likely end up being a wall with words made of plastic and other wasteful items, or a hanging or standalone piece. *RubiconGlobal.com

CG Animation Demonstration

Raymond Klimek
Faculty Sponsor: Mike Jones
12:00 pm - 12:30 pm
Tower Gallery; Haberman Gacioch Visual & Perfo

This presentation will show the process and practice of animation in Maya, the most prominent software used for digital animation in the world today. The narrative video tutorial will demonstrate the tools or software employed in making animation. This brief overview of how to create digital animation art will be informative and entertaining. I will give a talk before the video describing the production pipeline the students used to create the video.

Color Theory Studies in Gouache

Emily Brentley, Zachary Nosbisch
Faculty Sponsor: Kyla Kegler
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm
Tower Gallery; Haberman Gacioch Visual & Perfo

This installation of a series of color studies in the Tower Gallery was created by the students in Art 104 Design Concepts. The work displayed is a grid of 25 individual 7x10" mandala paintings, Gouache on illustration board, that demonstrate formal relationships between color and form. The compositions are abstract designs based on geometric patterns and sensational color relationships. The compositions function as mandalas, abstract focal points of color, and form.

Performances

The Pre-Law Student Association's 2019 Mock Trial Experience: The People v. Thomas Wade Carter

Brooklyn Crockton, 13 other students participating listed in excel file;
Faculty Sponsor: Lisa K Parshall
12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
DS 236

Case Number 06-4459, Erie County Supreme Court, 8th Judicial District, Erie County, NY. Thomas Wade Carter is facing criminal charges in the shooting death of one Joyce Ann Miller. The complaint alleges that in the late afternoon hours of Tuesday, July 6, Thomas Wade Carter discharged a weapon from the rear of a moving vehicle. The resulting shotgun blast struck and killed the four-year-old victim as she played in the front yard of the Miller family residence located on Fourth Street. The complaint further alleges that Thomas Wade Carter had set forth with the weapon in search of one Oscar Hanks, an individual residing on Fourth Street some three houses removed from the Miller residence. According to the complaint, after having been involved in an altercation with Hanks on the prior evening, Carter set out on the afternoon of July 6 with the purpose of retaliating against Hanks. Carter has been indicted on one count of second-degree murder (the unlawful killing of a human being with malice aforethought) and one count of involuntary manslaughter (the unlawful killing of a human being without malice aforethought).

Festivale Musicale & Campus Open Mic

Melissa Fiori, clinford anglade, ashley rosado
Faculty Sponsor: Melissa Fiori
2:30 pm - 4:30 pm
The Den, Wick Center

OPEN TO EVERYONE - Festivale Musicale is an event created to celebrate the hidden and unhidden musical talents that exist within the Daemen College community. The event seeks to provide an opportunity for the music lovers and music makers on campus to connect and enjoy the harmonies and melodies that resonate within us all. The event is also open to spoken word and slam poetry pieces on student perspectives regarding diversity, social issues, intercultural awareness, etc. at Daemen.

47, 600 Fragments of the opioid crisis

Robert Waterhouse, Makenzie C. Bush, Bakary Diallo, Jadion D. Jones, Melissa E. Kelley , Andrew McLaughlin, Nyree Naves
Faculty Sponsor: Robert Waterhouse
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Wick Alumni Lounge

A response is words and movement to the effects of opioids on our community, and to the 47,600 fatal overdoses logged in a single year. This experimental performance piece by students of Devised Theatre is based on fragments of interviews with those affected. 

Other

World Hijab Day Acknowledgement - Hosted by Daemen College's American Association of University Women (AAUW)

Isabella Acosta, Ehlimana Imamovic, Samantha Garcia , Michelle Correa, Esther Dondja
Faculty Sponsor: Penny Messinger
1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Wick Executive Board Room

If you have 20 minutes to spare today, visit the Daemen's American Association of University Women (AAUW) members at our World Hijab Day Acknowledgement event! The hijab is a type of religious covering worn by many Muslim women across the world. However, covered women -- called hijabis -- face a great deal of social stigma in many countries, especially after the anti-Muslim backlash that followed tragic events of 9/11. World Hijab Day, traditionally on February 1st, is an event meant to promote understanding and acceptance of these covered women. Have you ever wondered why women wear hijab? Or how to put one on? Or what you would look like covered? Pop in to try on a hijab, watch our looping presentation, and have your questions answered! Hijabs are personal property and not for sale but can be signed out to wear around campus for a short period of time if desired. (Please note that this is not an hours-long lecture.)

"True Gentility" Social Events and Upward Mobility in Jane Austen's Emma

Shawna Caparaso
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
1:00 pm - 1:15 pm
RIC 120

Jane Austen’s nineteenth-century novel Emma (1816) displays the importance of proper etiquette, rank, and reputation at social events. However, the novel's balls, dinners, and outings serve a more important function by revealing that Emma uses events to implement her matchmaking plans. I will discuss how Emma uses these occasions in order to become a successful matchmaker by promoting the upward mobility of orphan Harriet Smith.

"The cleverest witch of her age": Hermione Granger Uses Her Research Abilities and Knowledge to Defeat Lord Voldemort in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter Series

Cassandra Johnson
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
1:15 pm - 1:30 pm
RIC 120

Hermione Granger is the ultimate reason Harry Potter was able to defeat Lord Voldemort by the end of J.K. Rowling's series. She used her many abilities, like research, magic, and knowledge, to solve each mystery the Trio stumbled into in each novel. Hermione had most, if not all, of the ideas to overcome and solve each problem; without her, Harry and Ron Weasley would have been completely lost and may not have completed the tasks.

“The Power of Imagination”: The End of Evangelion and Collective Trauma

Connor LoTempio
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
1:30 pm - 1:45 pm
RIC 120

My thesis aims to examine how the anime film The End of Evangelion acts as a vehicle for processing collective trauma. It uses Freudian psychoanalysis, postmodern uses of religious imagery, and an apocalypse setting in order to help its audience of otaku (those with an interest in anime, manga, and other such paraphernalia) come to terms with traumas experienced in the decade leading to the film’s release. Protagonist Shinji Ikari acts as an analog for the traumatized otaku and his ultimate choice to reject an escape from his identity represents an attempt to help The End of Evangelion’s audience to work through collective traumas of their own.

Trapped in the Echo Chamber: Understanding Challenges to Conversation in the Age of Information

Nicholas Russo
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
1:45 pm - 2:00 pm
RIC 120

Though modern society has connected us to one another like never before, it seems more difficult to speak with and listen to others who share differing opinions and viewpoints. This is a problem for multiple reasons, each of which comes back to a single theme: bias. In the interest of preserving civil conversation, we will explore the roots of these problems in psychology, technology, and culture, and share the means to overcome bias in these areas.

“She crawls around fast, and her crawling shakes it all over”: The Dissociative Self in The Yellow Wall-Paper

Chiara Cirulli
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
2:00 pm - 2:15 pm
RIC 120

Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s short story, The Yellow Wall-Paper, portrays mental illness in the 19th century. Specifically, Gilman aims to reflect on her own experience with what today we would call Postpartum Depression. Gilman’s short story The Yellow Wall-Paper depicts the journal entries of a young woman who is experiencing mental health disturbances, which were categorized as “temporary nervous depression” or a “slight hysterical tendency” by her physician husband (648). Through ”Jane’s” first-person narrative, the reader begins to note how the severity of her condition increases, until the climactic end where her husband finds her in complete disarray exhibiting behaviors of an alternate personality. Through Gilman’s female protagonist “Jane,” she illustrates the lack of mental health care for women, specifically postpartum depression and dissociative personality disorder, as a source for further patriarchal dominance of her society.

“Real life sucks losers dry”: Romanticizing Abuse in Heathers

Mikyla Fisher
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
2:15 pm - 2:30 pm
RIC 120

Michael Lehmann's 1988 film, Heathers, and its 2010 musical counterpart explore the pressures of teenage acceptance and how far its characters are willing to go to receive it. In the musical adaptation, the relationship between Veronica Sawyer and Jason Dean is romanticized in order to adhere to the musical genre, changing the reading of their moral values and decisions as a result.

A More Perfect Union: Code Switching and Hip Hop’s Influence in the Administration of Barack Obama

Brooklyn Crockton
Faculty Sponsor: Nancy Marck
2:30 pm - 2:45 pm
RIC 120

"Na, we straight" was the remark that was heard nation-wide out of the mouth of our then President Barack Obama. Many questions arose as to who Barack truly was, and how unpresidential it was for him to speak in African American Vernacular English. Obama uses 'code switching' - that is, switching between two or more dialects of a language to relate himself to his supporters. For my research topic, I will be focusing on Barack Obama’s use of code-switching as persuasive discourse as well as the influence of hip hop into both of the administrations of Obama.

Core Competencies

The Daemen College Core is an innovative competency-based curriculum. Every course approved for core credit includes at least three competencies, including at least one primary competency. Course syllabi state the learning objectives that relate to the competencies and the assessment techniques that will be used to determine mastery.

Committee

Michael Brogan - SeniorVice President, Academic Affairs
Sherrie Przewozny - Special Events, Academic Affairs
Diana Alvarado - Printing Shop
Christian Brandjes - Visual and Performing Arts
Sabrina Fennell - Academic Support Services
Kevin Kegler - Visual and Performing Arts
Christen Kelly - Classroom Technology Services
Amanda Gross - Office of the President
Julia Grygier - Student Activities 
Susan Heater - Facilities
Hella Jacob - Center for Excellence in Teaching & Learning
Philip Longson - Visual and Performing Arts
Susan Marchione - New Programs/Initiatives, Institutional Effectiveness & Systems Integration
Michael Morgan - Publications
Yolanda Morris - Enrollment Management
Doris Murphy - Academic Affairs
Carol Renner - Nursing
Ryan Richardson - Daemen Dining Services
Joyce Strobel - Publications
Andrea Sullivan - Research Information Commons
Tom Wojciechowski - Web Communications
Brenda Young - Global/Local Sustainability, Natural Sciences
John Zaepfel - Information Technology

Faculty Proposal Reviewers

Brenda Young, Coordinator; Rebecca Begalle, Diane Bessel, Ryan Boggs, Hamish Dalley, Greg Ford, Colleen Kashino, Kevin Kegler, Casey Kelley, Vicki Madaus Knapp, Shannon Lupien, Lynn Matthews, Margaret Mazzone, Caitlyn Montross, Michael Ross, Jennifer Scheid, Robert Selkowicz, Sally Ann Smesko, Mark Warren, Robert Waterhouse, Sarah Whorley, and Andrew Wilton.

Student Editor Program Book

Cassandra Johnson, English, 2019

Student Proposal Logistics Review

Madeleine Ruger, History, 2020

Student Poster Session Coordinator

Madeleine Ruger, History, 2020 and Jameekia Blount, Health Promotion, 2021

Poster Session Committee

Jameekia Blount, Hella Jacob, Annie Mandart, Susan Marchione, Yolanda Morris, Carol Renner, Madeleine Ruger, Andrea Sullivan

Publications Design for Program Book & Poster

Mike Morgan, Joyce Strobel, Pam Gorman, Elise Chambers

Academic Festival Committee Chair/Program Book Editor

Sherrie Przewozny, Special Events

Special Thanks To

Daemen Dining Staff and Maintenance staff.

Poster & Front Cover

2018 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

Free, watercolor on paper
Carlye Sager, BFA in Painting, 2019

Back Cover

2018 Academic Festival Cover View Larger Version »

Tangled Thoughts, charcoal & conte on paper
Alyssa Macidyn,, BFA in Illustration/Drawing Emphasis, 2019

Student Workers

STUDENT EDITOR PROGRAM BOOK

Cassandra Johnson
English, 2019

STUDENT PROPOSAL LOGISTICS REVIEW

Madeleine Ruger
History, 2020

STUDENT POSTER SESSION COORDINATORS

Madeleine Ruger
History, 2020
Jameekia Blount
Health Promotion, 2021

FESTIVAL T-SHIRT DESIGN

Blue in Green, silkscreen on paper
Jacob Depoint

BFA in Illustration/Drawing Emphasis, 2019